Here is my interview with Elizabeth Coldwell

 

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Name Elizabeth Coldwell

Age 50

Where are you from

Born in Rotherham, South Yorkshire. Now living in London

A little about your self `ie your education Family life etc

I was the editor of Forum magazine for the best part of twenty years. When I left there, I made the decision to devote myself to writing fiction (as well as being a minding service for our two cats, who like to help me out by strolling across my laptop keyboard from time to time).

 

Fiona: Tell us your latest news?

I’ve just had a novella accepted for Tirgearr’s City Nights series. It’s set in Brussels and features a mixture of suspense and hot romance.


Fiona: When and why did you begin writing?

I’ve always written, ever since I was small. My parents have the first book I ever wrote, when I was about ten, in a drawer at their home.


Fiona: When did you first consider yourself a writer?

When I was at university, I had a couple of pieces published by a Leicester-based magazine. I didn’t know then that I would definitely become a full-time writer, but it was my first taste of what it’s like to write to a deadline and meet a word count.


Fiona: What inspired you to write your first book?

I reviewed a novel for Forum which I thought was truly terrible, and I was convinced I could come up with something better. I was on the train back to London, having been to the Isle of White to interview a couple who ran a specialist publishing house there, and I plotted out the book on the back of the timetable. That outline became Calendar Girl, which was published by the now defunct Headline Liaison imprint.


Fiona: Do you have a specific writing style?

Not one that I’ve deliberately worked on, though it has been remarked on by reviewers. The best description of it was ‘elegantly debauched’.


Fiona: How did you come up with the title?

For One Night In Brussels, my contribution to the City Nights series, I was following the format, which is One Night In… plus the name of the city where the story’s set. But I like to have fun with my titles. I wrote a novella called Stranded In Paradise – the title popped into my head first, then I had to work out where Paradise was and who was stranded there.


Fiona: Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?

I’m not really a ‘message’ author. If people read things into my books, that’s fine, but I’m not trying to preach to anyone or persuade them to think a certain way.


Fiona: How much of the book is realistic?

The setting of One Night In Brussels, very much so. I wanted to showcase what an interesting city Brussels is. Everyone seems to have the impression that Belgium is a boring country, but actually a lot of quirky things happen there. As for a couple meeting, enjoying the hottest sex of their life and getting involved in a life-or-death situation all on the same night – well, obviously a lot of that is fantasy but it’s what the genre requires.


Fiona: Are experiences based on someone you know, or events in your own life?

No, the hero and heroine are entirely fictional, though I’d like to think they appear like ordinary people so the readers can identify them.


Fiona: What books have most influenced your life most?

I don’t recall the name of the book, but it’s one an English teacher used to set our lessons when I was about 14. It dealt with things like use of the semi-colon in a fun way that allowed you to use your imagination, and it helped those principles of grammar to stick with me.


Fiona: What book are you reading now?

A compilation of the Molesworth books, by Willans and Searle. Even though the English public school system of the 1950s is completely alien in this century, the concept of Molesworth never stops being funny.


Fiona: Are there any new authors that have grasped your interest?

I discovered a couple of new names when I was editing for Xcite, including Demelza Hart and Seren Ellis-Owen. I’d like to read more by both of them.


Fiona: What are your current projects?

I’m writing the Lionhearts series of paranormal novels for Totally Bound, and at the moment I’m most of the way through the fifth book. This one’s about the relationship between a detective and a firefighter, and I’ve been doing research into topics including arson, so I’m expecting to be placed on some kind of government watchlist. *grins* And I have plans to finish a mainstream contemporary romance, but working on a series has meant that’s gone on the back burner.


Fiona: Name one entity that you feel supported you outside of family members.

My friend Gwenn. We have a shared sense of humour that baffles just about everyone else, and some of my better ideas have come from visiting various places with her.


Fiona: Do you see writing as a career?

Very much so.


Fiona: If you had to do it all over again, would you change anything in your latest book?

No, I’m very happy with the way it turned out.


Fiona: Do you recall how your interest in writing originated?

I’ve always enjoyed writing stories. I think everybody has one thing they love and are good at, and in my case I’m lucky enough to do it full time.


Fiona: Is there anything you find particularly challenging in your writing?

Keeping everything fresh. I never want to feel that I’m churning out words for the sake of them.


Fiona: Who is your favorite author and what is it that really strikes you about their work?

It’s hard to pin it down to one author, but I particularly enjoy the books of Donna Tartt. I like the way she can write in the first person as a male character and be so convincing.


Fiona: Do you have to travel much concerning your book(s)?

I tend to write about places I’ve already been to, rather than ones I have to visit. Thanks to the Internet, you can do a lot of research about a city without actually having to travel there.

 

 


Fiona: What was the hardest part of writing your book?

The hardest part hasn’t come yet – that’s usually the editing stage, when you have to go through the book again and either make changes or fight to keep a line the way it is.


Fiona: Do you have any advice for other writers?

Just keep at it, and don’t be put off by rejection – it happens to all of us.


Fiona: Do you have anything specific that you want to say to your readers?

Thank you, and I hope you enjoy what I’ve written.

 

Fiona: Do you remember the first book you read?

I can’t remember the title, but I remember reading it out loud on the way back from the library and my mother being convinced I’d read it before. (I hadn’t). I wasn’t quite three at the time, and it’s probably my earliest memory.

Fiona: What makes you laugh/cry?

Nothing has ever made me laugh as much as Bill Shipton, who edited Splosh! magazine and was a fund of endlessly hilarious anecdotes. The fact he’s not around to share them any more makes me cry.

Fiona: Is there one person past or present you would meet and why?

Delia Smith, so we could discuss cooking and football.

Fiona: What do you want written on your head stone and why ?

A line from the comedy show Absolutely: ‘Dead, dead, dead as you like. Thank you very much and goodnight’. I couldn’t put it any better

Fiona: Other than writing do you have any hobbies ?

I support Rotherham United, so in the football season most of my Saturdays are spent watching them play. I also do a lot of baking – I’m experimenting with different types of bread at the moment.

Fiona: What TV shows/films do you enjoy watching?

I love The Soup, which is the E! clip show that highlights all the absurdities of reality TV and home shopping channels, I like the quiz show Pointless, particularly when I come up with pointless answers while I’m watching and I’m currently getting into Wayward Pines. Other than that, you’ll mostly find me watching sport of some kind.

Fiona: Favorite foods / Colors/ Music

Food – cheese. I eat so much of it, my brother reckons I must be part mouse.

Colours – blue and green

Music – big, pompous rock music, like Asia and Muse

Fiona: If you were not a writer what else would you like to have done?

Possibly something involving food. But the great thing about being a writer is that you get to experience so many different careers via your characters. I’ve been everything from a rock star to the wife of a billionaire to the person who sorts the post in a large corporation.

 

Fiona: Do you have a blog/website? If so what is it?

It’s called The (Really) Naughty Corner, and it’s at http://elizabethcoldwell.wordpress.com

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Details of the City Nights series are at http://tirgearrpublishing.com/authors/City_Nights/index.htm

 

Here is my interview with Deb Peters

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Name: My Pen name is Deb Peters, but I have also been known as my given name Deborah Peters

Age: 49 soon to be 50 6/16

Where are you from:

I grew up mostly in Ohio and have lived here on and off for most my life.

A little about your self `ie your education Family life etc  :

I’m an award winning author that has had 20 years in the medical field and am a veteran mother of two grown kids. I have degrees in both the medical field and writing fields.

Fiona: Tell us your latest news?

Being interviewed by Women of Distinction Magazine’s fall edition


Fiona: When and why did you begin writing?

1996, when I had a composition class and my instructor asked me why writing wasn’t my career choice. I decided to do it as a hobby.


Fiona: When did you first consider yourself a writer?

In 2000 I started writing passionately and never looked back


Fiona: What inspired you to write your first book?

Not what really who. My son Troy was only 6 when he supported my writing


Fiona: Do you have a specific writing style?

Not really. I can write all dialog, poetry, non-fiction and fiction, for all ages

 

 

Fiona: How did you come up with the title?

I cam up with each of my book title’s in different ways. Most of the time, they just come to me. Some time’s I use what’s called a writer’s diagram. Usually the title has to do with something that happens in the book.


Fiona: Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?

I actually want the reader to enjoy reading. I enjoy the fact when it inspires them to make their lives happy.


Fiona: How much of the book is realistic?

I have lived a very full and action packed life. I’m not going to lie and say that I haven’t used my experiences to help with writing even my fiction books.


Fiona: Are experiences based on someone you know, or events in your own life?

More then likely yes. I also have a very vivid imagination.


Fiona: What books have most influenced your life most? a mentor?

People influenced my life more. Mysteries and crime have been a motivation for me to write something with intrigue and wonder; with twists and turns and right from the beginning.

My son was more a mentor for me as he grew up. I had some instructors that I would like to say made me keep writing. One especially claimed that he would have to watch out for me when it comes to writing Historical Fiction. I thought I had no chance because I got low grades in history.


Fiona: What book are you reading now?

I’m not. I’m a mentor to new authors, so am reading books by new authors at this time.


Fiona: Are there any new authors that have grasped your interest?

D. L.Barnes, Carol Boshears, June Betts

Fiona: What are your current projects?

I usually work on three at a time. However right now, I am working on more then that to come out by August.
SKUNK AGE=Children’s picture book
TOPSY TURVY=Children’s picture book
CROW’S SONG=continuing the BARREL RACING series (kids short story)
BRINGING UP BEN=continuing the BLINDING SNOW series (YA short story)
STUDENT BODY=YA thriller novel
DEEP CORTEX=Adult combination thriller series-continuing
UNDER THE SURFACE
PIED PIPER=Adult Christmas thriller series
I do have other I am working on, but wish not to disclose the titles to until I am closer to finishing them.

Fiona: Name one entity that you feel supported you outside of family members.

I have a support team of friends, to name just one would not be fair to the many who have had and are still supporting me through my writing life.


Fiona: Do you see writing as a career?

I am a disabled veteran. I have been published since 2004. I have won awards for my professionalism in the writing field. When I have treated writing as my life choice and have actually published, I would say yes. If I have inspired at least one person with my stories or non-fiction material, then yes.  Am I getting paid to write? No. Am I thinking of getting paid? It is a possibility that I might offer other authors the chance for me to be their coach/mentor. I might also decide to teach writing, because I have a degree in it, but at this time-it is just very rewarding to me when I see I have helped someone through my words on a page.


Fiona: If you had to do it all over again, would you change anything in your latest book?

I would like to add The last two years to the non-fiction book AGAINST ALL ODDS and I would like to add 50 pages to the book THE DISEASE AND ME
I would like to add some pages to the book THE END

 

 

 

Fiona: Do you recall how your interest in writing originated?
I had an English teacher in high school that wrote me a poem and I always wondered what it would be like to write. When I was confronted with composition classes in 1996, I had to write-it brought back those feelings and that is when I came up with my first 250 ideas.

 


Fiona: Is there anything you find particularly challenging in your writing?

Talking about myself when it comes to non-fiction


Fiona: Who is your favorite author and what is it that really strikes you about their work?

I’m totally on the edge of my seat with either Mary Higgins Clark and Tess Gerritsen. I didn’t imagine I could write what I dub Medical Thriller’s until I read Tess’s work. Adult crime suspense with twists became intriguing for me to try thanks to Mary’s work.


Fiona: Do you have to travel much concerning your book(s)?

I would like to do book tours, but I do not travel outside of Ohio for my books at this time.


Fiona: Who designed the covers?

My books with Authorhouse: I designed the covers from pictures I had or got from the publishers choice of pictures.

My books Adult and Young Adult on LuLu: I used a cover choice of the publishers pictures or made my own. 100 DAYS STRESS FREE I paid for the picture. Sannel Larson has been working on some book cover designs for my YA books as well.

My Children’s picture books: THE BIG’S series I drew myself. HOW HENRY FROG BECAME KING and SKUNK AGE were illustrated by Sannel Larson.

 

 

Fiona: What was the hardest part of writing your book?

When I come up with other book ideas while I’m working on the one’s I have started. Not having writer’s block is my main problem. I can’t shut it off.


Fiona: Did you learn anything from writing your book and what was it?

I’m proud of myself when I go back and read the books and think “I wrote that, wow that is good.” See, I lacked confidence in anything I did as I grew up.  I have also been called “One Smart Cookie.” I would say that each time I write a different style or smash my goals I learn something. That I am doing what makes me happy and inspiring others to try. Not to let even yourself stand in your way of making your dreams come true.


Fiona: Do you have any advice for other writers?

Write each day, even if it is one sentence. Be persistent and patient with others in the writing field. Expect to put a lot of time and energy into this field, if you want to become an author. Start with small press publishers-possibly look it up in the Literary Market Guide on-line or in libraries. Know your market and know how to write query letters and any other letters that have great hooks for the agent or publisher your sending to. If you want instant money with writing, look into freelance or other writing assignments through maybe magazines.


Fiona: Do you have anything specific that you want to say to your readers?

I’m the GO TO GAL of genres for a reason. I wish to offer reading enjoyment to as many people as possible who like different genres.

I hope you enjoy your journey wherever it may lead you. And if it leads you to my books, if you don’t see a genre you like; e-mail me your choice and I will see what I can do. I do have some genres I will never delve into, but would hope to please an maybe inspire you to enjoy reading more.

Fiona: Do you remember the first book you read?

I’m almost 50, so I don’t. I do remember a book that stands out the most.
DANA: THE YEAR BEFORE THE MAST. I hope to pick up a copy as memory of how well I liked it.

Fiona: What makes you laugh/cry?

On TV or in MOVIES: comedies make me laugh and sad romances make me cry.

Very few people have made me laugh. Might make me smile, but laugh-is hard.
These days I cry at the drop of a hat-hormones. Normally it is something sad.
A few friends make me laugh, and when I do, I laugh so hard.
I have heard laughter is the best medicine, so am trying to find more things to laugh about. When I have, it has made my day better.

Fiona: Is there one person past or present you would meet and why?

PAST: FDR; I have held him most of all presidents in my memory

NOW:

Fiona: What do you want written on your head stone and why ?

Since I plan to be cremated and no obit done, this does not fit me in reality.

Name rank and Serial number-lol :)

Fiona: Other than writing do you have any hobbies ?

Cross-stitch/Embroidery/Sewing, Singing, Drawing, Research for my books, Reading, Movies, and board games when it is with someone.

Fiona: What TV shows/films do you enjoy watching?

