Here is my interview with Angel Edenburn

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Fiona: Name  Gena Mantz aka Angel Edenburn- I  write under both names. Angel is my spicier stuff.

Fiona:Age –

Angel: older than dirt. Okay, I’m only 46.

Fiona: Where are you from?

Angel:- KANSAS! The marvellous land of the Kansa or Kaw, the WIND people, where the wind blows almost all of the time. I grew up a couple of hours west of here. I’ve lived in small-towns all of my life.

Fiona: A little about your self `ie your education Family life etc .

Angel: I am married, with one son, an amazing daughter-in-law, and two of the most wonderful grandbabies ever! I have an awesome and supportive mom too! During the week, I work as a home care aide for the elderly and disabled in their homes. Other times, I am a Gothic fusion belly dancer. (Sometimes you can catch me performing in the city.) I am a college drop-out who tries to educate myself continuously. I have a ranchette with lots of furred and feathered creatures who call it home. I also ride 4-wheelers at the lake and love to ride horses and motorcycles as well as work on classic cars. I have an old Fairlane and a vintage Camaro that are project cars for my husband and I.

 

Fiona: Tell us your latest news?

Angel: I have three books coming out this year. One is a vampire romance, “Night Blind”. I have a poetry book in the works for this summer, and a book of short stories titled, “Paranormal Bites” due out before fall.


Fiona: When and why did you begin writing?

Angel: As a child and a teenager, I was always telling the younger cousins or babysitting kids stories to keep them entertained. When my son was out of the house, I began writing poetry as a way to learn something new, meet new people, and get out of the house. A group met at my local library in the evenings. Then, from there I started writing vampire romance. I joked with someone once I could write a better story than some of what is out there. So I did the NaNoWriMo challenge, and wrote my first book (under my real name Gena Mantz) “Wild Hearted” in a month. A few months later, I self-published it and I haven’t stopped since!


Fiona: When did you first consider yourself a writer?

Angel: Um, I still have trouble thinking of myself as a writer even after I have had several stories published in anthologies and two self-published works.


Fiona: What inspired you to write your first book?

Angel: A bet! I joked with someone that I could write a better vampire romance than what was being published at the time. I have teenage nieces, and I wanted a book that I could be proud of if they were caught with it at my old school by the teachers!


Fiona: Do you have a specific writing style?

Angel: KANSAS writer! My stories are mostly set here in my home state. I am a seat-of-my-pants writer. I do map out a bit of what I do want to happen, but what happens in between is up to the characters. First person feels most natural to me but sometimes third person omnipotent is what I need to get the story told.


Fiona: How did you come up with the title?

Angel: For “Paranormal Bites” I was chatting with my grammar editor and we sort of tossed ideas back and forth and it sounded right. The book is a collection of some new and some old short stories. Some of them have been published in anthologies and some are brand-new, written for this book. All of the stories are paranormal. Ghosts, vampires, werewolves, and other creatures romp through Kansas in their adventures.


Fiona: Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?

Don’t judge people based on misconceptions. Give someone a chance, they might surprise you.


Fiona: How much of the book is realistic?

Angel: I do write about what I do know and have experienced. If I don’t I RESEARCH! RESEARCH! And do some more. I try to have a world where my characters have adult problems, they just happen to be paranormals.


Fiona: Are experiences based on someone you know, or events in your own life?

Angel: Sometimes. I had a rich childhood where I learned to work on cars, ride horses, keep up with the boys, and do so many wonderful things and I try to pull from that and my vivid imagination. Sometimes, one habit or quirk of a character I may pull from my life, but my characters are my characters.


Fiona: What books have most influenced your life most? a mentor?

Angel: Books would be Shakespeare’s plays, Dracula by Bram Stoker, Diaries of the Family Dracul series by Jeanne Kalogridis, and Dangerous Liasons by Choderlos de Laclos. Mentors? WOW! I am so lucky to have a BUNCH!  Gwendolen Funston was a poet who always pushed me to be a better poet and that makes me a better writer. Jeanne Kalogridis has been so encouraging. My friends list is FULL of so many authors who continuously cheer me on and help me in so many ways. I could fill a whole page with the names- THANK YOU ALL!!


Fiona: What book are you reading now?

