Here is my interview with Abdur Rehman Qadeer Chughtai

Name Abdur Rehman Qadeer Chughtai

Age 21

Where are you from Sialkot, Pakistan.

A little about your self `ie your education Family life etc :

I have graduated in commerce. I am a Muslim.  

Fiona: Tell us your latest news?

One of poems just got published in Nanotext anthology by Medusa’s Laugh Press. It’s titled “Bloody Feet”

Fiona: When and why did you begin writing?

I always saw the darkness overwhelming the world. I wanted to raise a voice but for a very long time, I could not. Then one day, I knew that there was a drone missile attack by Western forces in Wazirastan, and 18 kids died in that attack. And about that, I wrote my first poem. After that, I like to write about darkness and sometimes when “Nature” fascinates me into writing something. The thing I love most to write about is Nature.


Fiona: When did you first consider yourself a writer?

I think… When my poem ‘Song of Stable Boy’ got published by Quailbell Magazine.


Fiona: What inspired you to write your first book?

Well, I have none book written yet. But beauty of the Nature inspires me most.


Fiona: Do you have a specific writing style?

No, I don’t think so.


Fiona: What books have most influenced your life most? a mentor?

Al-Qur’aan… Especially the verse 27 of 3rd Surah.

“You cause the night to enter the day, and You cause the day to enter the night; and You bring the living out of the dead, and You bring the dead out of the living. And You give provision to whom You will without account.”

 

Fiona: Are there any new authors that have grasped your interest and who  is your favorite author and what is it that really strikes you about their work?

Allama Muhammad Iqbal, Hasrat Mohani, Robert Frost, John Keats, William Blake, William Wordsworth.


Fiona: Name one entity that you feel supported you outside of family members.

My Teachers, especially Sir Nusrat Ali.


Fiona: Do you see writing as a career?

Obviously… May be…


Fiona: Do you recall how your interest in writing originated?

I think the love for nature.

Fiona: Can you share a little of your current work with us?

Yes sure, this is my most recent published poem:

“You walked carelessly,

On the crumbs of hearts,

Now why so worried?

If you see,

Red footprints behind,

And the blood in your feet?”


Fiona: Is there anything you find particularly challenging in your writing?

Well… Writing about personal emotions I guess.

Fiona: If any of your books was made into a film who would you like to play the lead?

May be. By the way it seems impossible.


Fiona: Do you have any advice for other writers?

Write from heart. There is a lot more inspiration than books in the forest, deserts, seas, shores… The things around you. And perhaps in yourself.


Fiona: Do you have anything specific that you want to say to your readers?

Focus on the feeling.

 

Fiona: What book are you reading now?

Currently I am reading Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen.

 

Fiona: Do you remember the first book you read?

The Old Man and The Sea.

Fiona: Other than writing do you have any hobbies ?

Hiking

Fiona: What TV shows/films do you enjoy watching?

The Vampire Diaries, The Originals, Game of Thrones, The Musketeers, all Pakistani movies and all the Vampire movies.

Fiona: Favorite foods / Colors/ Music

Biryani is favorite food, and all music by Sami Yusuf and Zayn.

Fiona: If you were not a writer what else would you like to have done?

 I do a lot of things beside writing, and so would be in that situation.

Fiona: Do you have a blog/website? If so what is it?

http://ar-qadeer.blogspot.co.uk/

 

Here is my interview with Rob Kitchin

Name Rob Kitchin

Age 46

Where are you from Near Liverpool, but have lived in Ireland for 20 years

A little about your self `ie your education Family life etc I presently work as a professor of Geography, which keeps me pretty busy. At home, I mostly read and play with our three dogs. 

Fiona: Tell us your latest news?

I don’t have any fiction related news to be honest.  The last book was out three years ago.  My latest work has got stuck in the finding a publisher merry-go-round. In terms of non-fiction, the latest edited book was published last month and another will be published later in the year, and I’ve a steady stream of articles being published. I’ve spent most of the last few years concentrating on non-fiction writing.


Fiona: When and why did you begin writing?

I read quite a lot when I was a teenager and always had a desire to write. I wrote my first novels in my early 20s, but none were published.  I had my first non-fiction piece published in 1993 and have published fairly consistently since then.  So far, I’m just over the 30 books mark, plus a large encyclopedia, 200 or so articles/book chapters, a couple of thousand blog posts, and editing over 130 volumes of academic journals.


Fiona: When did you first consider yourself a writer?

In terms of academic stuff, early 1990s.  In terms of fiction, I still don’t really think of myself as a fiction writer; more a hobbyist.  I think the difference is probably success.  I’m well established as a non-fiction writer and have won a few prizes, etc., but I’m still finding my way with fiction.


Fiona: What inspired you to write your first book?

It was just something that I always wanted to do.


Fiona: Do you have a specific writing style?

No, not really.  I’ve written for a number of formats and audiences – academic, newspapers, blogs, TV documentary, fiction, etc.  I’m used to shifting registers and styles depending on what’s required.


Fiona: How did you come up with the title?

For Stumped – it was suggested by a friend.  The book was originally titled ‘Saving Siobhan’ but the publisher thought that non-Irish audiences might struggle with ‘Siobhan’.  Stumped works on a number of levels – the lead characters quickly get stumped in their deductions, the novel is set during an election when one of the characters is working the stump, and the lead character is a double amputee.  It also chimed well with the previous book that was titled ‘Stiffed’.


Fiona: Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?

No, not really.  The story is a comic crime caper and is meant to be a bit of fun.


Fiona: How much of the book is realistic?

In parts it’s reasonably realistic, but some of it stretches the imagination a little.


Fiona: Are experiences based on someone you know, or events in your own life?

No, it’s entirely made-up.


Fiona: What books have most influenced your life most? a mentor?

I read pretty widely.  Generally, I read a couple of novels a week, plus a lot of non-fiction.  I’m not drawn to any one book or writer.


Fiona: What book are you reading now?

Adrian McKinty, ‘Police at the Station and They Don’t Look Friendly’


Fiona: Are there any new authors that have grasped your interest?

Loads – I review a couple of books a week on my blog – The View from the Blue House.  New authors to me I’ve liked recently include Caimh McDonnell, Jock Serong, John Hart, and Harry Bingham.


Fiona: What are your current projects?

 

At some point during the year I’ll have a go at re-editing my latest work-in-progress.  Otherwise, it’s non-fiction writing related to large funded projects concerning the relationship between digital technologies and cities.


Fiona: Do you see writing as a career?

It kind of is on the non-fiction side.  My work involves a lot of writing, I make a bit of money from it, and do a lot of related travel (I get 80+ invites a year to give talks).


Fiona: If you had to do it all over again, would you change anything in your latest book?

In terms of the one I’ve been working on recently, not really, other than how readers react to it.  They generally think it’s a book aimed at 10 year old kids, whereas I think the target audience is adults!


Fiona: Do you have to travel much concerning your book(s)?

No, not really.  They are mostly based in Ireland.


Fiona: Who designed the covers?

The publisher looked after that, except for a couple of short story collections, which were done by JT Lindroos


Fiona: Do you have any advice for other writers?

A book doesn’t write itself; the only way it gets written is to sit and write it.  And write the book that you’d like to read, rather than trying to second guess agents, editors and publishers.

Fiona: Do you have a blog/website? If so what is it?

My fiction blog is The View from the Blue House (https://theviewfromthebluehouse.blogspot.ie /).  Generally, I review crime fiction novels and post short stories.  I have a bunch of other websites but they are all day-job related.  My Twitter handle is @robkitchin

 

http://www.kitchin.org/

 

Amazon Authors Page UK

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Rob-Kitchin/e/B001IR1IE6/ref=sr_tc_2_0?qid=1490639730&sr=1-2-ent

Here is my interview with Wren Michaels

Name – Wren Michaels

Age – 42

Where are you from – Born in Wisconsin, but currently living in Houston, Texas

A little about your self `ie your education Family life etc  

Wren hails from the frozen tundra of Wisconsin where beer and cheese are their own food groups. But a cowboy swept her off her feet and carried her below the Mason-Dixon line to Texas, where she promptly lost all tolerance for cold and snow. Together they have one amazing princess who rules their world. Fueled by coffee, dreams, and men in kilts, Wren promises to bring you laughter, sexy fun time, and action that keeps you on the edge of your seat. The easiest way to her heart is anything to do with the Green Bay Packers, Doctor Who, or Joss Whedon.

 

 

Fiona: Tell us your latest news?

I have several news tidbits.  First is I released my first contemporary romance called FRIEND ZONED. It’s about two college students using each other for sociology papers, but end up falling in love and have to cross some tough cultural divides to be together, as one of them’s stuck to be wed in an arranged marriage.

The second is my new release KISSES FROM THE KREMLIN, which is book 2 in my BREAKING THE SEAL series. It’s a novella written in Susan Stoker’s Special Forces: Operation Alpha kindle world, and it is the follow up to THE FOX AND THE HOUND which released in November.

 

 
Fiona: When and why did you begin writing?

I started around 2008 or so. I was going through a tough time in my personal life and it was a creative and therapeutic outlet for me. I just never stopped and have a very supportive husband who has been a champion of my writing since the very beginning.

 

 
Fiona: When did you first consider yourself a writer?

Probably when my first book got published, UNBEARABLE. Up until then, it was still a pipedream, never really thought anything would come of it. But Evernight Publishing took a chance on me, and I’ve never looked back.

 

 
Fiona: What inspired you to write your first book?

