Here is my interview with Charles Cassady Jr.

Hello and welcome to my blog, Author Interviews. My name is Fiona Mcvie.

Let’s get you introduced to everyone, shall we? Tell us your name. What is your age?

My name is Charles Cassady Jr. (although I rather like dreaming up far-out pseudonyms I may likely never use). I am currently 55 but I like to say I have the income of a teenager.

Fiona: Where are you from?

I was born and spent the vast majority of my life in an unfashionable, faded manufacturing town called Cleveland, Ohio. Now better known as the city close to where LeBron James came from.

Fiona: A little about your self (ie, your education, family life, etc.).

Well, when one grows up in a place like Cleveland, one tends to think of other places. And I found early on that books were marvelous ways of getting to those other places – even imaginary ones. I read voraciously on all sorts of exotic and wide-ranging material – I think I might have been ten or eleven when I found William Peter Blatty’s “The Exorcist” at my grandparents’ home and read it through. More to the point, though, was that my family indulged me trips to libraries all over the county. When I wasn’t borrowing books, I was inspecting the used-book sales they held on a monthly basis. For an adolescent such as myself, the idea of going into a marketplace with just small change and walking out with a shopping bagful of amazing books was very empowering. I bought tremendous quantities of books – mostly nonfiction. With my book-buying power far exceeding my shelf space, I soon starting applying arbitrary rules about what books I allowed myself to hoarde. They HAD to have an index. The author could not have written any other previous books that I had not read… Finally, I tried to restrict myself to buying only books I found autographed…So, even before internet-sales sites, I found tons of books that are autographed. My house is filled with them now. I suppose in the end I would either become a bookseller or an author. In the last ten years I’ve managed to produce six works of nonfiction.

Fiona: Tell us your latest news.

In early 2019 my first photo-oriented book comes out “Mardi Gras in Kodachrome,” created in partnership with Mary Lynn Randall. It’s an album of 60-year-old color photographs taken by Mary’s late grandmother at the New Orleans Mardi Gras carnival over a ten-year period in the mid-20th-century and never before published. Mary had offered me use of the photos in relation to some other regional history titles I had been doing, but I felt they were strong enough to support a step-back-in-time book all by themselves. It only took two queries sent out for us to find a publisher, Arcadia, who enthusiastically agreed about the value of the photographs.

Fiona: When and why did you begin writing?

I had decided to study journalism at university. Which was a big mistake; I think I might have done better in library science, as the acquisition, preservation and passing along of arcane knowledge is what really fascinates me. Three-quarters of my way through college I finally read one of those hoarded 25-cent library book-sale books of mine from way back, a standard popular how-to guide on the practice of freelance writing. It taught me all I needed to know, right there. No classes, no homework, no tuition, no getting lectures from laid-off reporters or editors who eagerly fled the profession. So I can date my life as a writing professional to my third year in university. But no thanks to university, unfortunately.

Fiona: When did you first consider yourself a writer?

I was embarked on a university semester-abroad program in London, England, still making a go of the journalism degree, combined with what I learned from that 25-cent ex-library guidebook (okay, I confess I had to get the updated edition to stay current, so it was more like 12 dollars). I sent out a barrage of letters and stamped return envelopes and International Reply Coupons – this was well before e-mail – to an array of potential magazine and newspaper publishers, so that once I situated myself in London I would have some connections and could market myself as an exotic foreign correspondent. In short order I sold an article (with photos) on the London Stock Exchange to a business magazine for more than $300. Still the best sale I’ve ever had. Pure beginner’s luck.

Fiona: What inspired you to write your first book?

It’s complicated. I came away from England, actually, with my first book contract in 1985, but it was as a minor contributor to an ongoing series of international film guides (this detoured me into being a film-critic type for many years). I’d only be published in France – but translated into Dutch! It was still enough to get me credit as a legitimate entertainment writer, so in the USA I formed similar relationships with other film-guide publishers, though I was always just a contributing writer (or editor). I wound up anthologized in perhaps more than two dozen books, some high profile, others quite obscure. My first solo book came somewhat out of the blue. Schiffer Publishing, in Pennsylvania, was running online classified ads soliciting regional writers to compile local ghost stories for their book series. I was now into my second decade of freelance writing, and I possessed file cabinets of such X-Files type material (it always made an easy sale around Halloween). I approached Schiffer with my credentials, and they signed me to write “Cleveland Ghosts,” which came out in 2008.

Fiona: How did you come up with the title?

It had to be called “Cleveland Ghosts”; that was pre-determined by the publisher to be internet-search-engine friendly. I have always had to defer to my publishers on those matters. There was one Schiffer book of the paranormal for which I wanted to use the word “Abcedarium” in the title. I am told top management was horrified, and not in a good way.

Fiona: Do you have a specific writing style? Is there anything about your style or genre that you find particularly challenging?

Schiffer has been very kind (except for book titles!) in letting me have my own attitude in most things. In writing about out-there and paranormal topics I tried to live up to (or down to) the standards of journalistic ethics and present the facts sensibly, even with a somewhat sardonic sense of humor. Of course, the challenge for me is not going to print with bad information and urban-legend fairy-stories passed off as true (unless I specifically describe it as such). After I wrote up the most famous haunted house in Cleveland for my opening chapter, I later met the future author William Krejci, who would later do his own book on the place – the results of some 20 years of study by Bill. But he complimented me that my version was the best account that had so far appeared in print; I only made four major errors!

Fiona: How much of the book is realistic and are experiences based on someone you know, or events in your own life?

In the paranormal field (even the true-crime and historical field, that I entered subsequently), it seems a la mode to insert oneself, telling Gilderoy Lockhart stories about personally battling demonic entities or tracking serial killers. But I am a boring Cleveland person to whom very little exciting happened, so it is mainly research and cross-checking varieties of sources and putting all that into something hopefully interesting to read. I have been lucky to talk to some adventuresome people. For my “Great Lakes Folklore” I had a nice, long phone interview with a scuba diver, wreck explorer and Clive Cussler associate, who provided invaluable information on some strange antique submarines lost in the Great Lakes. He said he wanted to make sure I wasn’t a “kook” before I quoted him (but I never heard from him afterwards, so perhaps I did turn out to be a kook after all).

Fiona: To craft your works, do you have to travel? Before or during the process?

I have wanted to, but as a lowly freelance writer-author with a wobbly series of odd jobs keeping me going, I just had no travel budget. One book-in-progress that never seems to get done, about UFO phenomena, would call for some proper travel, at least within the state of Ohio. But that’s been pushed to the margins.

Fiona: Who designed the covers?

My publishers have had final say on that. Sometimes they’ve surprised me and used a photograph or even an illustration of mine (I can resort to myself as an artist when I have to; nobody works cheaper!). For “Great Lakes Folklore” I had a marvelous lighthouse image contributed by Paul Wunderle, a digital-photography wizard I knew through mutual friends. It is my most beautiful cover by far. I submitted a slide of my own as a potential cover image, and I was not at all disappointed that my effort lost out to Paul’s. Funny story about the cover of my first true-crime book, “Crescent City Crimes: Old New Orleans, 1718-1918”; while living in a rotten Cleveland neighborhood I bought my first gun, a 32-caliber antique target pistol that some unknown owner, probably up to no good, had filed down into a sinister snub-nosed thing that fit easily in a pocket. Due to all the wire-brushing, it caught the light and photographed very well. And because the barrel was practically nonexistent, I could photograph the gun head-on with no blurriness. The revolver had a tendency to fall to bits, would probably disintegrate if I tried to shoot it. Nonetheless, my family was terrified that I owned a gun and figured I’d go insane and do something very harmful. I assured them it was only a photo prop, no worries…And so when Schiffer published “Crescent City Crimes” I practically begged them to put my picture of the gun on the cover. It’s only on the back cover, and not very prominent – but it is there. After 20 years, my family can relax.

Fiona: Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?

N/A, as I do not write novels; I just don’t possess that talent (or confidence that I have the talent, which is probably half the battle). But what carries all my prose books (I guess even the movie-review compilations, in their louche way) is the sheer thrill of storytelling – whether dubious neighborhood ghost legends, stirring sea tales or New Orleans outlaws passed off as folk-heroes and patriots.

Fiona: Are there any new authors that have grasped your interest? Who is your favorite writer, and what is it about their work that really strikes you?

Growing up I was transfixed by the fiction of Ray Bradbury. A neighbor girl who owed me a Christmas present almost apologetically gave me a paperback of “The Martian Chronicles.” I was hooked; I still have it. Mark Twain, though, is sublime, everything one might aspire to be in a writer (and equally a pleasure in nonfiction). And in my “Paranormal Mississippi River” I have a piece about the psychic powers that seems to run in Twain’s very talented family; it was a topic he took quite seriously.

Fiona: Outside of family members, name one entity that supported your commitment to become a published author.

Well, my publishers, obviously – Schiffer, and now Arcadia/The History Press. But that’s a very good question because a lot of authors just press ahead and write their manuscripts, in outline or entirely, without assurance of a contract or a publisher, ever. And for some of them, it’s worked out happily in the end. But for myself I just cannot go out on that limb bravely and lonely by myself; if I am going to pour so much time and effort into it I have to know some office is indeed waiting for my manuscript. Maybe that speaks ill of my character, I don’t know.

Fiona: Do you see writing as a career?

I suppose it is what I will be known for in the end (unless I do something really illegal). Though the sad fact is, writing has comprised less and less of my income over time. It did carry me along for a dozen years, even if I lived like a pauper at the time.

Fiona: If you had to do it all over again, would you change anything in your latest book?

I keep thinking the introduction in “Mardi Gras in Kodachrome” could have been stronger. But again, this is a book chiefly of images rather than words, so new territory for me.

Fiona: Did you learn anything during the writing of your recent book?

Unlike my past books, when I was weaving together entire nonfiction narratives, the task for “Mardi Gras in Kodachrome” largely amounted to writing photo captions and arranging pictures sequentially. But there is a real art to that for a project of this nature, if one seeks to maintain a sort of flow of information and artwork. I believe we pulled it off. Arcadia seems to think so!

Fiona: If your book was made into a film, who would you like to play the lead?

Oh, remember I started out as a movie critic. I do not have much faith in cinema for translating the written word, though there have been some noble attempts, even in nonfiction. I like to think that if the unthinkable happens and a property of mine actually goes before cameras, I would have the strength to dictate that the title be changed, so moviegoers realize that a movie and the book are two different creations. But commercially, for me to do that would be suicide (but I’ve made bad business decisions before…like my journalism degree).

