Here is my interview with Margareth Stewart

Hello and welcome to my blog, Author Interviews. My name is Fiona Mcvie.

Let’s get you introduced to everyone, shall we? Tell us your name. What is your age?

Margareth Stewart: My real name is Mônica Mastrantonio and Margareth Stewart is my pen name, but I like it so much that you can call me Margareth. I´m forty eight.

Fiona: Where are you from?

Margareth Stewart: I was born in Brazil in a little town called Londrina which stands for Little London as it was colonized by the British, and I also have Italian citizenship because of my great-grand-parents that immigrated there. Now I live in Sao Paolo, few months in Miami and at writer´s residencies, too.

Fiona: A little about yourself (i.e., your education, family life, etc.).

Margareth Stewart: Well, I´m a PhD professor in Social Psychology, and had been following an Academic career if I had not felt totally in love with the writing life.

Fiona: Tell us your latest news.

Margareth Stewart: Well, soon flying Cork for a two week residency at Greywood Art, my first time in Ireland.

Fiona: When and why did you begin writing?

Margareth Stewart: I´ve always written, as Academics – mostly scientific papers and articles, though lately felt an urge to start writing fiction. It´s not something I´ve planned, much to the opposite, I even tried avoiding it.

Fiona: When did you first consider yourself a writer?

Margareth Stewart: When I published my first novel Open/Pierre´s journey after war – at the end of 2017, so I´ve just began (lol). I had also compiled, edited and published anthologies, short stories, articles before, but I did not regard myself so. Then, when Open was accepted and published by web-e-books.com, it felt like the real thing was coming to life.

Fiona: What inspired you to write your first book?

Margareth Stewart: Can you believe it was a Facebook group? Awesome, I know. It was November – Nano writing month and this group ran a contest for the person who would reach 100.000 word count first. Obviously, I´ve missed it both the month and the word count. But it somehow gave me courage to book a writer´s residency in January in Wales and accomplish my target there. That was how my novel came to life. Then, it took me two years to have it published. So, my advice is never ever give it up. Champagne takes two full years to have the bubbles in it, so good things do take time.

Fiona: How did you come up with the title?

Margareth Stewart: The title is a reference to a scene from the book, the only romantic scene in it – when the main character falls in love. They were in a village stepping on the grapes to make wine, the weather changes and rain is about to fall heavily, the owner of the land was holding a bottle ready to be opened in his hand as a tradition to the new harvest, everyone surrounding him started shouting “Open open, open”. It was the first time Pierre held Claire’s hand.

Fiona: Do you have a specific writing style? Is there anything about your style or genre that you find particularly challenging?

Margareth Stewart: Guess not, only the fact that because of my background in Social Psychology, I mainly focus in the human beings, their relationships and their inner selves more than anything else.

Fiona: How much of the book is realistic and are experiences based on someone you know, or events in your own life?

Margareth Stewart: Mix of everything. There is no such a thing as a blank page, everything we ever lived influences us, what we read, hear, see, the people we´ve met, etc. Writing is putting all that in order.

Fiona: To craft your works, do you have to travel? Before or during the process?

Margareth Stewart: Yes, for sure. I´m a divorced mom of three kids, so my writing depends on having a break, getting to Writers Residencies somewhere far and isolated. I´ve written Open at Maelor Studio in Corris – Wales; Mademoiselle-sur-Seine at Camac – France and now comes the time to go to Greywood Arts in Cork, Ireland – so glad about it.

Fiona: Who designed the covers?

The Publisher, but I did some changes and suggested the main colour which is orange.

Fiona: Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?

Margareth Stewart: Yes, indeed. A message about last wishes. Pierre the main character lives for his last wish which is revenge. People do not pay attention to things they need to accomplish in life, so when old age comes, they become very bitter and frustrated.

Fiona: Are there any new authors that have grasped your interest?  Who is your favourite writer, and what is it about their work that really strikes you?

Margareth Stewart: Oh, so many influencers. I´m an avid reader since a small kid. I read everything I can ever get my eyes upon, and I love libraries and Book Shops – to a point that I could spend days inside one. So from Tchekov, to Dante, Gabriel Garcia Marquez, Sidney Sheldon, Yeats, Kafka, Steinbeck, Wilde to Agatha Christie, Cervantes and Mills and Boon to name a few. I´ve learned so much from them all.

Fiona: Outside of family members, name one entity that supported your commitment to become a published author.

Margareth Stewart: Facebook groups can play a great motivational role to new writers, feed-back from beta-readers, and artist residencies.

Fiona: Do you see writing as a career?

Margareth Stewart: Yes, it’s a career like any other. I wake up, get some tea, sit down and type until bleeding – as Nietzsche would say.

Fiona: If you had to do it all over again, would you change anything in your latest book?

Margareth Stewart: No, nothing, really, I´m very happy with the book, its edition, and so thankful to everyone that helped me along this way.

Fiona: Did you learn anything during the writing of your recent book?

Margareth Stewart: Yes, so much with Pierre, and also about the way I can produce more and write better for next time.

Fiona: If your book was made into a film, who would you like to play the lead?

Margareth Stewart: Oh, love this question, wish they read this interview, buy the book and decide to film it: Clint Eastwood or Jeremy Irons.

Fiona: Any advice for other writers?

Margareth Stewart: Keep writing – keep walking, and “Cheering” accordingly.

Fiona: Anything specific you want to tell your readers?

Margareth Stewart: Just read it.   

Fiona: What book are you reading now?

Margareth Stewart: Cyrano de Bergerac – I want to learn more about dialogues, spoken language, you know.

Fiona: Do you remember the first book you read?

Margareth Stewart: A series of adventure books for a contest at school, I just remembered I won, and read loads for weeks.

Fiona: What makes you laugh/cry?

Good talk & nice people, I get emotional when I meet people who are passionate about what they do.

Fiona: Is there one person, past or present, you would love to meet? Why?

Margareth Stewart: Shakespeare & Theodore Zeldin – one from the past and the other from the present – a great historian writer at a bar drinking beer.

Fiona: Do you have any hobbies?

Margareth Stewart: Jogging, cooking, dancing, and reading (lol).

Fiona: What TV shows/films do you enjoy watching?

Margareth Stewart: Can you believe I watch no TV? Zero. That´s me, I´m keen on films, but “zero” TV, not missing much is the feed-back I have from people watching it.

Fiona: Favourite foods, colours, music?

Margareth Stewart: Homemade Pasta made by me (my Italian side) and all sorts of music from Jazz, to folk, rock, samba, bossa, and classical.

Fiona: Imagine a future where you no longer write. What would you do?

Margareth Stewart: Can´t imagine it any longer…there are some paths that there is no turning around – writing is one of them.

Fiona: What do you want written on your head stone?

Margareth Stewart: Oh, nothing, so many things to write and do before that.

Fiona: Do you have a blog or website readers can visit for updates, events and special offers?

Margareth Stewart: Yes, please follow my Facebook Page where I post offers and new book releases. For 2018, we have Mademoiselle-sur-Seine (erotica) much hotter than 50 Shades of Grey.

https://www.facebook.com/AuthorMargarethStewart/

Open/Pierre´s journey after war is available at the link below, it can be easily read at any device, just look for Stewart, Margareth.

https://www.web-e-books.com/open/default.php

Fiona, thank you so much for putting these together for all of us; it´s an immense pleasure being here, and looking forward to next book interview, sincerely,

Margareth Stewart January 2018

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Here is my interview with Michelle Connor

Hello and welcome to my blog, Author Interviews. My name is Fiona Mcvie.

 

Let’s get you introduced to everyone, shall we? Tell us your name. What is your age?

 My name is Michelle Connor, and I’m thirty eight years old.

 Fiona: Where are you from?

 I live on the North East Coast of England in a place called Grimsby.

 Fiona: A little about your self (ie,  your education, family life, etc.).

I have been with my husband now for twenty years. We have three children together, our youngest has just turned sixteen. She is the princess of the family and has two older brothers.

As well as writing, I love painting, drawing and photography. I have a great intrigue for history and spend many a summers day hunting for castles and ruins to visit. I think this comes through in my first novella series as it is set in the medieval era.

 Fiona: Tell us your latest news.

 I have just released the complete series book for the Hers To Save series and it includes illustrations by a great artist, Keith Suddrey.

Fiona: When and why did you begin writing?

 Since I were a child I have loved to write. From making up songs with my friends to having poems published as a teenager. I lost that need to get all my thoughts down on paper through the hectic life of raising children. Then one night my character Aveline wouldn’t leave me alone until I gave up on sleeping and started jotting her down on paper.

Fiona: When did you first consider yourself a writer?

 The first time I held a print book in my hands with my name on.

Fiona: What inspired you to write your first book?

 My characters loneliness and pain called to me and I wanted to tell her tale of growing up and finding strength in herself.

 Fiona: How did you come up with the title?

 I was in a writers group and had my first draft up. When someone came to the scene where the prince comes into play, they made a comment about another book where the prince saves the day and marries the maiden. I remember commenting that ‘no that is not the case, my daughter would kill me if I had written a story like that.’ The name also made sense to me as another character in the book called Herveus feels she had saved him.

Fiona: Do you have a specific writing style? Is there anything about your style or genre that you find particularly challenging?

 My writing sometimes can start to sound a bit poetic. I allow myself small glimpses of this style but try to rein myself in.

Fiona: How much of the book is realistic and are experiences based on someone you know, or events in your own life?

 None of the events are real, but the emotions I try to invoke are, loss, fear. I did name several characters after people I know though. Sasha is named after my daughter, and two of the characters Paul and David are brothers I have been friends with since I was a baby. Paul lost his battle to cancer just after the second part, The Deceived was released.

Fiona: To craft your works, do you have to travel? Before or during the process?