I am reading multiple books simultaneously. I am working on my Gorey illustrated copy of Dracula, The Diaries of the Family Dracul series by Jeanne Kalogridis again.


Fiona: Are there any new authors that have grasped your interest?

Angel: TONS! Nia Shay, Cat and Lynx Raven, Saranna DeWylde, Deborah Dalton, Aimee Gross, Dennis Smirl, Brian Allen, Mark Bouton, Anya Breton, R. Richardsson, R.L. Naquin, Kevin Wohler, Loralynne Summers, Blaze McRob, Anthony Crowley, Jason Dyer, and so many others I could fill a page! (please forgive me if I forgot to mention you!)


Fiona: What are your current projects?

Angel: A poetry book, the short story collection, and my Isys the Kansas vampire series. Night Blind is her first book.


Fiona: Name one entity that you feel supported you outside of family members.

Angel: My local writing groups! I couldn’t do it without the support of all of my writing friends!


Fiona: Do you see writing as a career?

Angel: Yes. But I’m not as successful at it as I’d like to be. I have nowhere to go but UP from here!


Fiona: If you had to do it all over again, would you change anything in your latest book?

Angel: Maybe. I might include more stories, but then that might make it too long.


Fiona: Do you recall how your interest in writing originated?

Angel: I’ve always been a voracious reader with a vivid imagination. I wrote for school, but it wasn’t until a poet moved to my town and my local librarian encouraged me to try writing that I really started.


Fiona: Is there anything you find particularly challenging in your writing?

Angel: To not have boring heroines. NO nubile, barely 18, size 2, leather-clad ingenue. I have women. My characters tend to be older and more average body wise. I want them to either be strong or develop their toughness through the character arcs and the story.


Fiona: Who is your favorite author and what is it that really strikes you about their work?

Angel: OOOH! That is a tough one. I love so many!


Fiona: Do you have to travel much concerning your book(s)?

Angel: I WISH! I’m not big enough to have to travel, but I do hope that I will someday.


Fiona: Who designed the covers?

Angel: My first two, Wild Hearted and One Too Many, I designed myself. The latest ones were designed by Lillian Rose Asterios.


Fiona: What was the hardest part of writing your book?

Angel: Probably not criticizing my rough draft. I think I need to write a perfect first draft and I know it doesn’t work that way.


Fiona: Did you learn anything from writing your book and what was it?

Angel: I learned with each book, how to let go a little more and let the words flow. Cleaning it up comes later with the edits. First drafts are not meant to be error-free.


Fiona: Do you have any advice for other writers?

Angel: WRITE! Keep writing. Even if you think it is sloppy or bad, get that first draft out. Then you can polish it.


Fiona: Do you have anything specific that you want to say to your readers?

Angel: THANK YOU ALL! I wouldn’t be here without your support!

Fiona: Do you remember the first book you read?

Angel: Wow. That’s a hard one. I’ve been reading for as long as I can remember. Dr Seuss when I was small. In Kindergarten I checked out encyclopaedias. I read Sir Arthur Conan Doyle when I was about 7 years old.

Fiona: What makes you laugh/cry?

I have an odd sense of humor. I am a John Cleese (Monty Python), Benny Hill, and most nights lately I stay up far past my bedtime to watch James Cordon!
I cry easily. Any time anyone, human or other, is hurt for any reason, it makes me cry. But I don’t cry for myself. I cry for all the babies who don’t have moms or dads, those who lost a loved one, injured animals, anyone or any thing who can’t cry so I cry for them.

Fiona: Is there one person pass or present you would meet and why?

I wanted to meet Tanith Lee or Anne Rule. But I am content making new writer friends wherever I go.

Fiona: What do you want written on your head stone and why ?

Angel: I haven’t thought about that. I just want to be remembered for my kindness and loving others.

Fiona: Other than writing do you have any hobbies ?

Angel: Belly Dancing with swords. Designing my own costumes. Working on  and restoring old cars. Sometimes I even fix cars myself.

Fiona: What TV shows/films do you enjoy watching?

Angel:Anything true crime, vampire, werewolf, paranormal. Or Monty Python or James Cordon!