Fiona: Any advice for other writers?

First, read the annually updated library book that got me started (“Writers Market” is the title; I know there was a similar book in the UK for a long time). But have a fallback skill in the career field; you’ll probably need it…Also, one piece of advice I received early on is worthy of comment; some gentleman with a gleam in his eye said that women find writers intrinsically attractive, that it is practically an aphrodisiac. And you’ll get that message from a lot of memoirs and pop-culture. Well, allow me to say that such has not really been my experience. Rather the opposite. Maybe it’s a Cleveland thing.

Fiona: Anything specific you want to tell your readers?

I think my books find fresh angles and insights on subjects that are compellingly readable to begin with; no point in my writing them otherwise. But I do not do cleansings, banishings or exorcisms. I know some of the people who do, however.

Fiona: What book are you reading now?

I read several books at once – especially now that I get paid to do book reviews on the side. But the long-ago library booksale hoarding of my youth that I just now finally got around to is notable. “Folkways” is a 1906 volume, once very well known – now not so much – that seemed to represent the life’s work of scholar/lecturer William Graham Sumner. He tries to do nothing less than sum up all human behavior and tradition in quick, sharp strokes. Much of it, I have to say, comes across as disturbing, if not morbid and ghastly (chapters on cannibalism, abortion and slavery in quick succession). I like to think that the grim picture he paints is somewhat tainted by the bias of his times; unverified traveler’s tales, imperialism or racism. But too much, I fear, is more factual than not. Hopefully I can get verification from an anthropologist. And Sumner wrote that he originally planned to focus more on worldwide superstition – that he calls “goblinism” – but mostly left that part out. A ghost-story-monger such as myself really would wish he had done an equally massive job compiling goblinism after all.

Fiona: Do you remember the first book you read?

Sadly no. It was probably a bit beyond my comprehension abilities at the time.

Fiona: What makes you laugh/cry?

My royalty checks.

Fiona: Is there one person, past or present, you would love to meet? Why?

I suppose the noblest answer would be the unsung photographer Ruth Ketcham, who died well before her granddaughter Mary Randall gave me a box of her vibrant color slides that will see print now as “Mardi Gras in Kodachrome.” I would have been able to assure Ruth that the work she undertook all those decades ago, so long unseen, was not forgotten and will now be out on the racks and in libraries, available for the enjoyment of countless readers…But I would also have asked her to have taken better notes when she took the photos; I had to painstakingly reconstruct a lot of the caption circumstances under a magnifying glass. I also wish I knew what brand of camera and lens she used. Nobody in the family remembers.

Fiona: Do you have any hobbies?

I have had the privilege of generating an income out of things that other people consider hobbies, such as a watching films, reading books, hearing ghost stories, and so forth, so the line is fuzzy between livelihood and entertainment. I suppose my own photography and video-editing counts as my hobbies, mainly because I have thus far failed to gain any career advantage out of them. And I collect autographed editions, let us not forget that.

Fiona: What TV shows/films do you enjoy watching?

For sheer entertainment value, I enjoy the cult-movie showcase “Mystery Science Theater 3000” – although I have on occasion been lucky to be paid to review its DVD-release compilations. Otherwise, since my larger film-critic gigs have largely dried up, almost nothing lures me into the cinema any longer.

Fiona: Favorite foods, colors, music?

Out of ethics – and poverty – I have embraced a vegetarian/vegan diet. Give me an all-you-can-eat salad bar and I am content enough. As a photographer I cannot play favorites with colors – Kodachrome made them all glow. I find third-wave ska music immensely appealing, as well as film/TV soundtracks, gothic-industrial dance, and 80s alternative-underground pop. Part of that is rooted in nostalgia for my lost youth; the rest just proved very effective for keeping me awake and up late making deadlines.

Fiona: Imagine a future where you no longer write. What would you do?

I used to think photography was a suitable creative fallback, but in practice I determined it was even more competitive and high pressure than writing. I held a position as a sports videographer for seven years; it was great, and I often wish I could go back to it. Of course, part of the appeal was that I was installed all by myself in a tall camera tower in a wooded area overlooking a horse-race track all evening long. I was unsupervised, and in the downtime when the animals weren’t running I could do anything I wanted. So there in that racetrack tower is where I wrote three of my books!

Fiona: You only have 24 hours to live how would you spend that time?

I suppose I would go to the nearest hospital emergency room!

Fiona: What do you want written on your head stone?

“At Least I Got Out Of Cleveland” (this presupposes that I am able to arranged being interred out of state)

Fiona: Do you have a blog or website readers can visit for updates, events and special offers?

Not at the present time. I keep feeling the time I might take to establish an online presence would sap away energy and opportunity to write more books! Perhaps I’ll get past that block someday.

My Amazon Author Page:

https://www.amazon.com/Charles-Cassady/e/B001QV5QFQ/ref=sr_ntt_srch_lnk_2?qid=1546472060&sr=1-2

Link to my books published by Schiffer.

https://www.schifferbooks.com/search/results.html?keyword=charles+cassady+jr.&search-option=author&categories_id=&manufacturers_id=&pfrom=&pto=&dfrom=&dto=&x=22&y=8

 

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Here is my interview with Jon Hartless

Hello and welcome to my blog, Author Interviews. My name is Fiona Mcvie.

 

Let’s get you introduced to everyone, shall we? Tell us your name. What is your age?

I’m Jon Hartless, and I’m now far too old to admit my age.

Fiona: Where are you from?

The Black Country, in England, so named after the huge amounts of smog in the area which literally turned the sky black during the Industrial Revolution.

Fiona: A little about your self (ie,  your education, family life, etc.).

I attended my local university in Wolverhampton for both my BA and then the MA; I still sometimes wonder about going back to do my PhD. I’ve worked in shops and also as a tour guide at the local museum, but the past ten years or so have been in IT training.

Fiona: Tell us your latest news.

On the writing side, I’ve just sent the edits off for my next book, a sequel to 2017s Steampunk motor racing adventure Full Throttle. Provisionally entitled Rise of the Petrol Queen, it’s scheduled for a September release with Accent Press. And on a personal level, I am buying a new house. Not sure which of these requires the most concentration, really…

Fiona: When and why did you begin writing?

Writing was about the only thing I was ever good at and it’s something I enjoy, so I have been pursuing for the best part of twenty years. I think I’m just beginning to get the hang of it, now.

Fiona: When did you first consider yourself a writer?

Although I’ve had a lot of tuff published over the years, in some ways I don’t feel like a writer at all. Sometimes, I feel like I’m just shouting into the void.

Fiona: What inspired you to write your first book in your new Steampunk series?

It was a mash-up of ideas coming together in my head; the era of the Bentley Boys, (famous racing drivers of the 1920s), coupled with a home-made car called Brutus built by a chap in Germany, all mixed in with general Steampunk aesthetics. I realised with these elements I could say something about the huge gap between the rich and the poor via the medium of Steampunk motor racing.

Fiona: How did you come up with the title?

Full Throttle was the title of Tim Birkin’s autobiography, (Birkin being the most famous of the Bentley Boys), and it was a compromise title as the publisher didn’t like my first idea, which admittedly was terrible, but neither did they like Birth of the Petrol Queen, which I rather liked.

Fiona: Do you have a specific writing style? Is there anything about your style or genre that you find particularly challenging?

I’m not sure I have a style, as such; it seems to change depending on the book I’m working on. Full Throttle and its sequels are different as they are written as though by a man on an alternative timeline looking back at a woman who lived one hundred years beforehand and whose reputation he is trying to repair; as such, the style is very different to a “straight” third person narrative.

Fiona: How much of the book is realistic and are experiences based on someone you know, or events in your own life?

Despite the Steampunk setting, I have tried to create a recognisable, grubby world of privilege and inequality. Some of the experiences are taken from factual books, articles and personal testimony, so there is hopefully a shared familiarity and understanding present in the novels.

Fiona: To craft your works, do you have to travel? Before or during the process?

Thankfully, no. I can’t afford to travel. Except to local bookshops and the like.

Fiona: Who designed the covers?

Accent Press see to it all; the first one was an absolute pip, so I hope the second will be as good.

Fiona: Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?

Think about everything; question everything. Many elements in society presented as “normal” are no such thing but are instead manifestations of inequality and group control.

Fiona: Are there any new authors that have grasped your interest?  Who is your favorite writer, and what is it about their work that really strikes you?

I haven’t really got a new favourite as there are so many talented writers out there, but in any case I’m reading far less fiction these days than I used to as my tastes have moved more to factual tomes. Though I’m still reading some mainstream authors such as Kerry Hadley-Pryce, and also many from the indie author community including CL Raven, LM Cooke, Steven C Davis, Ash Hartwell, Antony Nick Britt and many more.

Fiona: Outside of family members, name one entity that supported your commitment to become a published author.

Various friends, certainly, but no organisations if that is what you mean?

Fiona: Do you see writing as a career?

Not at all, I’m afraid, and I’m always amazed to see articles claiming that the average income for a writer is something like £11-12000 per year. The most I have ever earned in a year is a little over £250. For me, it’s a hobby, albeit a passionate one.

Fiona: If you had to do it all over again, would you change anything in your latest book?

Yes; I think the preface is a little overwritten and could be pruned, and I’d also jiggle the timeline a little. Still, too late now.

Fiona: Did you learn anything during the writing of your recent book?

I looked into the history of the suffragette movement, though that entire section got culled during the editing process, and I also had a closer look at the way newspaper articles articulate their bigotry and hatred against anyone who is different.

Fiona: If your book was made into a film, who would you like to play the lead?

I honestly have no idea as I don’t watch that much contemporary stuff; how many Amazonian 6’2” (188cm) tall red-heads are there out there? Suggestions please 😀

Fiona: Any advice for other writers?

Do it for the fun and personal development.

Fiona: Anything specific you want to tell your readers?

I hope you enjoy Full Throttle and maybe think about a few of the themes also… and the sequel is out in September

Fiona: What book are you reading now?

I’ve just finished A Legacy of Spies by John le Carre; I wanted to see how it fitted in with the previous Smiley books, of which Tinker, Tailor… is one of my all-time favourites. And I’ve got a few biographies on the pile, ready to go.

Fiona: Do you remember the first book you read?

I’m afraid not.

Fiona: What makes you laugh/cry?

Awful jokes tend to do both.

Fiona: Is there one person, past or present, you would love to meet? Why?