I have not had TV since August of lat year, but when I did=I watched comedies or mysteries. CSI, NCSI, MASH, FRIENDS, BODY OF PROOF, LIE TO ME
Movies: romances, action packed, comedies, very small amount of scarey
REIGN OF FIRE, GONE IN 60 SECONDS, WEDDING DATE, PRINCESS DIARIES, ED, SALT

Fiona: Favorite foods / Colors/ Music

Italian or Chinese: Lasagna or Orange Beef Stirfy
My all time favorite meal: Prime Rib with Baked potato and Steamed veggies with carrot cake

My favorite color use to be blue-I have no idea why it changed over the years. I love oranges and reds-bright colors. I’m now liking pink as long as it is a darker color like my hat.

I like all kinds of soft rock and some country, but over the years I have acquired a mood for Jazz and Rhythm and Blues. I tend to want to sing it as well as listen to it.

 

Fiona: If you were not a writer what else would you like to have done?

I was in the medical field for 20 plus years. In high school I wanted to be a singer and I did that for awhile, so wouldn’t mind doing that again. Maybe a saxophone player or illustrator. Be in a relationship for more 40 plus years. My grandparents were married 60 plus years almost 70 before one or the other passed away: I would like to have that longevity.  

Fiona: Do you have a blog/website? If so what is it?

Www.facebook.com/yourjourneyawaits

www.lulu.com/spotlight/deblynn

I have a blog I just started up

www.yourjourneyawaits.blogspot.com

I had two websites and no one ever went to them, so took them down

I am on TWITTER and LINKED-IN.

I also have some books at AUTHORHOUSE, AMAZON, BARNESANDNOBLE, and other on-line book sites.

Some of my books can be ordered in any Barnes and Noble book store all over the USA. And you can actually ask your local book store if they can order one of my books for you.

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Here is my interview with Penelope Douglas

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Name: Penelope Douglas

Age: Forever Young

Where are you from: Dubuque, Iowa, USA

A little about your self `ie your education Family life etc  

I grew up in the Midwest, the oldest of five children. I have two younger sisters, Lisa and Kiley, as well as two younger brothers, Doug and Scot. My childhood was pretty tumultuous, but I think it gave me a very good idea of what I didn’t want for myself or my own child.

At 21, I finally decided to go to college. I studied Public Administration (Political Science, basically) at the University of Northern Iowa and then realized I wanted to teach. I attended Loyola University after that and earned my Master’s degree in Education. I got a teaching job in Las Vegas, dragged my fiancé with me, and nearly nine years later we’re still here, only now married with a daughter.

Fiona: Tell us your latest news?

Well, my latest WIP is done. Misconduct will release December 1st. I am now working on a dark romance, Corrupt.


Fiona: When and why did you begin writing?

I was bored, basically. Teaching was rewarding, and I loved the kids, but I wasn’t getting ahead. I felt like I was stuck and had stopped moving forward. I had started reading to escape the day to day monotony and discovered New Adult. I loved it! I like young love stories, and after reading tons of books, I started dreaming up my own stories. I didn’t set out to write Bully. The idea just came to me, and after months of dreaming about Jared and Tate, I finally sat down to write it.


Fiona: When did you first consider yourself a writer?

When Bully took off. Getting the validation from readers and bloggers made me feel like I had something good to offer in the book world.

 


Fiona: Do you have a specific writing style?

I don’t know. I think that’s more of a question for readers. I like to write first person, past tense. I also work very hard on character development and voice. I don’t stand on the outside and describe what the character’s feeling or doing. I’m in their head, telling you what I AM feeling and doing in that moment.


Fiona: How did you come up with the title?

I thought it would catch readers’ attention. I almost called Bully, Fall Away Lane, but with the amount of books out there, I needed a cover and title that would get people to stop and click on it.


Fiona: Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?

Oh, yes. In every book. The basic message of the entire Fall Away series is that we all have a story, even your worst enemies, and that life goes on despite mistakes and setbacks.


Fiona: How much of the book is realistic?

I channeled real experiences or feelings and dreamed up situations to go with that. Did any specific scene actually happen to me in real life? No. But it may have happened to a lesser extent or in a different way. The emotions and thoughts were real.


Fiona: What books have most influenced your life most? a mentor?

Johanna Lindsey was my first experience into romance, but other than that, I look up to Colleen Hoover, Tijan, and Abbi Glines. Each of them has nurtured a love of romance.
Fiona: What book are you reading now?

Toxic by Kim Karr

Fiona: Are there any new authors that have grasped your interest?

Stylo Fantome. She takes chances and blows my mind. Love her stuff!


Fiona: What are your current projects?

Editing Misconduct and writing Corrupt.


Fiona: Name one entity that you feel supported you outside of family members.

My agent, Jane Dystel. She makes me feel important, even though she represents authors much bigger than me.


Fiona: Do you see writing as a career?

Yes. The story ideas keep coming!


Fiona: If you had to do it all over again, would you change anything in your latest book?

I would change something in every book. I don’t think anything I write is perfect, and I can’t imagine any author does. We’re our biggest critics.


Fiona: Do you recall how your interest in writing originated?

I always liked words, writing poems and such when I was young. And I’m not a good public speaker, so writing is easier.

Fiona: Can you share a little of your current work with us?

It’s still being edited, so I’d rather not just yet.


Fiona: Is there anything you find particularly challenging in your writing?

Doubt. I’m constantly wondering if I this or that should be different. Did I make the right choices? What are people going to say?
Fiona: Who is your favorite author and what is it that really strikes you about their work?

I don’t have a favorite. My interests change a lot.


Fiona: Do you have to travel much concerning your book(s)?

I don’t have to, but I do for signings. It’s fun to meet readers and see new places.


Fiona: Who designed the covers?

Kari and Cover to Cover Designs designed the original Bully and Until You with the red and blue letterings. Now, my publisher does it.


Fiona: What was the hardest part of writing your book?

Writing it. LOL…Dreaming is fun. Going on Pinterest to visualize is addicting. But sitting down to write, knowing you have to dig deep and channel those feelings, it’s not easy. It’s far from easy.


Fiona: Did you learn anything from writing your book and what was it?

I learned a lot. Most of all, your editor is your best friend. They are a good judge of how the public will see your work, so trust them and, for the most part, do what they say.


Fiona: Do you have any advice for other writers?

Everyone digests books differently. What one person hated, a hundred others will love. You will NEVER make everyone happy. Don’t take it too much to heart.


Fiona: Do you have anything specific that you want to say to your readers?

Thank you for reading and supporting me. Without you, I’d be sunk.

Fiona: Do you remember the first book you read?

No, but the first chapter book I read was a Sweet Valley High book, I think.

Fiona: What makes you laugh/cry?

Ricky Gervais and George Carlin make me laugh. The movie Rudy makes me cry. Every damn time.

Fiona: Is there one person pass or present you would meet and why?

No, I’m shy.

Fiona: What do you want written on your head stone and why?

Since I’d prefer to be cremated, I guess not much, but I would love for someone to say “Because of her, my life is better.” at my funeral.

Fiona: Other than writing do you have any hobbies?

I love hiking. Walking with my iPod is the great escape.

Fiona: What TV shows/films do you enjoy watching?

I love sports movies, like Rudy, Hoosiers, and Miracle. I also watch The Vikings, The 100, Game of Thrones, House of Cards, and Orange is the New Black.

Fiona: Favorite foods / Colors/ Music

Food is pizza, color is tangerine, music is rock. All day, every day!

Fiona: If you were not a writer what else would you like to have done?

I would still be teaching, or I’d like to be in politics.

Fiona: Do you have a blog/website? If so what is it?

Yes, www.penelopedouglasauthor.com

Amazon Page http://www.amazon.com/Penelope-Douglas/e/B00DH04U8I/ref=dp_byline_cont_ebooks_1

Barnes and Noble Page http://www.barnesandnoble.com/c/penelope-douglas

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Here is my interview with Katherine Dell

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Name: Katherine Dell

Age: 36

Where are you from:

I was born and raised in Lethbridge, Alberta. I spend the first 21 years of my life there, before moving to Bragg Creek.

A little about your self `ie your education Family life etc:

I received certifications in my early twenties for both English and western riding/coaching in Edmonton, Ab. My dream was to become horse trainer and professional riding coach, and for a while, I was. After too many riding accidents, that I’m sure will plague me in my later years, I moved to the big city Calgary, Ab. I spent a few years working my way up the ladder until I settled at a media company as an executive assistant.  A few years of that, I got married, had two beautiful boys, and discovered my love obsession for reading and writing.

Fiona: Tell us your latest news?

I’m half way done editing my first YA novel! Fingers crossed I’ll have everything completed for a release date this fall.

Fiona: When and why did you begin writing?

I started writing this current book (Harmless) about 3 years ago. At times it was frustrating, having taken so long to complete it. But, now that I’m in the editing stages, I’m glad it did. My writing is that much richer for it.

Fiona: When did you first consider yourself a writer?

When my friends started calling me one. Now I tell people that’s what I do.

Fiona: What inspired you to write your first book?

I don’t know if there was any one specific thing that inspired me. I remember after having kids, the number of books I’d read went up dramatically. And I started to think… I can do this. I wanted to write my own stories. So, I read about how to write well, and took some courses.


Fiona: Do you have a specific writing style?

An Australia friend of mine once told me that my writing style sounds colloquial. I think my Canadian accent comes through in my writing… Eh!

But really… Most of what I read is YA fiction and it’s what I write as well. Despite being much closer to 40 than 30, I’m young at heart and thrive on all the ‘big feelings’ that come along with YA fiction.


Fiona: How did you come up with the title?

I wanted a short title that would attract the attention of a YA fiction reader. The book title, Harmless, is a word taken from a line spoken by the main character, early on in the book.


Fiona: Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?

Things aren’t always as they seem. Or maybe… the solution to your problems might be right in front of you.


Fiona: How much of the book is realistic?

Even though the book is fiction I spent a great deal of time researching the details. The town where the story is set is real. It’s in northern BC. I traveled there last summer, even hired a guide to show my graphic artist and I around the area. It was like my book came to life. It was an awesome trip.

Other details in the story, like the spirit bears (also know as Kermode bears) are real to. In fact the highest population of these bears can be found in the area where my story is set.


Fiona: Are experiences based on someone you know, or events in your own life?

Nope. My book is a total work of fiction. Each character and their experience took me years to craft.


Fiona: What books have most influenced your life most? a mentor?

I have a long list of authors I really like, each one contributing to my writing style. Here’s a few off the top of my head… John Green, Veronica Roth, Tahereh Mafi, Markus Zusak, Cassandra Clair…


Fiona: What book are you reading now?

I’m reading Mosquitoland by David Arnold. So far… 5 stars!


Fiona: Are there any new authors that have grasped your interest?

Yes… Heather Demetrios. I’ve read her book I’ll Meet You There. It was awesome. I’ll definitely be reading more of her work.


Fiona: What are your current projects?

Finish the editing my YA novel, Harmless! I’m also working on graphic novel prequels to my novel. I feel in love with some of my minor characters… their story needs to be told.


Fiona: Name one entity that you feel supported you outside of family members.

There have been so many… Who’s gone above and beyond? My graphic artist Bri. She’s read my first draft in its entirety, twice. She’s traveled with me on airplanes to see the place where the story is set. She’s worked with me tirelessly to perfect my book cover and graphic novel images. I’m reeeaally picky.


Fiona: Do you see writing as a career?

I hope so. As I said, I’m working on prequels to Harmless, and I plan to write a sequel as well. I write because I love it but… it would be nice to make some money at it too.


Fiona: If you had to do it all over again, would you change anything in your latest book?

Not that I can think of.


Fiona: Do you recall how your interest in writing originated?

My oldest son, who at the time was around 18 months old, decided to ‘help’ me clean one day. He grabbed a spay bottle of water and soaked are only TV. Not having money at the time to replace it, we went quite a while without one. Which is when I started to devour a book or two a week. I also started thinking… I want to write stories like these!

Fiona: Can you share a little of your current work with us?

I haven’t perfected my elevator pitch but, here goes…

My novel is about a seventeen-year-old girl, Rachel Barnes, in her last semester of high school. She’s trying to come to terms with her brother’s death, her parent’s divorce, and moving away from Vancouver, the only city she’s ever lived. Leaving the big city also means, no more regular visits to Rachel’s trusted therapist, the ‘Weather Lady’, who has been her rock in troubled times. This is a big blow for her, prompting her to look for other ways of dealing with her problems.

One night… through pure serendipitous chance, Rachel and her friends unwittingly release a spirit so old, the world has all but forgotten it existed. All this – from making wishes on spirit animal carvings no one thought were any more than just decretive trinkets. Wishes made… They were Harmless – right? But, everything comes with price.

The ancient spirit released that night, has taken up residence in… an unexpected friend. Rachel spend the rest of the story trying to ‘cure’ her new friend of this spirit, while dealing with her own problems of so much loss and hurt in her life.

There’s a twist at the end… I won’t spoil it for you. You’ll just have to read the book.


Fiona: Is there anything you find particularly challenging in your writing?

Writing in general is challenging. I find it difficult to keep to a consistent writing schedule. Usually, it’s life that gets in the way. Other times, I have loads of time to write, and can’t squeeze out a word.


Fiona: Who is your favorite author and what is it that really strikes you about their work?

I don’t have a true favorite, as there are so many good ones out there. One author does come to mind when you ask what strikes me about their work. Teherah Mafi. She wrote the Shatter Me Series. In the first book her main character is a shy girl, so unsure of herself, is constantly taking back the things she thinks. The author portrays this weakness by striking though sentences in the book. As a reader, you can still read what the character thought, but know that she changed her mind.

In the second book the occurrences of these strike through sentences decrease. In the third book they’ve pretty much disappeared. You can see how the character has changed and grown in to be a more sure and confident person. I really liked the strike-through sentence technique that Mafi used in theses books.


Fiona: Do you have to travel much concerning your book(s)?

I hope to have my book out this fall and plan on doing some  out of town book signings. If the book is a real hit, I’d love to travel in regards to furthering my writing career.


Fiona: Who designed the covers?

Brianna Schretlen designed my cover. She is a graphic designer I worked with years ago. She is also doing all the artwork for my graphic novel prequels to Harmless. I would recommend her to anyone wanting a professional cover.


Fiona: What was the hardest part of writing your book?

Finding the time to write! I have two young boys and a busy family life. BUT… I make time.


Fiona: Did you learn anything from writing your book and what was it?

Writing a book, and successfully publishing a book, are two different things. I could write many blogs on the subject. (Which I have)


Fiona: Do you have any advice for other writers?

Don’t be afraid to be bad at something, you’re not good at yet.


Fiona: Do you have anything specific that you want to say to your readers?

I love to hear your comments on my writings, especially the positive ones. Those one fuel me for days!