Honestly, it was the Twilight books. Some may not like them, but I was never a big reader until a friend convinced me to try reading them. And I fell in love with the world and didn’t want it to end. So I decided to write my own world where I didn’t have to leave the characters I created.

 

 
Fiona: Do you have a specific writing style?

Yes. I love writing strong heroines. I don’t write damsels in distress. I write damsels that cause distress. I also try to put humor into every book. I like to runt he gamut of emotions from laughter to tender moments, to hair raising suspense and action. I want to give all the feels.

 

 
Fiona: How did you come up with the title?

Some titles pop up immediately as the idea for a book takes shape. Others, like with my book VEXED, it doesn’t come until the book is done and I see the full story take shape. I’m a pantser, so sometimes I don’t know exactly how a book will turn out. I write from the hip, and let the characters take me where they want to go as they tell me their story.

 

 
Fiona: Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?

Each book is different. But in all my books so far, love conquers all. Some characters are more stubborn to see  it, but in the end, what they think will destroy them ends up saving them.

 

 
Fiona: How much of the book is realistic and are experiences based on someone you know, or events in your own life?

Each one is different, especially writing paranormal. LOL It’s more like, I wish I could have these kinds of abilities. And if I did, this is what would probably happen. For my contemporaries, a little of me is in each heroine. Things they say and do, mostly the humor, is a lot of me.

 

 
Fiona: What books have most influenced your life most? a mentor?

Well, Twilight for sure, since it’s what started me writing. But also Diana Gabaldon and Charlaine Harris. I love both of their work, such completely different styles, but wonderful storytelling. I wanted to be able to tell sweeping stories that give you all the feels.

 

 

Fiona: Are there any new authors that have grasped your interest and who  is your favorite author and what is it that really strikes you about their work?

LeTeisha Newton is an amazing author. She writes darker romance, but it punches you in the feels. Anne Conley is awesome. She has great voice and her characters are so easy to root for. Great sense of humor as well, she sucks you right in.

 

 
Fiona: Name one entity that you feel supported you outside of family members.

My agent, Margaret Bail. She’s been my champion and constant supporter when I feel like throwing in the towel.

 

 


Fiona: Do you see writing as a career?

Currently it is my career. My husband has been a huge supporter of my writing and has allowed me to take the necessary steps to make it my career and focus. I’m very blessed.

 

 
Fiona: If you had to do it all over again, would you change anything in your latest book?

There’s ALWAYS something you wish you could change in a book after it gets published. But as an author, you read over your work so many times that your brain starts filling in blanks, starts skipping parts as you read because it knows the story backwards and forwards. We know how the characters talk and what they mean when they say something, but sometimes that doesn’t always translate to the page as well as we think. Time and distance are powerful editing tools. So of course after it’s published and out of your mind for a time, do we go back and have those moments where we wish we would have done it differently or tweaked a bit here or there.

 

 

 

Fiona: Can you share a little of your current work with us?

Sure this is from the first chapter of FRIEND ZONED.

Beer dribbled down my chin as a breath hitched in my throat mid-drink. A line of suds trailed from my neck into the vast crevice of my breasts, never to be seen again. I muffled a cough as my eyes followed God’s gift to lady bits toward the bar. Sleeves rolled to the elbows, his white button-down shirt contrasted his olive skin. From the mess of tousled dark-brown hair, I figured he’d probably come to quench his thirst after a nooner. Lucky bitch.

The Longhorn game ruined my view, as a sea of students swarmed a giant flat-screen on the wall and swallowed his body. Normally, I’d be up there cheering right along with them, but Angie hated football. So like a good BFF, I hung at the booth with her.

“It’s so loud in here I can’t hear myself think. You’re lucky.” Angie quirked a brow and handed me a napkin. “You okay, Cat?”

Yup, lucky me. I gave her a nod. “Fine.”

I let my gaze fall away from reading her lips down to my hand patting its way into my bra as discreetly as possible.

“Uh huh. Which one is he?” she asked, not trying very hard to hide her sly grin.

As my roommate for the last several years, it was hard to hide anything from her. I leaned in. “The one in the white oxford.”

She jerked back. “The Bollywood model?”

“Shh,” I hissed through clenched teeth, shooting her a wide-eyed glare.

“Oh yeah, he’s yum. Seen him a few times on campus. No idea what his name is though. You want me to find out?” She inched her way to the edge of the booth.

“No!” I clasped a hand on her arm. “Chill, Ang.”

Dipping her chin, she locked eyes with me. “Chicken-shit.”

I gave her my finest death stare. “I’ve got a plan. I can kill two birds with one stone.”

“I like plans. Are we gonna tag team? From the looks of those muscles, he could probably bench press both of us.”

I inched my way across the table, closing the distance between us. “Back off, sister. I saw him first.”

“You’re lucky I love you like a sister.” She sat back in the booth. “Lay your plan on me.”

“I think I just found the first target for my sociology term paper.” I glanced over my shoulder to the bar. Mr. Bollywood fist pumped a Longhorn tackle and took a chug of dark beer.

“Okay, deets.” She sipped her white wine and bounced a leg under the table.

I spun back around and sifted through the noise around me for discernible words. “Huh?”

“Details. Spill it.” Angie set her glass back down, flagging the waitress for another.

“Oh, I’m dissecting the laws of attraction. In today’s social media age full of chatrooms, dating sites, and selfies, I thought it would be interesting to compare the old-fashioned way of meeting a guy in person versus getting to know someone online.”

“Interesting, go on,” Angie said.

“I’ll pick two targets. One guy I’m going to throw myself at in person, really working up the tangible side of things from simple physical attraction to touch and feel. The other I’m going to approach online, using words, wit, and charm.” I slipped a notepad from my book bag and jotted down some notes before I forgot anything. “I’ll see which one tries to get me in bed first.”

“Smooth. Get laid and a term paper done. Well played, Catherine Marek. Well played.” Her blue eyes twinkled in the beam of sunlight filtering between the slats of the blinds. “I totally should’ve come up with that one myself.”

“I’m not doing it to get laid.” I shook my head. “I’m trying to prove a point. If you flash tits, they’ll drop ‘trou’. I don’t expect it to last more than a couple of hours before I’m calling a cab.” I sat back and folded my arms. “Online, you get to know a person. Inside-out first.”

She arched a brow. “Mm-hmm, well, just make sure the objects of your mission aren’t in Sociology with you.”

“Well, Mr. Bollywood over there isn’t. I sure as hell would’ve noticed him. We’ve been in class for a month, and I’ve never seen him.” I took a swig of my beer, managing to keep it in my mouth this time.

Angie picked at her damp napkin as she glanced around the dimly lit bar. “So, he’s gonna be your in-person target?”

I traced the outline of a condensation droplet streaking my pint glass. “So far, he’s looking like a good pick. He’s brawny, into sports, and likes beer. Almost stereotypical college guy. I’m thinking he’ll probably respond if I target him with outright flirting. Can’t set myself up for failure, ya know?” Switching into stealth mode, I did my best to toss a side glance in his direction. He caught me as he turned from the bar and made his way to a nearby table, sitting across from a sandy-blond guy that may have been in my Economics class.

Rich, espresso-colored eyes locked onto mine for a brief second and a flutter ransacked my heart, sending it dive-bombing straight to my stomach. He glanced away as quick as I did.

“I think he just looked at you,” Angie said.

I stared into the amber liquid in front of me, studying the tiny carbonated bubbles zipping to the top. With each breath I sucked into my lungs, my heart hammered a little faster.

 

 
Fiona: Is there anything you find particularly challenging in your writing?

There’s always a challenge to find the right balance of how deep to take the characters, what kinds of tough topics can be introduced and not turn off a reader, what will keep readers connected to my characters, etc. Each book has it’s own set of challenges based on subject matter, what’s going on in today’s world, and just connecting to the audience.

 

 
Fiona: Do you have to travel much concerning your book(s)?

Some. I do a lot of local book signings, but this year I’m doing one in Wisconsin October. But I’ve been to New Orleans and Vegas for signings. It’s been exciting.

 

 
Fiona: Who designed the covers?

For my books with Evernight Publishing, Jay Aheer is my outstanding cover artist. For my book FRIEND ZONED and my Kindle World books, my cover artist is LeTeisha Newton with Boundless Tales Designs. She’s amazeballs.

 

 
Fiona: What was the hardest part of writing your book?

Just pushing through the self-doubt that all writers face. We go through a roller coaster with each book we write, where the idea takes hold and we’re all gung-ho to write this fabulous new story. But words get harder as the story progresses and what was once beautiful, we feel turns to crap mid-way and it’s a battle to continue on even when we’re at our lowest.

 

 
Fiona: Did you learn anything from writing your book and what was it?

I always learn something when writing a new book because I do a lot of research on subjects I’m not familiar with. For my Kindle World books I had to do a lot of research on the military and Navy SEALs and the CIA. With FRIEND ZONED, I had to do a lot of cultural research for Jai’s character to make sure I represented the Indian cultural correctly, and captured who he was as a person stuck between two worlds. And the fact that my heroine, Cat is deaf, I also had to do a lot of research on that and had a friend who is hearing impaired help me with that part.

 

 

Fiona: If any of your books was made into a film who would you like to play the lead.

LOL Depends on the book again, because I use Pinterest to storyboard each of my books. So I cast them with people before I ever write. With FRIEND ZONED, Cat I see as Jenna Coleman and Jaidev as Ruslaan Mumtaz. With my FOX AND HOUND series, Jayla is Ksenia Solo and Noah is Steven R. McQueen.