Fiona: Favorite foods / Colors/ Music

I have a lot of fave foods. I love Chinese, Thai, Greek, Mediterranean- anything that is friendly to my numerous food allergies. –My favorite color is BLACK. Always has been. I had the school counselors calling my mother about how much black I wore as a child. I must have been suicidal, right? NOT!! —  I have an eclectic taste in music, anything from Stevie Nicks and Melissa Etheridge to belly dance music or Native American Indian music, but mostly I’m a metalhead. My playlist for writing often looks like one a 16 year old boy would have full of angst, emo, and grunge music.

Fiona: If you were not a writer what else would you like to have done?

Criminal justice. Something in the legal field maybe or in the medical field like be a Registered Nurse.

 

Fiona: Do you have a blog/website? If so what is it?

My blog site is http://angeledenburn.com/  where I blog about almost anything. I also have a character blog, http://isysthevampire.com/ , is one where my character writes her own blog- and sometimes it’s about me. I never know what she will say next.

Links to my books- https://www.createspace.com/3919257

wildheartedcover

http://www.amazon.com/Wild-Hearted-Gena-K-Mantz/dp/1478131691/ref=la_B009P8O7VQ_1_1?

onetoomanycover

http://www.amazon.com/One-Too-Many-Gena-Mantz-ebook/dp/B009EA15DI/ref=pd_bxgy_kstore_img_y

bloodykissescover

 

http://www.amazon.com/Bloody-Kisses-Vampire-Erotica-Anthology/dp/1492813443/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1407730391&sr=1-1&keywords=bloody+kisses+2+a+vampire+erotica+anthology

morbidseraphiccover

http://www.amazon.com/Morbid-Seraphic-Book-Two-Anthology-ebook/dp/B00GH3IVR8/ref=la_B009P8O7VQ_1_2?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1407728642&sr=1-2

touchedbyshadowcover

http://www.amazon.com/Touched-Shadow-Caressed-Light-Cassidy-ebook/dp/B00MYDIULC/ref=sr_1_1?s=digital-text&ie=UTF8&qid=1408820397&sr=1-1

bloodysexycover

http://www.amazon.com/Bloody-Sexy-Anthology-Carmilla-Voiez-ebook/dp/B00N4JKJKK/ref=dp_kinw_strp_1

citydreamscover

http://www.amazon.com/City-Dreams-Angel-Edenburn-ebook/dp/B00YJO3IAW/ref=asap_bc?ie=UTF8 

Here is my interview with Monica May

 

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Name:  Monica May

Age: 40

Fiona: Where are you from: 

Monica: Born in New Orleans and raised right outside of the city in St. Bernard parish (known as a county to everyone else but Louisiana has parishes).

Fiona: A little about your self `ie your education Family life etc : 

Monica: I have been married to an amazing man for over 20 years and we have two crazy wonderful kids together.   We intended to spend our entire lives in St. Bernard Parish.  Raise our children and spend time with future grandchildren there, but a hurricane named Katrina showed us life can change in a split second.  And not only can your life change but you are really not in control of it.    We decided to leave the place we have called home for forever and move to higher ground.  We know live north of I-12 in St. Tammany Parish which we have grown to love and after 10 years we can finally call it home.

Fiona: Tell us your latest news? 

Monica: I am SO excited to tell you that my second book will be released this Friday!  July 31, 2015 Hidden Book 2 of The New Orleans Temptation Series.

Fiona: When and why did you begin writing?

Monica: I started writing in 2013.  Believe it or not I have never been a book reader.  I had a friend that kept going on and on about that 50 shades stuff and I figured what the hell?  And that is where my addiction started.  I bought my first kindle shortly after that and read like crazy.  After that my mind just took off.  I would have these stories just running around in my head and I thought what the heck I need to write that down.  And here we are.

Fiona: When did you first consider yourself a writer? 

Monica: Ha, I am not sure I do yet. I think we all wait for that validation before we can say yes we are a writer.  What that validation is?  I think it’s different for everyone and you don’t know it until it hits you yet.  With that said I think I will feel much more accomplished once I finish my first series.  There is one more book to The New Orleans Temptation Series, maybe when that is done?


Fiona: What inspired you to write your first book? 

I was inspired by the need to get the stories out of my head.

Fiona: Do you have a specific writing style? 

