Here is my interview with H.L. Laffin

Hello and welcome to my blog, Author Interviews. My name is Fiona Mcvie.

 

Let’s get you introduced to everyone, shall we? Tell us your name. What is your age?

My name is H.L. Laffin, and  old enough to know better, and young enough to have fun with my family.

 Fiona: Where are you from?

 I am from Carbon, Canada

 Fiona: A little about your self (ie,  your education, family life, etc.).

I completed two diploma’s, one in Marketing and one in Management. I have always been artistic. Whether its photography or painting to writing. I love my young family of three kids and husband of thirteen years. I’m very outdoors and love gardening before relaxing to an even fire. I believe in kindness and nature, therefore I help with fostering animals, and recycling to keep our planet clean for longer.  In my rare free time I par take with some boards in my town, and help out with local events.

 Fiona: Tell us your latest news.

 I’m excited for my 16th novel to be releasing on April 3rd. It’s my contemporary version of Beauty and the Beast. Except this story has a new spin on the fairytale.

Fiona: When and why did you begin writing?

My interest in writing started when I was seven and fully understood how to read and write. I fell in love with the journeys my mind often took me. I later shared them with my sister and then started to write them down.

Fiona: When did you first consider yourself a writer?

I think I first considered myself  a writer when I was in college and got back into writing heavily.

Fiona: What inspired you to write your first book?

Once my English professor renewed my confidence in my writing—as I had been privately writing due to my high school English teacher telling me not to take up writing. When I had the money, I published my first novel after my 2nd son was born.

Fiona: How did you come up with the title?

I don’t come up with titles right away. I may use a working title but the story usually comes up with the title. Something inspiring or relating peeks at my inner beast and a title is born.

Fiona: Do you have a specific writing style? Is there anything about your style or genre that you find particularly challenging?

When I chose romance, mystery and thrillers, not to forget paranormal (wolves, vamps, and witches) I knew that the genre’s would need research. Therefore as a child I watch many mystery shows, some soap operas, action movies, read many books in highschool from many talented authors. I do have a specific style, where as I try to explain the very best from each of the characters. It is their story and I am just connecting their readers. I’ve also been dabbling with first persona and third persona in only certain books and I find it plays out quite nicely.

Fiona: How much of the book is realistic and are experiences based on someone you know, or events in your own life?

Many of my books have a realistic edge to their story. I find things people can relate with and therefore once I’ve started the story I let the beast (my muse) take over. I add a bit of me to every book, with either things the character knows or learns, and I love bring my Canadian heritage into my work. Therefore many towns and locations of beauty.

Fiona: To craft your works, do you have to travel? Before or during the process?

I use what travels I’ve done, however many locations that I have not been to, I end up researching prior and many times during the process.  I also contact friends in the locations I’m targeting. 😉

Fiona: Who designed the covers?

I design the covers. I have a vision and then draft up what I want. The cover artist perfect it and sometimes suggests different things. J

Fiona: Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?

I think in most of my books there is a message written within. I always want to help my readers to improve, so if they can take any positive from the book, I’m pleased to have helped.

Fiona: Are there any new authors that have grasped your interest? Jennifer Faye Who is your favorite writer, and what is it about their work that really strikes you?

Annie West, and I love her relatable stories plus the humour she adds to the novel.

Fiona: Outside of family members, name one entity that supported your commitment to become a published author.

Besides best friends, then I give credit to Cathy, my old English professor.

Fiona: Do you see writing as a career?

As long as I have control of my timeline and stories, then I will enjoy my craft. Here’s to publishing 500 books before I die. lol

Fiona: If you had to do it all over again, would you change anything in your latest book?

No. I say this because I go over my book near 20 times with corrections, adjustments and fixes. Now my very first book Only Fate Could Predict, Yes that will be getting over hauled. The story will stay the same, however it will be written as it originally should have but I was new at publishing and still young at my craft.

Fiona: Did you learn anything during the writing of your recent book?

 I learned how to captivate my readers more with the back page write up, and how to outline the words to capture the buyer’s attention.

Fiona: If your book was made into a film, who would you like to play the lead?

 Depends on what book as I write all my books to become movies. I had wanted to go to Film school however after I got my minor, life changed directions and I became an author or a film producer-director.

Fiona: Any advice for other writers?

Never give up. Get help, read lots, ask questions. Write what you know and what comes to you  naturally.

Fiona: Anything specific you want to tell your readers?

I hope to make you smile, laugh and captivate you for the next many pages.

Fiona: What book are you reading now?

Currently writing a new book for the Family Secrets series so I’m not reading. I find I can’t read while crafting as I need to keep my thoughts mine and stay focused.

Fiona: Do you remember the first book you read?

It was a Lassie book.

Fiona: What makes you laugh/cry?

Funny acts and kindness.

Fiona: Do you have any hobbies?

 Fishing keeping, plants, painting, earrings and bead work, as well as knitting, and  many more fun things.

Fiona: What TV shows/films do you enjoy watching?

Romantics, comedy, mystery, suspense, action,

Fiona: Favorite foods, colors,  music?

 Spaghetti, Sushi, and I love blue and Green. With music, I love anything with a beat and has my body moving.

Fiona: Imagine a future where you no longer write. What would you do?

 I think if there becomes a future where I’m not able to write then I will relax and paint, as writing does take up most of my day—but I love it!

Fiona: What do you want written on your head stone?

The beast still resides!!!Lol (However I want to have my ashes spread so there won’t be a stone. I shall live on in my books!) J

Fiona: Do you have a blog or website readers can visit for updates, events and special offers?

 My readers can follow me on twitter @HLLaffin,Facebook https://www.facebook.com/HLLaffin/ , and on wordpress; https://hllaffin.wordpress.com/

Amazon Authors page USA  https://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss?url=search-alias%3Daps&field-keywords=H.L.Laffin

UK  https://www.amazon.co.uk/H.L.-Laffin/e/B00U6LO05E/ref=sr_ntt_srch_lnk_1?qid=1519323465&sr=1-1

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Here is my interview with Steven Fortune

Hello and welcome to my blog, Author Interviews. My name is Fiona Mcvie.

 

Let’s get you introduced to everyone, shall we? Tell us your name. What is your age?

My name is Steven Fortune, I’m 40 years old.

Fiona: Where are you from?

I’m from New Waterford, Nova Scotia, a small town on Cape Breton Island.  I currently live up the road in Sydney.

Fiona: A little about your self (ie,  your education, family life, etc.).

I went to Acadia University where I got a BA in Literature and History.  I also had stints as Editor-in-chief of the school’s creative arts journal, and News Editor of the school paper there.   My parents were almost exclusively blue collar, which is in keeping with the Cape Breton lifestyle.  My mother had some artistic tendencies; she read a lot and did needlepoint and things like that, but I was definitely the first in the family to take the artistic route in earnest.

Fiona: Tell us your latest news.

I’m currently promoting my fourth collection of poems, and first chapbook, titled The Gravity Of Ghosts, but I’ll be having a formal launch for my last full-length collection, Sentimental Drift, in April at the Sydney library to coincide with Poetry Month.  I haven’t been given a firm date for it yet, but I’ll be sure to let everyone know when it happens.

Fiona: When and why did you begin writing?

From the time I could write out a legible alphabet on paper, I was writing things down.  Through elementary school, I was always writing down little diary entries and stuff, though I never actually kept them as it was just something to pass the time back then.  By the time I got to high school I was keeping formal journals, which eventually evolved to poetry.  I was always an introverted kid, and the lack of playmates left me with a lot of time to read.  After several years of reading, I was hit with the notion that I would like to write my own material.  The further I progressed in school, the more rigid the social structure became, and I was beginning to get a grasp of what loneliness was.  That’s when a sense of creativity began to bloom.

Fiona: When did you first consider yourself a writer?

I wrote my first poem in 1997, titled A Coming-out Party.  I still have the paper on which I wrote it.  From that poem on, I considered myself a writer, though for many years it was only for myself.  It would be quite a while before I was courageous enough to even tell anyone else I was writing, let alone circulate the writing.

Fiona: What inspired you to write your first book?

 I can’t remember exactly when I began putting a manuscript together.  It was something I wanted to do for ages, but I never imagined anything would come of it.  It was probably around 2009 or 2010 that I actually started to compile a group of poems that I thought were my best, though I’d still had a long way to go with my voice at that time.  In 2012, I appeared for the first time in a literary journal, and that was when I began to feel my confidence in terms of getting my own book out.

 Fiona: How did you come up with the title?

 My first book was titled A Waltz Around The Swirls.  Ironically it came from a poem that has not been published to this day.  It came from an appeal to a lady for a dance.

Fiona: Do you have a specific writing style? Is there anything about your style or genre that you find particularly challenging?

With every poem I write, I try to incorporate one word that I’ve never used in a poem before.  Of course, the more I write, the less manageable that practice becomes.  In the last two or three years I’ve simplified things.  I’m not as obsessed with less-fashionable words than I used to be.  But a lot of my word choice has always come down to rhythm.  I’m sure that’s a by-product of my influences: Shakespeare, the Romantics, and so on.  Music is a big part of my life as well.  I don’t actually play anything but I’ve written lyrics for songwriter friends in the past.  I often find myself having to reach a compromise between the most appropriate word and the word that works best within the overall flow.

Fiona: How much of the book is realistic and are experiences based on someone you know, or events in your own life?