No; a great many historical characters were terrible people with good PR. It would be somewhat stressful to have to be polite to them.

Fiona: Do you have any hobbies?

I’m part of a local Steampunk group and we go out to places including museums and art galleries, but we also do charity shop crawls as well, which can be fun. But please note; never, ever get between two Steampunks when they see a vintage piece of clothing. You will be trampled.

Fiona: What TV shows/films do you enjoy watching?

I don’t watch that much these days but I am partial to older programmes on DVD, including cult bygone classics such as The Prisoner, Blake’s 7, classic Doctor Who, the Carry On films, Hammer Horror etc.

Fiona: Favorite foods, colors,  music?

Chocolate, black, and classical

Fiona: Imagine a future where you no longer write. What would you do?

Be very miserable, I suspect. Writing is all I can do.

Fiona: You only have 24 hours to live how would you spend that time?

 I’d probably tell a lot of people how I feel about them. For better or worse.

Fiona: What do you want written on your head stone?

Keep the noise down.

Fiona: Do you have a blog or website readers can visit for updates, events and special offers?

You can find me on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/jonhartlessauthor/ or on Twitter https://twitter.com/JHartlessauthor .

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Jon-Hartless/e/B002DEQ8EI/ref=sr_tc_2_0?qid=1546096380&sr=1-2-ent

Thank you very much 😀

Here is my interview with Thomas Leslie McRae

Fiona: Tell us your name and your age?

My name is Thomas Leslie McRae and I am 36 years old.

Fiona: Where are you from?

I was born in Coney Island Hospital in Brooklyn New York and after I finished Junior High School we moved to Far Rockaway Arverne New York in the Queens County.

Fiona: Tell us a little about yourself your education, family etc? 

I went to beach Channel High School in Far Rockaway Queens New York and from there I went to Delaware Valley Job Corp to learn construction painting and some routine facility maintenance.

Fiona: Tell us your latest news?

I’m currently promoting my newest book project which is all poetry and the title is fatal impact. this book has a collection of love, spiritual, death, personal and political poems. If you’re the type of person who enjoys poetry then you will enjoy this book because it has all kinds of emotions and personal feelings written all over it.

Fiona: When did you begin writing why?

I begin writing at an early age. But I never truly began to pursue it until I got older and truly began to appreciate my gift plus Talent as a writer and a poet.

Fiona: When did you first consider yourself a writer?

At first I considered  myself a writer, when I published my first book. But As I Grew Older and became more mature I began to believe I was a writer from the very beginning. But also when I got published in my local newspaper The Wave which is located at Far Rockaway Queens New York.

Fiona: What inspired you to write your first book?

I had several  inspirations, but the one that stood out the most was every time I thought about falling in love and when I thought I was already there. You see Poetry for the soul was strictly a love poem book inspired by love songs that I enjoyed, wonderful women I have fallen for Plus close friends and family that I keep in the core  of my heart.

Fiona: How did you come up with the title for your newest book?

It’s kind of  funny what inspired me to give the title of my book, was one day I was watching the TV show called Castle. It’s basically a writer who follows around this Detective as inspiration for his research on his book. On one of the episodes they encounter this major Popstar who was competing with another one and she was doing a press conference during her album release party in which she named the title of the album Fatal Impact. Now I can’t explain why but for some reason the title just spoke to me and from that point on I decided to run with it and here we are now.

Fiona: How much of the book is based on you and your loved ones?

Well pretty much all the poems in this book was inspired by life events or personal experiences. Whether its my own or the people I know and love. Fatal impact speaks for itself the title, the poetry, the passion and the soul it’s nothing like it and there will never be anything close.

Fiona: Who designed the cover?

I universe publishing took a picture I sent them from a old calendar and help me design a cover similar to match the one closest to the calendar. It was a very beautiful mountain, clear sky scenery like photo that just really caught my eyes and warmed my heart.

Fiona: Is there a message in your poetry book?

Yes every poem has some kind of a special message, it depends on what you get out of it and what you decide to read. If you’re into love poems then get ready for love and if you’re into Political, spiritual, personal or death then be ready to be touch in some way, shape or form.

Fiona: Are there any new authors that grab your attention?

Not really no I’m not trying to be conceited or obnoxious. I’m just really focus on me right now and trying to be the best writer I can possibly be. But that doesn’t mean I won’t support anyone who reaches out to me.

Fiona: Outside of family name one entity that supported your publishing career?

If I had to name one specific entity then I would have to say all of my genuine friends from my job and personal life who actually bought a copy of any of my books.

Fiona: Do you see writing as a career?

I see writing as a hobby and a way to release stress. Of course I would like to make a lot of money doing it, but money isn’t what got me into this. I love to write because writing is who I am and  it’s a huge part of my personality and my soul. It gives me something to look forward to and provides the Hope I need  for a new beginning. I’m very proud of what I’ve done and I hope I can continue to be blessed just like the great writers before me. I’m also grateful that I was able to reconnect with my Uncle Charles McRae and send him a copy of my newest book Fatal Impact  along with the newspaper article about me from The Wave paper. Charles has been nothing but genuinely kind, super supportive and all around a loving kind positive influence and that is why for my next book project I’m going to dedicate the book to him now the question is am I going to write another poetry book or short fiction novel.

Fiona: If you had to do it all over again would you change anything in your latest book?

In my honest and personal opinion I sincerely believe Fatal Impact is completely flawless and doesn’t need any changes. Now unfortunately I’ve had a few bloggers who said they didn’t care for the book but people are entitled to their opinion what matters is I’m proud of it, I stand by it and I believe in it.

Fiona: Any advice for other writers?

The only advice I can honestly give is to follow your dreams and never give up. Because it’s better to try and fail then to never try at all. Life is too short and precious so cherish it while you’re here and hold on to the people you love but more importantly the ones who love you back.

Fiona: Anything specific you want to tell your readers?

Yes Fatal Impact is available online all over and if you’re a poetry lover, or a poetry enthusiast please purchase this book because it’s something you won’t regret.

Fiona: What do you want written on your headstone?

These are the following things I want written on my headstone. I Thomas Leslie McRae loved his mother Sylvia McRae in more ways than words could describe. Because she wasn’t just my mother she was my best friend  and inspiration for life. Thomas Leslie McRae had a Carefree heart for his favorite uncle Charles McRae and several close friends plus family members. He tried to do right by them all even the ones who hated him in private and public. Thomas was also a talented writer who had much to give to the world and even though he is dead his literary Talents continue to touch us all in more ways than one.

Fiona: Is there anything else you like to share?

Fatal Impact is undeniably one of the most inspiring and most influential poetry books of its time so please support this phenomenal literary piece ordering online at amazon.com Google Books.com barnesandnoble.com fishpond.com and any and every book retailer online. You can even do a Google search and learn more about the book and myself contact my publisher iuniverse for more information and details. You can personally reach me at mcraethomas135@gmail.com I look forward speaking to you all and please have a safe plus blessed holidays.

Buying link     https://www.amazon.com/Fatal-Impact-Thomas-McRae/dp/1532061668/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&qid=1545566938&sr=8-3&keywords=Fatal+Impact

Buying link  https://www.amazon.co.uk/Pimp-Pulpit-Thomas-Leslie-McRae/dp/1608806049/ref=sr_1_10?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1545566980&sr=1-10

Here is my interview with Vanessa Fewings

Hello and welcome to my blog, Author Interviews. My name is Fiona Mcvie.

 

Let’s get you introduced to everyone, shall we? Tell us your name.

 Hey, Fiona, thank you so much for inviting me over to your blog. I’m thrilled to be here! I’m Vanessa Fewings, a British-American romance author.

 Fiona: Where are you from?

 I’m originally from a town in Hampshire called Aldershot. Now, I live on the East Coast of the United States. I’ve fallen head over heels in love with America.

 Fiona: A little about yourself (ie, your education, family life, etc.).

 After graduating from college, I went on to study photography in London and had the privilege of working at Great Ormond Street Children’s hospital for a brief time. It was here I was inspired to become a Registered Nurse. I qualified as an RGN and later a Midwife. My passion for travel and adventure led me into the British Armywhere I was commissioned as an officer. My postings included England, Hong Kong, Germany, and Cyprus.

After years of nursing, I transitioned into being a full-time novelist. I live with my wonderful husband and our dog Sherlock, a loveable Foxhound. I spend my days writing, working on what’s next in my publishing schedule, and taking Sherlock to the park.

 Fiona: Tell us your latest news.

My latest novel, Perfume Girl, was released in November. It’s an erotic contemporary romance set in Floridaabout a perfumer whose formula for her masterpiece fragrance is stolen. It’s received a fantastic response, and I hope to share some exciting news about the book soon.

Fiona: When and why did you begin writing?

I began writing at a very young age, around nine, I believe. It felt very natural to craft stories and create characters even then. I returned to my love of writing after nursing and have not stopped since.

Fiona: When did you first consider yourself a writer?

After I finished my first novel, A Vampire’s Reckoning. The book flowed and was easy to write and I knew then this was what I was meant to be doing.

Fiona: What inspired you to write your first book?

 As a fan of Anne Rice, I loved reading about her vampires. She created a spellbinding, vivid world with indelible characters that resonated.

 Fiona: How did you come up with the title?

 Goodness, there’s always so much thought that goes into a title. In the end, I drew the book title from the novel itself. Two vampires war it out for control in this dramatic tale of the underworld.

Fiona: Do you have a specific writing style? Is there anything about your style or genre that you find particularly challenging?

 It would be challenging to define a specific style of mine. I try to stay true to each story and the characters. If any style is evident, I hope it disappears when the reader opens one of my novels.

Fiona: How much of the book is realistic and are experiences based on someone you know, or events in your own life?

 The emotions are always intended to be realistic. The scenarios in my books are predominantly created and not experienced personally, though one character who is super popular in the Enthrall Sessions was heavily influenced by someone I know. He has the same dominating manner, the same intelligence. The same wit.

Fiona: To craft your works, do you have to travel? Before or during the process?

 No, not really. I’m bringing all my experiences of traveling to distance places with me when I enter the imaginary world.

Fiona: Who designed the covers?

A number of artists have been involved in the covers throughout the years. Designing my covers is a real joy, and I love this part of the process. For the Enthrall Sessions, I chose the theme of chandeliers and they suit the series so well. I wanted something sophisticated and alluring. I’m thrilled they bring this and the feedback I have from readers is truly appreciated.