Fiona: Do you remember the first book you read?

Can I Get There by Candlelight. I’m not sure how old I was.

Fiona: What makes you laugh/cry?

Sad movies make me cry. Laugh… I’m a very sarcastic person.  I find people with quick sarcastic whit very funny.

Fiona: Is there one person pass or present you would meet and why?

Rick Mercer. He’s just awesome.

Fiona: What do you want written on your head stone and why ?

Hmmm… See you on the other side… Because I believe theirs more than just this life to be lived.

Fiona: Other than writing do you have any hobbies?

I love to garden. My yard looks like a perfectly manicured golf course. I also like to camp, but not in a tent! I require hard walls, running water and lights.

Fiona: What TV shows/films do you enjoy watching?

Favorite TV shows: Vikings, The Walking Dead, Orange is the New Black, Hell on Wheels, and Reign.

Favorite Movies: (There are so many) V for Vendetta, Lady in the Water, Mad Max (the new one), Guardians of the galaxy, and Dracula Untold (Mmmm Luke Evans).

Fiona: Favorite foods / Colors/ Music

Favorite food: Cheese. Pretty much any cheese, except blue cheese.

Favorite color: Blue and grey

Favorite Song: (right now) I won’t give up – By Jason Mraz

 

Fiona: If you were not a writer what else would you like to have done?

So many things in this world interest me! Sometimes I think I may have missed my calling to be a psychologist.

Fiona: Do you have a blog/website? If so what is it?

Yep, it’s www.katherinedell.com. I post blogs twice a week. On Mondays, I have guest bloggers or I re-post fellow indie/small pub authors. On Fridays, I write a blog. It’s either a book review or my own musing about being an indie author. I’m also planning another blog on Wednesdays where I’ll interview authors… just like this.

The rest of my website has a bit about me, and the works that I’ve done or am working on.

Harmless_JustFrontCover_Final

I like to thank  Brianna Schretlen for doing my book cover . This is her Twitter handle https://twitter.com/Curly_Bri.

Here is my interview with John Nicholl

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Name John Nicholl

Age 54

Where are you from

West Wales

A little about your self `ie your education Family life etc

Happily married with three adult children and one grandchild. Qualified as a social worker and manager in what now feels like a different life!

Fiona: Tell us your latest news?

Became a granddad three months ago! Book selling well! Off to Italy soon. All in all, pretty good.

Fiona: When and why did you begin writing?

I wrote a multi agency child protection manual, and articles for news papers and a national social work journal during my career, but white  is the coldest colour is my first novel.

Fiona: When did you first consider yourself a writer?

When readers provided me with positive feedback; becoming an Amazon # 1 best seller was more than I could have hoped for.

Fiona: What inspired you to write your first book?

Given my career in child protection, I guess it was the book I had to write.

Fiona: Do you have a specific writing style?

Yes, I like to get inside the characters heads.

Fiona: How did you come up with the title?

Coming up with the title was almost as hard as writing the book! It finally came to me when listening to a favourite song.

Fiona: Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?

Primarily, I want readers to be entertained, but if they learn something along the way, I’m gratified by that.

Fiona: How much of the book is realistic?

The book is entirely fictional, but all too real.

Fiona: Are experiences based on someone you know, or events in your own life?

I’ve drawn heavily on my experiences as a police officer and child protection social worker. Fiona: What books have most influenced your life most? a mentor?

The Alchemist by Paulo Coelho.

Fiona: What book are you reading now?

The English Patient.

Fiona: Are there any new authors that have grasped your interest?

Angela Smith and Chris James.

Fiona: What are your current projects?

I’m writing a follow up to White is the coldest colour.

Fiona: Name one entity that you feel supported you outside of family members.

Other authors, reviewers and bloggers have been unbelievably supportive. Thanks to them all!

Fiona: Do you see writing as a career?

Yes, all being well. Fingers crossed!

Fiona: If you had to do it all over again, would you change anything in your latest book?

No.

Fiona: Do you recall how your interest in writing originated?

I loved books as a child, and it progressed from there.

Fiona: Can you share a little of your current work with us?

I’m writing a second novel which features some of the same characters.

Fiona: Is there anything you find particularly challenging in your writing?

Finding the time.

Fiona: Who is your favorite author and what is it that really strikes you about their work?

Kurt Vonnegut. So original, so groundbreaking!

Fiona: Do you have to travel much concerning your book(s)?

Some of my second book is set in Barbados. If I’m really lucky…

Fiona: Who designed the covers?

Spiffing Covers.

Fiona: What was the hardest part of writing your book?

Editing and re writing, agonising! Fiona: Did you learn anything from writing your book and what was it?

That you can’t please everyone.

Fiona: Do you have any advice for other writers?

Show don’t tell.

Fiona: Do you have anything specific that you want to say to your readers?

A big thank you to everyone who has  bought the book, it’s truly appreciated.

Fiona: Do you remember the first book you read?

Something by Enid Blyton.

Fiona: What makes you laugh/cry?

I’m a sensitive soul; how long have you got?

Fiona: Is there one person pass or present you would meet and why?

Jesus, Churchill, and Picasso for all sorts of reasons.

Fiona: What do you want written on your head stone and why ?

Nothing just yet!

Fiona: Other than writing do you have any hobbies ?

Yoga, cinema, family, but not in that order.

Fiona: What TV shows/films do you enjoy watching?

Good quality drama and documentaries.

Fiona: Favorite foods / Colors/ Music

I love vegetarian food, blue is my favourite colour, and I have a wide eclectic choice of music.

Fiona: If you were not a writer what else would you like to have done?

I would love to have played rugby for Wales.

Fiona: Do you have a blog/website? If so what is it?

Just a Facebook page in the name of the book. All this social media stuff in very new to me.

 White is the Coldest Colour_full jacket

Buying Link  http://www.amazon.co.uk/White-coldest-colour-psychological-suspense-ebook/dp/B00VR8X45W/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1432765478&sr=1-1&keywords=white+is+the+coldest+colour

Here is my interview with Rhenna Morgan

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Name – Rhenna Morgan

 

Age – Awe, man. Really? <Snicker> 47 and loving every minute of my midlife crisis.

 

Where are you from – Mostly Oklahoma, though I’ve dabbled in Texas. (That sounds naughty, doesn’t it?)

 

A little about your self

My resume reads like a hopped up pinball. I have a degree in Radio/TV/Film and worked as a DJ for years (rock radio mostly), then switched to office jobs when I realized I’d declared myself terminally low paid in radio. I’ve been a skip tracer, debt collector (that job sucked), administrative assistant, real estate agent, business analyst, project manager, product manager, IT manager, and (most importantly) a writer.

 

Fiona: Tell us your latest news?

On June 22nd, I’ll be releasing my first contemporary romance, What Janie Wants. My debut in the publishing world was book one of a contemporary fantasy series, Unexpected Eden. When I learned that there would be twelve months between the release of book and book two (Healing Eden—due out 12/8/2015), I decided I wanted to get something fun out for my readers in the interim. What Janie Wants is the result, and it’s a fun, fun, FUN story.

 

Fiona: When and why did you begin writing?

I’ve been an avid reader for years, always leaning toward romance. Every time I read something, there was a little voice in the back of my head saying, “You should do that.” Finally, I sat down and did it. The first book took me a year, but it was a wonderful experience and I was hooked.

 

Fiona: When did you first consider yourself a writer?

I don’t ever remember thinking of myself as anything else. You know those people you go to when you need something written because all you do is stare at a blank page? Yeah, I’m that go-to person. I get all the requests—everything from newsletters to resumes.

 

Fiona: Do you have a specific writing style?

I have no idea. :) I just write what comes out. Over the last few years, I’ve been blessed to work with some amazing editors who’ve greatly helped me hone my craft and have developed me further into a deep POV writer. I love that because it really helps me get into the character’s head. For me, deep POV books are more engrossing.

 

Fiona: How did you come up with the title?

Aside from beating my head up against a wall? :) I kept trying to come up with something really catchy or creative, but nothing worked. Finally, I sat down at my computer and asked myself, “What’s this story about?”  My answer was two-fold; learning Eden still exists and a woman discovering things about herself and her background she never dreamed could be true. When I pared that down to two words, I ended up with Unexpected Eden. It stuck. :)

 

Fiona: Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?

The core romantic arc is all about trust. Lexi comes from a crap background that makes her leery of people, and Eryx is so used to having to take charge and lead that adjusting to the concept of bringing a partner into decision making is beyond tricky. If it conveys anything, I hope it’s that relationships are best founded on trust. 

 

Fiona: How much of the book is realistic?

Well, it’s contemporary fantasy romance, so once we pop over to Eden, not much. :) There is some reality in the early sections of the story, or anytime the characters are in Oklahoma. There really is a Hard Rock in Tulsa (believe it or not) and that’s where Lexi’s bar is located…though mentioning the Hard Rock got the kibash during edits. Lexi’s apartment is a real place too. I drive by it every day on the way to the day job.

 

Fiona: Are experiences based on someone you know, or events in your own life?

Not really. Just my overactive imagination and a healthy dose of wishful thinking.

 

Fiona: What book are you reading now?

 I’m actually in the middle of catching up with some new releases from several of the authors I work with; Audrey Carlan’s Trinity series, Veronica Forand’s Untrue Colors, Dena Garson’s Your Wild Heart, Sabine Priestly’s Alien Attachment, A.S. Fenichel’s Ascension, & Juliette Cross’s Forged in Fire. (Yes, serious catch up for me for the next few weeks.)

 

Fiona: Are there any new authors that have grasped your interest?

It so hard to tell sometimes who’s “new” versus “new to me”, so I’ll go with the later. I recently stumbled on Roxy Sloane and Jasinda Wilder, both of which sucked me in completely within a few chapters.

 

Fiona: What are your current projects?

I mentioned it earlier, but my second book, What Janie Wants is about to release on June 22nd. It’s a contemporary novella with an older woman / younger man beach theme.  Book two in The Eden Series comes out December 8th, and I’ve just started a new contemporary Haven series with a tentative working title of Finding Haven for book one. Here’s the back cover copy for What Janie Wants–it’ll be on sale for .99 cents through the first few months of release.

 

Clothing optional…

 

Janie McAlister should have known better than to trust her quirky sister’s taste in resorts. Instead of thatched-roof huts and designer pools overlooking the ocean, she’s landed at the one seventies throwback in the Riviera Maya with an open door nudity policy. No way is she going au naturale in public. And she’s sure not entertaining the advances of the bold young man with the delicious body daring her to do exactly that…and so much more.

 

Well, hello, Ms. McAlister…

 

Zade Painel’s a man on a mission—grab some much needed R&R at Gypsy Cove, and figure out how to reclaim his boudoir photography business. He never thought the answer would come in the form of a curvy, forty-year-old redhead and an accidental knee to the ‘nads, but Janie proves to be a force of nature with a penchant for fixing things. She’s also sexy as hell. One way or another, he’s going to help her see just that. And if he plays his cards right, it’ll be a heavenly hands-on approach that lasts way past seven days in paradise.

 

 

Fiona: Name one entity that you feel supported you outside of family members.

RWA for sure. When I went to my first national convention, I’d just finished Unexpected Eden and hadn’t really met any other writers. I figured I’d show up, muscle through the torture of socializing with people I didn’t know, and then go home and figure out what to do next. I was SO wrong. Within an hour of being there, I called home and told my husband, “I’ve found my people!”

 

Fiona: Do you see writing as a career?

Absolutely. This is what I want to do full time, which means I essentially have two full time jobs. Three if you count being a mommy.

 

Fiona: If you had to do it all over again, would you change anything in your latest book?

You know it’s funny, but that’s something that hasn’t happened yet. I’ve written all the way through book three in The Eden Series (with one more to go) and I’ve yet to regret anything.

 

Fiona: Can you share a little of your current work with us?

 Sure! Here’s an outtake from What Janie Wants. It’s told from the hero, Zade’s, point of view and takes place just after they met on the beach:

 

The steady swish as Janie rubbed lotion into her legs sounded next to him. A coconut scent carried right behind it. “You said you’re a photographer, right?”

That was two details she’d remembered about him. Either she had an exceptional memory, or Ms. McAlister had given him a thought or two since yesterday. “Yep.”

“So, how could they screw that up?”

Well, this would be interesting. He sat up, planted his feet in the sand, and rested his elbows on his knees. “Because I had a specialty business. One that catered to women. One I busted my balls to make sure came across tasteful and made them feel good about themselves.”

“What kind of specialty?”

He smiled, poised to catch her reaction as if he had his camera. “Boudoir shots.”

Janie’s hand froze mid forearm and she snapped her head around so hard a strand of auburn hair tumbled over one eye. “Boudoir?”

“Nothing trashy,” he said. “All tasteful and meant to draw out a woman’s beauty. Usually with the help of their partner or husband.”

She licked her lip and started back up with the lotion, moving up to her shoulders in slower, deeper strokes. Shifting to face front, she focused on her toes and acted like they were chatting up the weather, but her voice dropped a notch. Not much, but enough. “And they screwed it up how?”

“You familiar with Glamour Shots?”

Her sharp laugh rang out across the cove and ricocheted back to them. Her easy smile stretched ear-to-ear, all the awkwardness of seconds ago obliterated. “Oh, Lord. Please tell me they didn’t gaudy up something good?”

“Double gaudy. Cheesy corsets, stilettos, and Photoshop. Everything that flies in the face of what I wanted to give them.”

“Give who?”

“Women.”

Janie’s gaze locked with his and, for a second, he wondered if she was holding her breath. She rolled her lips inward the way women did when trying to smooth out their lipstick, twisted as though looking for something behind her, and flicked the bottle top closed.

Her back. She couldn’t reach her back with the lotion. The cut of the swimsuit was low and her barely tanned skin was on display. Talk about divine intervention.

He stood and tugged the bottle from her grip. “Scoot up.”

“Huh?”

“Scoot up.”

Warily, she studied him.

He straddled the lounger behind her and sat.

“What are you doing?”

He squeezed out enough lotion to make damned sure he’d have to rub for a while. “Helping you with your sunscreen.”

“You can’t do that.”

“Why not? Would you rather burn?”

Janie twisted. “But it’s not appropri—”

His hands connected on either side of her spine and her shoulders snapped back. Every muscle clenched beneath his slow strokes and her breath came fast. He kept at it, circling his thumbs and kneading the back of her neck.

She let her head fall forward, and a few loose red tendrils fell forward with it. A moan of satisfaction vibrated beneath his palm.

Slow and easy, he worked the lotion into her smooth skin. Relaxed movements meant to sooth and entice. He nudged her shoulder straps a little wider, and dipped his fingertips under them. “When’s the last time someone’s touched you, Janie?”