There’s always an element of autobiography in my writing.  Lately I’ve been relying more on dreams for ideas.  In addition to poetry I occasionally write little stories, postcard stories you could call them, and dreams offer great fodder for those.  I haven’t been a prolific traveller in my life; I’ve never been outside of Canada, but I’ve seen much of own country.  Because we’re a big country, there’s a great deal of diversity when it comes to cultures, landscapes, and so on, so I’ve been able to draw inspiration from the various places I’ve been and worked.

Fiona: To craft your works, do you have to travel? Before or during the process?

Not necessarily.  In fact, most of my stuff comes to me after hours, either laying down before I fall asleep or after I’ve awoken from a dream.  Wherever I’ve lived over the years, the vast majority of material I’ve written has come to me in my bedroom, though I also write in malls, coffee shops and places like that.  I always have paper with me, wherever I go, just in case.

Fiona: Who designed the covers?

Three of my books were designed by my publisher, Melinda Cochrane, with photos taken by me.  The artwork for Sentimental Drift was designed by Tommy Jonq.

Fiona: Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?

Once I’ve settled on the group of poems that will comprise a collection, I always try to order them in a conceptual form.  Most of my poetry is written in the first person, so I feel the need to tell a story beyond the stories that each individual poem tells.  I’m predominantly an introspective writer, which is a delicate matter as I run the risk of having everything come off as autobiographical, which is not my desired outcome.  Naturally there will be a bit of me in everything I write.  After all, I was first driven to write creatively by the sense of social isolation I felt growing up.  But there has to be a sense of mystery as well to make it universal and accessible to readers.   If I can build a narrative framework from the various vignettes presented in the poems, it just adds a fresh and different dynamic.

Fiona: Are there any new authors that have grasped your interest?  Who is your favorite writer, and what is it about their work that really strikes you?

It’s so hard to pick just one.  I suppose Shakespeare has had the biggest influence on me.  Ever since I was first introduced to him in high school, I was fascinated.  Drama and poetry were never connected fields in my mind until I read The Bard, and I was blown away by the fact that someone could merge the two so seamlessly.  It probably had a big effect on the introspective tendencies that emerged from my own stuff.  As for new authors, I haven’t really read anyone new lately as I’ve just been kind of leafing through my bookshelf and picking things out at random.  But I have rediscovered some authors that I love but haven’t read in a while.  Robertson Davies is a fine Canadian novelist; I never get tired of reading his books.  Most of the ‘new’ writers I’m interested in are my friends from Facebook.  I’ve gotten to meet many great unheralded poets on social media.   This is where publishers should be looking for the next big thing.

Fiona: Outside of family members, name one entity that supported your commitment to become a published author.

Again, my online friends have been profoundly inspirational to me.  Confidence has never been my strong suit, and I regularly find questioning my creative staying power, but they are always there to prop me up with their compliments.  In turn, their writings inspire me and I learn new things and ways to write from them.

Fiona: Do you see writing as a career?

 I always tell people that my dream is to be like Bernie Taupin, Elton John’s lyricist through all these years.  I’d love to get into the music business, but I don’t possess the natural talent to play an instrument.  I know because I’ve attempted to play many.  I would love to find a songwriter or a band that is looking to collaborate with a lyricist.  It’s something I feel that I could do.  But even if writing never becomes the day job for me, I’ve already accomplished my dream of producing books with my name on the cover that are seriously read by many people.  I’ll die content knowing that.

Fiona: If you had to do it all over again, would you change anything in your latest book?

 I don’t think.  I devote a lot of time to choosing the poems that will go into each book, not to mention revising to the point where I’m comfortable with each one.  And the best poems don’t necessarily make it into a book right away.  That goes back to the endeavour to tell a story, and allow some kind of collective unconscious to grow from the collection of poems presented.

Fiona: Did you learn anything during the writing of your recent book?

I learned that I didn’t have to lace the poems with exotic words to get a message across.  The new chapbook represents a move to simplicity, and it seems to be going okay as I’ve gotten lots of great reviews for it.  Now the next collection I write could see me going back to the exotic approach, you never know.  Every book represents a snapshot of my mental state at the time that the majority of its poems were written.  Who knows how I’ll feel as the year progresses and I begin to fill another notebook.  I have to leave the exotic approach open because I don’t want to get hooked on one style, just because it brought me commercial success.

Fiona: If your book was made into a film, who would you like to play the lead?

Liam Neeson.  An online quiz told me I would look like him when I’m older.

Fiona: Any advice for other writers?

In times of writer’s block, practice your signature.  If you move the pen long enough, an idea will come.  Even if you consider it gibberish, it’s something to build on.  I started doing this as a kid because I wanted to develop an autograph in the event that my burgeoning dream of becoming a writer ever came true.  I still do it to this day, only now I’ll do it until something other than my name comes from the pen.  I find that even if I’m writing nonsense, the feel of the pen in my hand keeps me going.

Fiona: Anything specific you want to tell your readers?

Poetry is often considered to be a heady form of literature, something you have to invest a lot of brainpower into in order to enjoy its full effect.  I’ve never considered it to be like that.  Poetry is an escape to me; it provides alternate ways of looking at things we consider automatic.  For those of you who read my work, I simply invite you to enjoy the flow of the words rather than get caught up in the words as individual puzzle pieces.  I do hope there is enough mystery of course to be accessible to everyone on different levels, but not at the expense of interpretive wrangling over why this word or that word was included.   I would rather be enjoyed than studied.

 Fiona: What book are you reading now?

 Sometime in the next day or two I’ll begin The Dharma Bums by Jack Kerouac.  I enjoy the Beat writers very much, and have been compared to them many times, not so much in writing style but in atmospheric effect.

 Fiona: Do you remember the first book you read?

 My parents got me the Charlie Brown encyclopedia set around the time I was first able to read on my own.  When company came over they would get me to read from it for them.  Even back then I was aware of a discrepancy between a speaker and a talker, and the former was the one I was destined to be closer to.

Fiona: What makes you laugh/cry?

As a holder of depression and social anxiety, what makes me laugh on one day may make me cry the next.  I say ‘holder’ because I hate saying I ‘suffer’ from them, even though I do sometimes.

Fiona: Is there one person, past or present, you would love to meet? Why?

William Blake.  He’s a fascinating guy.

Fiona: Do you have any hobbies?

 Video games, walking, live music at a pub.

Fiona: What TV shows/films do you enjoy watching?

I don’t watch a lot of TV.  When I do, it’s documentaries or history shows predominantly.  I also enjoy old cartoons though, Looney Toons and so on, and British comedy.  That’s my comic relief.

Fiona: Favorite foods, colors,  music?

Blue is my favourite colour.  I’m a pretty fussy eater but Italian I enjoy for the most part.  I’m all over the board musically, though I’m a rocker at heart, particularly the prog-rock of the 60s and 70s.  That music was a big influence on my writing.

Fiona: Imagine a future where you no longer write. What would you do?

Go insane.  Seriously, I would go insane if I couldn’t or didn’t write.  I’m sure I’m not the only holder of that sentiment.

Fiona: What do you want written on your head stone?

I’ll refer to the opening line of a poem of mine, titled Vanilla Boy: Defining me would be like spelling out a hundred-letter word.

Fiona: Do you have a blog or website readers can visit for updates, events and special offers?

The easiest place to find me, and the best place to get all my updates is on Facebook.  My personal page is https://www.facebook.com/steven.fortune.9822 and my author page is https://www.facebook.com/stevenfortunepoet .   You can purchase all but one of my books on Amazon at https://www.amazon.com/Steven-Fortune/e/B00Q5LXMC6 .   My second book, Hollow Weight, is available on https://www.lulu.com/shop/search.ep?contributorId=1409506 .  You can also look me up on my publisher’s website: http://www.melindacochraneinternationalbooks.com/ , where I have a page and contribute blogs from time to time.

 

 

 

Here is my interview with Joan Livingston

Hello and welcome to my blog, Author Interviews. My name is Fiona Mcvie.

Let’s get you introduced to everyone, shall we? Tell us your name. What is your age?

Hello, Fiona, thank you for inviting me to your blog. My name is Joan Livingston, and as for my age, let’s say I am une femme d’un certain âge and leave it at that.

Fiona: Where are you from?

I have lived in different parts of the U.S., including 11 years in Taos, New Mexico. Recently, I returned to the rural hilltowns of Western Massachusetts, which is the setting for most of my fiction. It’s also where we raised our family for 25 years before moving to the U.S. Southwest.

Fiona: A little about your self (ie, your education, family life, etc.).

I grew up beside the ocean in Massachusetts, where my grandparents arrived from the Madeira and Azores islands of Portugal. I was a studious, sheltered child who was the first of my family to graduate from college.

From college on, I broke loose and chose an alternative lifestyle. I am the mother of six children, which although rewarding, took up all of my creative energy. I just couldn’t write during those years. So I did the next best thing — I read.

My spouse, Hank, and I are proud of our kids, who are now adults, and our two granddaughters. They are good people.

Fiona: Tell us your latest news.

My novel, Chasing the Case, is set for a May 18 release. Published by Crooked Cat Books, it’s the first in a mystery series featuring Isabel Long, a journalist turned amateur P.I. Her first case is solving a 28-year-old mystery about a woman who went missing in her small town of a thousand people. It was her first big story as a rookie reporter and now her first case as an amateur P.I.

The book will be available in paperback and to pre-order in Kindle before May 18. I will spread the news when that happens.

Its sequel, Redneck’s Revenge, will be published by Crooked Cat Books in the fall. Currently, I am working on the third.

Fiona: When and why did you begin writing?