The Icon Trilogy book covers were actually taken from a photo session with two models who posed as Zara and Tobias. They captured the chemistry and drama of the two characters in the series.

The Perfume Girl cover evolved from two hands holding a perfume bottle, to something far sexier. Najla Qamber created what we have today.I couldn’t be more thrilled. The response from my readers about the cover has been wonderful.

 Fiona: Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?

 Love always finds a way.

Fiona: Are there any new authors that have grasped your interest?  Who is your favorite writer, and what is it about their work that really strikes you?

I love so many authors. If I had to choose one who I’m a big fan of it would be J.R. Ward. Her writing is extraordinary. Recently, I had the honour of interviewing her on my Romance Show Podcast. You can listen to it on iTunes.

Fiona: Do you see writing as a career?

 Writing is really like breathing for me. I don’t like to go a day without placing words on the page, if I can help it. I see it as more than a career. It’s my passion.

Fiona: If you had to do it all over again, would you change anything in your latest book?

 It’s no longer my story. It belongs to the readers now.

Fiona: Did you learn anything during the writing of your recent book?

 I learned more about the perfume industry. Also, Astor, the hero in the novel, is a big conservationist, so it was a joy to learn more about this important work and the efforts trying to save the planet.

 Fiona: If your book was made into a film, who would you like to play the lead?

 What a wonderful question! I’d have to leave that to the expert producers and casting agents. However, I know that the trend these days is to include the author in a cameo role. Such an experience would be a true privilege.

Fiona: Any advice for other writers?

 Read a lot of different books. Read in and out of your genre. Attend conferences. Just write, and if you are truly an author, it will happen. Trust the process.

Fiona: Anything specific you want to tell your readers?

 I’m incredibly grateful to anyone who picks up one of my books and reads it.

 Fiona: What book are you reading now?

I just finished reading Devil’s Cut, the third book in J.R. Ward’sBourbon Kings series. The other novel I just read that was a 5-star read for me was Absolution, by Ava Harrison.

 Fiona: Do you remember the first book you read?

One of the first books I read as a teenager was Interview with the Vampire. It left a real impression on me. I believe this was why I chose the paranormal genre when I set out to write my first novel. The idea of a character who has lived hundreds of lives was just so compelling.

 Fiona: What makes you laugh/cry?

Cruelty to animals makes me cry. Seeing others suffering. The tragedies that have unfolded in the California recently were hard to watch. I can’t imagine what it would be like to endure all that pain.

My husband makes me laugh a lot. He is the funniest man I have ever met. He knows how to ease the tension out of a situation. He helps me laugh at myself, which is so important. We laugh most days.

 Fiona: Do you have any hobbies?

 When I can, I love to enjoy time on the water.

 Fiona: What TV shows/films do you enjoy watching?

My husband and I are both big fans of TV shows. I loved watching The Queen on Netflix. Films I’ve really enjoyed recently Bohemian Rhapsodybased on the life of Freddie Mercury and the other members of Queen.

 Fiona: Favorite foods, colors,  music?

 My favourite food is icecream. Though I have given up eating flour and sugar, so I rarely eat it. After this, I adore fruit.

My favourite colour is blue.

I’m a big fan of Sia and Adele.

 Fiona: Imagine a future where you no longer write. What would you do?

To be honest, I hope I will always be able to write.

 Fiona: You only have 24 hours to live how would you spend that time?

 Eating chocolate, and hanging out with my family, including Sherlock.

Fiona: Do you have a blog or website readers can visit for updates, events, and special offers?

 I’m on Facebook on my fan page. I’m also on Instagram, Twitter, YouTube, and Goodreads.

I’m also the host of The Romance Show, a podcast on Soundcloud and iTunes, and you can listen for free to some of the world’s most well-known and beloved romance authors.

Thank you again for inviting me over, Fiona!

For more on my books visit https://vanessafewings.com/

Amazon Authors page UK   https://www.amazon.co.uk/Vanessa-Fewings/e/B003D0BW92/ref=dp_byline_cont_ebooks_1

USA   https://www.amazon.com/Vanessa-Fewings/e/B003D0BW92/ref=sr_tc_2_0?qid=1545518077&sr=1-2-ent

Here is my interview with John Searancke

Hello and welcome to my blog, Author Interviews. My name is Fiona Mcvie.

Let’s get you introduced to everyone, shall we? Tell us your name. What is your age?

Hi! My name is John Searancke and I am 75 years of age.

Fiona: Where are you from?

I originally hail from Ashby-de-la-Zouch, a small market town in Leicestershire, where I spent my first 20 years or so. I then moved further south for 35 years and then up north to Lancashire until retirement.

Fiona: A little about yourself (ie, your education, family life, etc.).

I was sent off to Prep School on the South Coast, followed on by Rugby School, where my father had entered me from birth. Both are boarding schools, so I only went home for the holidays.

Fiona: Tell us your latest news.

My third book, The Reluctant Hotelkeeper has literally just been published, which is very exciting for me, particularly so because it has gathered an Amazon #1 in its category.

Fiona: When and why did you begin writing?

I only started writing when I retired, and have since the written three books over the last six years. I always wanted to write a book, but there was never the right moment until retirement came along.

Fiona: When did you first consider yourself a writer?

Am I really a writer, or just someone who has had a bit of good fortune along the way?

Fiona: What inspired you to write your first book?

My first book told the story of our emigration from England to live in the Canary Islands. We – myself, my wife Sally, and our dog Freddie – moved lock stock and barrel to sunnier climes. Whilst it went well, I thought perhaps it could be a useful exercise for others planning a similar venture.

Fiona: How did you come up with the title?

My wife has come up with all three titles. My ideas are much too pedestrian.

Dog Days in The Fortunate Islands relates to doggy stories, the becalming of trading ships off the coast of the Canaries, and lastly that final part is the age-old name by which the Canaries used to be known. So quite an interesting coming together I thought.

Prunes for Breakfast is also apposite, but to explain it might spoil the final denouement of the book. Read it for yourselves – please!

The Reluctant Hotelkeeper just says what it does on the tin, as we say. No more, no less. I was indeed reluctant to take the job on, and it lasted for 35 years!

Fiona: Do you have a specific writing style? Is there anything about your style or genre that you find particularly challenging?

I find that writing style evolves the more you do it. Having said that, I wrote Prunes for Breakfast in a different way entirely, because the subject matter demanded that of me. I hope that you may agree, because I am very proud of that book.

Fiona: How much of the book is realistic and are experiences based on someone you know, or events in your own life?

All three are realistic, based on real events in my life (2 books) and that of my father (1 book).

Fiona: To craft your works, do you have to travel? Before or during the process?

Prunes for Breakfast required me to travel to Normandy and retrace the footsteps of my father right from the D Day landing beaches inland through the assault on Caen, fighting through the bocage and finally to the actual orchard near Thury Harcourt where he was captured when his position was overrun by a German Panzer Division. It was all a very moving experience.

Fiona: Who designed the covers?

All three covers have been designed by John Harding, Illustrator, whose eye and skill is unsurpassed. All three are his original paintings.

Fiona: Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?

No, nothing that deep. Just sit back and enjoy the ride.

Fiona: Are there any new authors that have grasped your interest? Who is your favourite writer, and what is it about their work that really strikes you?

I am currently a big fan of Manda Scott. Her historical novels are so well written they take my breath away. The four books in her Boudicca series were unputdownable.

Fiona: Do you see writing as a career?

No. I am too old to make a career of it, and I don’t like the idea of divorce!

Fiona: If you had to do it all over again, would you change anything in your latest book?

At the moment I am suffering from the euphoria of a new release, so have not caught my breath yet.

Fiona: Did you learn anything during the writing of your recent book?

It is hard to go back and dissect your old life, particularly when mistakes were made.

Fiona: If your book was made into a film, who would you like to play the lead?

Oh my goodness! Which book? Prunes for Breakfast might have been a vehicle for someone like David Niven?

Fiona: Any advice for other writers?

I would not presume…

Fiona: Anything specific you want to tell your readers?

Keep reading books! Struggling authors need your reviews.

Fiona: What book are you reading now?

It’s a paperback thriller. I may not get to the end.

Fiona: Do you remember the first book you read?

No idea. Something in junior school with words and pictures I expect.

Fiona: What makes you laugh/cry?

Animals. I love them all and hate to see them mistreated.

Fiona: Is there one person, past or present, you would love to meet? Why?

Such a difficult question, and one that can vary with one’s moods. Churchill?

Fiona: Do you have any hobbies?

No time, no time…retirement is a busy occupation!

Fiona: What TV shows/films do you enjoy watching?

Friends, Strictly Come Dancing, mystery and thrillers.

Fiona: Favorite foods, colors, music?

My favourite colour is green. I prefer classical music. I eat almost anything.

Fiona: Imagine a future where you no longer write. What would you do?

This reminds me to start looking for a new hobby.

Fiona: You only have 24 hours to live how would you spend that time?

Gathering my remaining family around me and having a superb dinner on a waterfront in warm weather.

Fiona: What do you want written on your head stone?

At least he tried…

Fiona: Do you have a blog or website readers can visit for updates, events and special offers?

Here are some links:

Website:  https://www.johnsearancke.com/

John Searancke Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/john.searancke.1

Twitter: https://twitter.com/johnsearancke

Here is my interview with D. G. D. Davidson

Hello and welcome to my blog, Author Interviews. My name is Fiona Mcvie.

 

Let’s get you introduced to everyone, shall we? Tell us your name. What is your age?

I go by D. G. D. Davidson. I’m thirty-eight years old.

Fiona: Where are you from?

Originally, I come from eastern Oregon, but I’ve been all over the place. I used to work as an archaeologist, so my job often took me around the country. I’m currently living in Oklahoma, and I’ve made it into the official state database of Oklahoma authors, so I think that now qualifies as my home.

Fiona: A little about your self (ie,  your education, family life, etc.).

I grew up in Oregon and studied Anthropology in college. After I got a master’s degree in Archaeology at the University of Toronto, I worked as an archaeologist for several years, with a short stint in a Catholic seminary. I recently went back to school for a master’s degree in Library Science, so I am now an academic librarian. Most of my writing has been on the fly during projects, but now that I’m settled into a job with more regular hours, I have more time to write.

Fiona: Tell us your latest news.

The second volume of Jake and the Dynamo, Dead to Rites, is nearing completion. I can’t give a date on the publication, but I can say that the draft is nearly done.

After that, I will be finalizing the draft of Rag & Muffin, a novel thematically similar to Jake and the Dynamo, but with a darker tone as well as a more elaborate and exotic setting.