Monica: I don’t have a specific style per say.  Sometimes when I read my story back to myself I don’t even know where it came from.  My fingers just type and the stories are born.

Fiona: How did you come up with the title? 

Monica: So far the titles have been pretty easy.  I called my first book Devastated because that is exactly what Shelby was when she found the info on her husband’s phone.   And book two is named Hidden because that is what Sunny needs to do to stay alive and away from the man trying to hunt her down.

Fiona: Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp? 

Monica: Women are strong and we need to be who we are with no exceptions.

Fiona: How much of the book is realistic? 

Monica: 90% maybe?  I would say that both of my books are pretty realistic however there is always a little bit of fantasy there.  Why else would we read?

Fiona: Are experiences based on someone you know, or events in your own life?

Monica:  I would say all of the above.  Some things come from personal experiences or feelings; others come from watching people I know.  Or I just write from what I think should happen.

Fiona: What books have most influenced your life most? a mentor?

Monica:  There are too many to say.  I would say erotica in general has influenced my life and my writing.  It woke me up to where a relationship should be and what we as women are allowed to dream up.

Fiona: What book are you reading now?

Monica:  Without Me (Men of Inked Book 7) by Chelle Bliss—LOVE the series.

Fiona: Are there any new authors that have grasped your interest?

Monica:  Absolutely!  Chelle Bliss, Kristen Ashley, Deborah Bladon, Meg Silver, Joanna Wylde, and Heather Dahlgren.

Fiona: What are your current projects?

Monica:  Right now I am focused on getting Hidden off the ground and out to the public.

Fiona: Name one entity that you feel supported you outside of family members.

Monica:  My PA Alicia Marietta.  It has been amazing to me that a person I have never met would take so much time out of her life to help me get my books out there.  She does it because she loved Devastated so much and now she does it because we have become friends and she loves me.

Fiona: Do you see writing as a career?

Monica:  I hope so.  But being an Indie Writer is extremely difficult so I see keeping my day job for a little longer.

Fiona: If you had to do it all over again, would you change anything in your latest book?

Monica: Nope not one thing.

Fiona: Do you recall how your interest in writing originated?

Monica:  Simply from reading!

Fiona: Is there anything you find particularly challenging in your writing?

Monica: So far I have not had any challenges in writing but I fear that first writers block.

Fiona: Who is your favorite author and what is it that really strikes you about their work?

Heather Dahlgren is my favorite.  I just love the flow of her books.  If you feel like you have just watched a movie in your brain the author has done their job.  And I feel like Heather does that every time.

Fiona: Do you have to travel much concerning your book(s)?

Monica:  I have not traveled at all yet.  The budget of an Indie Writer is tight to say the least.


Fiona: Who designed the covers?

Monica:  Beth Maddox with Cover It Up Designs designed Hidden.  I love it so much I will defiantly use her for the final book of The New Orleans Temptation Series along with the box set and any future projects.

Fiona: What was the hardest part of writing your book?

Monica:  Finding the time to write around my job and family.

Fiona: Did you learn anything from writing your book and what was it?

Monica:  I learned that writing the book is the easy part.  Marketing is the toughest part and most unexpected part of the job.

Fiona: Do you have any advice for other writers?

Monica:  Write from your heart and write what you want.  Don’t worry with what others will think, just put it on paper.

Fiona: Do you have anything specific that you want to say to your readers?

Monica:  I want to tell all my fans, my PA, and my street team THANKS!  Without all of them spreading the word my words would just be lost on a page out on the internet.

Fiona: Do you remember the first book you read?

Monica:  I can’t remember the exact name but as a teen I recall reading a series about a teenage girl going skiing but do I don’t remember the name.

Fiona: What makes you laugh/cry?

Monica:  It takes a lot to make me cry, I’m just not a crier. Hum what makes me laugh?  Things that just happen and are funny not stupid funny.  If that makes any sense to you?

Fiona: What do you want written on your head stone and why ?

Monica:  Nothing I don’t want to think about being dead.

Fiona: Other than writing do you have any hobbies ?

Monica:  Watching my kids play sports, cook, and garden.

Fiona: What TV shows/films do you enjoy watching?

Monica:  Long Island Medium, Pretty Woman, and Urban Cowboy.