 When I’m stuck I get my husband to take me for a drive, always with a notebook and pen on hand. We live a short distance away from some beautiful countryside, and the rolling hills and farmers fields help me relax.

Fiona: Who designed the covers?

 I designed my cover myself.

 Fiona: Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?

 Aveline suffers physical abuse at the hands of her father, but she finds the strength to take herself away from that the situation and later she also goes back to confront her demons. I wanted to show that no matter how downtrodden we are, the strength is within us if we look and fight for it.

Fiona: Are there any new authors that have grasped your interest?  Who is your favorite writer, and what is it about their work that really strikes you?

 My favourite writer is Joel Shepherd. I got his first book as it has the same name as my daughter Sasha. His main character is a strong female, who took herself away from being a princess and instead becomes a warrior. It can be confusing when you first start to read the book learning all the different names, but if you work through that it is beautiful written series.

A new author I have just found is A.M Yates, I devoured one of her series and didn’t sleep for two days. I love the world building and the fantasy aspects that are not the norm.

Fiona: Outside of family members, name one entity that supported your commitment to become a published author.

 Other authors I became friends with along the way.

Fiona: Do you see writing as a career?

 I see it as something I have to do, like breathing.

Fiona: If you had to do it all over again, would you change anything in your latest book?

 I may have made it a little longer.

Fiona: Did you learn anything during the writing of your recent book?

 My descriptions became better the more I wrote. I hope that carries me through to future books.

 Fiona: If your book was made into a film, who would you like to play the lead?

 Dakota fanning

Fiona: Any advice for other writers?

 Get words on the page, they don’t have to be pretty that is what editing is for, so write first with your heart open, and edit with your eyes and mind open.

Fiona: Anything specific you want to tell your readers?

 Thank you for coming on the journey with me, my words would only be letters on a screen and paper without your imaginations to bring them to life.

 Fiona: What book are you reading now?

 Silver Staked, Shannon Mayer

Fiona: Do you remember the first book you read?

 Watership Down

 Fiona: What makes you laugh/cry?

 Everything makes me cry. I’m like a marshmallow.

Fiona: Is there one person, past or present, you would love to meet? Why?

 Virginia Andrews, her books haunted my teenage years.

 Fiona: Do you have any hobbies?

 Painting and photography.

 Fiona: What TV shows/films do you enjoy watching?

 The 100, Vampire Diaries, Blacklist, Blindspot, Criminal Minds…. I will leave it at that, the list is too long.

 Fiona: Favorite foods, colors,  music?

 Cheese, purple, rock music.

 Fiona: Imagine a future where you no longer write. What would you do?

 Cry, no I would take my camera out more and get to read more books.

 Fiona: What do you want written on your head stone?

 Loved and was loved in return.

 Fiona: Do you have a blog or website readers can visit for updates, events and special offers?

 I have a website http://michelleconnorauthor.co.uk/, but my author facebook page is where you will find me more often. https://www.facebook.com/Authormichelleconnor/

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Michelle-Connor/e/B06XFHSJ2W/ref=dp_byline_cont_ebooks_1

Blurb

When Aveline is betrothed to the Lord of her Village, it starts a journey that will take her far from home and everything she has ever known. She befriends a creature she’s only encountered in fairytales. Aeolius is twice her height and covered in silver scales.

Together they start a journey which will lead them into a battle they have no idea is being fought.

Can Aveline find her courage to play her part as a King’s madness spreads across the land?

Embark on a coming of age tale, turn the page the saga has begun.

Links:

Amazon.com Link: http://a.co/gciNOFW

Amazon.co.uk Link: http://amzn.eu/9F5PhF0

Hers To Save Excerpt.

Below a shale-grey sky, a brooding stone wall slashes across the landscape. Sweat beads Aveline’s forehead as her mind drifts in a veil of darkness. The vivid recollection of damp dungeon walls closes in on her, shackling her mind in the past where fear greets her. Like a guiding light, the soft touch of small fingers interlacing with her own drag her back from the dark fissure. Glancing down into the pasty face of her younger brother, she squeezes his hand. Crowded close together for warmth, slick-footed they thread their way through a massive set of wrought iron gates. Bone-white ice crystals lace the ground—left behind as a sparkling gift by the chilling winter’s breath. The sharp wind bites into her frozen cheeks. Reaching up, Aveline pulls the squirrel fur-lined hood tighter against her face.

A deathlike quietude haunts the city’s narrow streets, not a soul moves or murmurs. As if a canvas painted maroon by the violent brush-stroke of a painter’s brush, the cobble-stoned thoroughfare depicts the voiceless memories of violence. Many doors hang from limp hinges and the sunlight reflects off fractured and jagged glass windows. Pears, rotten and trodden lie scattered across the pathway, their sweet, rancid stench permeating the air. A flash of colour out of place against the sparkling ground catches Aveline’s attention. Dropping to her knees, coldness seeps through her leggings as she reaches forward with trembling hands and clutches a hold of a tiny shoe. Rubbing her thumb over the soft egg-blue material she tries to wipe away the speckles of crimson. Chin trembling, she tightens her fist around the discarded object and glances around. On the other side of the street rests a cart tipped on its side, underneath, attached to a matching shoe, a small leg sticks out. Scrambling to her feet, she sprints across the road. Pushing against the spokes of a large wheel, the cart rocks up a fingers width. Feet slipping in a gloop of pear mulch, she loses traction and the vehicle thuds back to the ground. Leaning forward, splinters of wood dig into her flesh and with gritted teeth she pushes again. A pair of masculine hands appear beside her own, and with a loud groan the cart topples over.

Exposed to the elements, the girls bruise mottled limbs twist at odd angles. Her delicate frame, covered in an embroidered fuchsia pink gown, lies unmoving. With cherub cheeks lacking a flush of colour and a face as pale as a harvest moon, Aveline can tell the small child has already been visited by the angel of death. Suffocating with each stuttering breath, an avalanche of anguish bleeds from Aveline’s eyes, distorting her vision. Tilting his upper body to the side, Herveus rests his head against Aveline’s own. “We’ll bury her before we leave. I promise you.”

 

Here is my interview with Adrienne Blake


Hello and welcome to my blog, Author Interviews. My name is Fiona Mcvie.

 

Let’s get you introduced to everyone, shall we? Tell us your name. What is your age?

Hello, Fiona, and thanks for having me. My name is Adrienne Blake.  I haven’t confessed my real age since <coughs> forty <coughs> but let’s just say when I write I can draw on A LOT of experience.

Fiona: Where are you from?

I’m originally from foggy London, UK, the land of the Queen, Hugh Grant and Mr. Bean .  I moved to the US in 2001 which suits me well because Americans are just as bonkers as us Brits.

Fiona: A little about your self (ie,  your education, family life, etc.).

I went to college over in Coventry – and  it broke my heart to leave my UK family behind in 2001, but what can I say? Love makes us all a little crazy, doesn’t it? I’m now divorced (hahaha), and working on the next Mr. Incredible.

Fiona: Tell us your latest news.

Writing-wise or other? Personally, I just bought a lovely little house and am in unpacking hell. It’s really incredible how much junk we pick up along the way – but I’m throwing out a lot of stuff and donating tons to Goodwill.  But if you mean writing, I recently finished a new novel – The Rancher’s Runaway Bride which is being launched on January 13, 2018.

Fiona: When and why did you begin writing?

You remember playing with dolls? I used to invent little fantasy stories for them, and then one day started putting my thoughts down on paper.  And here we are.

Fiona: When did you first consider yourself a writer?

When I was a teenager I used to babysit for my nieces – and would make up bed time stories for them. When they got a little older they suggested I start writing them down. So I did, and again, here we are.

Fiona: What inspired you to write your first book?

You ever read something mediocre and think, Oh hell, I could do better than this?Well, one day I had that thought and I just ran with it.

Fiona: How did you come up with the title?

For my first book? My first was Murder to a Tea, published as Iris Woodbury – and I dunno, the title just tickled me. Sometimes the title comes before the book. It’s just a thing.

Fiona: Do you have a specific writing style? Is there anything about your style or genre that you find particularly challenging?

I like my work to be fast paced and action-packed. Some readers and writers like to meander a little and that’s fine; we all like what we like.  But I’ve always disliked stories that wander too far from the plot – so I’m constantly asking myself, will my readers like this scene, and I strive to do my best to keep them engaged in both the plot and characters.

Fiona: How much of the book is realistic and are experiences based on someone you know, or events in your own life?

The emotions and responses my characters feel are always real and based on personal experience. It’s hard to portray an emotion you haven’t felt, I think. I’m taking a sexy wink on the rest of that question; I’ll let you guess.

Fiona: To craft your works, do you have to travel? Before or during the process?

Not really; though some of the things I have come across/done/experienced on my travels may have wormed their way into my books.

Fiona: Who designed the covers?

The cover art on my most recent books are all the work of my publisher, Stormy Night Publications http://www.stormynightpublications.com/

Fiona: Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?

Yes – Keep faith in yourself and others. I write strong male and female characters – a submissive can have as much inner strength as anyone else. My stories are often about when they lose their way – and how they get back to where they need to be.

Fiona: Are there any new authors that have grasped your interest?  Who is your favorite writer, and what is it about their work that really strikes you?

I loved The Sense of An Ending – by Julian Barnes. His writing style totally wowed me.

Fiona: Outside of family members, name one entity that supported your commitment to become a published author.

It wasn’t so much an entity as a person. And I can’t say more than that – but I’ll be forever grateful.

Fiona: Do you see writing as a career?

It’s my secret lover.

Fiona: If you had to do it all over again, would you change anything in your latest book?

Off the top of my head, no, but that might change when the reviews and feedback comes in, LOL.

Fiona: Did you learn anything during the writing of your recent book?

Yes. There aren’t enough hours in the day.