I have also begun a Christmas-themed novel under the working title Son of Hel, which was inspired by the infamously bad movie Santa Claus Conquers the Martians. It’s a science-fantasy incorporating legendry and folkore surrounding St. Nicholas, and involves Krampus.

Fiona: When and why did you begin writing?

Kindergarten. I dictated my first story, which was about pirates, to my kindergarten teacher, who dutifully wrote it down for me. I’ve always felt a need to tell stories. Most of my games as a child were elaborate stories. When my brother and friends were playing video games, I was always trying to puzzle out the backstories; I never cared for the gameplay itself, only the tale it told. Of course, video games have become more elaborate in recent years and are now real vehicles for stories, which they weren’t when I was young.

Fiona: When did you first consider yourself a writer?

Sometime in college, probably, when I first sold a story to a small e-zine. But I’ve always been writing. In middle school or late grade school, I attempted my first novel on a Tandy 1000, and I lost it all when the text file got too large for the computer’s memory.

Fiona: What inspired you to write your first book?

This particular book series, Jake and the Dynamo, the first volume of which is entitled The Wattage of Justice, came to me in a dream. I’ve always been a fan of science fiction and fantasy, but within the last ten years I’ve become increasingly interested in the sub-sub-genre of Japanese magical girls. I was working long hours on an archaeological project, and when I got back to my motel room late in the evening, I would usually eat a reheated dinner while catching a few episodes of the magical girl show Shugo Chara.

It’s probably on account of that show and on account of poor sleeping habits that I had a bizarre and vivid dream about a teenage boy who ought to have been in high school, but was forced back to fifth grade when a computer glitch erased part of his academic record. There, a moody young girl picked on him mercilessly, and he discovered to his chagrin that he could do nothing about it because he was neither a bully nor a snitch.

I thought that was a really funny idea, and I mulled it over for days, unsure what to do with it, when it suddenly struck me that this grumpy little kid might be a magical girl. Almost immediately, Magical Girl Pretty Dynamo, complete with her powers and personality, popped into my head.

I began writing the story as a lark. I originally thought I would self-publish it when it was complete, but as it grew, I realized it would fill more than one volume. I sent it to the fantasist L. Jagi Lamplighter, who does freelance editing and has helped some fledgling authors get started. She made insightful edits and also pitched the book to Superversive Press, which took it on her recommendation.

Because I originally intended to self-publish, I had contracted with an illustrator, Roffles Lowell, who did the book’s interior illustrations. Superversive graciously took the illustrations with the text, so I can proudly say that it is an illustrated novel.

 Fiona: How did you come up with the title?

The title came to me as suddenly as everything else did. As soon as I realized that little Dana was also Magical Girl Pretty Dynamo, the hapless teenage boy became Jake, and Jake and the Dynamo came to my mind. I think the old TV show, Jake and the Fatman, may have inspired this name combination. That’s not a show I’ve ever seen, but the title is one I vaguely remember.

I can also tell you that the reason she’s called Pretty Dynamo is a sort of joke: There are a number of magical girls with “pretty” in their names, such as Pretty Cure, Pretty Sammy, and of course the Pretty Soldier Sailor Moon. I wanted to reference those, which I think is why Pretty Dynamo became the name of my heroine.

Fiona: Do you have a specific writing style? Is there anything about your style or genre that you find particularly challenging?

I have been told that my writing has a distinct voice, whatever that means, and that I am very descriptive. When I was young, in late elementary and throughout middle school, I was enamored of Ray Bradbury. In my early attempts at writing, I tried to imitate him. I’m no longer deliberately imitative (and I’m no Ray Bradbury), but his influence is still with me.

I like lush settings with quickly delineated characters; this is a common technique in animation, perhaps best known from the works of Studio Ghibli, and I believe it works in prose as well. Considering how much influence animation has had on this particular novel, I think the boldly drawn but cartoonish characters set in a thoughtfully created environment are appropriate.

As for the challenges of my genre, it requires getting in touch with my feminine side. The story also needs to be heavy on humor, so there’s always a pressure to come up with new jokes and puns.

Fiona: How much of the book is realistic and are experiences based on someone you know, or events in your own life?

It’s not very realistic at all! And that is by design. The book is a combination of slapstick comedy and violent action. I constructed it in such a way that every other chapter would be a large action sequence, with lots of belly laughs in between. Someone has kindly created a page for it on TVTropes and described it as an example of “mood whiplash,” since it moves quickly from silly humor to much darker, more violent content, and back again.

That being said, I will mention that Dana, the alter ego of Pretty Dynamo, is very loosely based on a real little girl who talked in a deadpan, followed me around, and made sarcastic comments. Aside from that, various thoughts and experiences of mine have no doubt gone into the book, but none that I could point out specifically.

Fiona: To craft your works, do you have to travel? Before or during the process?

An interesting question. For this particular book, no; I had to research some of the foreign cultures that make up the world-city in which Jake and Dana live, but I did not travel for that purpose. I did, however, spend a few months in India as part of the research for Rag & Muffin, the book I will be finalizing after I finish the second volume of Jake and the Dynamo. I think that trip was very much worth it. I knew a fair amount about India before I went, but actually standing in it, feeling the people and the culture flowing around you, being overwhelmed by it, was very different from reading about it in a guidebook or history book. I think that trip changed the tone and feel of Rag & Muffin.

Fiona: Who designed the covers?

The artist is a talented fellow named Lee Madison, who draws in an anime-influenced style and has done several covers for Superversive Press. I was thrilled when he first showed me his design for Pretty Dynamo: She looks much better in his version than she did in my head, to be honest. I love the way he incorporated a lightning bolt motif into her blue and gold armor.

Fiona: Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?

I am wary of messages in fiction. Many years ago, I was tangentially involved with several authors in the Christian Booksellers’ Association; there are some talented storytellers in that set, but I got a sense that they tended to elevate message over entertainment, often to the detriment of their work. I drifted away from them, I think, because of a difference in artistic vision. In the broader publishing industry, we are now seeing something similar to what I saw in CBA, what with the heavy emphasis on social justice or inclusiveness or whatever you want to call it, where message is emphasized to the point that craftsmanship gets neglected.

The reader is free to find any message or none in Jake and the Dynamo.I am sure some of my opinions crept into the text, and anyone who wants to try to tease them out may do so. But the only messages I had firmly in mind were along the lines of, “magical girls are awesome,” and “being a teenager sucks sometimes.”

Fiona: Are there any new authors that have grasped your interest?  Who is your favorite writer, and what is it about their work that really strikes you?

To be perfectly honest, a lot of my reading and a lot of my influence right now is not coming from novels written in English. I read a fair amount of Japanese manga. I’ve recently been working my way through the Coloured Fairy Books of Andrew Lang as well as the dialogs of Plato. My reading in recent years, aside from manga, has largely shifted to classics and nonfiction.

I’m never sure what to say when asked for a favorite book or favorite writer. Since I mentioned Bradbury as my single greatest influence, I am probably safe calling him my favorite author. It was always his ability to create vivid word-paintings that most struck me; only rarely did I actually care for the plots or characters of his works. For a favorite novel, my go-to is All the King’s Men by Robert Penn Warren. I have chosen that title simply so I have an answer ready when asked for a favorite book, but also for the same reason I have chosen Bradbury—the incredible wordsmithing.

I should also name the graphic novel Bone by Jeff Smith, which encapsulates my storytelling philosophy: humorous and endearing characters who delight the audience with outrageously funny antics, yet who live in a story that steadily turns darker and more violent, but also more expansive.

Fiona: Outside of family members, name one entity that supported your commitment to become a published author.

That would have to be L. Jagi Lamplighter. She is almost singlehandedly the reason this book is published.

Fiona: Do you see writing as a career?

Yes, but I have no plans to quit my day job. I see it as something I intend to keep doing, something to which I am dedicated, something that has to be worked at steadily. In that sense, it is a career.

Fiona: If you had to do it all over again, would you change anything in your latest book?

I would fix a few typos that Iknow made it into the final draft. Aside from that, this book has been gone over with a fine-tooth comb by multiple people. Any additional improvements would be beyond my current abilities. So I am content with the published version.

Fiona: Did you learn anything during the writing of your recent book?

That’s a tough question. I think I learned some things about craft, perhaps most especially from the helpful suggestions I got from Lamplighter—although most of what she told me were things I knew already, but hadn’t accomplished as well as I’d thought. I wrote this book partly to stretch myself, because the story is told from a sidekick’s point of view: Jake has no superpowers, but is constantly in the company of girls who do. Keeping him in an active role is always a fun challenge, and I think it makes the action more inventive than it would have been if all the participants were magical girls and monsters.

Fiona: If your book was made into a film, who would you like to play the lead?

If this book were put to film, I would want it animated and produced in Japan, preferably as a TV series rather than as a movie. I don’t know my Japanese voice actors well enough to pick a lead. If I had to pick a studio, however, I might pick Studio BONES, which has made competent adaptations of light novels with similar themes.

Fiona: Any advice for other writers?

Probably none that they haven’t heard already. Give every character at least two things to want badly. Make sure at least two conflicts are present in every scene. Give your characters flaws. Mercilessly kill your sock puppets. Let your villains say their piece and give them real reasons. Write every day. There’s no such thing as writer’s block.

That kind of thing.

Fiona: Anything specific you want to tell your readers?

Only that I hope they have fun. I have had readers tell me that they have laughed so hard they’ve cried while reading Jake and the Dynamo. That is the most satisfying feedback I can get.

 Fiona: What book are you reading now?

The complete dialogs of Plato, the last volume of the Coloured Fairy Books, and Bleach.

 Fiona: Do you remember the first book you read?

No. However, I do remember the book that most influenced me as a child. It was City Beyond the Clouds by Roy Rockwood. It was part of the boys’ adventure series Great Marvel. The story involved several strapping lads loading up on guns, building a flying machine, and traveling to a second moon hidden in the Earth’s shadow, where they battled evil dwarves and giant grasshoppers to rescue a fair maiden. I was probably ten or so when I read it, and I had never before read anything quite like it. It blew my mind. I now own seven volumes of the Great Marvel series. I’m old enough now to see their flaws, but they’re still a hoot. A reader today has to go somewhere like Japan to find boys’ stories with the same kind of gumption.

 Fiona: What makes you laugh/cry?