The pool noise faded to nothing, but the soft, peaceful pattern of wind, waves, and birds seemed to thicken and amplify.

A tiny shiver shook her. “A long time.”

 

 

Fiona: Is there anything you find particularly challenging in your writing?

Mostly, I’d say keeping balance. I tend to be a bit of a pit bull on tackling things, sometimes so much so that I check completely out of reality until I can call a project “done.” This doesn’t do well for my sanity, my creativity, or my family life.

 

Fiona: Who is your favorite author and what is it that really strikes you about their work?

Kristen Ashley. I’m a total fan girl for everything of hers. I’ve tried for months to figure out what it is about her books that draw me in so deeply and I think it’s a combination of her deep POVs and alpha males. Seriously, KA knows alpha males. And on top of that, she’s just a kick ass lady. 

 

Fiona: Do you have to travel much concerning your book(s)?

 Not too much, though the more I travel the more ideas I get. Most of my travels are to conventions and signings and those are usually no more than a few a year.

 

Fiona: Who designed the covers?

 I’ve only worked with two designers so far, but both of them rock! Fiona Jayde did both of The Eden Series covers (so far) and Mayhem Cover Creations did the cover for  What Janie Wants.

 

Fiona: What was the hardest part of writing your book?

Finishing the first draft. It takes tremendous discipline to get from the start of a story to the end, particularly when you’re smack dab in the middle. I think it’s because patience is not one of my virtues. Once I’m done with the draft, it’s all downhill.

 

Fiona: Did you learn anything from writing your book and what was it?

I learn something from every book. Somehow they always end up being microscopic studies of some part of my personality or life I need to deal with. What Janie Wants is a great example of that. Janie’s taken care of people for so long that she’s lost sight of what she wants out of life and is almost afraid to claim what it is she really wants. She’s too caught up in what people think. I’ve been in that boat and am, thankfully, working through it.

 

Fiona: Do you have any advice for other writers?

Write. Write a lot and don’t give up (so long as it brings you joy).

 

Fiona: Do you have anything specific that you want to say to your readers?

 Thank you! The single best part of every book is when readers share that they’ve enjoyed a story.  It’s a surreal feeling to describe, but it’s nothing short of crack for me. If there weren’t readers, I wouldn’t have that experience.

 

Fiona: Do you remember the first book you read?

 Gosh, I wish I did. I still remember reading the story, but I don’t remember the name. I remember I picked it up at a grocery store and I still remember certain scenes from it. I also remember thinking that if my mother knew what I was reading, she’d probably kill me. LOL. The first story I remember the name of is Christine Feehan’s Dark Prince…and I still go back to it from time to time. I think Gregori was my first book boyfriend.

 

Fiona: Other than writing do you have any hobbies?

Does reading count? That’s my main relaxation. I’m so driven that reading lets me unplug my brain long enough to truly relax.

 

Fiona: What TV shows/films do you enjoy watching?

 This one is tough. Remember the three full time jobs thing up above? The one choice I’ve had to make in order to make writing a reality is giving up TV. I’ve got two series I’m working my way through on Netflix when I do get a little spare time; Sons of Anarchy (hello, Jax Teller) and Game of Thrones (though I have no intention of going past season 1 because that’s as long as Jason Mamoa’s in it. :) )

 

Fiona: Favorite foods / Colors/ Music

 

Food = Dessert!!!

Colors – Turquoise

Music – Anything from Shinedown or Hinder to Maroon 5. Every now and then I’ll dabble in country music. Depends on the artist.

 

Fiona: If you were not a writer what else would you like to have done?

 You know what? I really don’t know. Maybe graphic design? Something artsy for sure.

 

Fiona: Do you have a blog/website? If so what is it?

You bet! http://RhennaMorgan.com. Please drop by and sign up for my newsletter if you have a minute. That’s where I announce all upcoming goodies, giveaways, and release news.

 

 

Rhenna’s Social Media

 

http://RhennaMorgan.com

https://www.facebook.com/RhennaMorgan

https://twitter.com/rhennamorgan (@RhennaMorgan)

http://www.pinterest.com/rhennamorgan/

https://www.goodreads.com/Rhenna

https://plus.google.com/+RhennaMorgan

http://rhennamorgan.tumblr.com

http://amazon.com/author/rhennamorgan

 

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Unexpected Eden (Book #1 in The Eden Series) – On Sale Now

 

Paradise, love, power…and a prophecy with a price.

 

Most people believe Eden no longer exists. Lexi Merrill’s about to learn they’re wrong. A hard-working bartender with a self-sufficient backbone and a wary nature, she knows pickup lines like a second language. So, when Eryx Shantos barges into her world with too-smooth words and a body to back it up, she locks up her libido and vows to keep her distance.

 

Eryx has other ideas. As king of the Myren race, Eryx is duty-bound to enforce the laws preventing exposure of their existence to humans. Yet The Fates have led him through his dreams to Lexi, a temptation he doesn’t want to resist. The question—is she Myren, or human, which makes her forbidden fruit?

 

When Eryx’s nemesis tags Lexi as his next target, Eryx insists on taking her home where he can keep her safe. Lexi had no idea “home” would mean the one-and-only land of creation…or that she’d trigger a prophecy that could doom her newfound race.

 

Buy Links:

 

Amazon – http://goo.gl/4hlg5J

B&N – http://goo.gl/ZYs2pD

iTunes – https://goo.gl/K0wgDq

Kobo – https://goo.gl/LKq1Pp

All Romance Ebooks – https://goo.gl/NkZ54j

Google Play – https://goo.gl/qxtv6n

Kensington – http://goo.gl/Iu2kmb

 

Goodreads – https://goo.gl/M0QhzZ

 

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Healing Eden (Book #2 in The Eden Series) – Pre-Orders Available Now / On Sale 12/8/2015

 

In a world divided by war, falling in love is the ultimate betrayal.

 

Galena Shantos has never questioned her loyalty to Eden. As sister to the Myren king, she serves as a healer, one of the best in the army fighting to suppress the brutal Lomos Rebellion. She’s never doubted the importance of stopping the rebels bent on enslaving humans, until she spots a warrior across enemy lines—and knows instinctively that they’re destinies are entwined. . .

 

Rebellion warrior Reese Theron has nothing left to lose. He’s been forced to fight on the wrong side of a war he abhors in order to protect his family secret. His honor lost, as well as the trust of his own people, Reese has thrown himself into a battle he cannot possibly hope to survive. But after being rescued by a beautiful woman whose exquisite eyes seem to see him for more than the traitor he’s become—he may have just found a new reason to live. . .

 

Pre-Order Links:

 

Amazon US – hhttp://goo.gl/VmcnzZ

Amazon CA – http://goo.gl/OmUFS9

Amazon UK – http://goo.gl/V1Zc8w

B&N – http://goo.gl/mR7P1s

iTunes – https://goo.gl/wC5pwn

Google Play – https://goo.gl/RqbHhy

Kobo Books – https://goo.gl/pSmZH8

Kensington Books –  http://goo.gl/GY7pAK

 

Goodreads –https://goo.gl/XNCG6Y

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What Janie Wants – Pre-Orders Available Now / On Sale June 22, 2015 for .99 cents for a limited time.

 

Clothing optional…

 

Janie McAlister should have known better than to trust her quirky sister’s taste in resorts. Instead of thatched-roof huts and designer pools overlooking the ocean, she’s landed at the one seventies throwback in the Riviera Maya with an open door nudity policy. No way is she going au naturale in public. And she’s sure not entertaining the advances of the bold young man with the delicious body daring her to do exactly that…and so much more.

 

Well, hello, Ms. McAlister…

 

Zade Painel’s a man on a mission—grab some much needed R&R at Gypsy Cove, and figure out how to reclaim his boudoir photography business. He never thought the answer would come in the form of a curvy, forty-year-old redhead and an accidental knee to the ‘nads, but Janie proves to be a force of nature with a penchant for fixing things. She’s also sexy as hell. One way or another, he’s going to help her see just that. And if he plays his cards right, it’ll be a heavenly hands-on approach that lasts way past seven days in paradise.

 

Pre-Order/Buy Links:

 

Amazon US – http://goo.gl/W34Bih

Amazon UK – http://goo.gl/5OSO0x

Amazon CA –  http://goo.gl/eusJfN

iTunes – https://goo.gl/Rzd18p

Kobo – https://goo.gl/FF9a4G

B & N – http://goo.gl/AgLhOf

 

Trailer Link – https://goo.gl/zNJlho

Goodreads – https://goo.gl/JD4blL

 

Here is my interview with TW Embry

 

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Name TW Embry    

 

Age 52

 

Where are you from

I am a navy brat born in Japan while my father was assigned to the pacific fleet

 

A little about your self `ie your education Family life etc

I have a bachelor’s degree in both computer science and culinary science both of which I do not use, computers because it is terribly out of date, culinary for health reasons, working with other chefs makes me sick. I have been married to my beautiful wife Linda for 20 wonderful years. We have one daughter Corri who was married to the love of her life Travis just 3 weeks ago. Linda and I have one dog Ivy, she is half Rhodesian ridgeback and half red nose pit bull and she is the sweetest dog I have ever met and a fierce protector of her mom and dad. We have three cats who are Ivy’s best friends. In fact, sometimes I think she thinks she is a cat or a human, not a dog. The cat’s names are thing 1 and thing 2, black male twins. Then we have Biggin kitty who is a love, not a terror like the other two, but they are still kittens. I have lived in Port St Lucie Florida or Fort Pierce Florida since I was 7. My wife was born in Stuart Florida she is what we call a Florida cracker and she is proud of that. My family has lived in Kentucky since 1780 on the same farm we bought from the Choctaw Indians. I have visited the grave of my ancestor who fought in the revolutionary war, Thomas Scott on what used to be the family farm. Over the years, the farm has been divided and sold outside the family except for one small parcel where my grandmother lived. I am there now on a writing retreat courtesy of my Uncle Paul Scott. I will return to my wife who is at home minding the family business, A Beautiful Day Florist on 6/4/15. I miss her so and cannot wait to be with her again. After all I have been gone a whole three weeks.

 

Fiona: Tell us your latest news?

I have just finished my 3 novel titled Earth’s Mirror, the sequel to my second novel Alien Manifesto and Revenge from Mars completes the saga. I have also just submitted several short stories to a couple of contests. I have also just completed my collection of short stories and poems to my publisher. It is titled The Ravings of a Bi-Polar Mind


Fiona: When and why did you begin writing?

I wrote ghost stories for my grandmother as a child. However, as I am dyslexic, adhd and bi polar the only one who could read them was me. In frustration, I turned to other things for about 40 years. It was a comment by a well-meaning professor that showed me the path to where I am now. As my culinary degree is a bachelor’s degree, I had to take an English class in creative writing. I had completed an in class assignment much faster than any of my class mates. As I handen in my assignment Professor Wolfich ask me a question I will never forget. ”How many books have you written?”. With a typical bi polar response, I paid very little attention to his question as I was training to be a chef, Why would I write any books?

After several spectacular failures as a chef, I remembered Professor Wolfich’s comment, I sat down and wrote what was to become the opening scene of my first novel Revenge from Mars, and I discovered my long lost love for writing a good story.


Fiona: When did you first consider yourself a writer?

When I got picked up by the Gilbert Literary agency for representation. I consider myself a master story teller which is much more than being a writer. Writers tend to write instruction manuals and textbooks and novels that don’t sell. Storytellers on the other hand spin a story to enchant the reader, to entertain not just educate. It is posssiable to teach and entertain at the same time it just has to be done with a love of writing a really good story


Fiona: What inspired you to write your first book?

When I was 7 a friend of mine named Mitch Goldenfarb gave me a book of short stories. In that book was a story of tourists on Mars who found a hidden Martian army. It was written so that the tourists did not even wear space suits and helmets. That was the story that inspired Revenge from Mars


Fiona: Do you have a specific writing style?

I live for what I call a “crazy Ivan”, a completely unexpected twist that takes the story line in a new direction as you realize things that you have read so far are NOT how the story continues with a final twist to set up the reveal at the end


Fiona: How did you come up with the title?

To me tie title should describe the essence of the book but not in such a way as to give away anything. The book is to the title as the title is to the book one cannot be without the other


Fiona: Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?

My first novel Revenge from Mars defiantly has a message about what could happen if we don’t stop the religious fanatics now. My others are just for entertainment


Fiona: How much of the book is realistic?

I write scify so the possibilities that the adventures my characters have could happen is very real if one is open to the fact that life besides humans exists in space. If even one% of the billions of galaxies have intelligent life there are hundreds of thousands of planets that fall into the goldilocks zone for life planets, as we know it. How much we do not know about space is far greater than what we know or posssiable can imagine. In my opinion, which doesn’t amount to much, thinking that we are the only form of intelligent life is absurd, narrow-minded and shows just how ignorant we are about the true nature of space.


Fiona: Are experiences based on someone you know, or events in your own life?

I have based some of the personal attributes from the people in my life. That is ok as those that I have have a great sense of humor and do not take it personally. Not that any of my character’s are derogatory in any way I just have fun with them and take lots of artistic license with them.


Fiona: What books have most influenced your life most? a mentor?

I have read everything that Robert Heinlein has published and that is one of if not the biggest source of inspiration for me. The only exception would be the book of short stories my friend Mitch Goldenfarb gave me when I was 7 years old. I wish I could remember the title but the copy he gave me was missing the front cover.


Fiona: What book are you reading now?

As I have progressed in my writing I start books, figure out the plot in a couple of chapters and I get bored and put them down. The surprise twist is a lost art in todays fiction which seems mostly to deal with personal drama. I am not a fan of reality tv or writing if find it to be unentertaining drivel. I know that makes me sound like a snob but I have read over 10,000 books over the years. Everything from Zane Grey, Jules Vern and the classics to Steven King and Dean Koontz and everything in between. A book has to be exceptional to pique my interest and most of the big name authors do not. I tend to skip the big names as I have been disappointed on the last 10 books I purchased. I am currently reading books by newcomers in my genre and in my humble opinion they are much better than the same old rubber stamp some of the big names release and sell thousands of copies of.


Fiona: Are there any new authors that have grasped your interest?

Yes, Margo Collins Bond, Rival Gates, Marie Lavender, KC Sprayberry just to name a few.


Fiona: What are your current projects?

I just completed my third novel Earths Mirror and it wraps up the Alien Manifesto series for now. I have been writing short stories for contests and I have compiled them into a sampler of my work. It is titled The Ravings of a Bi-Polar Mind and it is almost finished. Both Earth’s Mirror and Ravings of a Bi-Polar mind should be available in august of this year


Fiona: Name one entity that you feel supported you outside of family members.