Fiona: If your book was made into a film, who would you like to play the lead?

Emily Blunt.Stunning. Talented.

Fiona: Any advice for other writers?

Write. Read. Write. Read. Write.

Fiona: Anything specific you want to tell your readers?

Thank you. I love hearing from you.

Fiona: What book are you reading now?

I just put down Sense of An Ending.

Fiona: Do you remember the first book you read?

No. I probably drew stick figures on it.

Fiona: What makes you laugh/cry?

People.

Fiona: Is there one person, past or present, you would love to meet? Why?

Oscar Wilde. He’s my favorite author. Though I’d be afraid he’d laugh at my lack of fashion sense.

Fiona: Do you have any hobbies?

Other than writing? Or working a full-time job? Or breaking in a new boyfriend? I dunno – does making cupcakes count?

Fiona: What TV shows/films do you enjoy watching?

I’m a British history nerd. Love it. Give me a Tudor movie and a mug of chocolate and I’m a happy bunny.

Fiona: Favorite foods, colors,  music?

Curry, Green, The Police.

Fiona: Imagine a future where you no longer write. What would you do?

I’d work on being reincarnated as  writer.

Fiona: What do you want written on your head stone?

W.I.P.

Fiona: Do you have a blog or website readers can visit for updates, events and special offers?

I confess I’m the world’s crappiest blogger – I put all my energy into the actual novels. But I do have a blog – and for what it’s worth, here it is.

http://authoradrienneblake.com/

I also have an Amazon Page, which has a very young pic of me (what can I say-It’s like dating) – but which shows all my other books.

Amazon Page  https://www.amazon.com/Adrienne-Blake/e/B01KBVBOQ6/ref=dp_byline_cont_ebooks_1

I’m not running any special promotions at this time but if readers wander onto the Stormy Nights web site there’s often a promotion. So take a peek!

Tamed by The Rancher

https://www.amazon.com/Tamed-Rancher-Adrienne-Blake-ebook/dp/B074YCV2QB

Cardinal’s Whores

https://www.amazon.com/Cardinals-Whores-Adrienne-Blake-ebook/dp/B01KBMFO7K

London Lady

https://www.amazon.com/London-Lady-Adrienne-Blake-ebook/dp/B01FRS5I1U

 

Here is my interview with Robert D Turvil

Hello and welcome to my blog, Author Interviews. My name is Fiona Mcvie.

 

Let’s get you introduced to everyone, shall we? Tell us your name. What is your age?

The name that goes on my books is Robert D Turvil, but everyone calls me Bob. As to my age, I’m just nudging the age of indiscretion.

Fiona: Where are you from?

Originally, the Hampton Court area by the grand old River Thames (but not the actual palace – or the river). After a few meanders around the UK, we’ve ended up in a village on the Dorset/Hampshire border.

Fiona: A little about your self (ie,  your education, family life, etc.).

I’m married and have three adult sons, all in happy relationships: two in London and one on Dorset. I must have been educated since I remember going to school a couple of times.  Something must have rubbed off as I ran my own management training and consultancy business for twenty odd years.

Fiona: Tell us your latest news.

Everyday is new and an adventure.

Fiona: When and why did you begin writing?

Can’t really remember when I didn’t write. Initially, just for the pleasure – and I guess it’s still that way otherwise there’s not much point.

Fiona: When did you first consider yourself a writer?

I suppose the milestone was when my first book was published – although I’d had articles and all sorts published beforehand.

Fiona: What inspired you to write your first book?

I just get an idea (usually an odd one) and it just has to be written.

Fiona: How did you come up with the title?

Deciding titles drives me to distraction. It sometimes comes down to a vote!

Fiona: Do you have a specific writing style? Is there anything about your style or genre that you find particularly challenging?

I quite like writing in the first person as you can really live the main character and indulge in things you couldn’t possibly do in the real world. However, some stories simply won’t work that way so it’s a matter of adopting a style to suit the story.

Fiona: How much of the book is realistic and are experiences based on someone you know, or events in your own life?

My first published book was a fantasy (written in the first person) so realism took second place to story credibility, i.e. making the story believable. I don’t consciously base my books on personal experiences or specific people. All my characters have a purpose and that’s what makes them who they are and determines what they do.

Fiona: To craft your works, do you have to travel? Before or during the process?

Only in my imagination.

Fiona: Who designed the covers?

I did.

Fiona: Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?

I’m not in the business of giving anyone messages. If readers want to interpret my writing in any particular way, they are most welcome.

Fiona: Are there any new authors that have grasped your interest?  Who is your favorite writer, and what is it about their work that really strikes you?

There are so many good authors about these days. It’s difficult – and possibly unfair – to pick on just one.

Fiona: Outside of family members, name one entity that supported your commitment to become a published author.

In terms of an ‘entity’ I would have to say Amazon as they have put together a platform that really supports authors.

Fiona: Do you see writing as a career?

A pastime perhaps.

Fiona: If you had to do it all over again, would you change anything in your latest book?

I’m very happy with my latest book ‘Vengeance of an Evil Man.’ However, everything can always be changed and there will always be the odd word, sentence or section that might benefit from a little extra polish. There comes a point when change does not fundamentally equal improvement.

Fiona: Did you learn anything during the writing of your recent book?

Every experience teaches something and it’s important to be open to learning opportunities. I think that a sense of perspective is something to appreciate.

 Fiona: If your book was made into a film, who would you like to play the lead?

There are three books, one with 7 short stories, so a tricky question. I think ‘Vengeance of an Evil Man’ would make an excellent film, but I wouldn’t care to name anyone for the lead. This is mostly because the main character is not described in detail, thereby letting readers draw their own impressions. Naming a particular actor would restrict this.

Fiona: Any advice for other writers?

Edit.

Fiona: Anything specific you want to tell your readers?

Thank you for your support. It’s really very much appreciated. As for my books, I really try to avoid clichéd, contrived or predictable situations and go for twists that invite the unexpected. By doing this, my stories are different and keep you guessing right to the end.

 Fiona: What book are you reading now?

I’m between books just at the moment.

Fiona: Do you remember the first book you read?

Not the title, but it was an adventure story and it really opened my eyes to the world of books.

Fiona: What makes you laugh/cry?

Life.

 Fiona: Is there one person, past or present, you would love to meet? Why?

Not so much an individual, more a period in history. I think it would be really interesting to experience life as it was at certain key periods in the past. But as to making a specific choice, that’s really difficult.

Fiona: Do you have any hobbies?

You mean there’s a life outside writing!

 Fiona: What TV shows/films do you enjoy watching?

I’m not a great TV watcher but drama that’s credible and well acted has definite appeal.

Fiona: Favorite foods, colors,  music?

I’m not sure about the idea of having favourites of anything. I’m definitely not a foodie and regard each colour and/or musical composition as simply different, neither better nor worse. Someone, somewhere is bound to be a fan, so who am I to judge!

 Fiona: Imagine a future where you no longer write. What would you do?

Give my wife the attention she deserves.

Fiona: What do you want written on your head stone?

“Quiet at last!”

Fiona: Do you have a blog or website readers can visit for updates, events and special offers?

Robert D Turvil website- https://books-rdt.com

Amazon Author Page – http://author.to/RDTurvil

Link to ‘Vengeance of an Evil Man’ – http://getbook.at/VenMan

Link to ‘The Devil’s Charity’ – http://getbook.at/Charity

Link to ‘7½ short stories you’ll want to read’ – http://getbook.at/7stories

Link to The After Death Afterlife of Ronald Foster   https://www.amazon.co.uk/After-Death-Afterlife-Ronald-Foster/dp/1511638869/ref=asap_bc?ie=UTF8

Twitter: https://twitter.com/RobertTurvil

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/RobertDTurvil

Here is my interview with Neil Williamson

Hello and welcome to my blog, Author Interviews. My name is Fiona Mcvie.

 

Let’s get you introduced to everyone, shall we? Tell us your name. What is your age?

Neil Williamson. I’m 49.

Fiona: Where are you from?

I live in Glasgow, Scotland.

Fiona: A little about your self (ie,  your education, family life, etc.).

I’ve always been interested in science and technology, so at university I trained in electrical and electronic engineering. My first job after leaving was doing things with microwaves as a junior engineer in London. After that, I got a job in Glasgow as a technical writer and I’ve been doing that for the last twenty five years.

Fiona: Tell us your latest news.

Well, I just finished a novel, Queen of Clouds, which should be doing the rounds with publishers any time now. This book is a sort-of prequel to my first novel, The Moon King, and it features wooden people and sentient weather.

Fiona: When and why did you begin writing?

Like many people, I suppose, in my teens I realised I enjoyed doing things with words, but I didn’t do much with that notion until I moved to London and discovered Interzone magazine. Interzone featured (and still does) stories of great craft and imagination, and I realised that I wanted to learn how to put my imagination on a page like that too.

Fiona: When did you first consider yourself a writer?

By the time my first story collection, The Ephemera, was published there would have been one morning where I realised that sitting down every day to put words on a page had become a major part of my life. But when exactly that was, I’m not sure.

Fiona: What inspired you to write your first book?

My first book was an anthology I co-edited with Andrew J Wilson called Nova Scotia: New Scottish Speculative Fiction, but I suspect you’re talking about novels here? I wrote The Moon King because I’d been writing short stories for six or seven years and felt it was about time I stepped up.

Fiona: How did you come up with the title?

For The Moon King? Well, one of the central characters is a seemingly immortal ruler of an island city around which the moon never sets, so in this instance it was a fairly easy title to pick.

Fiona: Do you have a specific writing style? Is there anything about your style or genre that you find particularly challenging?

If you asked readers that question, they might say I have a somewhat lyrical or poetic style. The only thing I find challenging about that style is it’s not apt for all the stories I want to tell, so sometimes I have to consciously try for something new.