An easy cop-out is to answer, “The contents of Jake and the Dynamo.” I did my best to put in the novel a lot of things that make me laugh or cry. The goofy humor that pervades the book, especially the bad puns, are there because they made me laugh, so I hoped they would make someone else laugh. The relationship that forms between Jake and Dana is there to make someone cry.

 Fiona: Is there one person, past or present, you would love to meet? Why?

If I gave it enough thought, there might be several. Since I’m reading Plato right now, I’ll say Socrates. Plato’s depiction of him is one of the most memorable personalities in world literature.

 Fiona: Do you have any hobbies?

Right now, writing is my biggest “hobby.” I’m trying to be more consistent in producing my work. Perhaps I’ll take up other hobbies once I pin this one down.

 Fiona: What TV shows/films do you enjoy watching?

Most of the TV I watch these days is animated. I’m always trying to increase my knowledge of the magical girl genre. At the moment, I’m watching ViVid Strike, which is the latest series in the Magical Girl Lyrical Nanoha franchise. It’s about young girls who happen to be magic-powered MMA fighters. I’m also fond of Miraculous Ladybug, a magical girl show out of France.

For movies, I like Kung fu. One of my favorite films is The Raid, an extraordinarily violent Indonesian martial arts movie.

 Fiona: Favorite foods, colors,  music?

I’ve never understood the concept of a favorite color, to be honest. I tend to dress in earth tones, so maybe I could say brown, except that sounds boring.

As for music, I am a complete plebeian; I’m fond of heavy metal, but have only a little knowledge of it. For whatever reason, I listened incessantly to “You’re Mine” by Disturbed while writing Jake and the Dynamo.

As for food, I like anything unhealthy. Jack on the rocks with vegetables and dip followed by cold pizza and beer is my notion of an ideal meal.

 Fiona: Imagine a future where you no longer write. What would you do?

If I weren’t writing stories, I would probably be absorbing other people’s. In such a future, I suspect I would spend most or all of my free time watching magical girl anime, which doesn’t sound at all wholesome.

 Fiona: You only have 24 hours to live how would you spend that time?

If I knew for certain that I had only 24 hours, I would probably put my affairs in order as well as I am able and spend the rest of the time in prayer. 

Fiona: What do you want written on your head stone?

“Pepperoni and cheese.”

 Fiona: Do you have a blog or website readers can visit for updates, events and special offers?

Yes indeed! You can visit my blog http://deusexmagicalgirl.com . I regularly deliver updates, and I also write quite a few reviews, mostly of anime.

https://www.amazon.com/D.G.D.-Davidson/e/B07H1KK9HG/ref=dp_byline_cont_ebooks_1

https://www.amazon.co.uk/D.G.D.-Davidson/e/B07H1KK9HG/ref=sr_tc_2_0?qid=1545316954&sr=1-2-ent

Here is my interview with J.T. Joseph

Hello and welcome to my blog, Author Interviews. My name is Fiona Mcvie.

 

Let’s get you introduced to everyone, shall we? Tell us your name. What is your age?

My name is J.T. Joseph and I am 29 years old.

Fiona: Where are you from?

I am from Fort Worth, Texas.

Fiona: A little about yourself (ie, your education, family life, etc.).

I have a bachelor’s degree in Creative Writing from the University of North Texas.

 Fiona: Tell us your latest news.

I recently released my debut novel,“The Adventures of Mary Nobleman”.

Fiona: When and why did you begin writing?

I started writing when I was a high school sophomore. I have always thought of myself as a creative person.

Fiona: When did you first consider yourself a writer?

I considered myself a writer when I fell in love with writing stories.

Fiona: What inspired you to write your first book?

It was a combination of the TheDa Vinci Code and the Arthurian legends.

Fiona: How did you come up with the title?

I wanted my readers to know right away that my main character was on an adventurous journey.

Fiona: Do you have a specific writing style? Is there anything about your style or genre that you find particularly challenging?

No. I would say research, because my stories are mostly inspired by myths or legends from different cultures.

Fiona: How much of the book is realistic and are experiences based on someone you know, or events in your own life?

It is completely fictional.

Fiona: To craft your works, do you have to travel? Before or during the process?

No, but I am open to the idea.

Fiona: Who designed the covers?

My publisher did it for me.

 Fiona: Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?

That life is an adventure.

Fiona: Are there any new authors that have grasped your interest?  Who is your favorite writer, and what is it about their work that really strikes you?

I have not read any new authors yet. My favorite author is Dan Brown, because his novels take the reader on a journey. He also makesthereader think about different concepts.

Fiona: Outside of family members, name one entity that supported your commitment to become a published author.

Morgan James Publishing

Fiona: Do you see writing as a career?

Yes, I want to make a living as a writer.

Fiona: If you had to do it all over again, would you change anything in your latest book?

No, because I like how my novel turned out.

Fiona: Did you learn anything during the writing of your recent book?

No, because King Arthur is a well-known character.

Fiona: If your book was made into a film, who would you like to play the lead?

I would want my main character to be played by a new actress.

Fiona: Any advice for other writers?

You should never give up, no matter how long it takes!

Fiona: Anything specific you want to tell your readers?

Life is an adventure and you should enjoy it.

 Fiona: What book are you reading now?

I have been too busy with my writing and marketing; but I want to read Originby Dan Brown in the near future.

Fiona: Do you remember the first book you read?

I have read many books, but I always likedthe Harry Potter series.

Fiona: What makes you laugh/cry?

I like comedy movies and TV shows.

Fiona: Is there one person, past or present, you would love to meet? Why?

I would love to meet Dan Brown, because he seems like an interesting person and his writing inspires me.

Fiona: Do you have any hobbies?

I like to dance sometimes.

Fiona: What TV shows/films do you enjoy watching?

I enjoy TV shows like The Big Bang Theory,and movies like The Avengers.

Fiona: Favorite foods, colors, music?

My favorite food is Italian. My favoritecolor is blue. My favorite music is Rock and Roll.

Fiona: Imagine a future where you no longer write. What would you do?

I would probably go into advertising.

Fiona: You only have 24 hours to live how would you spend that time?

I would spend the time with my family and friends.

Fiona: What do you want written on your head stone?

“He was a successful author and wrote many books and was an inspiration for family and friends.”

Fiona: Do you have a blog or website readers can visit for updates, events and special offers?

I don’t have a website or blog, but I have social media accounts for updates.

https://www.facebook.com/j.t.josephauthor/

https://twitter.com/JTJosephauthor

https://www.instagram.com/jtjosephauthor/

https://jtjoseph1.tumblr.com/

https://mewe.com/i/jtjoseph

 The e-book is on kindle, kobo, nook, and google play

https://www.amazon.com/Adventures-Mary-Nobleman-Novel/dp/168350948X

https://www.kobo.com/us/en/ebook/the-adventures-of-mary-nobleman

https://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/the-adventures-of-mary-nobleman-jt-joseph/1128333933?ean=9781683509493&st=PLA&sid=BNB_NOOK%20EBooks&sourceId=PLABiNA&dpid=tdtve346c&2sid=Bing_c&

msclkid=9b96be6c7b261fc61b98e264358172f3&adlclid=ADL-9454d513-a461-48ce-bd88-78d5a98e144f

https://play.google.com/store/books/details/The_Adventures_of_Mary_Nobleman_A_Novel?id=HRBdDwAAQBAJ

The paperback is in stores and online

 

Here is my interview with Phil Andrews

Hello and welcome to my blog, Author Interviews. My name is Fiona Mcvie.

Let’s get you introduced to everyone, shall we? Tell us your name. What is your age?

Hi Fiona.  My name is Phil Andrews and I am 57.

Fiona: Where are you from?

I was born and brought up in Isleworth, where the postal address says Middlesex but to most people these days it is in West London.  After all these years I still live there, which I guess shows either dedication or a serious lack of imagination.

Fiona: A little about your self (ie,  your education, family life, etc.).

I was privileged to spend my earliest years at a wonderful primary school called Worple Road.  That was a very long time ago – back in the 1960s and early seventies – but such was the bond that we local kids had that dozens of us still keep in touch through social media and organise reunions every two or three years.  From there I went on to Isleworth Grammar School and then to Manchester Polytechnic where I began a degree course in social science.  Regrettably though I was an immature student and paid scant attention to my studies, preferring to dedicate my time to my new-found freedom and social life up in the North West.  As a result I neglected my course and ended up dropping out and joining the world of employment, where I have since done just about everything from management to labouring to clerical work.  Oh, and I was a local councillor for twelve years – in Isleworth, naturally.

At the tender age of 34 I got married, and my wife Caroline and I now have 21-year-old twins Joseph and Rosina.

Fiona: Tell us your latest news.

Life these days seems to be a perpetual struggle between trying to find the time to be creative and the need to earn a living in order to pay the bills and meet everyday costs and outgoings.  I’m a social person by nature but I have to admit that I’ve become a bit of a hermit in recent years, attempting to keep these two balls in the air at the same time.

Fiona: When and why did you begin writing?

Incredible though it may sound my début novel The Best Year Of Our Lives was a whole four decades in the making.  In its original and most primitive form it began to take shape back in 1977, but it has been put to one side and then revisited on so many occasions since then.  To be honest I’m glad because my writing style even ten or twenty years ago was in my view very childlike, and had I completed the book back then I would almost certainly not be happy with it today.  The story was like a good malt whisky, it had to spend many years maturing before I could unleash it upon the pubic.

Fiona: When did you first consider yourself a writer?

English Language was always my strongest subject at senior school.  Although in most subjects I spent the larger part of my time in detentions or standing in the vestibule, I couldn’t get enough of story writing.  It is the only artistic medium for which I have any known talent so I use my writing to paint my pictures and compose my music.  That’s the way I like to think of it anyway.

Fiona: What inspired you to write your first book?

My first and so far only novel was inspired by my own adolescence.  The year 1976 was extraordinarily special for me, not only because it was the year of that famously long and hot summer but also because I was blessed to have been able to spend it in the company of a wonderful group of friends, all of whom I still think about more or less every day of my life.  It was a truly magical, almost surreal experience and I can still remember events and conversations from that year as though they happened yesterday.

Fiona: How did you come up with the title?

The title was a tribute to the singer and songwriter Steve Harley from Cockney Rebel, who was one of the artists that most inspired me during the years leading up to that period (his album The Best Years Of Our Lives was recorded in 1975 and contained some of his finest work).  As the book was set almost exclusively in one particular year it seemed very apt.

Fiona: Do you have a specific writing style? Is there anything about your style or genre that you find particularly challenging?