Both of my publishers Crimson Cloak Publishing and Solstice Publishing have been supportive of my scribbling of words. But the first one to take an interest in my work professionally was the Gilbert Literary Agency. The most supportive has been my wife Linda, my daughter Corri and my extended Kentucky family


Fiona: Do you see writing as a career?

I do now, when I first started it was just for fun. I knew once I got an agent and my first contract that this is what I was meant to do


Fiona: If you had to do it all over again, would you change anything in your latest book?

In my latest book no. I will someday do a rewrite of Revenge from Mars, while an outstanding book with all 5 star reviews on Amazon, I have progressed so much as a story teller that every time I look at Revenge from Mars I get an urge to redevelop some of the scenes


Fiona: Do you recall how your interest in writing originated?

Yes as a young boy I wrote ghost stories to scare my Grandma who I love very and miss very very much. I have so many challenges, dyslexica, adhd, bi-polar that I got so frustrated I put it down for 40 years. The advent of the personal computer and the word program have helped me overcome my challenges

 

Fiona: Can you share a little of your current work with us?

I would be glad to this is a short story I have submitted to several contests and is in Ravings of a Bi-Polar Mind

A Man I Once Met

By T.W. Embry

It was one hot humid south Florida summer day on a beach the locals still called Dynamite Point that I met the stranger. I remember just a few hardy tourists and a few locals were enjoying the beach before the hordes of Yankees descended upon the small town of Ft Pierce. Clogging up any entranceway to beach access and buying up all the suntan oil.

I used to gawk at the sunburned tourists in their outrageous clothes, but momma said that was impolite. Therefore, I was much more careful when I cast my gaze upon the freshly sunburned beauties who were parading the latest bikini fashions in and out of the only surf shop in town.

My relatives from out of state was visiting, we were having a family reunion at the state park on what had once been called Dynamite Point. Momma was complaining because it was the heat of the summer and her least favorite time of year, especially since she was 7 months pregnant.

We were walking to the A 1 A  7 11 to get more ice for the coolers. Momma was miserably hot. The air-conditioned store was at least a temporary sanctuary away from the heat and humidity of a perfectly blistering summer morning. And blister the tourists it has already today I thought as I remembered the surf shop and its bevy of sunburned beach bunnies.

It was mid-august and would still be a couple of more months until the snow birds arrived in droves, so we had the store to ourselves, except for the man looking at beer, in the back row. Momma had just scolded me for staring again so I snuck a quick glance out of the corner of my eye.

I risked looking again because he was dressed so strange, and so hot. Who wears all black long sleeves and black long pants in south Florida in August? And a black, long sleeved jacket? I was sweating, and I was just wearing my baggies, no shirt, no shoes. He turned and looked at me, his features hidden by his turned up collar and long brimmed hat, quickly looking away once he realized I had seen him. Momma called my name a second time before I heard her, turning to find her holding out two bags of ice for me to carry, my punishment for staring I guess.

“Y’all better hurry, said the elderly lady manning the register,, “Its gonna storm after while, least that’s what the weather man says on the radio,” she said with a big smile, handing momma her change. “Lord I hope so and sooner better than later,, Momma answered, “Come on son”, she instructed me as I turned for another look at the strange man, getting a stern look for my indiscretion.

He was gone, I didn’t see him leave, we were standing right in front of the only door in or out for customers so he must be in the bathroom. I just added him to my list of strangely dressed Yankees. I was anxious to get back to the beach, the surf was up and I loved to ride my raft on the waves all the way into the shore break.

When we got back Daddy told me not to go out very far as I was only twelve. But I knew the real reason. If I went out to the surf break that would mean he would have to watch me. And that would distract from his roving eyes enjoyment of the bevy of beauties who had returned to finish their sunburn, wearing new and even skimpier bikinis.

The nice lady at the 7 11 had been right, it wasn’t long before big black cloud’s started rolling in from the west, darkening the sky and obscuring the blistering sun. Soon we were all stuck under the pavilion because of the lightning. Sometimes these storms are very strong and very brief, other times they last for hours. This one appeared to be one of those that would last for hours.

Finally, after an hour long deluge, one of the family elders made the decision to move the reunion back to the hotel meeting room once we had finished lunch. The next joyous hour was filled with barbeque ribs, hamburgers and steak for the adults. Bowls of fresh melon and salad rounded up diner, with homemade chocolate cake and homemade vanilla ice cream for dessert, hand cranked by all the cousins old enough to turn the handle.

After stuffing myself, I asked Mommas permission to go to the bathroom, with a curt nod yes she returned to her conversation with my Aunt Betty. I made a beeline for the bathroom, remembering the rules about this sort of thing. And more importantly, what terrible wrath waited when I returned, if I dared stray from the path to the bathroom or acceptable family protocol. Daddy would whip me for sure if I messed up. Taking full advantage of my sudden freedom once I was out of sight, I took my time, enjoying the rain as it washed the dried salt from my sun-reddened skin and crew cut red hair.

As I reached down to pull up my baggies, I heard the wooden screen door open, then swing shut slowly, quietly. I carefully locked the door to the stall and peeked out the crack in the doorframe. I fully expected one of my younger cousins to jump out, trying to scare me, again.

My fear had heightened my sense of smell, the men’s room smelling faintly of pee and strongly of an acrid cleaning agent. My heart was hammering in my chest as I anticipated the jump of my cousin. I quietly unlocked the stall door, swinging it open suddenly to catch my cousin off guard. But no one jumped out at me. I bet they are hiding by the door, I thought, my heart pounding harder.

I took a couple of deep breaths to calm my fear, it was only one of my cousins after all and I had outsmarted them, again. Then as I peeked around the corner of the stall to the only blind spot in the room, I froze. Realizing suddenly, that it was the man from the store, he was the one waiting for me. I instantly wished desperately it had in fact been one of my cousins. I was so scared my knees were shaking.

He stood silently, his arms crossed over his chest, looking at me. “Are you William?, he asked me in a soft, oddly accented voice. “I have only seen you as a child in the pictures from this reunion,” he said. “I have something to tell you, something very important. So important you must never tell anyone about what I say or about me.” Stunned I tried to speak, fearing the worst, finally managing “Yes sir,” my legs too wobbly to run.

“You must build the time machine. It is possible to travel forward and backward through time. Now I have to go,” he said in response to a trilling coming from the device on his wrist.

“Who are you?” I managed to ask in a hoarse whisper.

“I cannot tell you for your own safety and mine,” he answered, turning giving me a good look at his face, his features highlighted by ghostly white skin and familiar shockingly pale blue eyes, just like mine. “Go back to the party; your parents will come looking for you soon. Remember tell no one,” he said stepping out of the way.

I made a mad dash for the door on unsteady steady legs, terrified I would fall or trip and then I would not get away from this crazy person who followed me into the men’s room.

When I arrived at the pavilion I was out of breath from my sprint, no one seemed to notice, or care. I was just one of the many children running about bored and ready to go either back to the beach or to the hotel to play games. The man dressed in black was soon forgotten in the rush to pack up and move the party back to the hotel. The rain had slowed down to a light sprinkle for the moment, causing a flurry of activity as the adults rushed to get the cars loaded without getting soaked to the skin.

It was the very next weekend that tragedy struck my family. We were coming back from a shopping trip to the Palm Beach Mall; northbound on the Florida turnpike. Dad was driving his usual 55 mph. He always drove exactly the speed limit. A southbound drunk driver crossed the centerline sideswiping us on the driver’s side rear, spinning us around. That knocked our old Mercedes into the deep canal than ran the length of that section of the turnpike, where it landed upside down. I am the only one who survived the crash; no one knows how I escaped. The gory details were thankfully hidden deep in my mind.

It was many years later that I returned to Dynamite Point. In my anger at those painful memories of my families death I thrust my poking stick deep into the illegal fire I had built on the beach, not far from the sight of our not so long ago family reunion, causing a shower of sparks. I was half-finished with the bottle of cheap bourbon and I intended to finish it. It was all that remained of the money from my grandparent’s estate. The bank had just foreclosed on the house they left me today and I was now homeless and penniless, my grandfather’s 64’ GTO my last possession.

But I don’t care, Screw the bank, screw them all, I told myself as I took another big swig of the cheap bourbon, grimacing as it burned all the way down to my empty stomach. It wasn’t long before the world seemed out of focus and the pain of my grandparents recent death dulled, if only for a short time.

I had given no thought to my future; instead, I had partied like a wild man throwing my newfound wealth away on girls, expensive liquor and even more expensive party favorites, nearly getting arrested several times. I didn’t know it but I was headed for real trouble and jail, if I didn’t kill myself or get myself killed by one of my new unsavory, fair weather friends.

I was just out of high school, graduating by the sympathy of my teachers, not my work. I had no job skills to speak of, and no family left who would speak to me. I was as alone as a man can be in this crowded, modern world.

No one cares, I thought to myself as I took another long swig out of the nearly empty bottle. Now I was even angrier at the world and my predicament, unwilling and unable to place the blame where it belonged, squarely on my shoulders. I had begun to blame myself for the sudden death of my grandparents just, last year, compounding my depression, which was not being helped by the cheap bourbon.

In my anger at losing my family, I had become very disruptive and the strain had been too much for my grandfather. He had a massive heart attack shortly after one of our many loud arguments. Grandma held on for just a couple of weeks longer, dying of a broken heart, alone for the first time after 57 years of marriage. It was all my fault, the accident, my grandpa’s death all of it, I thought as I finished the bottle, now nearly incapacitated, lying in the sand, sobbing uncontrollably.

It was much later that I woke from the chill, my fire having died down to just embers. I was jolted back to a semblance of sobriety by the realization that I was no longer alone. A dark figure was standing silently, watching me from the other side of my fire pit.

It was the man from the bathroom I realized, that strange encounter from my childhood flashing before my eyes, he was still dressed the same and seemingly unaged.

‘What do you want?,” I slurred, fixating my drunken rage on the stranger. The man said nothing, standing silently watching me his arms crossed across his chest.

“I’m talking to you”, I bellowed after I staggered to my feet. Still no reply from the man dressed in black. “Answer me damn you or I am going to kick your ass,” I snarled, now I was in a rage and ready to kill mister mysterious.

Still he only stared, not answering. With a bellow of rage, I lunged across the fire pit falling flat on my face after having stepped in the embers, badly burning both of my bare feet. “Who are you,” I screamed at the still silent man, as much from frustration as from the pain of my burns, as I lay sprawled out in the sand writhing in pain.

The man shook his head in obvious disapproval of my graceful efforts, uncrossed his arms and reached into his jacket pocket. My heart began to hammer in my chest from a sudden fear of what was surely coming; I feared he was reaching for a gun. Instead, he produced a small metal container.

Still silent he knelt at my feet and began spraying my burns with the container from his pocket. The relief was instant. I watched in amazement as my burns were healed before my eyes.

“Who are you?” I whispered in amazement, Can you tell me now?,” acknowledging that I remembered our previous encounter.

“I am your great, great grandson, he finally answered with a faint smile flickering across his face, “we have met but I was just a child at the time.”

“My what?” I sputtered my voice hoarse with astonishment. What the hell is he talking about I am not even married and I sure as hell have not invented a time machine I thought to myself as some inkling of the situation seeped into my bourbon soaked brain.

“Your great, great, grandson,” he answered quietly with a little bit of an actual smile.” Come with me and I will explain over breakfast,” he said his face now lit with a full smile at my obvious confusion.

“What the hell are you talking about,” I sputtered again demanding an immediate explanation.

“It is a very long story Grandfather. I will explain everything now that you are old enough to understand”, he replied his face still lit by his smile, as he reached down to help me up and out of the sand I had fallen into in my drunken rush to judgment.

As he helped me to my feet, I demanded, “Tell me now or I am leaving you and your secrets on this damn beach.” A look came across his face, a mixture of annoyance, concern and sympathy. A trill from his pocket caused an immediate change in his demeanor. “We don’t have time for that now, they are coming,” my grandson said as he reached into his other jacket pocket, producing a small metal cylinder. ”Who is coming?,” I demanded. “Hold still this will not hurt and I will explain everything,” he said as he touched my neck with the metal cylinder.

I felt a warm sensation spreading quickly through my body, then encroaching blackness. As I slowly sank to the ground fading toward unconscientiousness, two dark figures suddenly appeared out of the corner of my eye, attacking my grandson in unison.

I managed to hold on long enough to see first one then the other go flying away from him, landing with the sound of a wet bag of cement hitting the ground. Both remained still and unmoving, their necks bent at unnatural angles. As the blackness finally took me, my last thought was one of pride, my grandson is a bad ass, a feeling of peace and safety settled into my being. I didn’t have time to wonder just who his attackers were or why they were here before blackness took me.

I awoke with a sudden startled confusion, in a strange room, in a strange bed, undressed, showered, clean shaved and well rested. Oddly, with no sign of the severe hangover I knew I deserved. As I struggled desperately to remember how I got here, there was a knock on the door. “Room service,” said a voice from the other side of the door. Remembering my grandson’s attackers, I peered through the peephole just to be sure this visitor was who they said they were.

There was an older man dressed in some sort of hotel uniform patiently waiting behind a metal service cart. The top of which was loaded up with covered dishes of something that smelled wonderful. I was suddenly famished so I unhooked the door to let my meal in.

My grandson suddenly appeared behind the man before he got into my room. With a quick jerk from behind, he broke the waiter’s neck. “Get him inside,” he hissed as he pushed the waiter into my unsuspecting arms quickly, pushing the service cart into the room then closing the door behind him.

After I deposited the newly dead waiter on the floor inside the bathroom, I closed the bathroom door behind me. I found my grandson examining the meal cart with some sort of devise, the like of which I had never seen.

“OK grandpa the food is fine. I suggest you eat while you can. We will have to move quickly from now on,” my grandson said as he put the device on some sort of equipment belt hidden by his coat.

“What makes you think I can eat after watching you murder a man in cold blood,” I replied my stomach doing flip flops, “And stop calling me grandpa you are much older than I am”, I retorted my legs shaking.

“That man you were about to let in the room was here to kill you and me if he got the chance,” answered my grandson, “Now please calm down and eat your breakfast while I explain. It might be awhile before we get to eat food you are used to again.”

“Why would that man or the two from the other night want to kill me or you for that matter.” I sputtered still full of adrenaline from watching my grandson so expertly kill another man, again.

“I will start from the beginning,” my grandson answered calmly as he uncovered his breakfast. “In 2024 a man named Jerimiah Johnson wins the North American election becoming the leader of the most powerful and advanced country in the history in the world,” my grandson said between bites of his breakfast, “He was hugely popular with the people, until he started his movement for genetic purity. At first, it was simply sterilizing the deformed and the mentally ill. Then it got much worse.”