I began writing as a child and continued through college and a bit afterwards, when I fancied myself a poet. But as I hinted above, I had a rather lengthy writer’s block as I mothered six kids. Being a reporter got me back into using words. Being an editor freed me up to do my own writing. Suddenly, writing fiction became a part of every day. That was 19 years ago.

Despite countless rejections, I kept writing. I’ve completed thirteen books, including a middle-grade series, a bilingual series for children, and seven adult novels. I am in the process of writing two more — a mystery and the fourth in the middle-grade series.

I tried self-publishing — Peace,Love, and You Know What,The Sweet Spotand The Cousins and the Magic Fish/Los Primos y el PezMágico—but I really wanted to be part of a team that oversaw editing, design etc. and helped with promotion. I am so happy to have signed with Crooked Cat Books last fall — and that Laurence and Steph Patterson took a chance on me.

Fiona: When did you first consider yourself a writer?

Definitely as a child when I had teachers who encouraged me to write. But being an author took many, many more years.

Fiona: What inspired you to write your first book?

Actually, my first book, The Sacred Dog, hasn’t been published. I was inspired by the small town of 1,200 people in Western Massachusetts, where we livedfor 25 years.

Fiona: How did you come up with the title?

The Sacred Dog is the name of a bar that has a prominent role in the book. It was the nickname we used to call one of our dogs that would sit regally and composed in a household of six kids.

Thetitle for my most recent book, Chasing the Case, just popped into my head like so much of my writing. Or as I say, as a journalist, Isabel never lost a story she chased. Now as an amateur P.I., she’s not about to lose a case she chases.

Fiona: Do you have a specific writing style? Is there anything about your style or genre that you find particularly challenging?

I believe being a journalist for thirty-plus years, gave me the opportunity to observe people closely. It’s an experience that has helped me create realistic dialogue and scenarios. I sit at my laptop and let the words flow. I never work by outline. In one of the best books on the topic, the author Stephen King calls writing “telepathic.” That’s the way it works for me. Then there’s rewriting. But I liken it to taking up a really good daydream and making it better.

Fiona: How much of the book is realistic and are experiences based on someone you know, or events in your own life?

I take what I know and have my way with it. In Chasing the Case, I will admit the main character, Isabel Long, is a lot like me, kind of sassy and determined. Isabel and I are Portuguese in what is truly Yankee territory. Like her, the first job in my thirty-plus years as a journalist was reporting on small, rural towns. Isabel’s 92-year-old mother, Maria Ferreira, is her Watson. My own book-loving mother is the inspiration for that character, and I borrowed a bit from three of my kids to create Isabel’s adult children. The rest of the characters, the setting, and storyline are pure fiction.

Fiona: To craft your works, do you have to travel? Before or during the process?

The only travelling I do is in my mind.

Fiona: Who designed the covers?

I have self-published two adult novels: Peace, Love, and You Know What (a romp through the early ’70s with a group of hippie friends from college) and The Sweet Spot (a woman tries to persevere after her small town turns on her). Michelle Gutierrez, a designer who I worked with at The Taos News, created those covers.

For Chasing the Case, my publishers Laurence and Steph Patterson, of Crooked Cat Books, created the design with my input. I believe it captures the mystery well.

Fiona: Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?

Hmm, I hadn’t thought of any messages. Perhaps that there’s a lot more going on in small towns than people realize.

Fiona: Are there any new authors that have grasped your interest?  Who is your favorite writer, and what is it about their work that really strikes you?

I am currently reading the novels of my fellow authors at Crooked Cat Books. As for favorite writers, I am fond of those who write about rural areas such as Annie Proulx, Russell Banks, Richard Russo, Larry Brown, Larry Watson, etc. I am a huge fan of Sherman Alexie. I can’t say I love everything an author writes, but my favorites are the ones who make me forget I am reading.

Fiona: Outside of family members, name one entity that supported your commitment to become a published author.

Definitely my friend, Teresa Dovalpage, who is an author. Her latest book, Death Comes in Through the Kitchen, a mystery set in her native Cuba is being published in March. We met in Taos and became fast friends.

Fiona: Do you see writing as a career?

I haven’t had the good fortune yet to make enough from my fiction to count as a career, but being a long-time journalist was pretty close.

Fiona: If you had to do it all over again, would you change anything in your latest book?

Ha, I did many times while I was rewriting it.

Fiona: Did you learn anything during the writing of your recent book?

This was my first attempt at writing a mystery. I found I enjoyed the genre very much.

Fiona: If your book was made into a film, who would you like to play the lead?

I believe Jennifer Connelly or Kate Winslet, if they were willing to let their hair go silver, would do Isabel justice.

Fiona: Any advice for other writers?

I will pass on advice from one of my college professors: Write it like nobody else has written it before.

From me: Write because you love doing it.

Fiona: Anything specific you want to tell your readers?

I hope you enjoy what you read, and if you do, please kindly leave a review.

Fiona: What book are you reading now?

I am finishing up Ninja School Mum by Lizzie Chantree and will read Neil Randall’s The Girl in the Empty Room next. Both are Crooked Cat Books authors.

Fiona: Do you remember the first book you read?

I read a lot in school, the usual beginner books. But I recall being quite taken by The Diary of Anne Frank.

Fiona: What makes you laugh/cry?

I’m a bit of a stoic, so I tend not to cry. Laugh? Oh, the absurdity of life gets me all the time.

Fiona: Is there one person, past or present, you would love to meet? Why?

Only one? Crap, there are so many great people to choose from.In the present, I would love to have a beverage with Barack Obama. In the past, a smoke with John Lennon.

I will reveal a favorite pastime: Visiting the homes where famous authors lived. I try to get a feel for their creativity.

Fiona: Do you have any hobbies?

Making things grow.

Fiona: What TV shows/films do you enjoy watching?

Anything that makes me forget I’m watching. For TV shows I’m hooked on mystery/crimes series from the U.K. and Scandinavia. As for movies, I have the same criteria. Sorry to say there haven’t been many of those lately.

Fiona: Favorite foods, colors, music?

I like foods that use honest ingredients and clean cooking methods. I am fond of ethnic cuisines, especially Japanese and New Mexican.

I would say 80 percent of my wardrobe is black. But I do like turquoise.

As for music, I enjoy blue grass, folk, some rock ’n’ roll and blues.

Fiona: Imagine a future where you no longer write. What would you do?

Well, I suppose I would spend it travelling, reading, and gardening in that order.

Fiona: What do you want written on your head stone?

Not sure there will be one, but here’s an idea: She had her way with words.

Fiona: Do you have a blog or website readers can visit for updates, events and special offers?

Yes, you can catch me at www.joanlivingston.net . I also have a Facebook author page @JoanLivingstonAuthor and Twitter account @joanlivingston. On Instagram: JoanLivingston_Author.

https://www.amazon.com/Joan-Livingston/e/B01E1HKIDG/ref=sr_tc_2_0?qid=1519308290&sr=1-2-ent

Here is my interview with Daniel Dark

Hello and welcome to my blog, Author Interviews. My name is Fiona Mcvie.

 

Let’s get you introduced to everyone, shall we? Tell us your name. What is your age? Where are you from?

Yes my name is Daniel Dark dropping in from Nashville, Tn. My age is an enigma some say I’m from the Victorian era and some say that I’m from the middle of the last century.

Fiona: A little about your self (ie,  your education, family life, etc.).

I live out in the country with my wife, where our neighbours are mainly cows, horses, and chickens.

Fiona: Tell us your latest news.

Knife’s Tell came out in October of 2017 since then I have been doing book signings and guest appearances. Lately I was asked to be a part of the fiction authors about Jack the Ripper on the prestigious program Rippercast done by Ripperologist Magazine and Casebook.org/podcast. This last weekend I was also interviewed for another podcast. In the near future I will be at Vanderbilt Barnes and Nobel on the tenth of March and then at the International Steampunk Symposium in Cincinnati the end of April. As of today my first Victorian cookbook is being edited and should be at the Press soon.

Fiona: When and why did you begin writing?

I wrote back when I was younger, but it was not until I had a stroke, and was needing some way to rehab my brain that I took it up professionally.

Fiona: When did you first consider yourself a writer?

I still do not consider myself a writer. I am more of a word topographer.

Fiona: What inspired you to write your first book?

Having a stroke and no insurance for medical rehab was a factor. I needed to fill in the blanks of what used to be my profession that had be erased from memory.

Fiona: How did you come up with the title?

With Knife’s Tell I wanted something different that told you it was not going to be an ordinary story. It is what the knife sees and relates not so much in a tale but as the heart did in Poe’s work.

Fiona: Do you have a specific writing style? Is there anything about your style or genre that you find particularly challenging?

I have been told that I write very lyrical or poetic in a first person voice. This has challenges of story development but according to reviews, readers, and other authors I accomplish it seemlessly.

Fiona: How much of the book is realistic and are experiences based on someone you know, or events in your own life?

There are a few parts in my novels that come from personal experiences. My cookbooks come from me being a Chef and owning a Victorian style restaurant.

Fiona: To craft your works, do you have to travel? Before or during the process?

I do not have to visit certain parts of the world to get the story in general. I do think that if I have the chance I will go.

Fiona: Who designed the covers?

Aaron Drown Design

Fiona: Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?

If there is one it would be that not everything in life is black or white there is always some grave areas.

Fiona: Outside of family members, name one entity that supported your commitment to become a published author.

That is easy my publisher Seventh Star Press

Fiona: Do you see writing as a career?

Yes I do and according to people that have read my works a best selling author too.

Fiona: If you had to do it all over again, would you change anything in your latest book?

I do not think so.

Fiona: Did you learn anything during the writing of your recent book?