Fiona: Favorite foods / Colors/ Music

Monica:  Favorite food is seafood…. there are too many to just say one is my fav.  Boiled crabs, crawfish pasta, boiled crawfish the list goes on.  Did I mention I am from New Orleans we will live our life around food.

Favorite color is purple

Music:  Maroon 5 & Pink

Fiona: If you were not a writer what else would you like to have done?

Monica:  Since I’m not a full time writer I am still just a girl that works a desk job.

 Fiona: Do you have a blog/website? If so what is it?

My Facebook page link

https://m.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1445299175756052&ref=bookmark

Authors Amazon Page http://www.amazon.com/Monica-May/e/B00O5FKLDW/ref=dp_byline_cont_pop_book_1

Live on Friday 31st of July 2015

Hidden- Book 2 of The New Orleans Temptation Series

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http://bit.ly/Hidden-US

http://bit.ly/Hidden-UK

http://bit.ly/Hidden-CA

 

After losing her husband, Samantha throws her life into recreating her great aunt’s erotic club on Bourbon Street. She does her best to avoid getting close to any man, but how long can she hold out when Parke enters her life? While trying to avoid her attraction to Parke, Samantha tries her best to make her club a hit by hiring the most beautiful people in New Orleans.

During the hiring process, Shelby begs her to hire a woman she met at the battered women’s shelter. Reluctantly, Samantha caves and hires Sunny, not knowing much about her. Will this hire bring down her entire club? Samantha has no idea that Sunny is running from a man, a man that has vowed to find and kill her if she ever ran from him again. As the president of the MC group The Flaming Dragons, his reach is far and wide. Will he find her? Can Jackson, Sunny’s new love interest, keep her safe?

IMG_4957IMG_4810

 

 


Devastated – Book 1 of The New Orleans Temptation Series

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http://bit.ly/Devastated-US

http://bit.ly/Devastated-UK

http://bit.ly/Devastated-CA

 

Living the American Dream Shelby had everything she could have dreamed of. A handsome husband two wonderful children a beautiful home and a great job. What else could she ask for?

In an instant her world is turned upside down when she innocently looks at her husband’s phone. With this Devastating discovery Shelby has to decide if she will walk away from twenty years of marriage or will she find a way to fit into Grant’s erotic world?

Will she walk on the wild side she never knew she had? How far will she go? If she crosses the line will she be able to live with herself when the sun comes up? Or will she let her over conservative personality end her marriage?

 

Here is my interview with Fabio Scalini

AUTHOR

Name  Fabio Scalini

 

Age 33

 

Where are you from

Ravenna, Italy

 

A little about your self `ie your education Family life etc  

I have an odd education path: scientific high school, graduated in industrial design, but at the same time I studied 10 years of classical music in a “Conservatorio”. I’m a former classical musician, a former designer, a former a-lot-of-stuff.

I worked in many italian (and some european) orchestras when I was young. Later, I was a worker in a factory, a dock surveyor, a mailman, a 3D modeller. I always loved to work.

In the meantime, I wrote a lot. I started to write when I was 20’, during the long train journeys I made for reaching the orchestras. I quitted writing many times, but I always restarted. Working, playing and writing are my life since I was a teen.

 

 

Fiona: Tell us your latest news?

I’m out with my second novel, the Book Two of Mordraud. It’s the second volume of a fantasy saga that I began 13 years ago. I completed the saga in italian and now we are translating and publishing every volume one after another. I’m not the translator! It’s a professional translation. My english is very bad (sorry!). I presented the first volume at Comic-Con San Diego 2014. This year we presented again at SDCC the second one.

 

 
Fiona: When and why did you begin writing?

I started when I was 20’. I discovered that writing stuff on my notebook was a good way to manage the long train trips I used to do for work. I discovered in that moment, that I had many ideas that were sleeping inside me, older than I could imagine.

 

 
Fiona: When did you first consider yourself a writer?

I’m not considering myself a writer right now. Writing is a continuous learning-mistaking process. Style changes so much. Even if one could reach success, the process is neverending. And it isn’t all. I could write well, but the audience changes and evolves every second. I can never be sure if someone may enjoy my stories. Writing is a challenge without a goal. If you define yourself as a writer, it means that you have decided to stop your growth and your research.