“That sparked huge protests and riots in the street”, my grandson continued, “These were brutally crushed by his new social purity enforcers. Soon he began to target and exterminate any genetic undesirables, gays, minorities, the homeless, anyone with an abuse problem. The purge went on for years, spreading worldwide before the resistance formed. By that time, Jerimiah Johnson was calling himself the Supreme Leader of Earth. He founded the Church of Purity. Only those who could prove themselves genetically pure would be welcome into the new world order. Anyone else was an enemy of the state,” he finished with a grim look on his pale face.

I sat listening, dumbfounded by what my grandson was saying. “What does this have to do with me?’, I asked after he had finished his breakfast, mine was still untouched.

“Purifying the human race in our time was not good enough for the Supreme Leader”, my grandson answered bitterly, “not after he found your work on time travel,” my grandson answered, sending chills down my spine. “He wants to stop genetic abnormalities before they spread to the future. He built a time machine from your research. He started sending agents, mostly genetic fanatics, to eradicate the problem genes before they became a problem in the future. In my time there are two factions fighting the Supreme Leader and his genetic enforcers. My faction wants to restore genetic vitality to our race, ending the tyranny. The fake waiter belongs to the faction who only wants to destroy the Supreme leader at all costs, maintaining the purity already achieved.”

“What about the two men who attacked you at my fire?” I asked.

“They were agents of the supreme leader’s genetic purity enforcers, fanatics sworn to serve the Supreme Leader with out question. They would have gladly killed us both,” my grandson answered with a wicked grin, ”now they are taking the dirt nap they all deserve.”

“You were sent here to protect me?” I asked.  “NO Grandfather!, exclaimed my grandson his head bowed in respect, “I volunteered. I trained for two years for this mission. It is my honor to protect you, to restore our family name.”

“Restore our family name?” I questioned. “Yes Grandfather, In my time it is widely believed that you built the time machine for the Supreme leader voluntarily. I know the truth. I know that he imprisoned you and tortured you until you agreed to build your time machine. I have now have the proof to clear our family name.” “Clear it from who? I asked. “In one possible future the Supreme leader is defeated and anyone who participated in his genetic purity purges is being tried for crimes against humanity. There is only one penalty, death by execution. Our entire family line is at risk from those misguided fools.”

“Possible futures? I asked. “Yes Grandfather, possible futures,” my grandson answered,” Each time an agent of the supreme leader kills someone from the past it creates a splinter in the time line from that point into a posssiable future. Some are so insignificant that the effect is negligible. Others cause large disruptions as their decedents, important figures in our society’s history, are erased from the timeline. My fellow patriots and I have been trained to stop or try and correct any such disruptions.”

“But if the supreme leader kills me before I invent the time machine how will he send agents back in time to kill the “genetic problems.” ”I asked completely confused. “He was not trying to kill you those agents were sent to kill me, you were the bait,” answered my grandson with a grim smile.

“That means the other faction wants to kill me to keep the Supreme Leader from sending agents into the past in the time machine that I built. If I don’t build it won’t someone else?” I asked. “Perhaps in time someone would,” answered my grandson, “If the supreme leader built a time machine it would have to be in secret, because the Supreme Leader and his church have made any scientific advancement illegal, a crime against God and the state.”

“Which faction killed my parents,” I snarled, angry all over again. “The same faction that tried to kill you again today,” my grandson answered. “You mean my family was killed because of me?” I whispered hoarsely the thought nearly sucking the life out of me.

“No grandfather your family was killed to prevent the invention of time travel,” my grandson answered his emotion written on his face, a catch in his voice. “They obviously did not succeed as I am here via time travel,” my grandson answered trying to sooth my ire at finding out who was responsible for killing my family after all these years.

Looking at my grandson with pleading eyes I asked, ”You can you go back and prevent my families death, Right?”  “I wish it was that easy grandfather,” he answered, his head bowed, “If I prevent the factions, assassination of your family, many people in the future will die who did not exist because your family lives. Without these people, we would lose the war and the Supreme Leader will continue his reign of genetic purity,” he lamented. “Perhaps after the war and the Supreme leader is defeated that correction can be made safely,” he added seeing the look of anger slowly creeping up my neck and spreading throughout my face, trying to avert the coming explosion of emotion by giving me some hope of seeing my family again. It worked, for the moment.

“So what is your plan to keep us alive and accomplish your mission?” I asked my grandson. “We will be on the move from now on,” my grandson answered. “If the faction has found us once, they will find us again. The problem is they will know our every move before we have made them. Then they will send an agent or agents to that place and time to kill us. So ambushes will be frequent until I can cover our movements. That means getting away from any electronic surveillance technology. That includes ATMs, security recordings and traffic cams. Any Ideas?”, My grandson asked. “This is your time grandfather, not mine.” “What about disguises? Goodwill has plenty of clothes and no electronic surveillance that I know of”, I answered.

“The faction’s face recognition software is far too sophisticated for ordinary disguises,” my grandson answered with a grim smile.

“Then we have to find a small town and a small motel, most don’t have any electronic surveillance except perhaps at the front desk. We can make reservations online with a prepaid credit card that we can get from any gas station convenience store. Even if they have surveillance, they do not store it like the big companies do therefore no records to scan. All we have to do is get to my car and drive to either Stuart, Okeechobee or Vero Beach. I know them all pretty well. Once we are out of electronic sight we can go anywhere we want. As long as we avoid the bigger security systems we will be untraceable.”

“That is a good plan grandfather except if we use your car they will be able to use satellites to track your car’s license plates or black box, all modern cars have them,” answered my grandson with a thoughtful look.

“Not my Grandpas ’64 GTO! I said with a wide grin. “If we use a toll diffuser, the satellites cannot read the tag number. “They will be on us as soon as we go to your house to get the car,” my grandson answered. “It sucks to be them today because his GTO is in a restoration shop on the outskirts of town, they finished it yesterday,” I answered my grin getting larger.” All we have to do is get away from here without being seen.” “Leave that to me,” my grandson said with a wide grin.

“On one condition, no killing unless it is a faction member, understood?”, I said flatly leaving no room for argument. “Yes Grandfather, if you insist,” answered my grandson solemnly. “Enough innocent people have died because of me and I will have no more of it, so yes, I insist!” I answered with a finality that left no doubt as to my intentions. “I will call my friend Brian to come and pick us up not far from here. He wants to see my GTO anyway so it will be easy to get him to give me a ride over there to pick it up. All we have to do is walk out of here. The faction already knows we are here so it won’t matter if the surveillance cameras see us or not. All the faction will know is that we survived the hit and then disappeared out the front door of this hotel.

“They may be watching him,” warned my grandson. “I doubt that”, I said with a laugh, “we do all our business and visiting in person, no phones, he doesn’t trust anything else. I will warn him anyway. He knows Fort Pierce better than I do and I have lived here 42 years. All we have to do is call from a payphone so I can give him our secret password and he will come running,” I said with a grin, “After that it is your ballgame.”

“You get us away from here without our being seen and I will take it from there,” said my grandson with a huge smile of relief. “Then get to disabling that security system boy and let’s get a move on,” I ordered, “YES SIR,” said my grandson happily, a wide grin lighting up his face. “Give me a couple of minutes to send our friend back to where he came from along with a little present for his comrades. Then we can leave as that is what I was doing when I caught our friend impersonating the dead body I found in the dumpster.” “Good, I will go and call Brian, meet me out front in ten minutes, I said.

I fidgeted as I looked at my watch. It had been almost fifteen minutes and no sign of my grandson. Brian would be waiting by the time we got the half a mile or so to the meeting place. Another two minutes passed and I was getting really worried now.

What if my grandson had met up with more of the faction’s thugs? I knew there would be nothing I could do to help, but I had to try. Just as I resolved to go looking for my grandson, I felt a tap on my shoulder. Spinning around I came face to face with my grandson, who had a huge grin on his face because he had snuck up on me.

“Where have you been I was getting worried,” I grumbled as my heart hammered in my chest. “I had to get rid of the body grandfather, he said with a wicked grin and an evil glint in his eyes.” I also had to make sure he was alone. Then it took a little longer than I planned to retrieve the factions headquarters time coordinates from his temporal transporter, sorry I worried you.”

“What did you do with the body,’ I asked. My grandsons grin grew larger if that was possible, “I sent him home with a little surprise for his comrades,” he answered. “What kind of surprise?” I asked. “Let’s just say I would not want to be anywhere around the faction headquarters when my surprise goes off”, said my grandson with a look in his eyes that I hope he never gave me.

“We had better hurry, Brian will be waiting,” I reminded my grandson. As we walked toward our pick up point, my grandsons’ communicator trilled with a tone I had never heard, stopping my grandson in his tracks. “What?,” I demanded after a couple of minutes.

“I just got a message from my headquarters. My little surprise worked better than expected. The entire command structure of the faction was killed in the explosion. It also destroyed their temporal displacement equipment. They will not be bothering you anymore grandfather you are safe,” said my grandson excitedly. “I have been recalled for an assault on the supreme leader himself”, answered my grandson, that same evil look back in his eyes again. “What am I supposed to do now? Won’t the supreme leader try and kill me now? I asked. “No grandfather he needs you to invent time travel for him,” my grandson answered.

After a startled look from my question, my grandson started fishing around on his utility belt, producing a credit card and a passport with my picture on it. “Take this card, go to Boston and enroll in MIT, he said. Use this identity and you will be safe. Remember you will invent time travel. If you don’t I may never exist grandfather. I have to go now. It has been my great honor to serve you grandfather,” he said head bowed in respect.” Remember you must tell no one about the events you have seen or about me. It may cause disruptions in the time line. Goodbye grandfather,” he said, and then he was gone vanishing into thin air.

It was many years later that I returned to Dynamite point for my honeymoon after being given my doctorate in physics from MIT. I was awakened by a sudden gust of wind off the ocean. My bride, Linda, had the sliding glass door open so we could hear the surf while we slept.

A second gust of wind announced the coming storm. Soon the rumble of thunder grew closer. It was a full moon and after checking on my sleeping bride, I headed down to the beach to watch the storm arrive, once a Florida boy always a Florida boy I guess. I suddenly felt a tap on my shoulder as I sat watching the lightening in the distance, remembering my grandson. With my heart in my throat I spun around to confront what I was sure was an assassin from the future. It was my grandson. “You scared the crap out of me,” I grumbled.

This only made his grin bigger. “I have good news grandfather,” he said, “the Supreme leader has been killed and his henchman eliminated. You are safe at last. Our family name has been restored. Now the operation to save your parents can begin.”

“What will happen to my life if you succeed,” I asked. “Your whole life will change,” he answered his grin disappearing. “Will I still be married to my new bride Linda,” I asked. “I do not know the answer for sure but most likely not”, my grandson answered solemnly. “Then let the past be the past,” I said with a tear in my eye.” “This is the only chance you will have to change your past,” he cautioned.

I stared out over the ocean at the gathering storm for a minute, thinking about what to do. I would not lose Linda, she is the love of my live I decided. I turned back to my grandson and nodded my acknowledgement, unable to speak from the emotion welling up in my throat. “I know”, I finally managed to say. My grandson silently handed me a small silver cylinder, a device of some kind. Then he said, “If you ever need me you only have to open the cylinder and push the button and I will come, I swear grandfather,” said my grandson, tears in his eyes for the first time I had ever seen. Then he turned and vanished. It was not until my 120th birthday that I saw my grandson again. He being a child had no idea about our previous encounters of course and I could not say a word or risk altering the time line. I thought as I held the smooth metal cylinder he had given me so long ago in my age gnarled hand.

 


Fiona: Is there anything you find particularly challenging in your writing?

Marketing is my Achilles heel. I have learned how to write thanks to the word program despite my challenges

 


Fiona: Do you have to travel much concerning your book(s)?

No My favorite writing place was destroyed by the St Johns River reclamation project, a stand of 500 year old live oaks. Now I write on my back porch in Florida or in my recliner with my bestest dog buddy Ivy in my lap.


Fiona: Who designed the covers?

My nephew Ian Back designed the cover for my first novel Revenge from Mars. A local artist designed the cover for Alien Manifesto and will most likely do the cover for Earth’s Mirror


Fiona: What was the hardest part of writing your book?

Gathering up the courage to send my work to and agent when I was looking for representation. After that, it was easy. Although I dread the coming 1 star review that all authors get. I know it is coming and I have all 5 star reviews to get me past it.


Fiona: Did you learn anything from writing your book?

That I cam finally let my imagination lose on the world and people seem to like it.


Fiona: Do you have any advice for other writers?

Write every day if only for a few minutes to jot down a storyline idea. It gets easier with practice. I have told many of my writer friends after they got the dreaded 1 star review that noe everyone is going to like your work much less love it. When someone does leave a good review all of he negativity will fade away in the light of self satisfaction


Fiona: Do you have anything specific that you want to say to your readers?

Beware the “Crazy Ivan”

 

Fiona: Do you remember the first book you read?

Yes it was Dr Suese the Cat in the Hat

 

Fiona: What makes you laugh/cry?

I have worked long and hard to get anger out of my life as it is so destructive to positive growth so I avoid situations that would cause me to lose my temper. Stand up comedy or playing rook with my family always makes me laugh

 

Fiona: Is there one person pass or present you would meet and why?

There are so many historic figures I would like to meet that I cannot single out just one. Benjamin Franklin, Thomas Jefferson, Elon Musk, Howard Hughes, Bill Gates are at the top of my list

 

Fiona: What do you want written on your head stone and why ?

Beloved husband and father because my wife and my daughter and my new son in law and my extended family are the only people are the only people I need approval from

 

Fiona: Other than writing do you have any hobbies ?

I love to camp in wild places

 

Fiona: What TV shows/films do you enjoy watching?

Big Bang Theory, the Walking Dead and the Flash

 

Fiona: Favorite foods / Colors/ Music

My tastes in food and Music are very diverse and my favorite color is ice blue

 

Fiona: If you were not a writer what else would you like to have done?

I have had many jobs and I have been searching for what I was supposed to do with my life my entire life. After many spectacular failures I think I have finally found my calling as a storyteller

 

Fiona: Do you have a blog/website? If so what is it?

https://www.facebook.com/twembry

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http://www.amazon.com/Alien-Manifesto-Adventures-Human-Thomas/dp/0692300694

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http://www.amazon.com/Revenge-Mars-T-W-Embry-ebook/dp/B00FX3L1EI/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1432752748&sr=1-1&keywords=revenge+from+mars

 

Here is my interview with David Neth

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Name David Neth

 

Age 23

 

Where are you from

Batavia, NY

 

A little about yourself (i.e. your education family life, etc.)