I think everyone has a specific writing style.  I don’t set out to write in a particular style but instinctively I try to pitch the tone of whatever I’m writing to reflect the mood of the central character.  It is his story and not to use the power of words to project his thoughts and his emotional state at any given time is in my opinion a lost opportunity.

Fiona: How much of the book is realistic and are experiences based on someone you know, or events in your own life?

Those who know me will know that almost all of the characters in the book are modelled on real people who shared that wonderful period of my life with me.  Some of the events and even conversations are reproduced faithfully from memory.  But only some, that is the point which needs to be stressed.  The characters are fictional and that is for a reason – it gives me the licence to tweak them in a way that creates the desired contrast and group dynamics for the story.  Needless to say many of the events are fictitious too, because my challenge was to turn a diary of everyday existence into a tale with a beginning, a middle and an end.  But still I have friends who recognise “themselves” in the book and tell me “I didn’t say this” or “I didn’t do that”.  It’s a cross I bear happily.

Fiona: To craft your works, do you have to travel? Before or during the process?

The Prologue was written many years ago and I took a trip to Oxfordshire and visited some old haunts specifically to get a “feel” for the work.  It’s a short preamble to the substantive work but I couldn’t have written it had I not been there, actually physically looking out over the scene and breathing the air.

When the main body of the work was finally brought together I took an eight-month career break from my job as a postman and began almost every day with a four or five mile walk along the river, visiting some of the places that I’ve attempted to bring to life in the book.  It’s amazing how much detail one notices when one is specifically looking for it, even at locations which have been around me all my life.

Fiona: Who designed the covers?

That was my daughter Rosina.  She’s the visual artist, I just write stuff.

Fiona: Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?

I think there are all kinds of messages coming in left field, but I don’t think there is a moral to the story as such.  The lead character is a complex individual who is neither wholly good nor wholly bad, which I suppose could be said about any of us really.  I’ve noticed that some people do tend to make very binary judgements about others but if only life was that simple.

There is an element of mysticism in the work which I would guess has rubbed off on me from my interest in Arthurian legend and, on a different level, in the works of Tolkien.  Throw in my Christian faith with all of that and what emerged was always going to be an eclectic mix.

One thing I do hope that readers get from it is a recognition that we should not be too quick to dismiss the things that inspired and defined us when we were in our formative years.  There is a whole lot of truth in the things we go through when we are young which leave an indelible mark upon our souls as we beat our weary paths through adulthood.  Lose it and we lose who we are.

 Fiona: Are there any new authors that have grasped your interest?  Who is your favorite writer, and what is it about their work that really strikes you?

 It may sound an odd thing for an aspirant author to say but I’m not really a big reader of mainstream fiction.  Having discovered for myself a whole new world in the relatively recent phenomenon of self-publishing I tend to look there for literary entertainment.  I have recently read a couple of very interesting novels by Susan L. Stewart and Ray Burston respectively and I found them rather compelling.

Fiona: Outside of family members, name one entity that supported your commitment to become a published author.

 My old friends from back in 1976 spurred me on to get the book finished and out there, although even those I am still in touch with probably never realised it.  Just the memory was enough to keep me ploughing relentlessly on because we had something which I knew must never be allowed to die – and now it won’t.

 Fiona: Do you see writing as a career?

 I would dearly love to dedicate myself to writing without having to top up my income through other work, but the down side of self-publishing is that anybody can do it.  It was Andy Warhol who said that one day everyone will be famous for fifteen minutes and so it has proved, but that does tend to depress the market.

 Fiona: If you had to do it all over again, would you change anything in your latest book?

 Oh absolutely, I never cease thinking of things which I could have added into the mix.  Usually it’s very small stuff, like a reference or a piece of dialogue, but there is always something.  The truth is though that there needs to be a cut-off, a point at which one says that’s it.  Like a painting or a piece of music, a book represents a place in time.  It conveys the things I was feeling when I wrote it.  Other than correcting the odd typographical error I have deliberately left well alone since the day the book went into print.

 Fiona: Did you learn anything during the writing of your recent book?

 Lessons I’ve already forgotten, like really effective time management and the need to immerse oneself in the right environment not only for being creative, but for “feeling” the storyline.  Writing a novel is not just about putting a series of words together in the correct sequence, but about painting a picture that readers can really immersethemselves in.

Fiona: If your book was made into a film, who would you like to play the lead?

 That’s a very difficult one to answer Fiona because the lead character is only fourteen or fifteen years of age and I’m not familiar with any actors from within that age group.  But I would very much like to play the older man who features in the Epilogue.  I’ve a feeling it’s a part I could well grow into.

I would dearly love it to be made into a film and if I’m ever successful enough to acquire the necessary funds it’s something that I might actually consider commissioning myself, if only as a vanity project.  It would also be a wonderful challenge to set it to music and I do fancy myself as a lyricist, although in actual musical terms I’m clueless.

Fiona: Any advice for other writers?

 Self-publishing has opened up a whole new world of opportunity and if you really do want to get that book published there is now absolutely no reason why you shouldn’t.  But take some time to draw up a marketing plan before rushing to print because in some respects when you self-publish it’s the writing of the book that’s the easy bit.

 Fiona: Anything specific you want to tell your readers?

 All writers love feedback, and all but the most vain appreciate honest criticism where it is due.  It is impossible for me to read my novel through the eyes of an onlooker so please do let me know what you think of it, whether it be by means of an online review or just by contacting me directly.

 Fiona: What book are you reading now?

 Working At Worple by Ken Noakes.  It’s a history of my old primary school by a man who for two years was my class teacher.  It is truly marvellous that all this information and such precious memories can now be consigned permanently to record thanks to the technology which makes short-run publishing possible at a viable cost.

Fiona: Do you remember the first book you read?

 Yes, it was The Lion, The Witch and The Wardrobe by C.S. Lewis.  My first teacher, Miss Wilson, became so fed up with my constant interruptions and general bad behaviour as she tried to read it out to the class that she handed me the book and told me that if I felt I could do any better myself I should take over.  So I did, reading an entire chapter to my amused classmates and my gobsmacked teacher.  I was five years old, and she was so impressed that she gave me the book to keep.

Fiona: What makes you laugh/cry?

 I like to think I have a sense of humour and I’m afraid I am a sucker for sarcasm just so long as it’s clever.  I know the words to every episode of Fawlty Towers verbatim but it still has me in stitches.

On the crying front, I can be brought to tears listening to a sad song which I can relate to, especially when I’m in my own company and after a beer or two.  My mind just takes over and I redefine the words by applying them to some event in my own life, often hideously exaggerated.

Fiona: Is there one person, past or present, you would love to meet? Why?

 Steve Harley – I’m a big fan as I mentioned earlier.  I would talk him through his back catalogue and ask him what inspired his various songs, but also – and I know this is going to sound incredibly vain – I would ask him for his further thoughts on my own novel, in which there are several references to him and to his work.  He has already told me he liked the book, and wrote me a nice letter wishing me every success with it.  He is still performing and I regularly see him playing live.  It is comforting to have this tangible creative connection between my teenage years and the present day.

 Fiona: Do you have any hobbies?

 I have had, in the past, but to be truthful I’m a bit of a workaholic which has meant that in practice I have little time for hobbies.  It is only when I’m away on holiday that I manage to unwind, and it’s no coincidence that when I do so the creative juices begin to flow and I come back home with lots of new ideas and fresh perspectives.  So you could say that holidaying is my hobby, but even that has a work dimension.

 Fiona: What TV shows/films do you enjoy watching?

 I’m something of a geek when it comes to television, preferring news broadcasts and current affairs programmes to any kind of entertainment.  When I do manage to get into a film though I can take a lot from it.  I like historical epics rather than cheesy Hollywood dramas though.  Something like El Cid or Ben Hur, dated though they are, will always trump the latest movie blockbuster in my my book.

 Fiona: Favorite foods, colors,  music?

Food wise I enjoy anything with a bit of spice, which is odd when I was born into a family whose idea of an exotic meal was to open a tin of spaghetti.  Jerk, Indian (hot within reason, madras to vindaloo), Thai, Mexican – any of these do it for me.  I’m afraid I’m not very patriotic when it comes to cuisine, I find English food bland and boring although I am partial to the occasional fry-up.

My favourite colour is probably green, bearing in mind it was the colour of the rosette I sported when I was in the process of being elected to my local council (although it didn’t symbolise any particular party allegiance as I was an independent).

Musically like many of my generation I have always been a massive Bowie fan.  He was a creative genius who set the pace throughout the 1970s and continued to do so more or less ever since.  He began as a folky type who piggybacked the glam rock era and made it has own, then moved seamlessly on through a whole range of genres, setting the pace and then leaving them behind for something new.  It was my pleasure fairly recently to attend a presentation by Woody Woodmansey, Bowie’s drummer from The Spiders From Mars and sadly the last surviving member of the band, and Tony Visconti who was his producer as well as his occasional bass player.  After the event I had the opportunity to exchange a few words with both men and to have my photo taken with them, all of us holding the books that we had written.  They probably wondered who the hell I was but for me it was my Andy Warhol moment.

I have already mentioned Steve Harley more than once.  For whatever reason I found myself the proud owner of a couple of his early albums at a particular time in my life when I was looking for artistic inspiration beyond the comfort zone of slapstick glam, and it became the soundtrack to a relatively short but important period of my life.  Sure it had ego but it put in a shift and was refreshingly honest in its presentation.

Aside from Bowie and Harley my tastes are varied.  Rock is my go-to medium but every now and again I find myself dipping into mid-seventies disco or soul, or just some easy ballad.  It really depends on my mood at the time.

Fiona: Imagine a future where you no longer write. What would you do?

 Unless somebody can suggest another means of consigning my thoughts to record I cannot conceive of a futurein which I no longer write.  It is beyond even my imagination.

Fiona: You only have 24 hours to live how would you spend that time?

 Knowing me I would probably find myself catching up with stuff that should have been done before but has been put to one side.  Silly mundane things, like putting up a shelf that I’ve been promising to attend to for ages or doing the washing-up.

Fiona: What do you want written on your head stone?

 “I told you I didn’t feel well.”

Fiona: Do you have a blog or website readers can visit for updates, events and special offers?

 Yes it’s at www.phil-andrews.co.uk.  Forever a work in progress.