It takes more to get it out than to write.

Fiona: If your book was made into a film, who would you like to play the lead?

It would be an interesting proposition considering I am the cover photo on the book.

Fiona: Any advice for other writers?

Keep writing and learning.

Fiona: Anything specific you want to tell your readers?

Thank you for trusting in me.

Fiona: What book are you reading now?

Cinema of Shodows, Deranged, Female Serial Killers, Psycho USA

Fiona: Do you remember the first book you read?

When I was in grade school I read science books the first novel that I read was the Hobbit

Fiona: What makes you laugh/cry?

Real life

Fiona: Is there one person, past or present, you would love to meet? Why?

Wilkie Collins he was greatly underrated but collaborated with the likes of Charles Dickens.

Fiona: Do you have any hobbies?

My wife says that I have a spoke addiction. I ride a Penny Farthing and live my life on my terms.

Fiona: What TV shows/films do you enjoy watching?

One of my favourites is Last of the Summer Wine. I also like PBS history shows about the nineteenth century.

Fiona: Favorite foods, colors,  music?

I enjoy trying new foods and like a wide variety of music but my favourite color is black.

Fiona: Imagine a future where you no longer write. What would you do?

Die.

Fiona: What do you want written on your head stone?

Name and forwarding address. No really I would like to have my motto.

If you don’t live it you don’t believe it.

Fiona: Do you have a blog or website readers can visit for updates, events and special offers?

https://www.facebook.com/DanielDarkAuthor

Goodreads @Daniel Dark

Daniel Dark on SeventhStarPress.com

https://www.amazon.com/Knifes-Tell-Daniel-Dark-ebook/dp/B075RMJ4BJ/ref=sr_1_1?s=digital-text&ie=UTF8&qid=1519297234&sr=1-1

Here is my interview with Izzy Szyn

 

Hello and welcome to my blog, Author Interviews. My name is Fiona Mcvie.

 

Let’s get you introduced to everyone, shall we? Tell us your name. What is your age?

I’m Izzy Szyn and I’m 57.

Fiona: Where are you from?

From Detroit, Michigan but live in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma

Fiona: A little about your self (ie,  your education, family life, etc.).

I’m single, have a small chihuahua/terrier named Misty. I have three brothers, two sisters and bunch of nieces and nephews.

Fiona: Tell us your latest news.

I have Lizzy’s Temptation which comes out Mar 1.

Fiona: When and why did you begin writing?

I have been a reviewer/promoter for years. One day while in an author chat about four years ago, my friend Iris Pross dared me to write. Then she started sending stuff of publishers looking for submissions.

Fiona: When did you first consider yourself a writer?

I’ll let you know. LOL I’m still getting used to it. LOL

Fiona: What inspired you to write your first book?

I’m a huge fan of the television show Big Brother. My first book Phantasy House was based on that show.

Fiona: How did you come up with the title?

In Phantasy House, Heather the main character tries out for the network version of the show Fantasy House. I tried to think of something that wouldn’t get me in trouble. :)When Heather arrives at the audition, she finds out its for the adult cable version. I changed the spelling to differentiate the difference.

Fiona: Do you have a specific writing style? Is there anything about your style or genre that you find particularly challenging? 

The hardest part was getting used to writing love scenes. But now? It’s my favorite part to write.

Fiona: How much of the book is realistic and are experiences based on someone you know, or events in your own life?

In Lizzy’s Temptation, my character Lizzy Holloway used to sneak into events like weddings, bar mitzvahs, concerts. I actually used to sneak into concerts.

Fiona: To craft your works, do you have to travel? Before or during the process?

I wish I could travel, but work a full time, that’s why the Internet is awesome.

Fiona: Who designed the covers?

This cover was designed by Goedder’s Graphics.

Fiona: Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?

I tend to have the same message, that love is love.

Fiona: Are there any new authors that have grasped your interest?  Who is your favorite writer, and what is it about their work that really strikes you?

Thinking on that. My favorite writer? There are too many to name. I’ve been reading romance for over forty years. I love that their books draw you in from the first page and hold you until the last.

Fiona: Outside of family members, name one entity that supported your commitment to become a published author.

Cynthia Sax was a HUGE help when I started writing. She’s still a good person to go to when I need advice.

Fiona: Do you see writing as a career?

I’d love to stay home and write.

Fiona: If you had to do it all over again, would you change anything in your latest book?

No.

Fiona: Did you learn anything during the writing of your recent book?

Not really

Fiona: If your book was made into a film, who would you like to play the lead?

Hmm, if it were ever made into a movie it’d have to be on HBO or Starz or other cable networks, otherwise the big studios might not do it justice. I write erotic romance, I wouldn’t be adverse to an adult film company making it into a movie.

Fiona: Any advice for other writers?

Just write.

Fiona: Anything specific you want to tell your readers?

I just want you to enjoy my books.

Fiona: What book are you reading now?

I want to start on the newest In Death book by JD Robb

Fiona: Do you remember the first book you read?

Yes and no. I remember the first romance but not the title. I was about thirteen.

Fiona: What makes you laugh/cry?

I’m one of those people who cry when they’re mad. I don’t cry often, but when I do it’s a long time coming.

What makes me laugh? Movies, my family, my dog (she’s a bit of diva)

Fiona: Is there one person, past or present, you would love to meet? Why?

President Obama and his wife. I just think he’s the coolest best president we’ve had in my lifetime.

Fiona: Do you have any hobbies? 

Movies.

Fiona: What TV shows/films do you enjoy watching?

I love the Pitch Perfect movies, Legally Blonde movies. My favorite tv shows are Big Bang Theory, The Voice, Young Sheldon and Life in Pieces along with Big Brother.

Fiona: Favorite foods, colors,  music? Favorite foods? Chicken can eat it every day.

Color is green in all of its shades. Music anything from 60s to now.

Fiona: Imagine a future where you no longer write. What would you do?

I honestly do not know.

Fiona: What do you want written on your head stone?

Not sure

Fiona: Do you have a blog or website readers can visit for updates, events and special offers?

I’m bad about updating my website and blog. My blog is more up to date. If you really want ot keep up to date on my new releases and just want to hang out you can find me on Facebook. I try to do an ask Izzy day on there every week.

https://www.facebook.com/izzyszynhome/

On Twitter @izzyszyn

Amazon Authors page https://www.amazon.com/Izzy-Szyn/e/B00XKHESO4/ref=sr_ntt_srch_lnk_1?qid=1519255694&sr=8-1

Email izzyszyn@gmail.com

Excerpt for Lizzy’s Temptation:

“You wanted me to call you? Is something wrong?” asked Lizzy, smiling when she saw Ivory’s face on the screen.

“Are you alone?”

“Yes, why?”

“Lock the door, and look in your purse,” instructed Ivory.

“My purse is still in my desk,” admitted Lizzy.

“How long is your break?” asked Ivory.

“I have about ten more minutes,” answered Lizzy.

“Not enough time,” said Ivory. “Lock the door and take off your jeans. I want you to make yourself come.”

“Here?” Lizzy started to panic, looking at the door, she saw there wasn’t a lock on it. “I can’t lock it.”

“That’s not acceptable,” commented Ivory. “We’ll have to make arrangements for your breaks. Meet me outside at lunchtime. Spencer will be waiting.”

https://www.amazon.com/Lizzys-Temptation-Izzy-Szyn-ebook/dp/B079KY5GXT/ref=asap_bc?ie=UTF8

Here is my interview with Daisy St. James

Hello and welcome to my blog, Author Interviews. My name is Fiona Mcvie.

 

Let’s get you introduced to everyone, shall we? Tell us your name. What is your age?

Hi! I’m Daisy St. James and I’m….*peeks between fingers*…40 this year!

 Fiona: Where are you from?

I am from Montreal, Quebec in beautiful Canada.

Fiona: A little about your self (ie,  your education, family life, etc.).

I’m a stay-at-home-mom/voice-over artist. I have three beautiful children and an equally incredibly easy on the eyes husband. I have an Ewok, um, I mean dog, named Lulu (aka. The Creature, Louise or Louis). My life is pretty tame and simple. I like to read, write, craft, bake, cook, hike, garden, etc. There’s not much more to me than all that. I love my family and my family is my world.

Fiona: Tell us your latest news.

Well! My debut Paranormal Romance, Phoenyx in Flames, was just release on Amazon on Valentine’s Day of this year and I am currently working on book two, Phoenyx Falling. It’s a five-book series, so I’m keeping myself pretty busy!

Fiona: When and why did you begin writing?

Writing has been a part of my life since I could hold a pencil steady between my chubby little fingers. As to WHY I began writing…I loved reading. I would get so engrossed in a novel that sometimes reading would come before anything else when I was a teenager. One day I decided I’d try to write my own story and my friends loved it. They actually wanted to read more and more and so I found myself writing more and more. It became my passion.

Fiona: When did you first consider yourself a writer?

I’ve always considered myself a writer. Someone who writes every day is a writer. That’s me.

Fiona: What inspired you to write your first book?

It was a deep-seated need. I felt compelled to write it.

 Fiona: How did you come up with the title?

Well, my character Jane, aka The Phoenyx, goes through a kind of transformation throughout the books. The mythological Phoenix will burn and then emerge new. This is what my character goes through, hence, Phoenyx in Flames.

Fiona: Do you have a specific writing style? Is there anything about your style or genre that you find particularly challenging?

No, I don’t think I have a particular style per say. I write from multiple POV’s, but a lot of writers do that.

Fiona: How much of the book is realistic and are experiences based on someone you know, or events in your own life?