Let’s start with education: I have a Bachelor’s in Communication from Medaille College in Buffalo, NY and a Master’s in Publishing from Pace University in New York City. I work at a history magazine in Buffalo, NY as an assistant editor and I write about local history.

Family: I have two brothers, an older one and a younger one. My older brother was one of my earliest proofreaders and my younger brother has been helping me design some marketing materials for The Blood Moon.

 

Fiona: Tell us your latest news?

My first novel, The Blood Moon, is now available for preorder!


Fiona: When and why did you begin writing?

I began writing when I was 12 years old. I remember playing a video game and being a little miffed that the story didn’t go the way I wanted it to. So one day, rather spontaneously, I decided to write my own.


Fiona: When did you first consider yourself a writer?

I actually considered myself a writer pretty early on. Maybe when I was about 13 or 14 and I realized that writing wasn’t just something I did, but a hobby I was passionate about. Now the title “author”? That’s going to take some getting used to…


Fiona: What inspired you to write your first book?

The Blood Moon was inspired by my love of fantasy. At the time I was obsessed with witches and all things supernatural. I wanted to create characters who were magical living in a world that wasn’t. I didn’t realize at the time that this genre had a term: urban fantasy.


Fiona: Do you have a specific writing style?

I’ve grown a lot since I first started writing, so my writing style has certainly changed. I used to write very simply. I didn’t like it when authors used more complex storytelling and imagery that would make you think before you could really grasp it. I used to think that was work, but now I can appreciate that style of writing. So the simplicity I looked for when I was a teenager shows in The Blood Moon, whereas my next book has a bit of a different style. It’s more grown-up and there are a few more details that all tangle together to make it a more complex read. But my third book might be a different style yet. My writing style continues to grow and evolve and it’s influenced by what I’m reading at the time.


Fiona: How did you come up with the title?

The Blood Moon actually had a few working titles. Originally, it was simply The Lewis Brothers since the main characters, Josh and Chris, originally had Lewis as a surname. Then I decided to make the story into a series so I retitled it The Lewis Brothers and the Demonic Couple in the same vein as Harry Potter. Through the various rounds of edits I did a few years ago, the boys’ last name changed to Harper and I wanted a more succinct title. At the time, there was a lot of buzz about the four blood moons that would happen within a year and a half period, so I reworked a few things in the book and retitled it The Blood Moon.


Fiona: Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?

Readers don’t necessarily have to dig too deep to find the message in The Blood Moon. It’s very much about the battle between good and evil. Beyond that, though, I think there is a message of perseverance as well as a message about family. Josh and Chris have a small family, but they are able to rely on each other and make it through everything that’s thrown their way when they are only left with each other.


Fiona: How much of the book is realistic?

Well, I don’t know anyone with magic powers, but there are elements of this book that are realistic. I started writing The Blood Moon when I was 15 and that’s the same age as Chris in the book. A lot of the habits he does after school or the way he reacts to magic and his supernatural life is basically me projecting my teenaged self onto the page. But like I said earlier, the story is really about magical people who live in a non-magical world so there are a lot of realistic things that they deal with.


Fiona: Are experiences based on someone you know, or events in your own life?

I think any writer would be lying if they said they don’t draw from their own lives. I’m constantly making little notes either on my phone or on a scrap piece of paper with an idea. Those ideas are drawn from my life. I might see something or hear something that inspires me to take my work in progress in a different direction. Or I might be inspired to craft a story around a situation or create a character based off of a personality trait. I’m sure there are many instances in The Blood Moon as well as my other books that are directly taken from someone I know or something that’s happened to me.


Fiona: What books have most influenced your life? A mentor?

This is an interesting question. I had to look at my Goodreads account to kick-start my memory of what books I read. Basically, I love any story that can suck me in. It’s even better when it’s done unexpectedly. The Hunger Games was that for me. I saw the movie, wasn’t that impressed and on a whim picked up the book. I was hooked. I blew through the whole series. J.K. Rowling and Stephen King are the same way. Their books just pull you in. I can’t really name a book specifically, but anything by Rowling or King are likely to be some of my favorites.

 

I notice I tend to mimic authors I enjoy reading. So if I’m reading Stephen King while I’m writing, I’ll notice I pay more attention to details. If I’m reading J.K. Rowling, I’ll create more complex character histories. Typically it takes me four-six months to write a book, so I have time to read from a variety of authors while putting together a book, which is great because then I don’t borrow too much from one person.


Fiona: What book are you reading now?

I’m reading Gangsters and Organized Crime in Buffalo: History, Hits and Headquarters by Michael F. Rizzo. A friend lent it to me because I want to eventually include a mob boss as a villain in one of my future books.


Fiona: Are there any new authors that have grasped your interest?

Most recently it’s been Sally Green, author of Half Bad. Her series is similar to mine in the sense that the main characters are witches and it takes place in a world that isn’t entirely magical. Her books feature white witches and black witches and what’s interesting to see is how Green takes our inherent belief that white witches are good and uses the politics between the two to twist our ideas. I’ve only read Half Bad so far, but I can’t wait to read the rest of the series.


Fiona: What are your current projects?

Currently I’m finishing up edits on my second book, The Full Moon. I’m on my fourth draft now and then it’ll go to my editor in July. Once I’ve finished the edits on that I’ll really be able to jump into the third book.


Fiona: Name one entity that you feel supported you outside of family members.

Hands-down my former English teacher was the biggest supporter. She was my first editor and the reason I pursued a career in publishing. Her influence on the direction my life took when she told me that The Blood Moon was the best piece of student fiction she had read and that I should pursue publication is not forgotten. I dedicated The Blood Moon to her for this reason.

 

Beyond that, my friends have been extremely supportive as well. They get just as excited as I do when I reach different milestones and they’re looking forward to reading my books.


Fiona: Do you see writing as a career?

For me, absolutely. My ultimate dream would be to quit my day job and write all day and be able to support myself off my books. In order to do that, I need to treat writing as a career because hopefully it will be some day.


Fiona: If you had to do it all over again, would you change anything in your latest book?

There’s always room for improvement. Every time I go through any of my stories, I find things that I could change or tweak. Eventually, you have to close the computer and deem your book good enough. Obviously, you want to make sure it’s gone through enough rounds of edits, but you need to determine when your book is publishable.


Fiona: Do you recall how your interest in writing originated?

All my life I’ve been told that I can do anything. I still sort of operate that way. If I don’t know something, teach me. So the same was true when I was 12 and wanted to write my own story. Nobody was going to stop me. At the time, writing seemed like the easiest outlet to get my story out. From there, my love for books grew.

 

Fiona: Can you share a little of your current work with us?

The only preview I have is on Apple’s iBooks or Google Play. They both allow you to download a sample of the book prior to publication.


Fiona: Is there anything you find particularly challenging in your writing?

The beginning is always the hardest. Once you start you have the voice down, the characters set, a plot in motion. But getting those first few words on the page are the hardest. Writing the first draft in general is difficult, but not too bad if you have it plotted.


Fiona: Who is your favorite author and what is it that really strikes you about their work?

I’ll pick a popular one here and say Stephen King. The first book I read of his was Firestarter and the thing I noted right away was how well he knew his characters. Even the minor ones had rich back stories that made them seem real and less one-dimensional. His minor characters were the center of their universe, as they should be, even if they weren’t the center of the main character’s universe. That is something I always strive for in my writing.


Fiona: Do you have to travel much concerning your book(s)?

No. We live in a digital world now, so it allows me to work from home and still make connections throughout the world. But the one thing that I am looking to do once I have a few books out is travel to local bookstores and ask if they’d like to carry my book or do author events. That’s something I’d love to do, but it’s down the line once I am writing full time.


Fiona: Who designed the covers?

I blogged about the process I went through to find the cover for The Blood Moon. Basically, I ran a contest on 99Designs and was introduced to a wonderful duo, Jelena Gajic and Slobodan Cedic, who I will be working with for the other covers in my series.


Fiona: What was the hardest part of writing your book?

Like I said earlier, starting is the hardest part. Once I have the first chapter or two written, as long as I have the book plotted, I should be able to whiz right through it. If not, then I need to rethink my plot points because if it’s not driving me to keep writing, what’s going to drive my readers to keep reading?


Fiona: Did you learn anything from writing your book and what was it?

A book can be finished! The Blood Moon has been with my for almost 10 years and it’s always been “in progress.” Now it’s up for preorder and has a cover and is formatted. The release date is only a few months away and it is all very real now.


Fiona: Do you have any advice for other writers?

Read every day. Write as often as you can.


Fiona: Do you have anything specific that you want to say to your readers?

If you’ve read my book an enjoyed it, please leave a review. It helps other readers determine whether to give my book a chance and it helps me book promos to keep my dream alive. If you didn’t like it, send me an email and tell me why. I’d love to hear your thoughts.

 

Fiona: Do you remember the first book you read?

Not really, no. I actually wasn’t an avid reader until I was about 13 or 14. I read the first Harry Potter book and was bored because I had watched the movie so many times that I could predict the story. It really wasn’t until Cinda Williams Chima’s The Warrior Heir that I fell in love with reading.

 

Fiona: What makes you laugh/cry?

If you ask my friends, I laugh at everything. My grandma especially will make me laugh so hard that I cry. She’s so kooky and she’s so happy-go-lucky that I can’t help laughing sometimes.

 

Fiona: Is there one person past or present you would meet and why?

I’d love to meet some of my favorite authors, but I’m also nervous that if I met them they’d either seem so much smarter than me or they’d be mean and I’d feel guilty about reading their books and funding an asshole’s bank account. I suppose neither is likely to happen. They’re probably just normal people.

 

Fiona: What do you want written on your head stone and why?

One of my favorite quotes is by George R.R. Martin: “I’ve lived a thousand lives.” Really, with the amount of books I’ve read and will read, the quote is so true. I haven’t read Game of Thrones yet, but I suppose I will someday.

 

Another great quote is by Zig Ziglar: “You don’t have to be great to start. But you have to start to be great.”

 

Fiona: Other than writing do you have any hobbies?

I love running and biking. I run every day, even in the bitter cold. So far I’ve only done three 5K’s, but I have another one in a couple weeks and am planning on doing a few more this year. I also have a 25 mile bike ride that I’m doing with my brother in June.

 

Fiona: What TV shows/films do you enjoy watching?

I’m not a huge movie fan, but I just watch the Back to the Future series and I forgot how much I love those movies. The paradoxes in them, especially the first two with the various counterparts and alternative timelines is so interesting. It makes me want to write a time travel story.

 

As for TV, I’ve gotten sucked into the superhero mania. Arrow and The Flash are my two favorite shows, but I also love Supernatural and Nashville.

 

Fiona: Favorite foods / Colors/ Music

Food: I have a sweet tooth, so anything that has a lot of sugar.

Color: Blue

Music: Pop, mostly, but I like country too and more acoustic stuff where the singer’s voice is prominent.

 

Fiona: If you were not a writer what else would you like to have done?

That’s tricky, because writing led me to my current job in publishing. But even if I wasn’t writing, I’d still like to be doing something in publishing. Maybe more the technical side with layout and formatting.  

 

Fiona: Do you have a blog/website? If so what is it?

Website: www.davidnethbooks.com

Blog: www.theindependentauthor.wordpress.com

Facebook: www.facebook.com/davidnethbooks

Twitter: www.twitter.com/davidnethbooks

Goodreads: http://www.goodreads.com/author/show/13972928.David_Neth

Mailing List: http://t.co/HxSpAHKXuq

 

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The Blood Moon is available for preorder at the following retailers:

Amazon: http://www.amazon.com/Blood-Moon-Under-Book-ebook/dp/B00XIVXWFS

Kobo: https://store.kobobooks.com/en-US/ebook/the-blood-moon

iBooks: https://itun.es/us/l_et7.l

Google Play: https://play.google.com/store/books/details/David_Neth_The_Blood_Moon?id=_lFDCQAAQBAJ&hl=en

Smashwords: https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/542740

 

Here is my interview with Mark Elswick

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Name Mark Elswick
Age 46
Where are you from Michigan
A little about your self `ie your education Family life etc
I was born and raised in Michigan but lived a few years in the South. I’ve always been a major sports junkie. After graduating from high school, I attended the University of Michigan-Flint. However, as a junior, I was in a near-fatal automobile accident that left me comatose and on life support. A severe traumatic brain injury forced doctors to tell my parents that I’d more-than-likely die or be a vegetable; “Mr. and Mrs. Elswick, there is nothing else we can do.” After re-learning to walk, talk, etc., however, I slowly defied the odds and improved. Nearly four years later, I returned to college and finished my B.A. then went to Grad School and earned my M.A. from Central Michigan University. Today, I’ve self-published two novels and a publishing house published a collection of short stories I wrote. In the past four years, my writing/editing/publishing process continues to improve.

 

 

 
Fiona: Tell us your latest news?
I’m currently working on my next novel. It’s an extremely shocking, even painful, story.

 

 

Fiona: When and why did you begin writing?
Since my original goal was to be a sports writer then become the four-letter network’s next sports anchor, I’ve written most of my life. In fact, I spent a few of my younger years as a sports writer for a newspaper.
Writing, to me, is a way of expression. It’s a way to express how you feel about something. Just writing sporting news stories for a paper allows very little writing freedom. Therefore, I’m now writing what I want to write, books.

 

 
Fiona: When did you first consider yourself a writer?
That’s kind of a funny question. I remember first realizing that I may “have something,” when my favorite teacher in high school—who am I kidding? He was everyone’s favorite teacher for over thirty years–Dr. Robert Cronin (RIP, “Doc”)–approached me in the hall about a paper I’d written. It was a comical summary of a day spent playing the most uninteresting sport to watch, EVER—wait for it, wait for it–Golf. This is MY opinion, only. Remember, the opinions in this interview do not represent the opinions of the blog host.  He told me, “Mark this is really, really good stuff” and suggested I try to get it published, which I never did. I was on cloud nine. That meant a ton to me since I was just a jock with aspirations of writing and becoming the next Howard Cosell (Google him, young people.  ) Anyhow, people like Doc leave irreplaceable footprints in our minds and hearts. To make a long story short, Doc’s words made me first consider myself a writer at the tender age of eighteen.

 

 

 

Fiona: What inspired you to write your first book?
My first book, Padman: A Dad’s Guide to Buying…Those and other tales, is a collection of 12 short stories, mostly humorous. Four of the stories are survivor stories, however. Of those, three are traumatic brain injury survivor stories, including my own. Then, there are four everyday life funny stories and four comical stories of a single father raising a daughter. The humor is that I was forced to learn so much about girls/women that I didn’t know. The entire book is 100% true. Basically, it was my way of saying that humor is the best medicine. If we can’t laugh at ourselves, what can we laugh at?