 

 
Fiona: Do you have any advice for other writers?

Never give up. Perseverance is the key. Also, find critique partners. Beta readers are great, but you need Crit Partners, other authors who will read your work and shred it to make it better. Every writer has a strong point, find one who will help you with your weak points.

 

 
Fiona: Do you have anything specific that you want to say to your readers?

THANK YOU! I cannot say thank you enough to everyone who has taken a chance on my books, who has read my words and left such lovely messages for me in reviews. You are the reason I keep writing.

 

 

Fiona: What book are you reading now?

I just finished a couple of books by Skye Warren. I recently did a book signing with her and realized I’d never read her! She’s amazing. I just read Rough and Hard. Great books!

 

 

Fiona: Do you remember the first book you read?

I can’t remember as a child which book I read first, but as an adult, it was probably Outlander by Diana Gabaldon.

 

 

Fiona: What makes you laugh/cry?

I laugh a lot. I love people with dry wit. And I’m a very empathic person, so I cry at a lot of things, too. I can be in a room with people and it’s like I tap their emotions. So I cry at Kleenex commercials. It just depends on the day. LOL

 

 

Fiona: Is there one person pass or present you would meet and why?

That’s tough, because there’s lots of people I wish I could have met or meet today. I don’t know if I can narrow it down. From the past it would be anyone from Jesus to Princess Diana. Present, Ellen to Aaron Rodgers to Michelle Obama. LOL It just depends on the day.

 

 

Fiona: What do you want written on your head stone and why ?

She made the world laugh. Because I want to leave this world putting a smile on someone’s face.

 

 

Fiona: Other than writing do you have any hobbies ?

My family is active in the Renaissance Faire scene. We love camping and going to festivals.

 

 

Fiona: What TV shows/films do you enjoy watching?

I don’t watch a lot of TV. I’m always writing. But once in a while I binge watch shows like Vampire Diaries and Lost Girl.

 

 

Fiona: Favorite foods / Colors/ Music

Patty Melts/Blue/Depends on my mood. I love a lot of music and have a very eclectic taste, everything from Katy Perry to Within Temptation to Lady Antebellum.

 

 

Fiona: If you were not a writer what else would you like to have done?

I always wanted to be a marine biologist growing up. I love dolphins.

 

 

Fiona: Do you have a blog/website? If so what is it?

http://wrenmichaels.com/

https://twitter.com/AuthorWren

https://www.facebook.com/authorwrenmichaels

https://www.amazon.com/Wren-Michaels/e/B00TJFP5QG/

 

Here is my interview with Lissa Pelzer

Name Lissa Pelzer

Age  A lady never tells

Where are you from

The UK originally, but I’ve lived in the US, France, Japan and Denmark. I’m currently living in Germany

 

 
Fiona: When and why did you begin writing?

I first thought seriously about a career in writing during university. I was mesmerized by Patricia Highsmith novels and idolized her work and her lifestyle.

 

 
Fiona: When did you first consider yourself a writer?

I go in and out of phases of considering myself a writer. Once I had a job as a content writer, churning out 3000 words a day for a salary, then I felt like a writer!

 

 
Fiona: What inspired you to write your first book?

Patricia Highsmith’s Talented Mr Ripley. I desperately wanted to create a character than aspirational.

 

 
Fiona: Do you have a specific writing style?

I try for an economic, plot driven style, but know that sometimes readers like a little waffle too.

 

 
Fiona: How did you come up with the title?

My first book in the Carol Ann Baker series is called No More Birthdays. This title was designed as a hint towards the twist in the story. The detective trying to help Carol Ann after she’s killed a man in self-defense wrongly thinks she is a minor who will be eligible for leniency. It’s also meant to suggest danger, once someone dies, they don’t have any more birthdays.

 

 
Fiona: If you had to do it all over again, would you change anything in your latest book?

No. Because you can do that forever. You have to know when to stop.

 

 

Fiona: Can you share a little of your current work with us?

I’m currently working on a synopsis for a Virago competition. The brief is “suspenseful and original”, but otherwise it’s up to you. It’s hard to always be original. Too original and no publisher will go near it. A publisher’s dream book is always a little like another book which came before.

 

 
Fiona: Is there anything you find particularly challenging in your writing?

Editing after the first draft and remembering what has changed is a challenge. Sometimes, you read the first draft through and realize some tiny thing you wrote on page 52 doesn’t connect to something you wrote on page 99, so you change it. But then after the change, you remember there was something relevant on page 5, that now you’ve made the change, needs to be changed too. And on and on it goes a thousand times. I find that maddening.

 

 

Fiona: Do you remember the first book you read?

Princess and the Pea! I remember using it as a gauge to see how much I could read.  Once I could read the whole book alone, I was very proud of myself.

 

 

Fiona: Do you have a blog/website? If so what is it?

www.lissapelzer.com

 

Here is my interview with Rob Osborne

Name:  Rob Osborne

Age: 47 in June, 2017

Where are you from?

I live in Walderslade, a village outside Chatham in Kent.  I have been married for 23 years and have two sons of 18 and 15. I was born in Chelmsford, Essex and at the age of 6 months the family moved to Loose in Kent.  I attended the local schools and attained 5 O’levels and many CSE’s. From school I went into Further Education and studied Business and Finance and attained the BTEC Diploma. Whilst studying I had a Saturday job in Woolworths which is where I met my wife.  My first full time job was at Nationwide Building Society as a cashier and I worked my way up to Mortgage Advisor but couldn’t seem to advance any further (I found out later that the manager didn’t want to lose me although he encouraged me to apply for other jobs within the company. He actually quashed a promotion by telling a fellow manager I wasn’t ready.  When I told him I was leaving he offered me a £1000 pay rise) so after 6 years I moved on to the Alliance & Leicester.  My career progressed rapidly during my time there and I became a Financial Advisor before getting the chance to manage a couple of branches. I found the Branch Management fairly stressful and asked to return to Financial Advising 18 months later.  I was starting to become disillusioned with the whole industry and target based income but didn’t know anything else so I decided to try moving to another bank to see if it would reignite my enthusiasm, and after 6 years I moved to Lloyds TSB.  Unfortunately, this destroyed my love for the Financial Sector, the people were lovely but I was working between 11-13 hours a day, making very little money and not seeing my children so I realised that I needed a change.  Thankfully my brother-in-law was able to get me a job maintaining escalators on the London Underground and I have been there ever since working permanent nights.

Fiona: Tell us your latest news?

My first novel, Anything is Possible, comes out on 28th June, 2017.  It is a contemporary romantic drama with a smidgen of comedy. I am ¾ of the way through a second book and am completing another outline for a 4th book (I already have a 3rd book outline). None of these are sequels so I have a fair body of work to be getting on with.

Fiona: When and why did you begin writing?

I began writing in 2001 as a result of a dream.  I woke up before a satisfactory conclusion and couldn’t get back into it.  I spent the following days wondering what would have been the outcome and how the situation came about.  I thought that I would try and write about it and the rest is history!

 

 

 

Fiona: When did you first consider yourself a writer?

At the moment I don’t! This is purely and simply because it is my first book and it’s not been released yet.  I find it very surreal.  I took my mum out for dinner on Saturday and she wanted to order a copy of the book so she went into her local Waterstones. I wouldn’t go in with her because I thought it would be weird.  Also the book has taken years to reach the publishing stage (I tried to get an agent years ago without success).  The book survived being temporarily being lost and after rejection I lost confidence and planned to write as a hobby when I’d retired and self publish.  That all changed when my good friend Cheryl Butler told me that her book was being published.  She gave me the confidence to try The Book Guild.

Fiona: What inspired you to write your first book?

As I mentioned earlier it was as a result of a dream and I wanted to know what happened to the story after I woke up.

Fiona: Do you have a specific writing style?

I don’t think so!  I try to concentrate with the characters emotions.

Fiona: How did you come up with the title?

I thought that it could have two outcomes with the addition of punctuation. It could be a statement or question that is why I picked it.

Fiona: Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?

If you work hard at things you may have obstacles along the way but keep going then it may happen.  If you don’t try then you will never know. Oh, and make sure you have the full facts before acting on something.  Well at least I hope that comes out in the book.


Fiona: How much of the book is realistic and are experiences based on someone you know, or events in your own life?

It varies.  The first book has a fair chunk of personal experience in it. The main character works in a bank and I had the same operation that he has to cure a congenital defect.  My mood at the time was reflected in the book. Stuck in a job neither of us wanted.

Fiona: What books have most influenced your life most? A mentor?

Nothing has really influenced my life.

 

Fiona: Are there any new authors that have grasped your interest and who is your favorite author and what is it that really strikes you about their work?

I haven’t really been on the look out for new authors except my friend Cheryl Butler. I have read a sample of her book and my blood pressure shot up.

Fiona: Name one entity that you feel supported you outside of family members

Friends Cheryl and David Butler, Neil Stevenson, Rob Childs and finally Alexia Lewis.  It was Alexia who was the first unrelated person who read it.  She also did the vast majority of the proof reading originally.  When she first replied to me I scanned letter instead of thoroughly ready and saw the words needs totally rewriting.  I thought that meant the story was no good.  Thankfully after a short time of sulking I read the letter fully and it was only a paragraph she was referring to, not the whole book.  Never scan letters, always fully read. If I hadn’t I may have quit!!!

Fiona: Do you see writing as a career?

That depends on how the book is received.  I will continue on regardless and as long as people and publishers like my work I’ll be happy.  In an ideal world I would love to write full time.