I wish! Phoenyx’s life is so exciting, plus, Vampires. In all seriousness, I try to make my characters as real and as flawed as I possibly can, so there is some of me in there, of course. As for life events…. not yet! But maybe in the future books. Right now, it’s purely fiction.

Fiona: To craft your works, do you have to travel? Before or during the process?

I travel only in my mind.

Fiona: Who designed the covers?

I found a wonderful cover designer on Fiverr actually, Olivia Pro Designs. I love her! She really works hard to give me what I want and make it look exactly how I see it in my mind.

 Fiona: Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?

I think the biggest message would be that people tend to change, but that’s not always a bad thing. We can’t ever remain constant so why fight it. Change means growth.

Fiona: Are there any new authors that have grasped your interest?  Who is your favorite writer, and what is it about their work that really strikes you?

 Kelsey Nicole Price…she writes Sci-Fi Romance. I never thought I could love Cyborgs so much, but she succeeded!  As for my favourite writer…I don’t have a favourite, but I really love Kim Harrison, J.R. Ward and Deborrah Harkness.

Fiona: Outside of family members, name one entity that supported your commitment to become a published author.

It was a very long time ago, but I would have to say my High School English teacher, Mr. Jerry O’Neil. He always thought I had what it took and made me promise to dedicate my first published book to him. Although, I published six other short novels before Phoenyx in Flames, this current book was the only one that I felt was worth dedicating to him. I think he would have been very proud of me. I think about him a lot the older I get. He was very influential when it came to encouraging my writing in every form.

Fiona: Do you see writing as a career?

I would very much like to!

Fiona: If you had to do it all over again, would you change anything in your latest book?

Not a thing! It’s exactly as it should be. After all, I had twelve years to plan it!

Fiona: Did you learn anything during the writing of your recent book?

Continuity is everything! This book has a lot of details and is full of secrets and mysteries. I had to make sure I was keeping them all straight!

 Fiona: If your book was made into a film, who would you like to play the lead?

I actually have pictures of the actors in a file folder that I look at while I’m writing lol

Phoenyx/Jane: Scarlet Johansson

Hutton: Pierce Brosnan

Cortez: Nicolas Gonzalez

Monroe: Eva Green

Ian: Ian Somerhalder

Lilith: Amber Heard

Lazarus: Jude Law

Ash: Josh Hartnett

Morty: Christopher Mintz-Plasse or Robin Taylor (I always saw him as a love child of the both of them)

The Chemist: Jon Heder

Judas: Is the only one I couldn’t think of an Actor to play…If you ever read the book, tell me who you think he should be! lol

Fiona: Any advice for other writers?

Write. Just write. Even if you get only fifty words or a hundred words down, at least it’s something. I’m a strong believer in the “Use it or lose it” school of thought. Keep a journal, write your thoughts down. If you hear something funny on tv, a piece of dialogue or a witty come back, write it down! You can find inspiration in everything. Don’t forget music either. Music really helps me get into the right frame of mind for whatever it is I’m working on at the moment. When I get an idea for a book, I instantly create a playlist in my Spotify. Music is very inspiring.

Fiona: Anything specific you want to tell your readers?

There’s more to come! Phoenyx in Flames is only the beginning of her story and there is a lot more story to tell so, stick around! I’m currently working on book two and it’s taken me in a direction I never even thought it would go in so…get ready!

Fiona: What book are you reading now?

I’m re-reading The Hollows Series by Kim Harrison.

Fiona: Do you remember the first book you read?

The very first children’s book, I’m afraid not. However, I do remember the first romance novel I ever read. Ashes on the Wind by Kathleen E. Woodiwiss. It was in a box of my mother’s old books and I found it when I was twelve. It was an enormous book, huge print, but the cover was so breathy and ethereal, I felt pulled to it. I loved the story so much that I’ve read it about fifteen times since. The book is being held together by boxing tape at this point.

Fiona: What makes you laugh/cry?

It’s harder to make me laugh than to make me cry. I’ll be honest lol. I’m a super sensitive person so I could be watching a hardware commercial and if it involves family or has a sentimental undertone, I’ll be a blubbering mess. What makes me laugh? I’m not a fan of slapstick comedy. I like dry, witty, sarcastic comedy. I think the darker it is, the funnier I’m going to find the joke.

Fiona: Is there one person, past or present, you would love to meet? Why?

I’ve been very into Vikings lately so, if I could sit down with anyone, it would be LagerthaLothbrok. This woman existed in life. She was a warrior, a mother, a lover, so, so strong. My mother always said to my sister and I that she was raising female warriors. If I could talk to anyone, it would be Lagertha. I know the fictionalization of her is probably glorified for television, but the real Lagertha was a Sheildmaiden who fought men openly in battle. Her golden hair flowing down her back in what I assume could only be a slap in the face to the men she killed with her sword. I think she’d be very interesting to speak with.

Fiona: Do you have any hobbies?

I crochet. I know, it’s an old lady hobby, but I love it. It’s relaxing. I also sing. I love singing. I’ve been singing ever since I was a child. And I collect stationary. Pens and journals are like crack to me.

Fiona: What TV shows/films do you enjoy watching?

Back to what I said before, Vikings is a new favourite! I’ve been catching up on past episodes. I also really like The Good Doctor, a lot. Game of Thrones, Penny Dreadful (which ended far too soon for my liking), anything on Investigation Discovery.

Fiona: Favorite foods, colors,  music?

I love food. My mother’s cooking would have to be my favourite. She’s the best vegan chef I know! Favourite colour is green. I listen to all types of music. My taste is very eclectic, but I like songs that tell stories and have real emotion when you listen to them. I also like listening to covers of eighties songs! Some have been reimagined so beautifully.

Fiona: Imagine a future where you no longer write. What would you do?

In a future where I no longer wrote, I would probably be a Therapist or Psychologist. I love helping people and the human brain fascinates me.

Fiona: What do you want written on your head stone?

“She had a lot to say, and she said it well.”

Fiona: Do you have a blog or website readers can visit for updates, events and special offers?

I do! Readers can stalk me here:

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/authordaisystjames

Fan Page: https://www.facebook.com/groups/121278862003063/

Amazon Page: https://www.amazon.com/Daisy-St.-James/e/B07974ZLD9/

Website (you can also sign up for my mailing list here): https://daisystjamesauthor.wixsite.com/daisystjames

Twitter: @DaisyStJames78

Instagram: @authordaisyst.james

 

 

Here is my interview with Linda Lund Thomsen

Hello and welcome to my blog, Author Interviews. My name is Fiona Mcvie.

Let’s get you introduced to everyone, shall we? Tell us your name. What is your age?

Good afternoon Fiona. My name is Linda Lund Thomsen. Thank you for having me on your blog – it’s a real pleasure! Now as for my age… hmm… I think I stopped counting the years when I turned 40 – it seems less important these days – but since you ask so nicely, I will reveal that I am 46 years of age.

Fiona: Where are you from?

As the somewhat different spelling of my surname might imply, I am originally from Denmark. These days, however, I live in the UK – near Sherwood Forrest, as it were.

Fiona: A little about your self (ie, your education, family life, etc.).

I grew up in a small village just outside town, which may well be the reason that I love the countryside to this day. Skipping ahead some years, I attended college in Denmark at an old ‘academy’, which – if memory serve me right – was founded around 1625.

I finished college and must have been around 20 when I first moved to the UK. Staying with some English friends of the family – originally with the view to practise English – I tell you no lie that it was really just a stunt to spend some time figuring out what the heck to do next, whilst working as a bartender.

As some higher entity would have it, I actually met my husband during that time and we have been together since, although we did not jump into that pesky marriage commitment for a long time. In fact it would be 2008 before we finally did.We have two children, often lovingly referred to as ‘the unicorn’ and ‘the owl’.

I am one of those people who never found their ‘shelf’ or ‘purpose’. Until I started writing and realised that I felt compelled to carry on, I had already tried my hand at a fair few things. I have been a teacher, an archaeologist, a NVQ assessor and a manager – I have even worked in Fantasy World too, but that’s another story.

Between writing and family, life is super busy, sometimes ‘nuts’. Commonly, the hours fly and come the weekend I will wonder where the week went, but there is rarely a dull, spare moment. I guess that’s neat.

 Fiona: Tell us your latest news.

So there is a lot happening in my life at the moment. First of all I am super excited to say that I will be publishing the first ‘episode’ of my debut book ‘The Missing Shield’ on the 30/3/18. It will be available on Kindle as eBook and through Create Space as a paper back copy.

‘The Missing Shield’ is the intended first volume in an adult high fantasy series called ‘The Veil Keepers quest’, but to get the ball rolling I have decided to split the initial work into sections. I think of it a like watching a series on TV – and within that you have a current season. ‘The Missing Shield’ is one book – or season – split into episodes to offer the readers a number of cheaper ‘normal length’ books, rather than one big ‘tome’. The first episode will be titled, ‘A Change of Rules’.

Secondly, I am just putting the finishing touches to my author website llthomsen.com. It should go live at the end of February ’18 – and it is an extension of me and my work so there’ll be lots of things to explore in support of the books, such as: glossaries, maps,gossip, etc.

There will of course also be the usual links to catch me via social media. I am a very approachable person so I hope people will take the opportunity to get in touch.

Fiona: When and why did you begin writing?

I believe it was a combination of timing, coincidence and need, which put me on the author path. When the children were born it was easier to stay at home, and I was suddenly sprouting all sorts of ideas about plots and characters, so I sat down one day and let my fingers dance in tune to my thoughts. It has become a passion. Like most writers I know, I cannot imagine giving it up.