In terms of genre, I write mostly in the speculative genes – science fiction, fantasy, horror, etc. The biggest challenge with those is to keep things fresh, to be unstinting in imagining new things. We all have keep challenging ourselves to write new stories instead of retreading the paths of the old ones, and one of the best things to have happened in the speculative genres in recent years is the rise in awareness that we need to keep evaluating our assumptions of race, gender, sexuality, ability, etc. Suddenly the genres are fresh again.

Fiona: How much of the book is realistic and are experiences based on someone you know, or events in your own life?

None of The Moon King is based on reality or anyone I know (although I did tuckerise my young nephew and niece for auxiliary characters, but just their names). However, the city in the book has deep roots in Glasgow. Some readers have caught that from it, which I’m happy about.

Fiona: To craft your works, do you have to travel? Before or during the process?

Not specifically, but when I do travel I take notes and they sometimes find their way into the fiction. My most recent published story, The Insider (from an anthology called Imposter Syndrome), is set in north west Italy, for example, which I’ve visited a couple of times recently.

Fiona: Who designed the covers?

Most of my books to date have been published by NewCon Press and the cover design is usually a collaboration between the publisher, Ian Whates, and a talented designer called Andy Bigwood.

Fiona: Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?

It’s pretty much up to readers to take whatever they want out of a book. I’m not sure it’s for me to tell them.

Fiona: Are there any new authors that have grasped your interest?  Who is your favorite writer, and what is it about their work that really strikes you?

I love authors with a strong writing style and a wicked imagination. My favourite books in recent times have included Hal Duncan’s wildly irreverent and yet touching Scruffianstories, and my long-time favourite authors include Graham Joyce, Jonathan Carroll, M John Harrison, Joyce Carol Oates and Ian McDonald. I’d probably add Adam Roberts to that list now too.

As for new authors, I’m very grateful to social media which provides a great conduit to discovering new voices, and I’m always eager to find more. In the last couple of years, I’ve enjoyed the work of Karin Tidbek and Eric Schaller an awful lot. I’ve recently discovered Cat Hellisen too, who has a new story collection out this year, and one of my GSFWC compadres, Cameron Johnston, publishes his first novel, The Traitor God, in the summer which I think Game Of Thrones type readers are going to love. In terms of short fiction, if you love beautifully crafted stories in various shades of strangeness, you should really be seeking out Ruth EJ Booth,Priya Sharma, Laura Mauro, and Georgina Bruce.

Fiona: Outside of family members, name one entity that supported your commitment to become a published author.

I joined a critique group called the Glasgow SF Writers Circle (gsfwc.co.uk) in 1993 and it has been right there with me ever since. The most important thing I’ve learned was to teach your inner editor to be unflinchingly honest.

Fiona: Do you see writing as a career?

I see it as a vocation, and on those terms I’m deeply ambitious. I’m not sure anyone can really make much of a living at it these days, alas.

Fiona: If you had to do it all over again, would you change anything in your latest book?

I don’t think so. Queen of Clouds was difficult to write, but I think I’m pretty happy with the outcome.

Fiona: Did you learn anything during the writing of your recent book?

Lots. But I’m always learning. I’ve been doing this for a couple of decades now and I’m still always learning. I wouldn’t want it any other way.

Fiona: If your book was made into a film, who would you like to play the lead?

For The Moon King there are three main characters. For Anton, an engineer, probably someone who can come across as slightly scatty but maintaining a keen focus beneath. In the old days I’d have suggested Peter Falk, but maybe someone like Mark Ruffalo could do the job. For the policeman, Mortlock, it’d have to be someone older, with a brooding physical presence – I could see a Liam Neeson type pulling that off. And for, the artist, Lottie? It’d have to be someone a bit unconventional, and for that I’d be delighted with a young Lori Petty.

Fiona: Any advice for other writers?

Read lots, write lots, seek the opinions of brutally honest people.

Fiona: Anything specific you want to tell your readers?

No, not really.I’m not sure what they’d want to hear!

Fiona: What book are you reading now?

The Book of Dirt by Gretchen Heffernan and Binary System by Eric Brown.

 Fiona: Do you remember the first book you read?

No, sorry. It was probably a Ladybird children’s book, but I don’t remember a specific one.

 Fiona: What makes you laugh/cry?

Onions do both to me. I find it ridiculous that one of our staple foods should have such an effect on us and yet we keep on eating them.

Fiona: Is there one person, past or present, you would love to meet? Why?

David Bowie. A few years back I wouldn’t have given this answer but since his death I’ve learned so much about him that I believe he was one of the most outstandingly creative people there’s ever been. And he loved to read too!

Fiona: Do you have any hobbies?

I’m a musician and cabaret performer – which is more of a second job than a hobby – so, I play a lot of piano.

Fiona: What TV shows/films do you enjoy watching?

That changes with the seasons. At the moment I’m enjoying the heck out the new series of Inside No9, and my favourite thing this year has been the Twin Peaks: The Return.

Fiona: Favorite foods, colors,  music?

Don’t have a favourite colour. Food varies with the season. It’s winter right now so I hanker for hearty, meaty stews with plenty of root veg and a hunk of fresh baked bread on the side.

In terms of music – I listen to music all the time, and like nothing better than discovering new bands. Recent finds that I’m enjoying include a German indie duo called GURR and a London-based art-rock outfit called Artificial Pleasure, but ask me next month and I’ll give you a different answer.

In terms of music to write to, I listen to a lot of film scores and instrumentals. Currently, I have a lot of Max Richter in my writing playlist.

Fiona: Imagine a future where you no longer write. What would you do?

Compose more music, I would think.

Fiona: What do you want written on your head stone?

I’ve honestly never given that any thought. Surely posterity is for others to decide, not for me to dictate?

Fiona: Do you have a blog or website readers can visit for updates, events and special offers?

https://neilwilliamson.blog/about/

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Neil-Williamson/e/B004FU9YYY/ref=sr_ntt_srch_lnk_1?qid=1515759071&sr=8-1

You can find me on Goodreads and LibraryThing and on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram, if those are your things.

 

Here is my interview with Al Burke

Hello and welcome to my blog, Author Interviews. My name is Fiona Mcvie.

 

Let’s get you introduced to everyone, shall we? Tell us your name. What is your age?

My name is Al Burke, and I’m 46.

Fiona: Where are you from?

 I live in Vancouver, Canada, but I’m from Dublin, Ireland. Moved here about eight years ago.

Fiona: A little about your self (ie,  your education, family life, etc.).

I have a wife and two awesome kids who keep me feeling young (and dumb). I work in my local library and like to read, watch movies/TV and listen to music. I go for occasional hikes too. Basically I do very little. Oh yeah, I also write. I have a degree in Philosophy.

Fiona: Tell us your latest news.

I’m currently working on some short stories based on folk horror, and also a trilogy based on Irish mythology. I have some others in the pipeline. I just need to focus and finish them one at a time.

Fiona: When and why did you begin writing?

I wrote about American college football (and some NFL) for about five years or so before I got burned out and decided to take a break. That’s when I decided to try a novel, which I had been planning for a couple of years previously.

Fiona: When did you first consider yourself a writer?

When I was started writing about football. I used to write when I was kid, and I did some other projects over the years, so I guess I was always was a writer.

Fiona: What inspired you to write your first book?

 I’d been thinking about it for some time, and finally took the plunge. Wandering the stacks of a library can have a strange effect on you too.

Fiona: How did you come up with the title?

Funnily, the title was the first thing I came up with. I have another book I’m working on that I already have the title for.

Fiona: Do you have a specific writing style? Is there anything about your style or genre that you find particularly challenging?

I’m not sure I have a particular style, but humour is definitely a factor (at least I like to think so). There’s also some smatterings of some philosophy in there too. I think the biggest challenge in almost every genre is staying fresh, creating your own voice/style.

Fiona: How much of the book is realistic and are experiences based on someone you know, or events in your own life?

 It’s fantasy, and I haven’t really based the characters on anyone I know. My folk horror is far more close to home. Some are stories I heard from my great uncle as a kid, and have some personal experiences thrown in for good measure.

Fiona: To craft your works, do you have to travel? Before or during the process?

 Only in my mind.

Fiona: Who designed the covers?

RL Weeks, who as as an author of some repute.

Fiona: Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?

I don’t preach. but I like to drop some earworms to get people thinking.

Fiona: Are there any new authors that have grasped your interest?  Who is your favorite writer, and what is it about their work that really strikes you?

 I could give you a list as long as my arm. I like authors who make their characters real – flawed just like the rest of us.

Fiona: Outside of family members, name one entity that supported your commitment to become a published author.

My local library (aka work).

Fiona: Do you see writing as a career?

 Not yet. Maybe never. I’m just having some fun right now. If it takes off, so be it, but I’m not quitting my job any time soon.

Fiona: If you had to do it all over again, would you change anything in your latest book?

The first edit.

Fiona: Did you learn anything during the writing of your recent book?

It’s a marathon, not a sprint. And it’s damn hard work, but rewarding.

 Fiona: If your book was made into a film, who would you like to play the lead?

Chris Hemsworth. Zach MacGowan for lead #2.

Fiona: Any advice for other writers?

 Sit your butt down and write. You’ll have good days and bad days, but stick it out.

Fiona: Anything specific you want to tell your readers?

Thanks for reading. Hopefully have something new sooner rather than later.

 Fiona: What book are you reading now?

The Art of War anthology. It’s outstanding.

 Fiona: Do you remember the first book you read?

Nope. I have read a ridiculous amount of books.

 Fiona: What makes you laugh/cry?

 Laugh? Everything, especially my kids. Never been much of a cryer, except when peeling onions. Maybe I have onion empathy.