Fiona: If you had to do it all over again, would you change anything in your latest book?

No but that could change with peoples reviews.

Fiona: Do you recall how your interest in writing originated?

The dream

Fiona: Can you share a little of your current work with us?

At the moment the book is in the process of being edited so it wouldn’t be the finished article.  I do have an unedited chapter on my Facebook page.

Fiona: Is there anything you find particularly challenging in your writing?

Time, all day long! I stopped working in finance because I was neglecting my family and working night’s means I have to split time.  My wife is a great support and doesn’t nag me a great deal.  She is probably the only one who could put up with me.

Fiona: Do you have to travel much concerning your book(s)?

None at all so far!

Fiona: Who designed the covers?

The Production Team at The Book Guild designed them.

 

 

 

Fiona: What was the hardest part of writing your book?

Not skipping chapters and writing the end first.


Fiona: Did you learn anything from writing your book and what was it?

Yes a great deal! I learnt that I could have the discipline to finish the job and keep going back until I was happy with it.  Before my dream I’d never considered writing so to finish something that people liked (I gave my book to a select few before attempting to publish) fills me with immense pride.

Fiona: If any of your books were made into a film, who would you like to play the lead?

I haven’t really thought about it?  If it was an American film maybe Anna Kendrick for the female and Patrick. J. Adams for the male.  That was off the cuff without much thought. If it was a British film I really have no idea.

Fiona: Do you have any advice for other writers?

For new readers? If you have an idea go for it.  If you are passionate about something you will overcome the obstacles facing you and you will put your heart and soul into the project.

Fiona: Do you have anything specific that you want to say to your readers?

Please give my book a chance! So far no one has disliked it.

Fiona: What book are you reading now?

I am not reading anything at the moment but I shall be reading David P Perlmutter’s Wrong Place Wrong Time, Cheryl Butler’s A Proclivity to Purience, Jim Proctor’s Veronica Phoenix: Phoenix Series Book 1 and Niki Livingstone’s Eyes Wide Shut.

Fiona: Do you remember the first book you read?

Three Bill Goats Gruff is the first one I remember.

Fiona: What makes you laugh/cry?

Anything makes me laugh. American Comedy. As regards to crying rom coms and sad events.

Fiona: Is there one person past or present you would meet and why?

Kenny Dalglish was my idol growing up.  Daryl Hall…The list is endless

 

Fiona: What do you want written on your head stone and why?

Writer, father, husband all round good guy, sorely missed!  Not necessarily in that order.

Fiona: Other than writing do you have any hobbies?

I enjoy playing football and cricket.  I also love watching films and TV Shows (mainly American ones)

Fiona: What TV shows/films do you enjoy watching?

Suits, Scandal, Once Upon a Time, Grimm…The list is endless.  I have over 30 TV shows in my DVD collection.  As for films I like every genre. Star Wars, Matrix, Rocky, Serendipity, I Love Trouble, My Best Friends Girl, Paycheck.  I could go on all day…

Fiona: Favorite foods / Colors/ Music

Steak and Chips, Spag Bol, Roast dinners etc.  My favourite colour is Green, why? I don’t know! I absolutely love Hall & Oates but I like all kinds of music.

Fiona: If you were not a writer what else would you like to have done?

Movie, TV critic. I could watch them all day and be paid for it.

Fiona: Do you have a blog/website? If so, what is it?

I have a  Facebook Page https://www.facebook.com/robossieauthor and https://twitter.com/RobossieAuthor for Twitter

Amazon authors page UK https://www.amazon.co.uk/Rob-Osborne/e/B01N5XKZAP/ref=dp_byline_cont_book_1

 

Buying link

UK https://www.amazon.co.uk/Anything-Possible-Rob-Osborne/dp/1911320688/ref=la_B01N5XKZAP_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1490635936&sr=1-1

 USA https://www.amazon.com/Anything-Possible-Rob-Osborne/dp/1911320688/ref=asap_bc?ie=UTF8

 

Here is my interview with Maya Starling

Name: Maya Starling

Age: 33

Where are you from: Zagreb, Croatia

 

A little about yourself (ie. your education, family life, etc):

Maya: I was born and raised in Zagreb, Croatia. Even though I have an MBA in Business, I ended up in the publishing industry; writing books and creating covers. That’s where my true passion lies. Now, I am a published author, and a cover designer with Panoptic Books Services. Married, and with a toddler, life keeps me plenty busy.

 

Fiona: Tell us your latest news?

Maya: On March 21st I published my second fantasy novel, Book Two in Dragons Awaken Trilogy; Dragon’s Prize. Most recently, the team I’m part of with Panoptic Book Services, contracted with Kace Tripp Publishing, along with the independent services we offer.

 

Fiona: When and why did you begin writing?

Maya: I’m a late bloomer when it comes to reading, and then writing. It wasn’t something I wanted to do since I was a kid because my family was never big on reading, but the passion grew inside me, and my wife was the one that introduced me to the world of reading. Fast forward a decade later. I was fresh out of university, unable to get a job because of the recession. Depression set in and I just lost myself in reading, mostly on Wattpad, which soon turned to editing for one of the authors there. Then, prompted by that author, I started writing.

 

Fiona: When did you first consider yourself a writer?

Maya: About six years ago when I first wrote something with a beginning and an end, in my own setting, with my own characters.

 

Fiona: What inspired you to write your first book?

Maya: I felt bad for the dragons. Why do they almost always have to be the bad guys? Why does the prince have to win the maiden? I wanted to read about the what if, so I wrote it. And also, a little secret: the maiden gets to save herself in the sequel. I wanted to give the dragon a chance at love and the maiden a chance to save herself.

 

Fiona: Do you have a specific writing style?

Maya: I’m not sure. Not too simplistic, not too purple prose. I am still experimenting with styles on my short stories. But one this is sure, I’m a pantser.

 

Fiona: How did you come up with the title?

Maya: It has a double meaning, and it just kind of came to me right from the start.

 

Fiona: Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?

Maya: I didn’t think about a message when writing it, but I guess you could say the message would be not to judge people, to be brave, to take destiny into your own hands.

 

Fiona: How much of the book is realistic and are experiences based on someone you know, or events in your own life?

Maya: Since the book is a fantasy novel, there is little that is realistic. The setting was inspired by low magic fantasy worlds. Also, I think that some of the characters share some traits with some of my friends.

 

Fiona: What books have most influenced your life most? A mentor?

Maya: There hasn’t really been a book that has really impacted my life, but there are a few that influenced my writing, and that I love to read:

Sharing Knife Trilogy by L.M.Bujold

Moirin Trilogy by Jacqueling Carey

Shadows of the Apt series by Adrian Tchaikovsky

After the Golden Age and Discord’s Apple by Carrie Vaughn

Lud-in-the-Mist byHope Mirrless

Chronicles of Amber by Roger Zelazny

 

Fiona: Are there any new authors that have grasped your interest and who is your favorite author and what is it that really strikes you about their work?

Maya: I love discovering new talent! Especially among the indie authors like

Emerald Delmara, Kim Fry, Poppy Reid and most recently M.A.Ray (totally hooked).

 

Fiona: Name one entity that you feel supported you outside of family members.

Maya: There is not only one, but a group of fellow authors from PSG community and among them, my biggest cheerleaders have been Emerald Delmara and Kim Fry.

 

Fiona: Do you see writing as a career?

Maya: Yes! Would love to have that dream come true.

 

Fiona: If you had to do it all over again, would you change anything in your latest book?

Maya: Maybe just some more polishing, but other than that, it’s one of my book babies and I love it just the way it is, flaws and all. I don’t think a book could ever be perfect and able to satisfy the needs of every reader.

 

Fiona: Do you recall how your interest in writing originated?

Maya: It originated with writing fanfiction.

 

Fiona: Can you share a little of your current work with us?

Maya: I have two WIPs, the third book to my trilogy, Dragons’ Queen, and a dark fantasy novel Vengeance Upturned.

 

Fiona: Is there anything you find particularly challenging in your writing?

Maya: At the moment, it’s finding the time to write with an occasional bout of self-doubt.

 

Fiona: Do you have to travel much concerning your book(s)?

Maya: Not too far, only in my imagination.

 

Fiona: Who designed the covers?

Maya: I made the covers myself and now I make them for Panoptic Book Services as well.

 

 

Fiona: What was the hardest part of writing your book?

Maya: Editing! Editing is a part of the writing process and I find that to be the hardest part. And not editing as I write.

 

Fiona: Did you learn anything from writing your book and what was it?

Maya: I learned to take critique, and learned that I have to trust my instincts.

 

Fiona: If any of your books was made into a film who would you like to play the lead?

Maya: Aidan Turner, and someone younger but similar to Rose Byrne.

 

Fiona: Do you have any advice for other writers?

Maya: Just keep writing, no matter how bad you think it is. There will be good days, there will be bad days, but you will only get better the more words you put out. And read! Read your genre, learn from the masters, read with the intent of editing someone else’s work, because that is how you will learn what works and what doesn’t, but don’t be afraid to develop your own style.

 

Fiona: Do you have anything specific that you want to say to your readers?

Maya: Thank you for your loyalty and support. Thank you for believing me and giving the wind to my writing sail. And reviews please: 😉

 

Fiona: What book are you reading now?

Maya: I have a couple lined up in my reader: Scream for me by Kim Fry, Hard Luck by M.A. Ray and The Ocean at the End of the Lane by Neil Gaiman.