 

 

 

Fiona: How did you come up with the title?
When/If you read Padman, you’ll understand how significant that is for ANY new father. With a 12, 13, whatever-aged daughter who starts her . . . well, ?cycle? . . . we fathers go into the store to buy . . . those . . . and come out PADMAN: SUPER DAD! (even though it’s only in our own minds.)  The story takes a step-by-step look at a man’s ignorant insecurities in the dreaded feminine hygiene aisle.

 

 

 

Fiona: How much of the book is realistic?
That book, surprisingly, is 100% true. The book was nominated in the Midland States Literary Competition. One of its shorts, “Newborn to Dad: NO Multitasking!” was nominated for a Pushcart Prize.

 

 

 

Fiona: Do you see writing as a career?
That’s the plan. I’ve written various genres, even two novellas under a pen name. I did so in preparation for a career in writing. Following the release of my next novel—the shocking, heart wrenching brain injury + football book which I am not disclosing the name of, YET—I would love to write true novels about people in sports, television, movies, music, etc, … who have overcome a tremendous adversity. My passion for a comeback story, since I’ve lived one, is something that will be stamped on every page of those books. . . . Stay Tuned!

 

 
Fiona: Do you recall how your interest in writing originated?
When I was younger, like elementary, junior-high age, I read a lot of sports books; that’s all I ever read unless it was required reading for schoolwork. I used to think, “Man, I want to do this when I grow up. I want to go to games and write about them or the players.” Well, that KINDAAAA worked out.

 

 

 

Fiona: Who is your favorite author and what is it that really strikes you about their work?
I’ll list a couple of completely different writing styles; both of which I love.
John Feinstein: The way he writes factual information makes one feel as if they lived it.
Stephen King: The combination of suspense, detail, and passion he writes with is amazing.

 

 

 

Fiona: Do you have to travel much concerning your book(s)?
I haven’t yet, but I’m planning to in the near future. Also, I’m in talks with a literary agent. We have a sort-of handshake agreement, now, but I’ll reveal that info soon enough. We’ve briefly discussed a possible book tour.

 

 

 

Fiona: Who designed the covers?
For my two novels, it was the tremendous people at Damn Women Promotions.

 

 

 

Fiona: What was the hardest part of writing your book?
Writing is a love. The words flow rather easily. The hardest part is research. Many times, hours of research will prove a waste as it will not be used. It can become very, very frustrating.

 

 

 

Fiona: Do you have any advice for other writers?
Don’t quit! I know that sounds over-used, but it’s so true. It seems way slow in the beginning but have a plan; have a schedule. Don’t ever stop it.

 

 

 

Fiona: Do you have anything specific that you want to say to your readers?
I’m just starting out, really. I’m perfecting this self-publishing process. Don’t expect perfection, but with my next novel, the one about brain injury (my passion) and football (sports, another passion), feel free to expect perfection because you will see and feel the . . . yep! . . . Passion!

 

 
Fiona: Do you remember the first book you read?
The first full-length book I read for enjoyment, NOT for school/college—those tended to suck and I don’t really remember—was John Fienstein’s Season On the Brink. It’s a basketball book about Indiana University’s legendary coach, Bobby Knight. I couldn’t put it down.

 

 
Fiona: Is there one person pass or present you would meet and why?
Just one?  I don’t think I can do that. There are a few, but I’ll try and limit to just a couple; hope that’s ok.
First and foremost, The Man in Black, Johnny Cash:
“So, Johnny, where did you get ideas for much of your music. Also, how often did you think of quitting on your rise to the top.”
Next, NOT last, Elvis Presley.
“Hey, Elvis, you had every woman alive falling at your feet? What was it like to be The King?”

 

 
Fiona: What do you want written on your head stone and why ?
That’s kind of a sick question to ask. Haha However, it’d be something like, “Here’s a man who never quit, despite being told he didn’t have a chance.”

 

 
Fiona: What TV shows/films do you enjoy watching?
I’m not usually into series’ on TV, but lately, I’ve really been getting into Bates Motel and The Returned. I can’t wait for the next season to begin.

 

 
Fiona: Favorite Music
I’m a huge country music fan. However, I love, surprisingly, Texas Country Music, specifically. Among my favorites are Wade Bown, Aaron Watson, Randy Rogers Band, Pat Green. My ultimate favorite, though, is Double D, Deryl Dodd. A great avenue, run by great people, is the internet radio station, www.RadioFreeTexas.org.

 

 
Fiona: If you were not a writer what else would you like to have done?
Since I can’t say writer, I’d say sports journalist. I would have stayed on that path. However, I wanted to write books. What can I say, I’m a writer.

 

 
Fiona: Do you have a blog/website? If so what is it?
Website: www.AuthorMarkElswick.com
Blog: I’ve been way out of that loop. I’ll be blogging again, soon. Get on my website and LIKE the homepage, Facebook style, and watch for details.

Facebook: Author Mark Elswick

Twitter: @MarkElswick2

Amazon Page http://www.amazon.com/Mark-Elswick/e/B00MT1HRDG/ref=sr_tc_2_0?qid=1432672639&sr=1-2-ent 

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traveling writerMe RR green button

Here is my interview with William Meikle

WMheadshot

Name: William Meikle

Age: 57

Where are you from:

Kilbirnie, Ayrshire, Scotland

A little about your self `ie your education Family life etc :

I was raised in a steelworking town in North Ayrshire that started going to seed when the steelworks closed in the mid 70s just as I was about to leave school. Mum and Dad are still there, in the house we moved to when I was 5. I left in ’75 to go to uni, got a degree in Botany ( no, it doesn’t mean I know about gardening ) then went on to a career in IT in London, Aberdeen and Edinburgh before, in 2007, I’d had enough. With my wife we sold up in the UK and moved to Newfoundland, Canada, where we live on the shore with icebergs, whales and bald eagles for company.

Fiona: Tell us your latest news?

The newest of the new news is that I’ve sold a story to THE MAMMOTH BOOK OF JACK THE RIPPER, coming from Little Brown later in 2015. This makes me happy for several different reasons.
Fiona: When and why did you begin writing?

I grew up on a council estate in a town where you were either unemployed or working in the steelworks, and sometimes both. Many of the townspeople led hard, miserable lives of quiet and sometimes not so quiet desperation

When I was at school books and my guitar were all that kept me sane in a town that was going downhill fast. The local steelworks shut and unemployment was rife. The town suffered badly. I -could- have started writing about that, but why bother? All I had to do was walk outside and I’d get it slapped in my face. That horror was all too real.

So I took up my pen and wrote. At first it was song lyrics, designed (mostly unsuccessfully) to get me closer to girls.

I tried my hand at a few short stories but had no confidence in them and hid them away. And that was that for many years.

I didn’t get the urge again until I was past thirty and trapped in a very boring job. My home town had continued to stagnate and, unless I wanted to spend my whole life drinking (something I was actively considering at the time), returning there wasn’t an option.

But my brain needed something to do apart from write computer code, and fiction gave it what was required. That point, almost twenty five years ago now, was like switching on an engine, one that has been running steadily ever since.


Fiona: When did you first consider yourself a writer?

In a way I always have, but the epiphany came in 2005 when I sold a story to a professional anthology, NOVA SCOTIA. I got to stand at the launch with Charlie Stross, Ken MacLeod and a load of other award winners and I thought — I can do this.


Fiona: What inspired you to write your first book?

The first novel was ISLAND LIFE and it came from various trips to small British coastal towns and islands. I’ve always loved the sea and it all came out on that first book.
Fiona: Do you have a specific writing style?

Pulpy adventure with lots of action and dialogue. And monsters.


Fiona: How did you come up with the title?

It’s an island. There’s life on it. :-)


Fiona: Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?

Stay away from monsters. They’ll eat you.


Fiona: How much of the book is realistic?

Almost nothing. Thankfully.


Fiona: Are experiences based on someone you know, or events in your own life?

Sometimes things from real life make it into my work, but mostly I make shit up. It’s who I am, it’s what I do.


Fiona: What books have most influenced your life most? a mentor?

No mentors — I did it all my own way. As for influences… It would have to be the reading I did in the genre as a teenager in a small West Coast Scotland town in the early-seventies, before Stephen King and James Herbert came along, that were most formative.

I graduated from Superman and Batman comics to books and I was a voracious reader of anything I could get my hands on; Alistair MacLean, Michael Moorcock, Nigel Tranter and Louis D’Amour all figured large. Pickings were thin for horror apart from the Pan Books of Horror and Dennis Wheatley, which I read with great relish. Then I found Lovecraft and things were never quite the same.

Mix that with TV watching of Thunderbirds, Doctor Who, the Man From Uncle, Lost in Space and the Time Tunnel, then later exposure on the BBC to the Universal monsters and Hammer vampires and you can see where it all came from. Oh, and Quatermass. Always Quatermass.

I have a deep love of old places, in particular menhirs and stone circles, and I’ve spent quite a lot of time travelling the UK and Europe just to visit archaeological remains. I also love what is widely known as “weird shit”. I’ve spent far too much time surfing and reading fortean, paranormal and cryptozoological websites. The cryptozoological stuff especially fascinates me, and provides a direct stimulus for a lot of my fiction.


Fiona: What book are you reading now?

Just about to start Dan Simmon’s new one, where Sherlock Holmes meets Henry James. I’m looking forward to getting immersed


Fiona: Are there any new authors that have grasped your interest?

I’m a big fan of Gary McMahon—a British writer who has a strong vision and voice, and matches that to some great disturbing storylines. Seek him out folks—he’s the real deal.


Fiona: What are your current projects?

Recently finished and delivered a novel to DarkFuse, the 5th in a 7 novel contract with them. So 5 down, 2 to go. I have a tickle of an idea for the next, and right now I’m waiting for it to gestate.


Fiona: Name one entity that you feel supported you outside of family members.

As I said, I did it my way—I’m not one for joining writers groups and associations. It’s all either my own fault or my own hard work.


Fiona: Do you see writing as a career?

These days, definitely. I do it full time, and if I didn’t treat it as such, I wouldn’t be able to eat.


Fiona: If you had to do it all over again, would you change anything in your latest book?

Nope — the one I’ve just delivered is fast paced, pulpy fun and I’m rather proud of it.


Fiona: Do you recall how your interest in writing originated?

I answered that above—started with songwriting and grew from there.

 

Fiona: Can you share a little of your current work with us?

Nope — I have no idea yet what it’s going to about.

Here it is in its current entirety.

“I thought it was all Carlos Castaneda, mescalin medicine man bollocks,” the girl said as she wiped blood from her brow. “How was I to know the fucker really meant it?”


Fiona: Is there anything you find particularly challenging in your writing?

Getting the ending right is my biggest problem. I get an idea, rush at it and beat it to a pulp, then try to get it to resolve into something that makes sense when it’s finished.


Fiona: Who is your favorite author and what is it that really strikes you about their work?

I don’t have one particular favorite but across the whole span of my reading life—fifty years now—Raymond Chandler has stayed a constant. I could never write like him, but I learned a lot about plotting and character from him. I don’t read him to study his craft though—I read him for pure, unadulterated pleasure, and he delivers every time. The Long Goodbye in particular is a slice of genius.


Fiona: Do you have to travel much concerning your book(s)?

Nope. I sit at a desk overlooking a Newfoundland shoreline and watch the sea. All the traveling is done on my head.


Fiona: Who designed the covers?

I have many books. The most constant designer recently has been M Wayne Miller who I’ve worked with on my Carnacki, Sherlock Holmes and Challenger books, and in one offs like The Creeping Kelp. The lad’s a genius.


Fiona: What was the hardest part of writing your book?

They all vary. Some are easy, like THE INVASION which came in one mad rush, some take longer and need more thinking time.


Fiona: Did you learn anything from writing your book and what was it?

I’m constantly learning—something new with every work. 25 novels and over 300 short stories so far. That’s a lot of learning.


Fiona: Do you have any advice for other writers?

Write, write then write some more. If you feel doubt, don’t stop. Write until you don’t doubt anymore, or until the doubt doesn’t matter.


Fiona: Do you have anything specific that you want to say to your readers?

Buy more of my books. Then buy more. In fact, just buy them all.

Seriously though, I’m very thankful for every reader I have, and I hope I’m able to bring a little entertainment and fun into their lives along the way.

 

Fiona: Do you remember the first book you read?

I remember various kiddies things, the main one being something called ‘Lofty Joe and the Lion Cub’ when I was 4. I also read a lot of comics back in the early ’60s but the first longer thing I remember would be Treasure Island when I was about 8. I found the Hobbit not long after that and things were never quite the same again.

 

Fiona: What makes you laugh/cry?

Cry: Danger / sickness happening to loved ones. Child abuse. Animal abuse. And “Who Knows Where the Time Goes” by Fairport Convention.

Laugh: Monty Python, the Goons, Ghostbusters, Douglas Adams, my dad.

 

Fiona: Is there one person past or present you would meet and why?

Probably Robert Louis Stevenson, who I’ve idolized as long as I can remember. Plus I want to know the trick to writing a Treasure Island or Doctor Jeckyll and Mr. Hyde for the 21st Century.

 

Fiona: What do you want written on your head stone and why ?

No tombstone. I want my ashes scattered at sea to sleep with the fishes.

 

Fiona: Other than writing do you have any hobbies ?

I’ve been playing guitar badly since 1973.

 

Fiona: What TV shows/films do you enjoy watching?

X-Files, Fringe, Quatermass, the Alien movies, Outer Limits… places where science and horror meet.

 

Fiona: Favorite foods / Colors/ Music

Food: Curry, Pizza, single malt Scotch and Beer

Color: Black

Music: A lot of singer songwriters — Richard Thompson, Elvis Costello, Nick Cave, Nick Lowe, Leonard Cohen among many others.

 

Fiona: If you were not a writer what else would you like to have done?

I still play guitar and write songs but I’d have loved to spend time recording and touring in a band.

 

Fiona: Do you have a blog/website? If so what is it?

 

I have a website at http://www.williammeikle.com and apart from that I mostly hang out on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/williammeikle Mostly.

Amazon page http://www.amazon.com/William-Meikle/e/B002BMOP0G/ref=dp_byline_cont_pop_ebooks_1 

 

dunfieldterror

 

 

Buying link

USA http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00TNKKUJO/

UK http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B00TNKKUJO/

CA http://www.amazon.ca/gp/product/B00TNKKUJO

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