 Fiona: Is there one person, past or present, you would love to meet? Why?

Somebody who owes me money. It’s a long list.

 Fiona: Do you have any hobbies?

 Nothing too exciting outside of reading and watching stuff or playing with my kids. I’m at a stage in life where I’m comfortable with that.

 Fiona: What TV shows/films do you enjoy watching?

Sci-fi or dark thrillers. Currently watching Black Mirror (literally, as I type this).

 Fiona: Favorite foods, colors,  music?

I always say steak for food, but I love a good burger. I could also eat chili every day. Favourite colours – Black? Blue? Don’t care a whole lot. Music – I have eclectic tastes depending on what I’m doing. When writing I like to listen to classical instrumental, particularly Beethoven.

 Fiona: Imagine a future where you no longer write. What would you do?

Read. Watch TV more than usual.

 Fiona: What do you want written on your head stone? S

top standing look at a rock and get on with your lives.

 Fiona: Do you have a blog or website readers can visit for updates, events and special offers?

You can find my sporadic posts at http://www.alwroteabook.com/

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Al-Burke/e/B01MT6POZ7/ref=dp_byline_cont_book_1

 

Here is my interview with James Quinlan Meservy

Hello and welcome to my blog, Author Interviews. My name is Fiona Mcvie.

 

Let’s get you introduced to everyone, shall we? Tell us your name. What is your age?

My name is James Quinlan Meservy, and I phrasing the question ‘what is your age’ is a very polite way of asking ‘how old are you?’

I have long considered age to be an irrelevant construct beyond one’s twenty-first birthday, and therefore I no longer keep track of my age.  So, to answer your question let it suffice for me to say that I was born in the year 1982.

Fiona: Where are you from?

In my immediate case, that question is far more complicated than you may have anticipated.  I am from the United States, and consider Mendon, Utah to be my home town, but I was born in Logan, Ut., and spent my childhood and teen years living in Logan, Ut.;  Hinesville, Georgia; Mendon, Ut.;  Randolph, Ut.; Springville, Ut.;  West Jordan, Ut.;  and Clearfield, Ut.  I presently reside in Idaho Falls, Idaho with my wife and children.

Fiona: A little about your self (ie,  your education, family life, etc.).

I am a graduate of Utah State University with a BA in Anthropology with an emphasis in Archaeology, and minors in Russian and Geology.

I was lucky enough to meet my wife while working at Island Park Scout Camp, which is operated by the Grand Teton Council of the Boy Scouts of America.  We married in 2005, and presently have four children.

My day job is driving a forklift in a warehouse in Idaho Falls, which is ironic considering how much I dislike operating motorized vehicles.

Fiona: Tell us your latest news.

Writing, writing, promoting my writing career, more writing, and providing for and spending time with my family consumes my life.  I am a rather boring yet focused individual who strives to stick on task until I have accomplished my goals, so at present my only news is that my book The United, is recently released with my new publisher, Cosby Media Productions.

Fiona: When and why did you begin writing?

I honestly do not remember when I started writing, I suppose I started writing creatively in grade school, and have never stopped.

Fiona: When did you first consider yourself a writer?

Funny you should ask this, I still do not consider myself to be writer. I consider myself to be a loving husband and father who happens to write books.

Fiona: What inspired you to write your first book?

When I was in fifth grade my teacher, Mrs. Card, assigned us to write a Halloween story.  And I thought of a story involving a wolf named Dark Fang, whose sole purpose was to capture human souls.  I called the story ‘Dark Fang.’  After I turned it in, my teacher told me I had true writing prowess, and offered to work with me to publish ‘Dark Fang’ as a short story.  I said no, not wanting to become a writer.

As the years went past, the story stayed with me and grew.  In seventh grade I was given another writing assignment and chose to write a Part 2 to the Dark Fang story.  Then in tenth grade, I wrote the concluding Part 3 of the Dark Fang short story series for yet another creative writing assignment.

Those original short stories became oral stories I shared around campfires while working at summer camps for the Boy Scouts of America.  Then I eventually transformed those stories into the book that is now called The United, Book 1 of the Realm of the Light (Rai Saga).

Fiona: How did you come up with the title?

That is a very interesting question, because I went through three or four different titles before finally settling on The United.  I am not even sure how it happened.  I was looking over my draft of the book, and thinking about how to improve it.  While reviewing and editing the text, I came upon the phrase ‘the united’ and I knew it was the title.

As for the rest of the title, The Realm of the Light is the book series that occur on the world referred to in the text as the Realm of the Light, which is located within the Universe of Rai.

Fiona: Do you have a specific writing style? Is there anything about your style or genre that you find particularly challenging?

The best thing about writing fantasy is also the most challenging.  When taking the reader to new realm of existence as the writer I am free make up my own rules of physics, physical behavior, indigenous flora and fauna, but herein lies my greatest challenge of writing either fantasy or science fiction.  I have to find the best way to describe what I am seeing in my mind’s eye so the reader is able to catch the same vision.

Fiona: How much of the book is realistic and are experiences based on someone you know, or events in your own life?

The specific events and experiences detailed in The United are to the best of my knowledge fictional.  However, I do have real personality quirks built into the characters that are based myself as well as some of my friends.

For example, I am hydrophobic, and I felt it fitting to share that trait with a main character.

Another example is based on one of my good friends from the Russian Federation.  She had this amusing habit of talking without breathing, so the longer she spoke her words came out faster and in a higher pitch, and the redder her face became.  When she was truly excited she could spit out entire paragraphs in a single breath, making it very difficult to understand her.  We affectionately called it her ‘chipmunk mode,’ and I loved it so much that I gave that trait to another one of my main characters.

Fiona: To craft your works, do you have to travel? Before or during the process?

I have never seen the need to travel for any part of my writing process, but that is because I am in the process of writing a fantasy series, where I let my imagination take control.

I strongly believe that if I ever write a historical fiction or a novel set in a specific city where the setting plays a vital role in the story, or something of that nature, it would be imperative to travel to be on site before writing to recreate the setting as accurately as possible.

Fiona: Who designed the covers?

The creative team at Cosby Media Productions designed this cover.  And I feel they did a great job, I have received multiple compliments on their behalf.

Fiona: Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?

Light is more powerful than darkness.

Fiona: Are there any new authors that have grasped your interest?  Who is your favorite writer, and what is it about their work that really strikes you?

There are two new authors that have grasped my interest.

First is N. R. Bergeson.  He only has one title out thus far (Magnificent Glass Globe), and I am anxiously awaiting his second, which he tells me is due to release later this year.

Second is James Dragon.  Dragon only has one title out at present (Sleighed, The North Pole Chronicles Book 1); but it was a magnificent read, and I look forward to reading more from him.

My favorite writer is Charles Dickens.  No doubt about it.  The first book of his I read was ‘Great Expectations,’ followed by ‘A Tale of Two Cities,’ and the third was ‘A Christmas Carol.’  And I was hooked.  I cannot describe it with words, but when I read his books I feel as if I am in Victorian England, and understand the main characters as though they were my family and dearest friends.

Fiona: Outside of family members, name one entity that supported your commitment to become a published author.

That is an easy question for me.  Cris Pasqueralle.

We first met a few years ago when I was starting out as a self-published author.  Cris was the first author to ask me for an author review exchange.  Then he was very helpful providing me with constructive ideas when my book was originally published by Tate Publishing.  Then after Tate Publishing went out of business in January 2017, it was Cris who recommended my work to Cosby Media Productions.

Fiona: Do you see writing as a career?

No, I do not.  I write because I have stories that need come out, the fact that I am a published author makes sharing my stories with the world quite a bit easier.

Fiona: If you had to do it all over again, would you change anything in your latest book?

Actually I would.  I originally wrote The United to take place in a realm exactly parallel to our own in virtually every regard.  If I could do it all over again, I would make it less of a parallel.  I would change names of cities and nations and work in a completely created, albeit closely tied, realm that is familiar yet alien to the reader.

I am content with what I created, but look for the next books in the Realm of the Light series to have a more imaginative setting.

Fiona: Did you learn anything during the writing of your recent book?

I learned how to write a compelling fantasy novel.

One of the reasons it took so long for me to turn the short stories of the ‘Dark Fang’ series into a novel was because my early drafts were not good.  In fact the early drafts were so predictable, so mind numbingly bogged down with pointless details and descriptions that I fell asleep as I attempted to write and edit my work.

At that point I realized I needed help learning how to write a compelling fantasy.  So I read and really analyzed my favorite fantasy novels, the Harry Potter series, the Lord of the Ring series, the Chronicles Narnia.  I also read a few nonfiction books on how to write, the most helpful of which was Stephen King’s ‘On Writing.’ Then I tried again, and again, and again.  Every draft was better than the last, and with each draft I was able to see my previous mistakes and improve upon it.

Eventually the novel became so compelling to read that I felt confident enough submit it publishers and literary agents, eventually signing on with Tate Publishing.

Fiona: If your book was made into a film, who would you like to play the lead?

I have actually given this a great deal of thought, and I would like the four leading roles to be played by virtually unknown actors and actresses.  If it ever turns to a film, I would like think back on it as a positive experience where I provided someone the opportunity to start or at least bolster their acting career.

Fiona: Any advice for other writers?

Just write, when you think you have written everything down you could possibly ever create, write some more.

Fiona: Anything specific you want to tell your readers?

Thank you for your support, and if you have any questions, comments, or constructive feedback, feel free to message me on Facebook or shoot me an email at jqm.serv@gmail.com.

Fiona: What book are you reading now?

Just yesterday I finished listening to the audio book, ‘Killing the Rising Son,’ by Bill O’Reilly, and started listening to ‘The Autobiography of Mark Twain, Vol. 1.’  And I am reading ‘The Count of Monte Cristo’ by Alexandre Dumas on my e-reader.