 

Fiona: Do you remember the first book you read?

Maya: The first book I remember reading and that I liked reading it was The Jupiter Project.

 

Fiona: What makes you laugh/cry?

Maya: Lately, my son. Toddlers are funny, and also exasperating, and when you combine it with lack of sleep … you get crying.

 

Fiona: Is there one person past or present you would meet and why?

Maya: There is actually quite a few people I would love to meet, mostly from the publishing or entertainment industry.

 

Fiona: What do you want written on your head stone and why?

Maya: Here slumbers Maya, the great dragon shaman now turned to stone.

P.S. she was awesome!

 

Fiona: Other than writing do you have any hobbies ?

Maya: At the moment, only reading.

 

Fiona: What TV shows/films do you enjoy watching?

Maya: Mostly geeky stuff. Fantasy and sci-fi.

 

Fiona: Favorite foods/colors/music:

Maya: I really don’t have favorites when it comes to foods and music. But I do prefer deep purple or blue, but I mostly wear black.

 

Fiona: If you were not a writer what else would you like to have done?

Maya: Drawing!

 

Fiona: Do you have a blog/website? If so what is it?

Maya: You can find me many places! If you like to read blogs, book reviews, free short stories and be up to date with new releases, follow me on www.mayastarling.com If you prefer the social media:

https://www.facebook.com/StarlingMaya/

https://twitter.com/MayaStarling

 

Links to my books can be found here:

https://books.pronoun.com/dragons-treasure/

https://books.pronoun.com/dragons-prize/

Amazon Authors Pages

https://www.amazon.com/Maya-Starling/e/B01N9DYXHU/ref=dp_byline_cont_ebooks_1

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Maya-Starling/e/B01N9DYXHU/ref=sr_tc_2_0?qid=1490555368&sr=1-2-ent

 

And, of course, you can check out the Panoptic Book Services site at https://www.panoptic-books.com/ as well.

Here is my interview with Heather L. Fleming

Name Heather L. Fleming

Age 36

Where are you from

I am from Reading, Pennsylvania, 2nd eldest of 7 children. I currently reside in the Southern Tier of New York with my two children and loving husband.

Fiona: Tell us your latest news?

Drama Child: Emotion in Rhyme is available on Amazon. It’s a collection of poetry written in my early childhood and teenage years.

Drama Child: Falling in Rhyme is set to release at the end of 2017 and is a collection of new poetry, and the 2nd in the Drama Child Series.

You Might Want to Read This, is set to release in the fall of 2017 and is a collection of short stories.

Check out my Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/DramaChildPoetry/ for all the latest details.


Fiona: When and why did you begin writing?

I was obsessed with Shel Silverstein’s poetry and writing. I loved the rhyme. Light in The Attic and Where the Sidewalk Ends are two of my favorite treasures and biggest inspirations. Then I found Stephen King’s books and movies and I fell in love with the written word. Writing helps me overcome emotions I find too hard to speak of. I heal in my writing. My writing shows the contrast and similarities between Silverstein and King. I’m a dark and twisted rhymer and writer.


Fiona: When did you first consider yourself a writer?

I was about twelve or thirteen when my school started publishing my poems and my classmates started making special requests. I became a professional writer that day and you’ll never convince me otherwise….


Fiona: What inspired you to write your first book?

The Drama Child in me…

 

Fiona: Do you have a specific writing style?

Poetry and Rhyme has always been my first love!


Fiona: How did you come up with the title?

My title Drama Child describe my poetry. I consider it the works of a Drama Child.


Fiona: Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?

Well, I’ve buried messages and hidden some in plain sight, finding the message that suits the reader is for them to decide, not I.


Fiona: How much of the book is realistic and are experiences based on someone you know, or events in your own life?

It’s a splash of me, and my memories painted in mysterious fiction.


Fiona: What books have most influenced your life? a mentor?

Shel Silverstein Light in the Attic, Where the Sidewalk Ends, Stephen King’s, On Writing, Misery, Carrie. Diary of Ann Franke, Where the Red Fern Grows, Heidi by Johanna Spyri. Poetry by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow.

Fiona: Are there any new authors that have grasped your interest and who is your favorite author and what is it that really strikes you about their work?

Shel Silverstein and Stephen King are probably my favorite Authors. I read and reread their work constantly. I think that shows in my style of writing too.

I’ve been enjoying some of Lang Leav’s poetry as well.


Fiona: Name one entity that you feel supported you outside of family members.

My co-workers

Fiona: Do you see writing as a career?

Always!


Fiona: If you had to do it all over again, would you change anything in your latest book?

Never!


Fiona: Do you recall how your interest in writing originated?

A teacher in my elementary school read Shel Silverstein poetry and stories to us every day. I’ve been inspired and fascinated with rhyme and writing ever since!

Fiona: Can you share a little of your current work with us?

Collection of Short Stories set to release in the fall of 2017

Title: You Might Want to Read This… By Heather L. Fleming

Excerpt from Lucky Ones

“I never think of myself as being poor, though people have said that to me. That poor was what the rest of the world described me as. I’ve heard grown people talk about child neglect, and abuse, but I don’t think I have that. I could see the differences in my life compared to my friends, but I just count them as one of the, lucky-ones. I wanted the nice things they had, I wanted the movies they went to see, I wanted the beautiful clothing and shoes they wore but most of all I wanted the hugs and kisses I seen them get from their parents. I really want my mom to look at me the way Jessy’s mom looks at her. Jessy goes to my school. During our class play, her mom sat in the front row and cried when Jessy read her lines. My mom couldn’t come to the play, she said she had to watch my baby brothers and sisters. They can be a handful, ya know.

But do you know what else I see? Children just like me, living the same way I do, sometimes it’s really bad. Thomas had a black and blue eye once that he got from his older brother, and because he’s a boy his mom wouldn’t let him wear make-up on his face to cover it up. I wore make-up for the first time when I was five. My step-dad hit me on accident a few times and it busted my eyebrow and lip clean open. I got to wear make-up for almost two weeks. I think some of the other girls were jealous of me because they kept staring and pointing. I understand that many of us weren’t born to be part of the, lucky ones and that’s okay. I tried to show them how our imagination could give us anything we wanted but even the other unlucky kids don’t want to play with me, and ya

know what? That’s okay. I always imagine them playing with me even if they never really want to. And if having all kinds of fun stuff like the lucky ones means giving up pretending, then I don’t want it anyway.”

2nd Book in Drama Child Series of Poetry, set to release in 2017

Title: Drama Child: Falling in Rhyme…. By Heather L. Fleming

Baby’s Breath

Another vial powdered white. You crawl around for in the night.

Beneath the skies, spoiled eyes the next fix is what’s insight.

You feel new sickness, unwell. More than the hits would tell.

On your knees; begging trees. Shame of womb, begins to swell.

Lights in whirling, screaming glows. Soaked down to your toes.

Feening, shaking, baby-making. The birth and rebirth of you shows.

Barely felt, nothing left. At the brink, fighting with death.

Introducing, drug inducing

Saved by a Baby’s Breath.

Ashamed Consent

 Creeping sweet nothings, Stuck in her mind.

Earning on the dollar Giving up herself for the dine.

Breath on her neck, Cringed at his embrace.

Couldn’t bring herself to look upon his face.

As his beer drenched lines Rolled out like sticky hands.

She tried to act intrigued Give-in to sickening demands.

Killing off the nerves of her already numbed skin.

The consent of a desperate woman in her own moral raping.

 

Fiona: Is there anything you find particularly challenging in your writing?

Finding time to write is often a challenge.


Fiona: Do you have to travel much concerning your book(s)?

No, but I travel with my family as often as I can and I always have my book with me.


Fiona: Who designed the covers?

I designed my cover.


Fiona: What was the hardest part of writing your book?

Finding patience, not rushing the project just so I could hold the book in my hand.


Fiona: Did you learn anything from writing your book and what was it?

I learned to stop being so hard on myself because others are more than happy to do that for me. One less job I must worry about! Ha-ha!

Fiona: If any of your books was made into a film who would you like to play the lead?

I don’t know, do you think Beyoncé could pull it off? 😉


Fiona: Do you have any advice for other writers?

Write for you!


Fiona: Do you have anything specific that you want to say to your readers?

Thank You for reading my writing. That’s all I want, all I ever need… readers.

Fiona: What book are you reading now?

Stephen King’s IT

Fiona: Do you remember the first book you read?

The first novels I read as a child were Heidi by Johanna Spyri and Charlotte’s Web by E.B. White

Fiona: What makes you laugh/cry?

Friends, Family, Good Television, Movies, and Books

Fiona: Is there one person pass or present you would meet and why?

Stephen King and his wife because I want them to read my poetry and stories, of course!

Fiona: What do you want written on your head stone and why?

I’d rather not think about that…

Fiona: Other than writing do you have any hobbies?

Photography, Dancing, watching Movies, reading books

Fiona: What TV shows/films do you enjoy watching?

Walking Dead, Better Call Saul, Super Natural, Scandal are my current favorite TV shows.

Movies- Dirty Dancing, Legends of the Fall, The Kingdom, Superstar, Overboard, Baby Boom, Exorcist, Flowers in the Attic, The Strangers.

I am a lover of film!

Fiona: Favorite foods / Colors/ Music

I love a good medium rare steak, mash potatoes, and broccoli.

Favorite colors are blue and purple.

Favorite Genre of Music: R&B but I love any music that can make me cry, lift me up, or shake my hips.

Fiona: If you were not a writer what else would you like to have done?