Fiona: When did you first consider yourself a writer?

I dabbled when I was younger – mostly by inventing characters and writing in the form of scripts with each ‘actor’ line typed out, and a few paragraphs of detail in support here and there.

Looking back it seems obvious that it’s always been in me, but though I have been writing for some years now, I still feel the ‘imposter’ for daring to do this. It’s weird. In my heart I have claimed writing as my professions, but it’s still an abstract issue in my mind.

Fiona: What inspired you to write your first book?

My muse appeared without a doubt when ‘the unicorn’ was born.

It didn’t strike me immediately, but a back door must have been opened ajar because I remember having ideas about a fantasy world and about these two characters that just wouldn’t go away. I could see their interactions clearly in my mind’s eye and felt the urge to explore them. It was not even a skeleton of a plot or anything, but it started with a fight scene in the rain, and the more I wrote, the more the ideas came pouring.

Fiona: How did you come up with the title?

Not for years was I able to figure out anything to really encompass the entire story. However, I always like something that carries a double meaning – ala Peter V. Brett’s title, ‘The Painted Man’ – so with that in mind, when my wip began to show the promise of a full book, I simply sat back and let my thoughts flow.

The book title is a twist on a main character’s job, which is to say that she is a type of body guard called a ‘Life Shield’ or simply a ‘Shield’. She has a number of personal issues that makes her lose her usual mojo, which in turn makes her vulnerable, but she also goes physically missing. The title is a reference to that, mixed a bit with the fact that the magic that is supposed to be a shield and a weapon for the world, now lies crippled and useless.

‘The Missing Shield’ was ‘The Broken Shield’ for a while, but in the end, one title just rang better than the other.

Fiona: Do you have a specific writing style? Is there anything about your style or genre that you find particularly challenging?

I like detail. And I like a particular flow. If a man goes into a bar, I cannot just write ‘A man went into a bar’ – I have a need to embellish, which tends to make my work slightly longer than that of most writers’. Mine is not a quick read. The length is very ‘old school’ but deliberately so.

I am aware that the genre is currently very much into books of a certain length. Anything over a 100k word-count by an unknown writer is pretty much considered untouchable by any self-respecting agent, due to the perceived risk – and, I suppose, break with prevailing trends.

I had to decide whether I wanted to embrace my own creativity or if I should cater to that of the market norm. They say ‘be yourself – don’t imitate other writers’ – so I am, and I haven’t.

Fiona: How much of the book is realistic and are experiences based on someone you know, or events in your own life?

This epic fantasy was thankfully very much made up as I went along, but I try to keep people and situations ‘real’, though with fantastical aspects.

There are issues within the story lines that have come about via personal experiences – or through things that have happened in real life that I was inspired to tinker with in the fantasy setting. For example, I have a crown princess that suffers from anxiety. I have taken that from my own feelings on certain matters and have twisted it to make the character a little less perfect. There is also a strong flow of friendship weaving through the book as well. This vibe is mildly based on the fact that I have certain friends that I would go to extreme lengths to help and shelter, if necessary.

Fiona: To craft your works, do you have to travel? Before or during the process?

No physical travelling necessary here – passing through that portal in my mind, certainly helps though. As does visiting new places in the real world.

Fiona: Who designed the covers?

I did not have oodles of cash to spend, but I had a concept in mind, so I went to SelfPubBookCovers.com. The one I choose is quite slick, designed by TheChunkyDesigner.

 Fiona: Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?

Nothing more than: ‘Come along for the journey’ – if you think it’ll go in one direction, you may well be surprised.

Fiona: Are there any new authors that have grasped your interest?  Who is your favorite writer, and what is it about their work that really strikes you?

The beauty about writing these days is that there is so much to explore and discover on social media. I love indie writers. Many are extremely talented, so with that in mind I cannot wait for my friend ‘Gabrias’ to release ‘The Crownguard Affair’. Other than that, look out for the titles of ‘Control’ and ‘The Windsinger’. All three are still in the beta reading stage, but they are amazing.

As to something recently published, in my ‘books to read’ pile, I have ‘Memories Forgotten’ by Anthony Tyrone Clemons & ‘Eclipse’ by Meredith Cole.

My favourite writer at the moment is Steven Erikson – he’s a story-crafter without comparison, weaving together extraordinary prose with first-class world-building and plots.

Fiona: Outside of family members, name one entity that supported your commitment to become a published author.

Entity? Hmm… not per se. Weirdly, I have queried agents, and though ‘rejected’, you could argue that their kind feedback has given me a sort of strength to carry on. At one point I was also in contact with a manager at Ingram Spark. He was very supportive and offered me his help and knowledge, but I was not then ready to go ahead and publish.  Other than that I am pretty much in this game alone – that’s not a sad thing – but a factor that makes me ultra-hard-working.

Fiona: Do you see writing as a career?

 Oh well wouldn’t that be sweet?! If I could cross everything I own and make it so, then yes please: let writing be a career for me! I guess it remains to be seen – but I am dedicated, certainly.

Fiona: If you had to do it all over again, would you change anything in your latest book?

No. I took a while to decide on my style and flow. Swim or sink – I made a choice to write this way and I will stand by that. Certain other writers don’t appear to understand that my goal was to produce something individual – they have even warned me that it will not work – so maybe ask me this question again in the future. With proper hindsight I might have changed everything, lol.

Fiona: Did you learn anything during the writing of your recent book?

Patience, passion, care, detail, plotting, realism, cloud-formations… the list goes on. I also learnt that you can never give up and that you have to grow thick-skinned and confident – even when you feel like a mouse that wants to hide in a deep hole.

 Fiona: If your book was made into a film, who would you like to play the lead?

Oh now the dreams are flying, indeed!I love that question!

I never really imagined all of my ‘cast’ with the faces of famous actors. Oddly, however, the princess Iambre was always loosely modelled on Jessica Alba, and Knights Commander Zulavi, one of the antagonists, was always vaguely modelled either on Jason Statham or Alexander Skarsgård. Still, the trouble is that they are probably too ‘old’ for these ‘roles’ now, so new talent would be cool with me.

Fiona: Any advice for other writers?

Push it and then push it some more. Never give up and don’t apologise for what you write. It is my view that there are no right or wrongs, but don’t fake it.

Fiona: Anything specific you want to tell your readers?

I hope you enjoy my tale. If you read the first page and give up, you will never know what you miss! As hinted at above, I am playing around with something a little different here, so keep an open mind and embrace it if you can.

In truth, I rather think my work is like Marmite: you’ll either love it or hate it, but at least it has never been called ‘meh’. This is fantasy with a twist: within my pages you will find mystery, magic, darkness, romance, peril, fights and a quest – so be prepared to go on a journey.

Oh, and also: it would be really grand if every reader could please leave a comment, or a snippet of feedback. Not just for me but for any writer. Any small thought is always better than none, and for indie-writers and first-time writers, a review is truly invaluable when it comes to attracting other readers.

 Fiona: What book are you reading now?

I am reading the Kindle version of MaximianHeld’s, ‘Whisper of End’.

 Fiona: Do you remember the first book you read?

Not really – I always had my nose in a book. But I read a lot by Swedish author, Astrid Lingren. They have never dated.

 Fiona: What makes you laugh/cry?

I have a crooked sense of humour. Often rooted in sarcasm. I also laugh at dumb camera takes where people fall off their skateboards or get kicked by a cow. I cry at most things that tug at the heartstrings – ill children, true love, family reunited, lost animals, dying anything, the news…

 Fiona: Is there one person, past or present, you would love to meet? Why?

I think Nelson Mandela. He was one of the most amazing people. The world needs more heroes like that.

 Fiona: Do you have any hobbies?

Writing?  Does that count?

Lol. Seriously, between maintaining social media, organising publication of my work, looking after kids, animals, and friends, there is not a lot of time left to even eat – let alone to enjoy a hobby. But I like to walk, and I like horse riding, travelling and photography.

 Fiona: What TV shows/films do you enjoy watching?

Enter the geek in me –I often binge watch boxsets. So here goes – Britannia, Kill Joys, Supernatural, GOT, Leverage, Spooks, The Walking Dead, Black Matter, X-Files, Westworld, Graham Norton, Task Master, Russell Howard’s Good News… (You get the picture).

 Fiona: Favorite foods, colors,  music?

I love Pizza but I am not picky.

I like the colours green and blue.

In music I like Kasabian, Foo Fighters, Calvin Harris, Swedish House Mafia, anything Classical (Baroque)… again I am not picky and my mood determines the tunes.

 Fiona: Imagine a future where you no longer write. What would you do?

Scarily that may not be too far off. In a future where I don’t write, I would be doing a job to earn some pennies.

 Fiona: What do you want written on your head stone?

I am not really a head stone kinda person. I always imagined I’d have a tree…

 Fiona: Do you have a blog or website readers can visit for updates, events and special offers?

As mentioned above, my website llthomsen.com will be live at the end of Feb – or latest at the beginning of Mar ’18.

You can also catch me and much more on:

https://twitter.com/LLThomsen1

https://www.facebook.com/linda.thomsen.12979

Hopefully in the near future I will also have a link for subscribing to my newsletter, and for joining me on Good Reads, but I am not quite that organised yet.

 

Here is my interview with Cindy O’Quinn

Hello and welcome to my blog, Author Interviews. My name is Fiona Mcvie.

 

Let’s get you introduced to everyone, shall we? Tell us your name. What is your age?

My name is Cindy O’Quinn, and I am 51.