Fiona: Do you remember the first book you read?

By way of actual books, not children stories mind you but actual chapter books, I believe it was one of three titles.  In my fifth grade class, Mrs. Card assigned us to read.  I remember three books I read that year, but I forgot which was actually first.  As a class we read ‘The Island of the Blue Dolphins’ by Scott O’Dell.  For a book report on a book of my choosing I read ‘Julie of the Wolves,’ by Jean Craighead George.  Then in a group with five or six other student I read a biographical sketch of Jackie Robinson, unfortunately I cannot remember the title or author.

I clearly recall that ‘Julie of the Wolves’ was my favorite book that I read that year, a decision which was heavily influenced by my obsession with and lifelong love of wolves.

Fiona: What makes you laugh/cry?

The older I get the more I find myself crying during emotionally charged films, and occasionally while listening to emotionally powerful and personally relevant songs.

I rarely laugh.  My children are known to have asked their mom, ‘Why doesn’t daddy ever smile?’  However, in the event that I am overly tired, I will burst out laughing while quoting or watching ‘Monty Python and the Holy Grail.’

Otherwise I have a very sober personality.

Fiona: Is there one person, past or present, you would love to meet? Why?

The sad truth is that no one person comes to mind.  There are great heroes of the past, and it would be an honor to meet them, but I have nothing in common with them and would be completely lost in their cultural world view.  There are a few well known people of today I think it would be awesome to meet, but they have no idea who I am, and we have little to nothing in common.

So our conversation would start by me saying something like, “It is my pleasure to meet you.  I love your (music, books, archaeological research, athletic prowess, so on.)”   Then the other person would shake my hand and say something like, ‘Thank you.’ After which our conversation would either end or be forced, awkward, and uncomfortable for both parties.

But so as to not leave your question unanswered, I would have to say I would love to meet Cris Pasqueralle in person.  I can honestly say that at this time Cris is my best friend whom I have never had the opportunity to meet in person.

Fiona: Do you have any hobbies?

My hobbies are reading, spending time with my family, and writing.

And I will read anything from any author at least once, but my favorite books generally fall into the fantasy, and science fiction genres.

My family loves to watch movies together, play games, go hiking, read stories, and play together.

I generally write fantasy.  I love writing fantasy, and any time I try to write a project that is not fantasy, I find myself adding fantastical elements.

Fiona: What TV shows/films do you enjoy watching?

I have yet to find a TV drama that I enjoy.

There are a few TV sitcoms I really enjoy, ‘That 70s Show,’ ‘How I Met Your Mother,’ and ‘Everybody Loves Raymond,’ being the most notable titles.

I enjoy watching movies with my children, and our favorites are Disney animated classic features, and Pixar animated features.

Favorite movies includes ‘Batman: The Dark Knight,’ ‘Monty Python and Holy Grail,’ ‘Inception,’ ‘Stardust,’ just to name a few. Generally speaking however, my favorite films to watch are thought provoking films that I can watch and rewatch and rewatch, noticing something new with every view.

My favorite movie series comes from “a long time ago in a galaxy far, far way.”  I was first introduced to ‘A New Hope’ by my father as a young child, and my love of the Star Wars has only increased as I grew older.  Now I have the joy of sharing my love of the Star Wars franchise with my children.

Fiona: Favorite foods, colors, music?

My favorite foods are biscuits and gravy, hamburgers, and pizza.

My favorite colors are any shade of dark blue, dark red, and dark green.

My favorite music on the other hand is bit more complicated.  I do not really enjoy one particular genre of music over any other.  I will listen to any musical artist or group at least once if not twice regardless of their genre.  My favorite musical artists and groups include Sarah Brightman, Samantha Barks, the Moody Blues, Carrie Underwood, Fall Out Boy, the Piano Guys, Lindsey Stirling, but my absolute favorite musical artist is Garth Brooks.

Fiona: Imagine a future where you no longer write. What would you do?

 That is easy, I would spend my time reading, playing video games, and doing things with my family.

Fiona: What do you want written on your head stone?

I would rather not have a head stone, preferring cremation over burial.  But if I must have a head stone, I would like it to say:

James Quinlan Meservy

1982 – (Year of Death)

Fiona: Do you have a blog or website readers can visit for updates, events and special offers?

https://jqmserv.wordpress.com/

Or readers can follow my Author page on Facebook, James Quinlan Meservy – Author.

Here is the Amazon.com link to The United.

https://www.amazon.com/United-Realm-Light-Book-Saga/dp/1981985433/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1515434370&sr=8-1&keywords=james+meservy

 

Here is my interview with Noor De Olinad

Hello and welcome to my blog, Author Interviews. My name is Fiona Mcvie.

 

Let’s get you introduced to everyone, shall we? Tell us your name. What is your age?

My author name is Noor De Olinad and I just turned 30.

Fiona: Where are you from?

A straightforward question for most people but not in my case. I am a global citizen. Currently I live with my family in Australia but my ancestral roots are from a tiny mountain village in the Italian Alps through my father’s side, and in the Middle East through my mother’s side. For me homes is where my family is.

Fiona: A little about your self (ie,  your education, family life, etc.).

I am the oldest of two children and the dreamer of the family. My head is always in the clouds and I need my family to keep me grounded in reality. Luckily my little sister is very calm and rational. I suppose we are a bit like Elinor and Marianne from Sense and Sensibility. I am more like Marianne even though I am the oldest.

My academic background is in cultural anthropology, sociology, history and languages. In that, I take after my father who loves history and literature. He has travelled the world and when I was little I wanted to grow up and be just like him.Having said that, it was my mother who accidentally put me on the path of becoming a writer by telling me bed time stories when I was little. Alas, her dream of me becoming a doctor failed but it really is her own fault. She shouldn’t have told such good stories.

Fiona: Tell us your latest news.

Well, my book The Foreseen is available for purchase from all major ebook retailers and also available in print from major online bookstores like the Bookdepository. Combined with a book launch in February, it’s shaping up to be an exciting year!

Fiona: When and why did you begin writing?

I began by telling my little sister bed time stories at the age of 5 or 6 but I didn’t start to actually write them down until I was 12.  I wrote because I felt I had to. I had so many stories in my head and they demanded to be told. Mind you, they weren’t very good but thankfully my writing skills have improved since then!

Fiona: When did you first consider yourself a writer?

Actually to be perfectly honest I still do not think of myself as a writer. I think of myself as an aspiring writer but I have yet to make my mark on the literary world. Until then, I am a story teller like the ancient bards.

Fiona: What inspired you to write your first book?

My first book was actually a travel memoir called ‘Not a typical tourist in Israel and Jordan.’ I wrote it because I wanted to share my experiences with people and show them that people are essentially the same no matter where they come from. My second book, The Foreseen, was more of an escape from the pressure of a Masters degree. Then when my fur child Brülê died, it became a tribute to her.

Fiona: How did you come up with the title?

I tried several others but none of them seemed to fit and I kept coming back to the original one. I took it as a sign and kept the title as ‘The Foreseen’.

Fiona: Do you have a specific writing style? Is there anything about your style or genre that you find particularly challenging?

Maps. I have no sense of direction and I always get lost even in familiar territory so you can imagine the challenges of world building in a fantasy realm. Luckily my cover artist Mariya also drew my map for me. The one I tried to draw looked sadly like a 5 year old’s scribble…

Fiona: How much of the book is realistic and are experiences based on someone you know, or events in your own life?

Quite a bit. We have all experienced great challenges in our lives which left us thinking, ‘I can’t do this’.  Like Astra, many of us have had to do the unthinkable, the unbearable which broke our hearts but we did it for the sake of a loved one. It would amaze you the sacrifices you can make for the ones you love.  And of course, like Lumimost of us have had to say goodbye to a loved one at some point in our lives. That requires tremendous strength and resilience. We never know our own strength of spirit until we are tested.

Fiona: To craft your works, do you have to travel? Before or during the process?

I would love to do that but alas no, unless I become a best seller and then I can travel with the excuse that it is ‘research’ for my writing. I did however act out the sword fight scenes with my husband using kitchen wooden spoons to make sure I got the sequence and actions correct. He loved helping me develop those fight scenes.

Fiona: Who designed the covers?

I was lucky enough to find MariyaKrusheva on Etsy. Originally I tried to design my cover myself but after many failed attempts, I decided to leave it to a professional.

https://www.etsy.com/au/shop/MKDesignLife

Fiona: Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?

Yes. The way we are living is not only out of harmony with our natural world, it is destructive. By destroying our environment we are damming the human race. We will only truly prosper when we learn to respect the life around us of both fauna and flora.

Fiona: Outside of family members, name one entity that supported your commitment to become a published author.

I’m not sure if this is what you mean but I am going to name my doggy fur childBrülê who inspired the characters of Brör  andGreywülf. This book is in her memory. She taught me the true meaning of unconditional love and loyalty and I will never, ever forget her.

Fiona: Do you see writing as a career?

I dream of it and certainly hope it will become a career. Who wouldn’t want to get paid for doing what they love? Plus I would love to prove my parents wrong and show them that writers don’t starve!

Fiona: If you had to do it all over again, would you change anything in your latest book?

Probably not. The story has changed a lot since the first draft but the more I wrote, the more it seemed to acquire an existence of its own and led in a particular direction. It is what it was meant to be.

Fiona: Did you learn anything during the writing of your recent book?

Yes. PLAN! Writing when inspiration strikes will not work if you have not planned out your storyline properly. Also, research before you start writing!

Fiona: Any advice for other writers?

It is easy to dismiss ourselves and our dreams, to think we are not good enough and nobody will want to read our stories. Give yourself a chance. Better to have tried than always regret not trying and wondering ‘what if?’

Fiona: Anything specific you want to tell your readers?