I currently work in non-profit and provide afterschool and summer programming to children in need. I’m also studying to be a teacher.

 

Fiona: Do you have a blog/website? If so what is it?

 

Drama Child: Emotion in Rhyme Available at:

https://www.amazon.com/Drama-Child-Heather-Lynn-Fleming/dp/1461055806/ref=tmm_pap_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&qid=1490460642&sr=8-1

Amazon Author’s Page for Heather L. Fleming:

https://www.amazon.com/Heather-Lynn-Fleming/e/B01MXPS39X/ref=dp_byline_cont_pop_book_1

Facebook Fan Page:

https://www.facebook.com/DramaChildPoetry/

Follow on Twitter:

https://twitter.com/AuthorHeatherL

Follow on Instagram:

https://www.instagram.com/heather_fleming005/

Facebook Author’s Page:

https://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100014763795319

Here is my interview with Ellen L. Buikema

Name

Ellen L. Buikema

Age

60, unless you print this after 4/20, in which case 61, lol.

Where are you from

I was born on the island of Oahu and raised in the Village of Forest Park, Illinois, where at the time there were more dead people than living.

Fiona: Tell us your latest news?

Volume 3 in The Adventures of Charlie Chameleon series, Summertime, is being illustrated and due to be published in early June. The eBook versions are on preorder.


Fiona: When and why did you begin writing?

I started thinking about writing a long time before I actually did anything about it.

When I was around 8 years old, my mother had to go into the hospital for surgery. My brothers were sent to live with an aunt, uncle and cousins in the suburbs. I really wanted to go with them—my cousins were a lot of fun to be around—but it wasn’t meant to be. I was driven to my grandparents’ house in Chicago to stay for three weeks. Much to my chagrin, I also went with three weeks of homework.

My grandpa was born on a large farm in southern Ireland. He had a wry sense of humor, told wonderful stories about his life as a boy and his “mad” math teacher, and used to recite poetry to me. I adored his stories, particularly the poems. I developed a great love storytelling from him.

I did not begin to write for other people until after my own children were grown.


Fiona: When did you first consider yourself a writer?

I considered myself a writer after I held my first physical book, Parenting . . . A Work in Progress, in my hands. It wasn’t “real” to me until that moment.


Fiona: What inspired you to write your first book?

Answered within why and when


Fiona: Do you have a specific writing style?

I’d say that my voice varies with the type of book I’m writing. The Parenting book borders on academic, with serious to goofy vignettes. The Charlie series encourages empathy with a great deal of humor. The book I’ve just begun, Ride the Rails West (working title) will combine adventure, sadness, suspense, humor, and a glossing of supernatural. I suppose I am eclectic in my writing, although humor seems to weave into all my work.


Fiona: How did you come up with the title?

Sometimes titles present themselves in dreams, daydreams, or meditation. Other times I decide upon a title after the story is written. Frankenfish, a Halloween story in The Adventures of Charlie Chameleon: Holiday Celebrations (not out until January 2018 – is on preorder) came to me as I wrote the first page. I remember laughing as I typed on my laptop, and my husband walking past me, shaking his head. It can’t be easy living with a writer.


Fiona: Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?

The central message in most of my writing is to have consideration for our fellow beings. If we take time to understand why someone acts the way they do, we can be more patient. I am big fan of empathy.


Fiona: How much of the book is realistic and are experiences based on someone you know, or events in your own life?

Real life experiences of my own and others that have had an impact on my life are woven into the body of all my books. The book I’ve just begun is loosely based on family history.


Fiona: What books have most influenced your life most? a mentor?

Generally, I have used books as a means of escape for years. Whenever I was depressed, unhappy, or in need of a vacation with no way to take one, I’d find a book to cuddle up with and get lost inside the pages. There is no one book, but as a child I reread The Secret Garden by Frances Hodgson Burnett and reread The Hobbit and following trilogy on and off from 8th grade through university years. I am seldom without a book.

There is a teacher from 8th grade, Mr. Morrissey, who is not strictly a mentor, but very influential. He taught us that we should pay attention to the little things happening around us and to find something special in the ordinary. At least that is what I understood from him.

Fiona: Are there any new authors that have grasped your interest and who is your favorite author and what is it that really strikes you about their work?

I’m skipping this one. I hope you don’t mind. I know too many authors. 😀


Fiona: Name one entity that you feel supported you outside of family members.

I have the support of my author family, which includes two critique groups, an author support group, my Social Media writer connections, and two marketing groups. It takes a village to bring a good book into the world.


Fiona: Do you see writing as a career?

I see writing as part of my life. Something to share.


Fiona: If you had to do it all over again, would you change anything in your latest book?
No, it’s all good.


Fiona: Do you recall how your interest in writing originated?
Already answered

Fiona: Can you share a little of your current work with us? Already answered


Fiona: Is there anything you find particularly challenging in your writing?

Yes! Point of view and tense. I had more trouble with both early on and sometimes slip and error. Critique groups have been especially helpful in these areas.


Fiona: Do you have to travel much concerning your book(s)?

Travel has not been necessary for me at this time, however I do a lot of research online, send email to professionals in the field of my research, and call historical societies now and then. Most people have been very forthcoming.


Fiona: Who designed the covers?

My illustrator, Elizabeth Engle, designed the covers of The Adventures of Charlie Chameleon series. I haven’t chosen a designer for my newest book.


Fiona: What was the hardest part of writing your book?

Relaxing into the book can be tough. When I say that I mean getting into the writing zone can be difficult. The rest of the world falls away into the distant background when I am in deep writing mode. For me, this time usually doesn’t last for more than a few hours.


Fiona: Did you learn anything from writing your book and what was it?

For the newest book, I learned a lot about hobos. I never knew they had a code of ethics.

Fiona: If any of your books was made into a film who would you like to play the lead

I would love the Charlie stories to become animated shorts. They would make awesome cartoons!


Fiona: Do you have any advice for other writers?

Don’t rush. Do be patient with yourself, good work takes time. Be generous with your time. It will come back to you.


Fiona: Do you have anything specific that you want to say to your readers?

The same as above: Don’t rush. Do be patient with yourself, good work takes time. Be generous with your time. It will come back to you.

Fiona: What book are you reading now?

Three Legs of the Cauldron, by R.L. Cherry

Fiona: Do you remember the first book you read?

No, but I remember the Dick and Jane books they had us read in school—horrible. The first thing I remember trying to read were the Sunday comics.

 

Fiona: Other than writing do you have any hobbies ?

I love to read and am never without at least on book. On vacation I usually bring two. I draw and used to paint, but haven’t set aside time for painting in quite a while. I sing in a choir. I tried bowling. That was hilarious! Once I bowled a strike in the lane next to me. Thankfully no one was hurt. If dancing were a sport, I’d do fairly well, I love to dance.

Fiona: What TV shows/films do you enjoy watching?

I am a SciFi fan and love a good mystery. Comedy is also great fun.

Fiona: Favorite foods / Colors/ Music

            I believe that chocolate should be part of the food pyramid. My taste in music is eclectic, although I am not a fan of heavy metal or opera, unless it is light.

Fiona: If you were not a writer what else would you like to have done?

I would be an artist of some kind. I sometimes wish I’d pursued singing.

 

Fiona: Do you have a blog/website? If so what is it?

My website is http://ellenbuikema.com

https://www.amazon.com/author/ellenbuikema

 


https://www.amazon.com/Adventures-Charlie-Chameleon-New-Beginnings/dp/0990897931/

https://www.amazon.com/Adventures-Charlie-Chameleon-School-Days/dp/0990897966/

 

 

Here is my interview with Marnie Cate

Name   Marnie Cate

Age  A lady never tells

Where are you from  Originally Montana, my heart is in California and my home is Arizona.

 

Fiona: Tell us your latest news?

I just released the third book in the Protector of the Elemental Magic series and I am almost done with the fourth book.

 

 
Fiona: When and why did you begin writing?

I wrote as a young girl stories that would be called fan fiction now.  Through  high school and college, I had no interest in writing.  In 2011, I was struck by a strong image of a young girl and her grandmother.  From this, the series began.  It was as if something inside me was unleashed and I had to put my stories to paper.

 

 
Fiona: When did you first consider yourself a writer?

When I self-published Remember and the first paperback copy arrived in the mail.

 

 
Fiona: What inspired you to write your first book?

The strong image I had in 2011 was first a paragraph and then the story began to come to life in my mind.  Around this time, I stumbled across the actress Dame Judi Dench. This little woman was such a beacon of light and inspiration to me that I began to believe I could write a book.

 

 
Fiona: Do you have a specific writing style?

My first book was just write the story.  It came to mind as I went.  The next books in the series had a general outline but as I typed more ideas and thoughts would develop.  A small scene would take the story in a new direction.  Also, I talk out the characters when I am driving and play different scenarios.

 

 
Fiona: How did you come up with the title?

Sadly, I don’t remember (no pun intended) how I picked the name of the first book.  I decided from day one my series titles would spell out the word REMEMBER.  The next books were based on finding the best word to describe the books theme based on the letter.

 

 
Fiona: Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?

No matter where your life takes you or how lost you feel, love and family will always guide you.

 

 


Fiona: How much of the book is realistic and are experiences based on someone you know, or events in your own life?

The protagonist Mara is a bit of me with her conflicting bouts of insecurity to strength.  The character, Gram, was inspired by my own grandmother and Judi Dench.  The relationship between the sisters, Meg and Mara, are based on the strong bond I share with my sister.