Paperback – http://goo.gl/PViH7h

Ebook – http://goo.gl/kcptpX

Author page (UK) – http://goo.gl/KWU27r

Author page (US) – http://goo.gl/QRsai3

Web page – http://www.phil-andrews.co.uk

Facebook – http://www.facebook.com/thebestyearofourlives

Here is my interview with R.L. Seago

Hello and welcome to my blog, Author Interviews. My name is Fiona Mcvie.

 

Let’s get you introduced to everyone, shall we? Tell us your name. What is your age?

R.L. Seago, age old enough to know better, too old to care…lol

Fiona: Where are you from?

 Northern California

Fiona: A little about yourself (ie, your education, family life, etc.).

I have been married to my best friend and muse Anna for almost 29 years. We have 2 fur babies, Bella and Sophie.  We have a daughter Angel, two grandsons and one great granddaughter Ella Rose. I am retired/disabled after 40 years in healthcare, and am a former Navy Hospital Corpsman having served from 1980-1985.

 Fiona: Tell us your latest news.

I just released 2 new novels in November 2018, The Wages of Sin and There Are None So Blind.

Fiona: When and why did you begin writing?

My freshman year I elected a journalism class for an “easy A’ and was hooked on writing

Fiona: When did you first consider yourself a writer?

When my first novella came out, The Chains That Bind, I finally realized that hey, I’m a writer

Fiona: What inspired you to write your first book?

My time in the military gave me so much background, plus working in healthcare for almost 40 years. Talk about opening Pandora’s Box.

Fiona: How did you come up with the title?

I think each of my novels have decided their own titles

Fiona: Do you have a specific writing style? Is there anything about your style or genre that you find particularly challenging?

I believe in letting the characters dictate the story, the events, and ultimately the ending. I am simply there to put it in the proper format.

Fiona: How much of the book is realistic and are experiences based on someone you know, or events in your own life?

The events not so much, but I do think that society as a a whole gives you everything you could need or want to write a novel

Fiona: To craft your works, do you have to travel? Before or during the process?

Not much, except my extensive travels around the world open up a whole new areas to explore.

Fiona: Who designed the covers?

A young lady in England has done all of my covers. I met her through a mutual contact, and loved her design  ideas. Her name is Lindsay Anne Kendall, and I highly recommend her work.

 Fiona: Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?

Depends on the book. For Chains, it would be, “be careful who or what you do or hurt, because there are no time restraints on revenge. As for my others, I think the message is in the story itself. Loyalty, love, betrayal, all which give us things to think about

Fiona: Are there any new authors that have grasped your interest?  Who is your favorite writer, and what is it about their work that really strikes you?

As for new writers, none come quickly to mind, although the amount of exceptional talent out there is almost scary. As for my favorites I would say John Steinbeck ( I adore Of Mice and Men) James Patterson, Stephen King and of course Dean Koontz.

Fiona: Outside of family members, name one entity that supported your commitment to become a published author.

The first person to buy a copy of the original The Chains That Bind came up to me several weeks later and said she loved the story, but was pissed off ( her words, not mine) that there was no room for a sequel, which I had never even considered. That night my wife and I sat down, came up with the idea of a prequel and went straight to work.

Fiona: Do you see writing as a career?

Maybe a second career. Being retired I have lots of time on my hands, so yes, I guess I am embarked on my second career.

Fiona: If you had to do it all over again, would you change anything in your latest book?

Maybe add a dog to the story. I have dogs prominently features in every book, but this one it just didn’t seem to fit

Fiona: Did you learn anything during the writing of your recent book?

I learned how dark, depraved and truly scary a writers mind can be.

 Fiona: If your book was made into a film, who would you like to play the lead?

Depends on the book. For Voices the character of Samuel (antagonist) I would love to see Jeffrey dean Morgan. In None So Blind, for Cassidy I would love Jessica Alba or Jessica Biel

Fiona: Any advice for other writers?

Write, write, rewrite and write some more. Your work will never be perfect enough for you, as we are our own worst critics, but you will know when you get to that place of happiness with your work. Ignore the nasty, negative reviews…even a bad review has benefit. It is not personal

Fiona: Anything specific you want to tell your readers?

Thank you for reading my works…for someone to take their time and money and invest in my story is the greatest compliment I can get

 Fiona: What book are you reading now?

John Steinbeck’s East of Eden

 Fiona: Do you remember the first book you read?

Rascal by Sterling North

Fiona: What makes you laugh/cry?

Cruelty to animals and children makes my blood boil and can even evoke tears, the bad kind. Our great grandaughter Ella can make me laugh even at the worst of times

Fiona: Is there one person, past or present, you would love to meet? Why?

Martin Luther King. I would love to hear his voice and listen to him as he strives to make us all better humans

Fiona: Do you have any hobbies?

Movies, concerts, the occasional trip to Reno or Lake Tahoe

Fiona: What TV shows/films do you enjoy watching?

Comedies, thriller and a good suspenseful horror movie

Fiona: Favorite foods, colors,  music?

Chinese food, hot chicken wings, pizza. Red and blue. I love old country, even into the early 80-90’s, old 70’ rock and roll, and even some soft rock when I am writing

Fiona: Imagine a future where you no longer write. What would you do?

Read more, work in my shop, maybe travel more

Fiona: You only have 24 hours to live how would you spend that time?

With my wife, daughter and friends talking and laughing about old times

Fiona: What do you want written on your head stone?

Loyal husband, father, grand and great grandfather and TRUE AMERICAN PATRIOT

Fiona: Do you have a blog or website readers can visit for updates, events and

special offers?

WWW.RLSEAGO.WEBS.COM,

https://www.amazon.com/R.L.-Seago/e/B00IHNDMPM/ref=dp_byline_cont_ebooks_1

WWW.FACEBOOK.COM/RLSEAGO, OR I EVEN INVITE PEOPLE TO MY personal email caseago@aol.com

Here is my interview with Lily Lamb

Hello and welcome to my blog, Author Interviews. My name is Fiona Mcvie.

 

Let’s get you introduced to everyone, shall we? Tell us your name. What is your age?

Lily Lamb…Let’s just say I am a mature lady 😉

Fiona: Where are you from?

I am from Turkey and I live in Australia

Fiona: A little about yourself (ie,  your education, family life, etc.).

In day time I work as a community nurse. I’m happily married to a wonderful man. We have 3 adult children and a furry son, Sir JJ Basil-Pee-a-Lot (A Maltese X)

Fiona: Tell us your latest news.

I just uploaded a very short horror story, Terror Before Christmas, on Amazon.

Fiona: When and why did you begin writing?

I used to review stories and beta read for a few wonderful authors. Writing seemed a natural progression to those activities.

Fiona: When did you first consider yourself a writer?

When I uploaded my first story in 2014

Fiona: What inspired you to write your first book?

Social issues…I wanted an alternative to sad events that I read on the News or heard from others. Wouldn’t it be great if we all had our happily ever after end?

Fiona: How did you come up with the title?

It was easy because my protagonist was a socially awkward guy

Fiona: Do you have a specific writing style? Is there anything about your style or genre that you find particularly challenging?

I think my style is a little formal. I am very comfortable in my style because that writing style comes easy to me.

Fiona: How much of the book is realistic and are experiences based on someone you know, or events in your own life?

I am inspired by news and social events so there is a significant element in the stories that readers can see where I come from…some parts are from personal experiences but mostly pure imagination.

Fiona: To craft your works, do you have to travel? Before or during the process?

No. I just travel to cafes to write. I love writing in cafes I get to enjoy beautiful coffee as I write.

Fiona: Who designed the covers?

Different people from paid professional cover artists to friends with incredible talents and lately my husband.

Fiona: Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?

Yes. Good over evil.

Fiona: Are there any new authors that have grasped your interest?  Who is your favorite writer, and what is it about their work that really strikes you?

There are so many wonderful authors, it is really hard to choose one, but J.R Ward and Stephen King will always stand out for me.

Fiona: Outside of family members, name one entity that supported your commitment to become a published author.

Amazon Kindle Publishing.

Fiona: Do you see writing as a career?

Yes. It is my dream to be a full-time writer.

Fiona: If you had to do it all over again, would you change anything in your latest book?

Maybe add more horror scenes? 😉

Fiona: Did you learn anything during the writing of your recent book?

Yes, I must never assume that I know a lot  I must keep on learning and studying.

Fiona: If your book was made into a film, who would you like to play the lead?

Cameron Boyce would be great playing Phil Spiers

Fiona: Any advice for other writers?

Keep writing.

Fiona: Anything specific you want to tell your readers?

I am a multi-genre author. I tend to write a little dark Fantasy Romance and supernatural horror. Each story touches social issues but the end is always happy, wishing that is how life wold be.

Fiona: What book are you reading now?

A fiction about an Amish girl…it is a romance

Fiona: Do you remember the first book you read?

It was Rapunzel.

Fiona: What makes you laugh/cry?

I get easily tearful and giggly. Animal and child cruelty is unbearably distressing to me. I laugh at kids and animal’s silly acts

 Fiona: Is there one person, past or present, you would love to meet? Why?

I wish I had the pleasure to meet with Abraham Maslow. He was a very forward thinking man. I think his heart was bigger than Australia. I love his work/books. I also would love to meet with Dalai Lama.

Fiona: Do you have any hobbies?

I adore sewing, creating the type of clothes that I cannot find or can afford. I have a very quirky sense of dressing and sewing made my dreams come true.

Fiona: What TV shows/films do you enjoy watching?

Modern Family. The Good Doctor. The Sixth Sense. Annabelle. The Nun.

Fiona: Favorite foods, colors,  music?

I’ll eat anything vegetarian. I do love sprinkling chilli over anything savoury. I love all the primary colours (but lime green is my weakness..I’ll pick anything in lime green). I adore Vivaldi and Bach.

 Fiona: Imagine a future where you no longer write. What would you do?

I’d keep on sewing and looking for other meaningful activities.

Fiona: You only have 24 hours to live how would you spend that time?

I’d cuddle my husband and invite my kids. I’d be in my back garden watching my olive tree and the birds.

Fiona: What do you want written on your head stone?

“She did her best to live meaningfully and be kind.”…something like this

Fiona: Do you have a blog or website readers can visit for updates, events and special offers?

https://lilylambwriter.wordpress.com/ and

https://www.facebook.com/LilyLambwriter/

https://www.amazon.com/Lily-Lamb/e/B00VCQC47I/ref=dp_byline_cont_ebooks_2

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B07LDHQJ54/?fbclid=IwAR3lmO4C4ieACyaVh_we-aBqDPW7Id3jAgSNMNrBBqIU4mUZsg_SSpKpfa8