It is deeply horrifying that in 2018 we still have so many cases of animal cruelty. Animals being tortured and mutilated for amusement, caged in zoos or on the streets – forced to perform for our amusement, their wild spirit broken so tourists can ride/pat or feed them. I simply ask, is this the kind of world you want your children to inherit?

Fiona: What book are you reading now?

Re-reading some childhood favourites like ‘Heidi’ and ‘The Secret Garden’. Turning 30 has made me feel very nostalgic of my childhood…

Fiona: Do you remember the first book you read?

I remember most of the books I read as a child but not precisely the first one. The one that stands out most in my mind though is the series of Asterix and Obelix, the two indomitable Gauls! I have always felt a great affinity for them which probably makes sense since my ancestors were the Italo-Gauls. Sometimes they are referred to as Celts.

Fiona: What makes you laugh/cry?

We laugh a lot in our household, and we love to laugh at ourselves. It is good for the spirit or we become in danger of taking ourselves too seriously. Anything can make us laugh – turning up on the wrong day for an appointment, burning the dinner because we were distracted watching funny videos on youtube…Really, it is the little things in life that give us most joy.

What makes me cry? The human species.It seems we have learnt very little from history and are doomed to repeat it. How depressing. Let us talk about something more cheerful.

Fiona: Is there one person, past or present, you would love to meet? Why?

From the past – Jane Austen. Her writing is the most elegant style I have ever read and I love her humour. She can make you think about serious social issues with a simple phrase, a small joke. Brilliant. If I had the chance to meet two people from the past, I would love to meet Queen Elizabeth the First. A woman ahead of her time, forging a path in a man’s world.

From the present  – I would love to meet Tamora Pierce and tell her that her writing inspired me to write my own stories. Her characters and stories are  the most realistic in their depiction of girls and women without turning them into sexualised fantasies.

Fiona: Do you have any hobbies?

I love to garden. Not that I am very good at it, but I love watching green things grow. My goal is to have an organic, sustainable edible garden but that is still a long way off. My other obsession is crochet – I love making crochet toys. As children, my sister and I would make some of our own toys and they had much more sentimental value than store bought ones. I am looking forward to having nieces and nephews to give them toys that have been lovingly made just for them.

Fiona: What TV shows/films do you enjoy watching?

My absolute favourites are the great British comedies of the 60s, 70s and 80s. Things like Are you being served?, Yes Minister etc. I love to laugh so comedy is my favourite thing to watch but I do also love watching Bollywood movies, Japanese, Korean and Taiwanese comedy series.

Fiona: Favorite foods, colors,  music?

Color: blue. Not baby blue but more of a luxurious peackok blue, or an elegant royal blue. Also turquoise.

Music: Very difficult to choose one and I have unusual taste. I love music from around the world like Andean flute music, yodeling from Austria and my favourite Bollywood songs. For writing I need to listen to epic writing mixes from Adrian Von Ziegler and Thomas Bergersen.

Food: I love trying new dishes. So far I have tried making Korean bibimbap, Japanese ramen noodle soup, Moroccan tagine and Indian curries.  That I am writing about it is evidence my husband and I have survived my cooking experiments and have lived to tell the tale. So it can’t have been that bad.

Fiona: Imagine a future where you no longer write. What would you do?

Difficult to imagine and I hope it never happens. I suppose if I had to pick a different path I might work with animals in a rescue centre, like caring for orphaned baby elephants and rhinos or abandoned dogs and cats.

Fiona: What do you want written on your head stone?

Something funny like “Wit is educated insolence.” (by Aristotle) in Latin so people would think it was a deeply profound statement.

Fiona: Do you have a blog or website readers can visit for updates, events and special offers?

Blog-site http://noordeolinad.wordpress.com/

Facebook page https://www.facebook.com/NoorDeOlinad

Amazon author page – https://www.amazon.com/Noor-De-Olinad/e/B00LQDR1CU

Goodreads – https://www.goodreads.com/NoorDeOlinad

 

Here is my interview with Leslie C. Halpern

Hello and welcome to my blog, Author Interviews. My name is Fiona Mcvie.

 

Let’s get you introduced to everyone, shall we? Tell us your name. What is your age?

 Leslie C.  Halpern.  I’m of legal age and then some.

 Fiona: Where are you from?

 I was raised in Louisville, Kentucky, but have lived most of my adult life in the Orlando, Florida, area.

 Fiona: A little about your self (ie,  your education, family life, etc.).

 I have a Master of Liberal Studies degree and a Bachelor of Arts degree in Journalism.

 Fiona: Tell us your latest news.

My most recent news is the release of my eighth book, a children’s poetry book titled Silly Sleepytime Poems. It delivers information about sleeping and dreaming  in a humorous way. It follows closely on the release of another book I wrote, a nonfiction book for adults titled 200 Love Lessons from the Movies: Staying Moonstruck for Life.

Fiona: When and why did you begin writing?

My first poem was published in the newspaper when I was in the third grade. I’ve been writing poems, articles, and stories ever since. I enjoy sharing ideas with other people and writing seems the perfect method of self-expression for me.

Fiona: When did you first consider yourself a writer?

That’s an interesting question. I think since my first poem was published as a child, I knew I enjoyed writing.  But I suppose I didn’t consider myself a real writer until I got paid for it, which was in high school when I wrote a regular teen column for a newspaper.

Fiona: What inspired you to write your first book?

 My first book, Dreams on Film: The Cinematic Struggle Between Art and Science, is an expanded version of my Master’s Thesis.  I added another 50 pages, 40 photographs, and tweaked the text a little to make the work more accessible for a general audience. I’ve always been fascinated by dreams and most of my career has been as an entertainment journalist writing about the film industry, so the book seemed a natural combination of my interests.

Fiona: How did you come up with the title?

I liked that 1980’s song from Duran Duran titled “Girls on Film.”  I just changed it a little to reflect the contents my book because it seemed like such a nice fit. It’s simple and direct: Dreams on Film.

Fiona: Do you have a specific writing style? Is there anything about your style or genre that you find particularly challenging?

I write in many different styles and genres. My children’s books are humorous poetry. My nonfiction books for adults range from scholarly to general readership.  I like the variety and don’t find it challenging to switch styles and genres.

Fiona: How much of the book is realistic and are experiences based on someone you know, or events in your own life?

My children’s poetry books, Silly Sleepytime Poems, Frogs Hogs Puppy Dogs, Shakes Cakes Frosted Flakes, and Rub Scrub Clean the Tub, are often based on funny things that actually happened to my son, his friends, myself, and my friends when we were young. My nonfiction books are based on my research and analysis.

Fiona: To craft your works, do you have to travel? Before or during the process?

No travel outside the state of Florida has been necessary for my books. Most of the interviews I’ve conducted were by phone or online, and sometimes an in-person interview with a visiting celebrity to the area.

Fiona: Who designed the covers?

My books have been published by several different publishers. They ask me for suggestions, which I provide, and then they hire their own designers to complete the job.

Fiona: Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?

In my most recent children’s book, Silly Sleepytime Poems, the work appears to be just light-hearted fun. But underneath it all, my message is that sleep is vital to your physical health and that understanding dreams is important for your mental health. I expound on these ideas in the resources pages in the back of the book.

Fiona: Are there any new authors that have grasped your interest?  Who is your favorite writer, and what is it about their work that really strikes you?

Most of my favorite writers are poets from the English Romantic era, such as Samuel Taylor Coleridge, and classic American poets, such as Emily Dickinson and Edgar Allan Poe.  I try to include lots of imagery, word play, and rhythm in my poetry for children.

Fiona: Outside of family members, name one entity that supported your commitment to become a published author.

Some of my professors in college and graduate school were encouraging.

Fiona: Do you see writing as a career?

Yes, writing in some form has always been my career.

Fiona: If you had to do it all over again, would you change anything in your latest book?

No. It’s just the way I want it.

Fiona: Did you learn anything during the writing of your recent book?

 I took more liberties with the writing style and visual design in my latest children’s book.  I think these changes (which begin a new series) are for the better.

 Fiona: If your book was made into a film, who would you like to play the lead?

 Silly Sleepytime Poems is not a novel, so the question doesn’t exactly apply in my case. However, if the poems were animated in a film, I would choose Seth McFarlane as the narrator.

Fiona: Any advice for other writers?

If you think writing is difficult, wait until you have to market the book! Writers must have very thick skins.

Fiona: Anything specific you want to tell your readers?

 Keep reading. It seems like each generation is reading less and less.

 Fiona: What book are you reading now?

 I’m re-reading some poetry collections to get inspired.

 Fiona: Do you remember the first book you read?

 Probably a Dr. Seuss book.Green Eggs and Ham, I think.

 Fiona: What makes you laugh/cry?

 Movies, books, television shows, commercials, real life.

 Fiona: Is there one person, past or present, you would love to meet? Why?

 I’d like to meet Dr. Seuss, Theodor Seuss Geisel. What an amazing talent!

 Fiona: Do you have any hobbies?

 My hobbies include gardening, home decorating, painting, going to the movies, and practicing yoga.

 Fiona: What TV shows/films do you enjoy watching?

 The list of TV shows and films I enjoy is extensive. I’m very open-minded in terms of entertainment.

 Fiona: Favorite foods, colors,  music?

 My favorite foods are currently foods that keep me healthy, which would be fruits and vegetables. I’ve always loved shades of purple and turquoise. I have a wide range of musical favorites, including alternative rock, classical, and pop.

 Fiona: Imagine a future where you no longer write. What would you do?

 Paint and create collage art.

 Fiona: What do you want written on your head stone?

 My name and years should be sufficient.

 Fiona: Do you have a blog or website readers can visit for updates, events and special offers?