 

 
Fiona: What books have most influenced your life most? a mentor?

I was an avid reader for most of my life.  Authors like Billie Letts, Cynthia Voight, Judy Blume, Gail Carriger and Jennifer Estep inspire me to bring characters to life that you root for, are disappointed in and love.

 

 

Fiona: Are there any new authors that have grasped your interest and who  is your favorite author and what is it that really strikes you about their work?

There are so many talented authors I have been lucky to learn about in the indie community.  Currently, my favorite author is Jennifer Estep.  Her Elemental Assassin series is more than an interesting storyline, she created a world with characters so real it was an emotional rollercoaster in each book

 

 
Fiona: Name one entity that you feel supported you outside of family members.

I have several good friends that encouraged me from day one.

 

 
Fiona: Do you see writing as a career?

I would love to say yes but being an author full-time at this point in my life is a distant possibility.  I consider writing my part-time career even though I spend as much if not more time on it than my full-time job.

 

 
Fiona: If you had to do it all over again, would you change anything in your latest book?

I can honestly say no. I love Mazy and where the series is going.  It has opened the door to exciting storylines I can’t wait to share with my readers!

 

 
Fiona: Do you recall how your interest in writing originated?

Just an odd thought that called me to write.

 

 

Fiona: Can you share a little of your current work with us?

WIP – Envy (Book 4)

Chapter

“Grandmother?”

 

Taking a deep breath, I rested my hand on her shoulder. She did not turn to face me. She just stared out the window. The tightness in her shoulders relaxed the smallest amount when I called my element – Air. Silently, I prayed for Air to release her tension. I hoped it would coax her to be honest with me.

 

I had taken a chance coming here. Being back in the home of my grandmother gave me an uneasy feeling. For the first six years of my life, I had been raised in this cold, lifeless mansion. It was not until I went to live with my half-sisters, Mara and Meg that I knew what family meant. My new family immediately welcomed me and I felt at home. In the Drygen Mansion, I had been taught to only speak when spoken to, to focus my mind on becoming an educated young man and to always use proper etiquette. In all the time I was here, I could only remember one tender moment with my grandmother.

 

Blanche Drygen was a complete contrast to my maternal grandmother, Mae Veracor. My first introduction to her began with her insisting I call her Gram. Both women were beautiful and intelligent. Where Grandmother Drygen was always formal and icy towards me, Gram wrapped me in love for the brief hours I spent with her. Even though Gram truly was a stranger to me, her death cut me to my core.  This small glimmer of love awoken my heart. I decided then I would never be a Drygen and I would become the man Gram would want me to be.

 

“I know you hear me, Grandmother,” I said, forcefully. “I want to talk to you about our family. I need to know more about —”

 

“He was a good man,” she said, interrupting me. “He just never knew how to break the bind she put on him.”

 

I stood still not wanting to stop her from talking. If I listened quietly, she might tell me what I needed to know. She might tell me why the Drygen family had become so dark and cruel. Why they had betrayed the Goddess Danu.

 

“It was all because of their ridiculous promise to Protect the Magic,” she sneered. “If they would have just left it alone maybe things could have been different. If they would have said, ‘No, thank you’, they could have lived a happy mortal life.”

 

Her shoulders slumped and she sighed, “No, he would have never known I existed.”

 

Kneeling next to her, I softly touched her cheek. Her eyes glistened with tears. “Please tell me the story, Grandmother. I need to know.”

 

“You are from her blood. The Silver line has drowned out any drop of Drygen you had left in you,” she said, softly. Her words were not hateful. She sounded full of regret. “Please get me a sweater from my room and I will tell you how the Drygen’s became cursed to never truly love.”

 

 
Fiona: Is there anything you find particularly challenging in your writing?

Time.  There is never enough time.

 

 
Fiona: Do you have to travel much concerning your book(s)?

Only in my mind.

 

 
Fiona: Who designed the covers?

My publisher works with The Cover Collection to make my beautiful covers.

 

 
Fiona: What was the hardest part of writing your book?

Proofreading.  It is very hard to see the errors.  My mind plays tricks on me.  I listen to my book and catch the errors.  The funny thing is that even knowing the issue, I sometimes still can’t see it.

 

 
Fiona: Did you learn anything from writing your book and what was it?

Be confident.  Know you are not perfect and you don’t have to be.

 

 

Fiona: If any of your books was made into a film who would you like to play the lead

Judi Dench would have to play Gram!  Vanessa Marano from Switched at Birth would be a good actress to play Mara.

 

 
Fiona: Do you have any advice for other writers?

Follow your heart.  Write everything down. You can cut it later and never let anyone tell you that your way is wrong if you feel strongly about it.

 

 
Fiona: Do you have anything specific that you want to say to your readers?

Thank you for your support.  I hope you love my stories as much as I do.

 

 

Fiona: What book are you reading now?

Joe Compton’s Amongst the Killing.

 

 

Fiona: Do you remember the first book you read?

I am sure this is not the first book but Fudge by Judy Blume comes to mind.

 

 

Fiona: What makes you laugh/cry?

I am easily amused so I can find the funny in things easily.  Lately, crying seems much easier to come by.  From injustice in the world or a sad song, I will find myself tearing up.

 

 

Fiona: Is there one person pass or present you would meet and why?

Always Judi Dench – she is my inspiration.

 

 

Fiona: What do you want written on your head stone and why ?

She loved. She Lost. She Wrote.

 

 

Fiona: Other than writing do you have any hobbies ?

Is there anything besides work and writing?

 

 

Fiona: What TV shows/films do you enjoy watching?

I love britcoms and British series.

 

 

Fiona: Favorite foods / Colors/ Music

Favorite food – a bloody steak.  Favorite color – a beautiful rainbow  Music – All of it but am drawn to swing music and more modern electro swing by Parov Stelar (Booty Swing).

 

 

Fiona: If you were not a writer what else would you like to have done?

Can’t imagine anything else.

My real-life caticorn and muse

Fiona: Do you have a blog/website? If so what is it?

www.marniecate.com

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MarnieCate

Twitter: twitter.com/Marnie_Cate

Pinterest: pinterest.com/marniecate

Goodreads: goodreads.com/Marnie_Cate

Amazon page: amazon.com/dp/B01BVSJU5K/

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/authormarniecate

 

 

Here is my interview with Stephanie Barr

Name  Stephanie Barr

Age  49

Where are you from: 

I was born in New Hampshire (USA) and lived all over the states during my lifetime, but I’ve been living south of Houston for the past 29 years.

I have a degree in Engineering Physics from 1989 and I’ve been working as a rocket scientist ever since with various contractors. At this point, I generally work from home, because I’m a single mother of three children, one in grad school and two autistic. I also have eight cats. And a manga obsession.

Fiona: Tell us your latest news?

Although I’ve put out five novels, one short story anthology and one book of poetry out in ebook form for a couple of years, I am just now reissuing them in paperback as well. That’s five novels in the science fiction, fantasy or combined realm, three intended for emerging adults and two for adults, though I think all are quite readable for adults.

 

 
Fiona: When and why did you begin writing?

I was a freshman in high school (13 – I had skipped eighth grade) starting with poetry then moving on to short stories in college and then novels afterwards. I’ve recently rediscovered the fun of writing short stories. I have not yet rediscovered the fun of poetry.

 

 
Fiona: When did you first consider yourself a writer?

Probably since I started writing. Once I started telling stories, it’s all I wanted to do. But, a gal (two brief husbands, three children and eight+ cats) gotta eat.

 

 
Fiona: What inspired you to write your first book?

Georgette Heyer. I love her books and wrote something in a similar vein but it was sadly devoid of plot and is in my virtual drawer awaiting a rewrite.

My first novel that’s actually been published (Curse of the Jenri) stemmed from my first published short story (Code of the Jenri) which was reviewed and someone noted that the problem with sword and sorcery short stories is the world-building made it feel just like a precursor to a whole novel. So, I wrote one.

 

 
Fiona: Do you have a specific writing style?

I write in a sort of chatty style, I suppose. I’m always focused on characters so I tend to take on the tone of the particular brain I’m using.

 

 
Fiona: How did you come up with the title?

Often through blood, sweat, and tears and, sometimes, some sort of sacrifice to the Gods of creativity. Sometimes they come to me easily (Best Within, Curse of the Jenri, Saving Tessa, Tarot Queen) and sometimes they are a struggle through many many options (huge phalanx of short story titles).

 

 
Fiona: Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?

I’m not a fan of preachy fiction; I think that’s counterproductive anyway. I do have things I want to say: equality, feministic notions, that people should be judge by who not what they are, etc, but I try to make them so integral to the story, such a part of the world I’ve built, that you don’t consciously put that in your head. Instead, you just walked away, nodding at a world created to suit my preferences.

I do overtly challenge rape culture and rapists do not fare well in my books.

 

 
Fiona: How much of the book is realistic and are experiences based on someone you know, or events in your own life?

I don’t know how well I can answer this. I absorb all kinds of things without paying conscious attention and I’ll often find variations in my writing. I’m not sure if even the originators would recognize it after it’s been through the meat grinder that is my subconscious. I try to make sure cultural level scenarios have precedence in history which rarely slows me down since history is full of weird stuff.

I do very much try to make my characters feel natural and act in a realistic manner.

 

 
Fiona: What books have most influenced your life most? a mentor?