 Fiona: Where are you from?

I grew up in the beautiful mountains of West Virginia, and as an adult, I lived in the Shenandoah Valley of Virginia for about 20 years. Once my husband retired, we moved to Maine. It’s not the coastal Maine that people tend to imagine when you tell them where you live. My family and I liveon an old homestead in the woods of northern Maine.

 Fiona: A little about your self (ie,  your education, family life, etc.).

I graduated from the Dabney S. Lancaster nursing program and worked as a nurse for years. Here on the homestead, my focus has been writing and homesteading. We raise, process, and preserve a great deal of our own food; vegetables, fruits, dairy, and meats. The entire family wanted a simpler way of life, and we have found it here in Maine.

Fiona: Tell us your latest news.

My short story, “The Lake Ghost”, was acquired by Deadman’s Tome for their newest anthology and will be released soon.

Fiona: When and why did you begin writing?

I have been writing stories and poetry since about age 10. It’s something I have always enjoyed, and it keeps the characters’ voices to a tolerable minimum.

Fiona: When did you first consider yourself a writer?

Once I finally decided to let go of some of my writing, and it started getting published. My short story, “The Handshake”, was the first.

Fiona: What inspired you to write your first book?

The title of the book, Dark Could on Naked Creek, came to me long before the story. I guess I needed to live a bit more before the story could unfold. Eventually, my work as a nurse in the correctional system and growing up in West Virginia put the story in motion.

Fiona: How did you come up with the title?

I was working for the pharmaceutical company, Merck, at the time. One morning on my way to work, I noticed the dark clouds over Naked Creek. That image stuck with me for years before I ever wrote the first word of the novel.

Fiona: Do you have a specific writing style? Is there anything about your style or genre that you find particularly challenging?

I think my style varies a bit from story to story and is influenced by the different authors that I enjoy reading. Horror is my preferred genre from early on, and that is thanks to my mom. She took me to the drive-in to see movies like, The Texas Chain Saw Massacre, and It’s Alive, when I was 8 years old, and that began my 40 plus years of reading and watching horror.

Trying new things like YA horror and capturing the POV from a teenage boy or girl can be challenging but at the same time, exciting.

Fiona: How much of the book is realistic and are experiences based on someone you know, or events in your own life?

In my first novel, there were definitely a few similarities. The main character was a nurse living in West Virginia and working in a men’s prison. Beyond that, a lot of ‘what if’ questions came into play. “What if when the nurse touched an inmate she could see their past and future?”

There is most always a spark of truth to my writing that inspires the fiction.

Fiona: To craft your works, do you have to travel? Before or during the process?

I haven’t travelled for a particular story, but I do tend to write about the places where I have lived or visited, such as Maine, Virginia, and West Virginia.

Fiona: Who designed the covers?

David Allen designed the cover of Dark Cloud on Naked Creek, and I took the photograph for my dark poetry collection, Return to Graveyard Dust.

 Fiona: Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?

That message varies with each story, life isn’t always HEA. With Dark Cloud on Naked Creek, some characters die, but good wins over evil. I love speculative fiction that leaves you, the reader, to decide.

Fiona: Are there any new authors that have grasped your interest?  Who is your favorite writer, and what is it about their work that really strikes you?

There are writers who aren’t necessarily new, but fairly new to me that I enjoy. Tom Deady, James A. Moore, Josh Malerman, John McIlveen, Linda Addison, Alison Littlewood, Richard Chizmar, and Tony Tremblay, just to name a few.

Stephen King is my favorite writer. I can dive into the flow of his stories and be entertained without unnecessary distractions.

Fiona: Outside of family members, name one entity that supported your commitment to become a published author.

There are 2 friends that have always supported my commitment to writing. (Deanna and Debbie)

 Fiona: Do you see writing as a career?

I would like to see it as a career, but it does not pay all the bills. It allows me to feed my book habit and pay the occasional light bill. Perhaps in the future.

Fiona: If you had to do it all over again, would you change anything in your latest book?

I think about the characters and wonder where they are now. I wouldn’t change anything about Dark Cloud on Naked Creek, but maybe someday revisit and continue the story.

Fiona: Did you learn anything during the writing of your recent book?

I learn new things with every story and poem I write, and I hope that will always be the case.

Fiona: If your book was made into a film, who would you like to play the lead?

Reese Witherspoon would make a good ‘Afton Sullivan,’and Kathy Bates as ‘Miss Betty.’

Fiona: Any advice for other writers?

My focus in college was nursing, but I took advantage of writing classes, as well. It’s helpful to not only have beta readers but to be one for other writers. Read lots of different authors and different genres. Write everyday…

Fiona: Anything specific you want to tell your readers?

Thank you! It means so much when I receive letters or messages from readers, and it puts a smile on my face when a reader posts a photo of a book of mine they are reading. Reviews are a bonus!

 Fiona: What book are you reading now?

I just finished Off Season by Jack Ketchum, and now I’m halfway through a collection called This Is Halloween by James A. Moore.

Fiona: Do you remember the first book you read?

The first novel I chose for myself to read was Where the Lilies Bloom. My first horror novel read was The Shining.

Fiona: What makes you laugh/cry?

My sons are experts at making me laugh. It’s not unusual for me to be cry as I write the final paragraph of a book. Anymore, the nightly news makes me cry.

Fiona: Is there one person, past or present, you would love to meet? Why?

From the past, I would like meet Shirley Jackson, because I admire her work.

From the present, I would like to meet Stephen King, my favorite writer.

Fiona: Do you have any hobbies?

Homesteading started out as a hobby but has become a way of life that takes a great deal of time and effort.I love photographing nature.

 Fiona: What TV shows/films do you enjoy watching?

I have limited access to television and internet, but I am enjoying the series, The Alienist, and I like Vikings.A few films that I watch over and over are Halloween, Misery, The Shining, and Delores Claiborne. I love October because horror movies are on TV all month.

 Fiona: Favorite foods, colors,  music?

I enjoy homemade soups. My favoritecolor is green. I love classic rock music, I set Pandora on AC/DC radio, and I am good to go.

 Fiona: Imagine a future where you no longer write. What would you do?

My time would be spent reading, homesteading, and taking pictures.

.Fiona: What do you want written on your head stone?

I don’t want headstone, but if I had to pick, a verse from one of my poems would do.

From my poem, “After”

Take no special effort

to mark what lies beneath,

I’ll be dirt again soon enough

when the worms get done with me.

 

 Fiona: Do you have a blog or website readers can visit for updates, events and special offers?

I am on Facebook – Cindy O’Quinn

And you can follow my Facebook page @CindyOQuinnWriter

Amazon link –

https://www.amazon.com/Cindy-OQuinn/e/B01N0TN3TN/ref=sr_ntt_srch_lnk_1?qid=1519175871&sr=8-1

 

Here is my interview with Lavinia Urban

Hello and welcome to my blog, Author Interviews. My name is Fiona Mcvie.

 

Let’s get you introduced to everyone, shall we? Tell us your name.

Lavinia Urban

Fiona: Where are you from?

I am originally from England but for the last 18 years I have been living just outside Edinburgh, Scotland.

Fiona: A little about your self (ie,  your education, family life, etc.).

I live in a small village in Scotland with my husband, two children and two fur babies. As well as being an author, I home educate my youngest child. We only started in April 2017 so it is still new but very rewarding.

Growing up I always wanted to be a full time writer but just in case I decide to train in law and business. Only then did I become a full time author J

Fiona: Tell us your latest news.

I have metastatic breast cancer. I was diagnosed last year (2017.) I took a year out of writing to concentrate on my health. This year I am getting back in the saddle and I will be releasing my journal of my journey. I won’t ever get rid of my cancer but I will not let it dictate who I am.

Fiona: When and why did you begin writing?

I have been writing for as long as I can remember and from the age of 12 I started getting pieces of my work published but it was difficult to continue getting things published.

Fiona: When did you first consider yourself a writer?

I have always been a writer. It is not something I have ever stopped being. Though in 2012 I was able to proudly say that I am a full time writer.

Fiona: What inspired you to write your first book?

When I was 14 I wrote my first full length novel, this was 26 years ago, and I felt a sense of pride. It was only general life that inspired me to write this story.

Nine years ago I started writing my first novel as a full time indie author. This particular story/series was inspired by my oldest child who was being bullied and she wanted something to help her get through it. So Erin the Fire Goddess series was born. I wasn’t going to publish it but then different people began reading it and one thing led to another and then it was published.

Fiona: How did you come up with the title?

The series was named after my eldest child and the Fire Goddess bit was because the main character has supernatural fire powers.

Fiona: Do you have a specific writing style? Is there anything about your style or genre that you find particularly challenging?

My writing style changes depending on the genre, etc.

Fiona: How much of the book is realistic and are experiences based on someone you know, or events in your own life?

Every single book I write has some types of aspects of real life, even the Paranormal ones. I also like to name characters after family, friends and readers.

Fiona: To craft your works, do you have to travel? Before or during the process?

I do the majority of my writing from home.

Fiona: Who designed the covers?

I have had a variety of cover artists. When I pick a cover artist I like to keep them for the entire series.

Fiona: Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?

Each book has different messages but the main ones are always to believe in yourself.

Fiona: Are there any new authors that have grasped your interest?  Who is your favorite writer, and what is it about their work that really strikes you?

I admit that I do not read as much as I would like to so when I do I tend to stick to the authors I have read in the past, knowing that they will help me disappear into their creative world.

Currently I am reading Butterfly by Cambria Hebert.

Of course books that would normally take me a couple of days to read now take around a month because I am writing and homeschooling as well as reading.