 

 
Fiona: What inspired you to write your first book?

I sincerely don’t know. Mordraud is my first story and it’s very long and complex. I started it when I was 20′ but the seeds of the story are much older. The name itself, Mordraud, was one of my childish obsession. Like an unknown man without a face and a past.

 

 
Fiona: Do you have a specific writing style?

I love to build brief, strong phrases. I try every time to clean all the useless toppings. I am not so good in environment descriptions, I think. I always find dialogues much easier. I want to be very close to the emotions of the characters.

 

 
Fiona: How did you come up with the title?

It’s simply the name of one of the main characters. My only goal is to describe their stories, and their dramas. Any other title would put the wrong flavour to the novels, and distract the readers.

 

 
Fiona: Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?

Good question. Maybe, I hope that my readers manage to comprehend that my characters are more real that it could be imagined. And also, that my stories might hide a bigger, so much bigger scheme that will be clear only at the very end. I wrote the entire saga before publishing the first volume, so the story – for me – is over. No risk of unfinish the work. No risk of an eternal wait for an end.

 

 
Fiona: How much of the book is realistic?

I think my stories are very realistic. Ok, it’s a fantasy fiction, but it’s only the appearence. I talk of family dramas, difficult loves, death and hatred. No heroes, no rock-hard good and evil. Many readers pointed out that Mordraud’s life isn’t so different from their own experience. The only difference is the fantasy setting.

 

 
Fiona: Are experiences based on someone you know, or events in your own life?

Every time you write something, is always something of you. When you try to put someone other’s experience in a story, you are only putting your  own remembrance of that. Writing is a personal matter. Even if you try to avoid that, you are only escaping from shadows, thus falling into even darker ones.

 

 
Fiona: What books have most influenced your life most? a mentor?

I’m a huge fan of Jorge Luis Borges and Italo Calvino. Postmodernism shaped my mind in many ways. “Library of Babel” and “Le città invisibili” are right now my personal life goals regarding good writing.

 

 


Fiona: What book are you reading now?

Sci-Fi stuff. I love Sci-Fi, a lot more than fantasy. I’m reading “Roadside Picnic” and “Hard to be a God” of Arkady and Boris Strugatsky.

 

 
Fiona: Are there any new authors that have grasped your interest?

I have to be sincere: no. I’ve no problem with new authors: I’m one of them! I don’t really have so much time to read right now…

 

 

Fiona: What are your current projects?

I’m working on the editing and “polishing” of the third and fourth book of Mordraud before publishing them. And I’m at the very beginning of a new story: I can’t tell anything about. It will be my next huge passion.

 

 


Fiona: Name one entity that you feel supported you outside of family members.

My girlfriend. We are a couple and a teamwork since the very beginning of this crazy project. Almost 13 years.

 

 
Fiona: Do you see writing as a career?

If my stories manage to reach success, well, probably. But like I said above, I can’t consider writing like a proper kind of work. It could end in every moment, even tomorrow.

 

 
Fiona: If you had to do it all over again, would you change anything in your latest book?

No, when something is done, is done. No regrets.

 

 
Fiona: Do you recall how your interest in writing originated?

Nothing peculiar. Only the boring of a train trip, and the surprise of finding out  stories inside me that were only waiting to emerge.

 

 

 

Fiona: Can you share a little of your current work with us?

Sadly, I can’t. Until I don’t speak of my new project, it’s only mine. It’s a beautiful sensation. I’m not ready to lose this mood.

 

 
Fiona: Is there anything you find particularly challenging in your writing?

Writing is a tough activity. When you can’t find inspiration, is orrible. When you are only in the middle, without seeing an end of the struggle, is orrible. Concluding a book is a powerful and cathartic experience.

 

 
Fiona: Who is your favorite author and what is it that really strikes you about their work?

Like i said, I love Jorge Luis Borges and Italo Calvino. When I read their stories, I’m always overwhelmed by their ability to define a setting, a plot and beautiful messages in a few pages. You can find gorgeous sentences in their works. I love that.

 

 
Fiona: Do you have to travel much concerning your book(s)?

No, only in my dreaming.

 

 
Fiona: Who designed the covers?