I don’t know that I had a mentor, though I’ve had several people who have helped me become a better writer. I read everything when I was younger and my tastes in my “read over and over” shelves are eclectic with James Clavell, Nora Roberts, Georgette Heyer, Robert Lynn Asprin, Heinlein, Herbert, Dorothy Sayers, Shakespeare, Poe, Michener, Stephen King, Sharon Lee and Steve Miller. For the past ten years, I’ve been reading tons of manga and I’m surprised how much of an influence it’s had on my fiction. It’s really stimulated some different perspectives.

 

 

Fiona: Are there any new authors that have grasped your interest and who is your favorite author and what is it that really strikes you about their work?

I’ve recently become enamored with the work of Emily Snyder. Before that, I was really really enjoying much of the work (namely most of the Liaden series) of Sharon Lee and Steve Miller.

 

 
Fiona: Name one entity that you feel supported you outside of family members.

I have a line of very supportive friends who have read and continue to read my stuff, from my freshman high school English teacher (Haynes-san) to my writing buddy now (Chuck Larlham). I don’t know that I can pinpoint just one and be fair.

 

 
Fiona: Do you see writing as a career?

Yes, but not as a living, at least for me.

 

 
Fiona: If you had to do it all over again, would you change anything in your latest book?

Nope. I’m self-published. If I did, I’d just fix it.

 

 
Fiona: Do you recall how your interest in writing originated?

I started scribbling while waiting for my transfer paperwork was worked through at a new school (7th grade) – some poetry my new English teacher was impressed with. I wrote poetry for a year or so, but tossed it right after I wrote it until I wrote something I thought my father would like. He did and made me promise never to throw another away. And I haven’t, even stuff that was garbage.

But much of it wasn’t.

 

 

 

Fiona: Can you share a little of your current work with us?

Yes

This is from Aberation Unfettered (hard SF):

Nayna stopped herself from shaking her head. No need to multiply the pain. “Didn’t need explosives, just need the metal vapor arcing to start charging a battery in reverse. They have big arrays of batteries in there, plenty of opportunity.”

“Okay, we’ll go with that explanation for now. Now, when they come through here, and they will, here’s your story. I brought you in here for a little copulation.”

“What? Why would I use a secure data room for that when we both have staterooms? Under my own code, I might add.”

“I’ll tell them you’re kinky. Shouldn’t be hard to believe. There’s only a few positions that would be effective with that work chair.”

“And you expect them to believe you seduced me in the community analysis room?”

“Oh, Rana, no. You enticed me. I was captivated by your beauty in the cold green LEDs of the analysis room. Believe me, that’s perfectly plausible. Only…”

She was wearing a zip tunic/skirt ensemble. With quick sure movements, her top was removed, and returned in place but backwards, the zipper only part way up the side. With a tug, the skirt was sent partially askew and he unzipped the skirt to where it was just held at the waist.

She tried to tug the zipper back down. “What do you think you’re doing?”

“I’m making you believably disreputable, my dear.”

“What about you? Why aren’t you ‘disreputable’?”

“I have practice putting myself back together, unless you want me to rip a seam so they know how badly you wanted me?”

“Would you be serious?”

“I am deadly serious. If you don’t want to relive the brainwashing sessions, be interrogated indefinitely, possibly tortured, even put to death, you will erase from your consciousness that you ever heard of a rumor, that you were looking at any sort of schematic, that you know anything about me other than where my tan line is.”

“But they’ll know. The records…”

“My guess is every computer in the entire bases is fried beyond salvage, every memory module attached to it, every peripheral device. I know the one here is. We’ll be working on standalone handhelds and maybe even paper for months if not longer.”

He looked at her squarely. “I think you know you don’t want to tell them you were looking at Code Q data and definitely don’t want to add you figured out the attack method on your own within seconds. If you do, you will never see the light of day. You know that.”

She did know that. “So, we tell them nothing?”

“Even better if they think there was nothing to tell. That metal whisker thing you mentioned, you mentioned it had happened before?”

“Yes, it’s happened in several facilities. They always have rules against galvanized steel and tin plating but some unrelated hardware no one thought about always turns out to be the culprit. Sometimes it takes months to find.”

“Could it happen here? With no sabotage, just bad luck? Is it plausible?”

“Well, it’s credible but, Bryder, are you going to pretend this wasn’t an attack? Are you going to cover for the terrorists?”

“Do you know what happens if they decide this was a deliberate attack by the natives?”

She shook her head, her heart in her throat at the dangerous look on his face, but she did know. Of course she did.

“If it’s an attack, tomorrow we all get moved to a different center on a different planet and Clevelhand becomes planet number 64. I’m not willing to do that.”

Her voice fell to a whisper. “But if they find out? How will we explain the lockdown?”

“I’ll tell them I thought it was a bomb and, knowing the history of the Clevelhand people, I did a shutdown as a precaution.”

Why did that sound plausible? Maybe his tone of voice. “Will they believe you?”

“The only one at risk will be me, sweetheart, and the locals.”

She took a shaky breath. The ache in her head had subsided mostly, but she felt more disoriented than ever. The Empire had to trust this man implicitly. Was this a game he was playing with her? Was he genuinely protecting a group of resistance fighters to save a planet? “How can I trust you?”

“I’m not asking you to trust me. I’m putting my trust in you. You could get me taken out with a single word.” He came up close and breathed in her ear. “But I trust you.” He chucked her under the chin. “I have pretty much any data you want, unadulterated, in my private stores. Tell me if you want anything to read on your handheld.”

Data that could not be directly accessed by the Empire, that could not be adjusted or traced or censored. “I want to know about the sixty three planets that were annihilated.”

“That’s my girl. I’ll get you the discs tomorrow, but keep them out of sight of others.” He smiled. “Now fix your tunic. You look a mess.”

She sputtered and tried to shift the tunic without removing it just as the door opened and security tramped in.

 

 
Fiona: Is there anything you find particularly challenging in your writing?

Finding time. Working full time, uninterrupted writing time is a premium.

 

 
Fiona: Do you have to travel much concerning your book(s)?

I can’t travel. Kids are first priority.

 

 
Fiona: Who designed the covers?

Ryn Katryn Digital Arts did the covers for Curse of the Jenri, Saving Tessa, Nine Lives, Tarot Queen and Conjuring Dreams. Brendan Smith did the cover for Beast Within. I did the cover for Musings of a Nascent Poet.

 

 
Fiona: What was the hardest part of writing your book?

Marketing. Not my strength. I love writing and editing is a breeze.

 

 
Fiona: Did you learn anything from writing your book and what was it?

I always learn something when I write. How to optimize dialog, little bits and pieces of history, science or other trivia, how to put things together so they are more and more seamless. I think writing is a learning process and I never want to stop learning.

 

 

Fiona: If any of your books was made into a film who would you like to play the lead?

I know a lot of writers pick out actors to help them visualize their characters, but, for me, the appearance is like the least important aspect of my characters so I don’t. Most of my female characters are tough, so I want want women who are comfortable playing badasses with lots of action, like Scarlet Johansson for Curse of the Jenri. That would be effective.

 

 
Fiona: Do you have any advice for other writers?

Write what you love. You’re going to spend hours and hours with your characters and in your worlds; make sure you enjoy it or the reader won’t either. And, if you’re going to invest so much of your life, you ought to enjoy it. Also, humor. No book was made worse by adding humor.

 

 
Fiona: Do you have anything specific that you want to say to your readers?

Look for writers who care about people and love their work. You’ll enjoy yourself much more. You might even learn something, too.

 

 

Fiona: What book are you reading now?

I’m reading the Saga of Menoral by Emily Snyder right now and a long list of ongoing manga.

 

 

Fiona: Do you remember the first book you read?

Melissa and her Family, about a cat and her kittens. It must have made an impression. I always have cats in my books. Often in pivotal roles.

 

 

 

Fiona: What makes you laugh/cry?

Sarcasm is my favorite form of humor and I laugh long and hard. Losing someone when there was no other way to do it, that makes me cry. I’m very empathetic so, when someone describes a loss and they do a good job, I’ll feel it.

 

 

Fiona: Is there one person pass or present you would meet and why?

I’m not big on this because I’m really not into celebrities. But, if I could, I’d love to talk to Georgette Heyer, tell her how much pleasure I’ve had from her books over the years.

 

 

Fiona: What do you want written on your head stone and why ?

She made me think. People don’t have to agree with me, but I do want people to think about their views, not just regurgitate them thoughtlessly. And be kind, but, to me, kindness falls out nicely from thinking.

 

 

Fiona: Other than writing do you have any hobbies ?

Manga obsession. Reading, of course. I used to crochet and do crewel/needlepoint but I’ve been short on time lately.

 

 

Fiona: What TV shows/films do you enjoy watching?

I like action/humor, but I mostly watch Disney and the like due to the kids, which if fine. I like those, too.

 

 

Fiona: Favorite foods / Colors/ Music

Italian, purples and blues, anything I can sing to, mostly pop, but the occasional opera or country song.

 

 

Fiona: If you were not a writer what else would you like to have done?

I would have liked singing, I think, but writing is better.

 

 

Fiona: Do you have a blog/website? If so what is it?

 

I have three blogs:

Rockets and Dragons (writing) http://stephanie-barr.blogspot.co.uk/

Rocket Scientist (non-writing) http://rockets-r-us.blogspot.com

The Unlikely Otaku (manga/anime obsession) http://askthers.blogspot.com/

I also have a FB author page:

Dragon Faerie Creative Enterprises https://www.facebook.com/stephanieebarr/

Amazon Authors Page https://www.amazon.com/Stephanie-Barr/e/B00N9W84YK