 My website includes my blog and information about all my books:www.LeslieHalpern.com

 My Facebook fan pages:

https://www.facebook.com/LeslieCHalpern

https://www.facebook.com/funnychildrenspoems

 Amazon Author Page:

 https://www.amazon.com/Leslie-C-Halpern/e/B001H9PJT0/ref=dp_byline_cont_book_1

My books at Amazon.com (also available at Amazon.co.uk and other Amazon locations):

https://www.amazon.com/Silly-Sleepytime-Poems-Leslie-Halpern/dp/0999376306/

 

https://www.amazon.com/200-Love-Lessons-Movies-Moonstruck/dp/1630761370/

 

https://www.amazon.com/Dreams-Film-Cinematic-Struggle-Between/dp/0786415967/

 

https://www.amazon.com/Frogs-Hogs-Puppy-Dogs-Childrens/dp/069225899X/

https://www.amazon.com/Shakes-Cakes-Frosted-Flakes-Childrens/dp/0615883265/

https://www.amazon.com/Rub-Scrub-Clean-Tub-Self-Image/dp/1478254750/

 

https://www.amazon.com/Passionate-About-Their-Work-Celebrities/dp/159393548X/

https://www.amazon.com/Reel-Romance-Lovers-Guide-Movies/dp/1589790642/

 

 

Here is my interview with Linda Watkins

Hello and welcome to my blog, Author Interviews. My name is Fiona Mcvie.

 

Let’s get you introduced to everyone, shall we? Tell us your name. What is your age?

Hi, my name is Linda Watkins and I am ageless.

Fiona: Where are you from?

I was born in New England. My family moved to Michigan when I was four and I stayed there until I graduated from college (Carnegie Mellon ’70). After that, I moved to the San Francisco Bay Area where I lived most of my adult life. In 2006, I took the plunge and, with my four rescue dogs, moved to a remote island off the coast of Maine. Currently, I reside in Sedona, Arizona.

Fiona: A little about your self (ie,  your education, family life, etc.).

I have a B.A. in Psychology from Carnegie Mellon University. I completed one year of graduate study but then, tired of school, dropped out and moved to San Francisco. Currently, I am single and live with my two rescue dogs.

Fiona: Tell us your latest news.

I have recently published two books, one a full-length novel, Summer Girl, and the other a novella, Sarah & Zoey. Both are available in eBook and paperback formats. In addition, I am currently working on a book for inclusion in the multi-author box-set; genre – romantic suspense.

Fiona: When and why did you begin writing?

I began writing my first novel when I lived on the island in Maine. I’d written a lot in the past, but mostly songs and poems – nothing published, just for fun. In 2011, I decided I’d try my hand at a book. The result was my award-winning debut work, Mateguas Island: A Novel of Terror and Suspense.

Fiona: When did you first consider yourself a writer?

I don’t think I really thought about it much. I guess you could say I first considered myself to be a real ‘writer’ after I publishedMateguas and held the paperback version in my hand. That was a definite thrill!

Fiona: What inspired you to write your first book?

I’m not sure. I’ve had stories running around in my head for years and, finally, decided to see if I had the wherewithal to actually put one of them on virtual paper. The setting for Mateguas mirrored where I lived so, I guess, in a way, Chebeague Island, Maine was my inspiration. The story itself evolved rapidly and, at times, it seemed as if it were being ‘channelled’ through me by some outside force!

 Fiona: How did you come up with the title?

It just seemed right.

Fiona: Do you have a specific writing style? Is there anything about your style or genre that you find particularly challenging?

I don’t think I have a specific writing style. The Mateguas Island books and Sarah & Zoeyare all written in the 3rd person.Summer Girl is written in the first person – the story seen through three distinct points of view. My current work in progress and the prequel to that novel are both written from the 1st person point of view. Most of my editorial reviews comment on the strength of my characterization – on how real and complex my characters are. That, I think, is one thing that sets me apart from many other writers.

Fiona: How much of the book is realistic and are experiences based on someone you know, or events in your own life?

The plotsand characters in my novels are all figments of my imagination. None of the characters mirror anyone I know or knew in real life.

Fiona: To craft your works, do you have to travel? Before or during the process?

Nope, no actual travel necessary. My trips are all in my mind.

Fiona: Who designed the covers?

For the Mateguas Books, the front and rear cover photographs are all ones I took while living on Chebeague Island. My friend, H. William Ruback, did the colorizations and design layout.

For Summer Girl and Sarah & Zoey, I used cover artist, Jessica Ozment.

Fiona: Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?

The Mateguas Books are just for fun. No hidden messages.

Summer Girl tackles a more serious subject – child abuse – and it conveys a serious message.Sarah & Zoey also deals with serious subjects – spousal and animal abuse and loss. I guess the message I’m sending is that, through love and friendship, you can get on and that there is nothing quite like the unconditional love you get from a dog.

Fiona: Are there any new authors that have grasped your interest?  Who is your favourite writer, and what is it about their work that really strikes you?

New authors:

I just read a book of shorts by Gwendolyn Kiste(And Her Smile Will Untether the Universe) – absolutely brilliant. Her stories are strange and gripping. I will be looking for more from her.

Also, Abby Geni, author of the most beautiful book, The Lightkeepers. She painted pictures with her words. The book moved me terribly.

Favourite Authors:

Stephen King – his characterization is superb. Favourite book – toss-up between The Stand, It, Salem’s Lot, and The Shining. All are classics in the genre.

John Fowles – The Magus is my favourite book of all time. Each time I read it, I learn something new.

Peter Straub – a master of horror. Favourite book, Shadowland.

Fiona: Outside of family members, name one entity that supported your commitment to become a published author.

My writing group in Michigan: Argon Press.

Fiona: Do you see writing as a career?

In the sense that you don’t make any real money, no. But, it’s not a hobby, either!

Fiona: If you had to do it all over again, would you change anything in your latest book?

Nope! I stand by my writing.

Fiona: Did you learn anything during the writing of your recent book?

For Storm Island, I had to do some research related to witches and witchery in the colonies in the 1600’s. For the Mateguas books, research into Abenaki and other north-eastern tribes was essential.

Fiona: If your book was made into a film, who would you like to play the lead?

If Mateguas were made into a film/series, I think CateBlanchett or someone like her would be great as Karen.

Fiona: Any advice for other writers?

Just keep writing and reading. And, always, hire a professional editor to proof your work!

Fiona: Anything specific you want to tell your readers?

First of all, I love you! Secondly, be patient – I’ll get to that 4th Mateguas novel soon! Also, I think you’re going to like the Kate Pomeroy series – she’s not quite a ‘Karen,’ but she’s feisty!

Fiona: What book are you reading now?

Fire & Fury – the one about our, dare I use the word, President.

Fiona: Do you remember the first book you read?

Nope. Have no idea. It was too long ago. I remember reading The Last of the Mohicans when I was a kid, but I know I read something before that – probably,Nancy Drew or the Hardy Boys. When I was young, I was a solitary child and I read anything and everything I could get my hands on. I even read all my father’s Mickey Spillane dime novels.

Fiona: What makes you laugh/cry?

Remembering my dog, Splatter, who passed on the first day of summer, 2017, makes me cry every day. Watching my two new dogs play, makes me laugh.

Fiona: Is there one person, past or present, you would love to meet? Why?

Stephen King. Because he’s not only a great writer, but a great human being.

Fiona: Do you have any hobbies?

My dogs.

Fiona: What TV shows/films do you enjoy watching?

Lots of series: Game of Thrones, The Handmaid’s Tale, The Affair, Homeland, Stranger Things, Ozark, etc. Basically, anything that is character-driven and well-made.

For films, good horror. And by that I mean ‘intelligent horror,’ not blood, guts, and gore.

Fiona: Favorite foods, colors,  music?

Foods: Italian and Chinese

Colors: Orange, Blue

Music: Classic Rock and folk (Joan Baez, Judy Collins, Leonard Cohen).

Fiona: Imagine a future where you no longer write. What would you do?

Die.

Fiona: What do you want written on your head stone?

She loved her dogs.

Fiona: Do you have a blog or website readers can visit for updates, events and special offers?

Yes, I have three websites.

www.lindawatkins-author.com

www.lindawatkins.biz (blog)

www.mateguasisland.com (specifically for the Mateguas Island Series)

Links to my works:

MATEGUAS ISLAND:

  • MATEGUAS ISLAND, A NOVEL OF TERROR & SUSPENSE

Amazon: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00K0SDP9K/ref=series_dp_rw_ca_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1482326175&sr=8-4

Barnes & Noble: https://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/mateguas-island-linda-watkins/1119612360?ean=2940149980277

Kobo: https://www.kobo.com/us/en/ebook/mateguas-island

GooglePlay: https://play.google.com/store/books/details/Linda_Watkins_MATEGUAS_ISLAND?id=Kp8EAwAAQBAJ

iBooks: http://itunes.apple.com/us/book/isbn9780991055456

  • RETURN TO MATEGUAS ISLAND

Amazon: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00PQZH8Y0/ref=series_rw_dp_sw

Barnes & Noble: https://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/return-to-mateguas-island-linda-watkins/1121640662?ean=2940151236010

Kobo: https://www.kobo.com/us/en/ebook/return-to-mateguas-island

GooglePlay: https://play.google.com/store/books/details/Linda_Watkins_RETURN_TO_MATEGUAS_ISLAND?id=2m_GCwAAQBAJ

iBooks:  http://itunes.apple.com/us/book/isbn9780991055487

  • GHOSTS OF MATEGUAS

Amazon: https://www.amazon.com/Ghosts-Mateguas-Island-Novel-ebook/dp/B01BJ38QAW

Barnes & Noble: https://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/ghosts-of-mateguas-linda-watkins/1123742354?ean=2940157740245

 

Link to Amazon Author Page:

https://www.amazon.com/-/e/B00HQOY94Q