My girlfriend, and my best co-worker.

 

 
Fiona: What was the hardest part of writing your book?

Finding the time. I usually work at night, or in the weekend. I need many hours to find the right mental mood. I’ve my methods to do that –  for example, I need to find the right music. I write only with music around me. It’s not important the type: I don’t need hard sound for hard stuff. I need the right soundscape. When I can’t find the right sound, I usually create it by myself, digital-composing music that could be well-suited for the scene I have in mind.

 

 
Fiona: Did you learn anything from writing your book and what was it?

Writing is a great method to discover how many deviances and mess I have in my mind. And it’s a continuous process. Years pass, and I can’t reach an end of this. Thanks to writing, you learn a lot about yourself.

 

 
Fiona: Do you have any advice for other writers?

Maybe only one thing: if you want to begin to write, but you don’t know how, try to start by the end. Imagine the end, how you desire your last chapter, write it. It’s my technique when I can’t find the right beginning of a story.

 

 
Fiona: Do you have anything specific that you want to say to your readers?

Read through the lines! Mordraud is a long story, and it’s layered beyond the events of the plots. There’s something hidden. Like I love to say, “This is not a book of fantasy, but purely the description of a different world, hidden within a flash of your eyes”.

 

 

 

Fiona: Do you remember the first book you read?

I began to read at 4’. It was a terrible 80’s fantasy: the Lake of Blood, author I don’t know. There was a barbarian with an half naked girl near him. A lot of fake violence, and sex that at that time I didn’t figure it out. Loved that.

 

 

 

Fiona: What makes you laugh/cry?

I’m quite emotional. Music is very poweful on me. I can laugh and cry with a song in the right (or bad) moment. I have a lot of “key-song”, some of these are older than 20 years.

 

 

 

Fiona: Is there one person pass or present you would meet and why?

My grandfather that fought in the IIWW. It was an italian partisan. His nickname was “red devil”. Very cool: when i was young, I imagined him like a movie star. I never known him.

 

 

 

Fiona: What do you want written on your head stone and why ?

Wonderful question! Me and my girlfriend always joke about this. I want this phrase: “Visse nell’agio, morì a disagio”. In english it’s almost untranslatable. Like “lived in confort, died uncomfortable”. In italian is better, trust me.

 

 

 

Fiona: Other than writing do you have any hobbies ?

No, I’ve no time for hobbies other than the writing. Sometimes I compose music. I love cooking pasta. Traditional italian way.

 

 

 

Fiona: What TV shows/films do you enjoy watching?

Last thing I saw was “True Detective”. What a masterpiece. But I haven’t TV in my home. Italian TV is so awful.

 

 

 

Fiona: Favorite foods / Colors/ Music

Food: well, I love pasta in many ways – I’m a good cook, I think. I’m quite a boss of traditional egg-based pastas like “tagliatelle” or “cappelletti” or “strozzapreti”. I live in Romagna, an italian region with a very strong tradition in pasta recipes. I inherited many of them from my grandmother. Here where I live, the “bolognese sauce” – what an horrible way to call that – is called “Ragù” and it’s kind of a ritual: 6-8 hours of very slow boiling, best quality beef and good red wine. Cooking relax me a lot.

Colors: I love every colors like I love black or white or grey. A complete rainbow is wonderful.

Music: There is so much music I love! From classical to industrial metal. It only depends on my mood. I have a quite extensive knowledge of music, as a listener and a performer too. One of the masterpieces that I can’t live without:

perfection in an unhuman scale.

In my novels I put a lot of music. Even the magical element is entirely based on music.

 

 

 

Fiona: If you were not a writer what else would you like to have done?

Many other things, I suppose. Probably a worker somewhere. I try always to focus on the future.