Fiona: Outside of family members, name one entity that supported your commitment to become a published author.

Close friends always have.

Fiona: Do you see writing as a career?

A career and a passion.

Fiona: If you had to do it all over again, would you change anything in your latest book?

Definitely not. I write how my characters dictate.

Fiona: Did you learn anything during the writing of your recent book?

I have just finished writing 2 books – the third Alimanti book and my journal.

When reading back my journal I learned that I am pretty bad assed 😉

Fiona: If your book was made into a film, who would you like to play the lead?

I have never been good at this question because when I write I do not think of actors. There are just too many good actors out there, but I know that when I see them I will know.

Fiona: Any advice for other writers?

Believe in yourself and don’t take to heart what any hater says. There will always be haters but there will be even more people who love your work.

Fiona: Anything specific you want to tell your readers?

Thank you for choosing my worlds. Thank you for being patient with me as I took time out to concentrate on my health.

Fiona: What book are you reading now?

Butterfly by Cambria Hebert

Fiona: Do you remember the first book you read?

Oh wow, good question. The honest answer is no, but it could be something like Fantastic Five, Railway Children, Watership Down, Foxy and the Badger, and so much more. I also loved Sweet Valley High books, when I was growing up.

Fiona: What makes you laugh/cry?

So many things. Even the smallest of things can trigger me into hysterics or tears – things that others wouldn’t bat an eyelid at. My hormones are everywhere and … I am a little weird lol.

Fiona: Is there one person, past or present, you would love to meet? Why?

Too many to choose from – Michael Jackson, Morgan Freeman, Oprah, Ellen, Adam Sandler, and so many more.

Fiona: Do you have any hobbies?

Reading, lol.

Fiona: What TV shows/films do you enjoy watching?

I tend to binge watch things. However… I watch the entire Harry Potter series every week… I am a little obsessed 😉

Fiona: Favorite foods, colors,  music?

My favourite colour is purple. My taste in music is wide – from R&B to Classical to Pop and so much in between.

Fiona: Imagine a future where you no longer write. What would you do?

The only time I no longer write would be when I am dead but even then I would probably be a spirit moving around writing and scaring people… maybe then I will write horror lol.

Fiona: What do you want written on your head stone?

I don’t want a headstone as I want to be cremated so I have nothing that I want on there but my husband always says that on my headstone it will say ‘that’ll do,’ as this seems to my favourite thing to say.

Fiona: Do you have a blog or website readers can visit for updates, events and special offers?


On 26th May I will be hosting an author event in Edinburgh. The event will have authors from around the world as well as a witches and wizards theme in the evening.
For more details and to grab a ticket then go to the following link – www.edinburghauthorsigningevents.co.uk

Website: www.laviniaurban.co.uk

Blog: http://laviniaurban.blogspot.co.uk/

Facebook: www.facebook.com/LaviniaUrbanAuthor

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Lavinia-Urban/e/B0099KE47C/ref=dp_byline_cont_ebooks_1

Here is my interview with A.M. Manay

Hello and welcome to my blog, Author Interviews. My name is Fiona Mcvie.

 

Let’s get you introduced to everyone, shall we? Tell us your name. What is your age?

My name is Anne Margaret Manay.  I write under my initials, A.M. Manay.  I’ll be thirty-eight next month.

 Fiona: Where are you from?

 I was born in Pennsylvania and grew up in Atlanta, Georgia.  Shortly after I got married, we moved to California, and we’ve been here ever since.

 Fiona: A little about your self (ie,  your education, family life, etc.).

 My degree is in Chemistry, and I taught high school for a few years.  I had been diagnosed with Lupus about the time I graduated, and unfortunately, my work as a teacher exacerbated my illness, and I was forced to stop.  I tutored for a while, and eventually found my way back to writing, which I had very much enjoyed as a child.

My husband and I have one child, an eight-year-old boy, whom we adopted as a newborn.  When I’m not writing, I volunteer at his school and at our church.  Fortunately, my health is much improved these days.

 Fiona: Tell us your latest news.

My big excitement right now is my Kindle Scout campaign for my new sword-and-sorcery fantasy novel, Hexborn.  It’s the first book in a new series about a young woman dealing with a congenital illness that has rendered her an outcast.  She has to deal with those hardships while using her magical ability to protect the kingdom.  You can nominate the book here, through March 9th:

https://kindlescout.amazon.com/p/2Q22TVKET6NES.

Fiona: When and why did you begin writing?

I wrote quite a lot as a kid, but I fell away from it when I became more interested in math and science.  I took it up again when my son was a toddler.  Being the stay-at-home mom of a small child is isolating.  You kind of start to feel your brain atrophy, and I needed an artistic and intellectual outlet.  I had an idea for a character and began there.  The result was my first book, She Dies at the End, a new adult paranormal novel.  Eventually, this led to a vampire series of three novels and six short stories.

Fiona: When did you first consider yourself a writer?

I suppose I began to feel like a real writer when I got that first royalty check from Amazon. 😉

Fiona: What inspired you to write your first book?

 It began, in a way, out of my irritation about a certain extremely popular vampire novel with which we are all familiar.  I wanted to see if I could write something as engaging as Twilight with a heroine who doesn’t mistake abuse for love.

 Fiona: How did you come up with the title?

I’m not sure.  I remember checking my working title on Amazon and finding about a hundred books with the same name, so I knew I couldn’t use that.  I finally took the title, She Dies at the End, from the fact that you know from page one that she does, indeed, die at the end.  You know this because the main character is psychic and has been seeing her own funeral since she was a toddler.

Fiona: Do you have a specific writing style? Is there anything about your style or genre that you find particularly challenging?

I consider my style to be both literary and conversational, which sounds strange, I know.  Sometimes I feel like I have a hard time conforming to genre conventions.

Fiona: How much of the book is realistic and are experiences based on someone you know, or events in your own life?

 I draw from real-life challenges and feelings, but very little of my work is based on people I know or things that have happened to me.  I joke that everyone is going to think I have a bad mother because I write so many bad mothers, but you always seem to have to find some way of getting rid of the parents when you have a young protagonist.

In Hexborn, my main character has a chronic illness.  That does draw somewhat form my own experience, in that I know what it is like to be frustrated with your health at a young age.  I was diagnosed with Lupus at 21, and I’d had symptoms since middle school.

Fiona: To craft your works, do you have to travel? Before or during the process?

I haven’t travelled for the specific purpose of research, but I do try to use places I’ve been as a basis.  For example, much of my vampire series takes place in the San Francisco Bay Area, where I live.  And my kingdom in Hexborn, Bryn, takes its geographic features from Northern California.  I figured if it was good enough for Tolkien, it’s good enough for me.

Fiona: Who designed the covers?

 My cover designer is Eeva Lancaster at thebookkhaleesi.com.  She is amazing and affordable.

 Fiona: Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?

I try to communicate the fact that an outsider can be a hero and that compassion is a powerful thing.

Fiona: Are there any new authors that have grasped your interest?  Who is your favorite writer, and what is it about their work that really strikes you?

My fave writer is probably Hilary Mantel, the brilliant author of Wolf Hall and A Place of Greater Safety.  She is a master of dialogue and of making vile people sympathetic.

Fiona: Outside of family members, name one entity that supported your commitment to become a published author.

My fellow authors have been very supportive.

Fiona: Do you see writing as a career?

 I do.

Fiona: If you had to do it all over again, would you change anything in your latest book?

 Hmm.  That’s a tough one.  I might rethink its genre placement, but that’s more of a marketing issue than a writing issue.

Fiona: Did you learn anything during the writing of your recent book?

 Well, unfortunately, I learned what it is like to lose a parent, so my understanding of grief is much deeper now.

 Fiona: If your book was made into a film, who would you like to play the lead?

For Hexborn, I’d choose Selena Gomez.

Fiona: Any advice for other writers?

Make friends with other writers.  Join groups, online or locally.  Learn from their experience.

Fiona: Anything specific you want to tell your readers?

 I’d like to tell them how much I appreciate them.  It’s an amazing feeling to create something and to have strangers enjoy it.

 Fiona: What book are you reading now?

 Throne of Glassby Sarah J. Maas

 Fiona: Do you remember the first book you read?

 Nope.

 Fiona: What makes you laugh/cry?

 I cry at the drop of a hat.  Commercials during the Olympics are especially brutal.  I laugh at snark and pop culture jokes.

 Fiona: Is there one person, past or present, you would love to meet? Why?

 I’d love to meet my mother’s father, who died when she was five.  I’d love to know what he was like.

Fiona: Do you have any hobbies?

 I love action movies, singing, and 9Round (a kickboxing-based gym).

 Fiona: What TV shows/films do you enjoy watching?

 Let’s see.  My favorites include the entire Marvel Cinematic Universe, The Good Place, Justified, Westworld, Project Runway, The Americans, and Robot Chicken.

 Fiona: Favorite foods, colors,  music?

 I adore cheese, chocolate, alternative folk/bluegrass, and, currently, the color gray.

 Fiona: Imagine a future where you no longer write. What would you do?

 I’d probably try to get a job in the non-profit sector or working in science.

 Fiona: What do you want written on your head stone?

 That I loved and was loved.

 Fiona: Do you have a blog or website readers can visit for updates, events and special offers?

 Of course: Check out www.ammanay.net or sign up for my newsletter at http://bit.ly/ammanayfanlist.

https://www.amazon.com/A.M.-Manay/e/B0113KJ14Q/ref=sr_tc_2_0?qid=1519207536&sr=1-2-ent