 

 

 

Fiona: Do you have a blog/website? If so what is it?

http://www.mordraud.com   it’s the main website of my project, where you can find a lot of beautiful stuff like comics based on the saga of Mordraud, my musics, and also a short movie based on the events of the first book. The short reached the final stage at Comic-Con International Independent Film Festival 2014. Quite a goal for me.

copertina_1_eng_fronte

Buying link http://www.amazon.com/Mordraud-Book-One-Fabio-Scalini-ebook/dp/B00LP22QG8/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1438251901&sr=1-1&keywords=Fabio+Scalini

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Buying Link http://www.amazon.com/Mordraud-Book-Two-Fabio-Scalini-ebook/dp/B00ZQASTCA/ref=sr_1_3?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1438251901&sr=1-3&keywords=Fabio+Scalini

Here is my interview with Lynn Snyder

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Lynn Snyder

 

 

I was born in Akron, Ohio, and lived there with my parents and older brother and sister, until I left for college, very eager to get away from my family and from Akron.

 

I enrolled at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor.  My goal was to find out how the world works.  An effective beginning toward that goal came from four of my most stimulating classes:  American constitutional law, Shakespeare’s plays, modern poetry, and introduction to economics.  I graduated with a double major in political science and English literature.

 

My mother, who wanted my goal to be finding a husband, complained that she must have done something very wrong in the course of raising me.  My father, the successful owner of a men’s clothing store, asked me how this goal would get me a job.

 

At the time, I had no answer to that question but loved the excitement of moving from one place to the next to find out. I started as a copy girl/occasional reporter on a weekly labor newspaper in Washington, D.C., then moved to Long Branch, N.J. to work for two years as a staff reporter on a daily newspapaper.

 

As a teenger in Akron, I had seen a magazine picture of the California coastline, where the Coast Range met the Pacific Ocean and decided that some day, I would live in California.  So, from New Jersey    , I drove across the country to Los Angeles  and found a job as a reporter, editorial and feature writer on a small suburban newspaper.  At a UCLA world affairs meeting, I met a British philosophy student on a Fulbright scholarship.  We decided to live together as a preview for getting married, so I went to England with him.  I had no hesitation about leaving the U.S as I had wanted to live at least for a few years in Europe.  In London, I worked as senior reporter, editorial and feature writer on a small suburban newspaper.

 

I first thought of myself as a writer when, at age eleven, I wrote a rather grim short story about my unhappy family.  My sister urged me to rewrite it with a happy ending, which permanently ended her role as first reader.

 

I don’t know that I have a specific writing style.  As a playwright, I write both drama and comedy, and the tone of most of my work is ironic realism.

 

My early focus as a writer had been short stories until I took a writing class at Massachusetts Institue of Technology, about two years after I came back to the U.S. from England, having decided not to marry the British philosphy student.  Living in Cambridge with an MIT linguistics professor, I was able to attend classes at MIT free of charge.  The writing instructor liked the dialogue in my short stories and suggested I turn one of them  into a play.  I did that, and when I came back to Los Angeles, the play was produced with three other one-acts, including one by Tennessee Williams, an inspiring proximity.

 

Back in Los Angeles, I began working as a writer and communications director in political campaigns for Democratic candidates for public office.  That experience led to my writing several political plays, which are published in one of my play collections, POLITICS AND CORRUPTION, Three Plays.  Like most of the characters in all of my plays, they are the combined product of real people and invented ones.  As convincing fiction requires that we write what we know, my plots are based on real life situations that I know well enough to bring them to life on stage.

 

I write often about the highs and lows of our relentless effort to find lasting love.  Some of these plays are in my collection, COUPLES IN CRISIS, Five plays.  There are both full length and short plays, drama and comedy, in this book, which includes a play that was produced at an Edinburgh Fringe Festival and another that was produced in Bologna in an Italian translation.

After several highs and lows in my own search, I found very deep love with my husband, a Stanford professor of biopsychology.

 

My third collection, SOCIAL ORDER UPENDED, Two Plays, includes a farce about the Mafia taking over charity and a comedy about older hippy followers of The Grateful Dead, before and right after the death of Jerry Garcia.

 

Among contemporary prose writers and playwrights I read are Hilary Mantel, Robert Russo, Ian McEwen, Joan Didion, David Mamet, Alan Ayckbourn, Donald Margulies.  Among other writers who have stimulated and influenced my writing are Raymond Carver, Jane Austen, Virginia Woolf, E.M. Forester, Faulkner, Hemingway, Roddy Doyle, Saul Bellow, Philip Roth, Flannery O’Connor, Harold Pinter.

 

Currently, I am reading Hilary Mantel’s Bring Up The Bodies and Ron Chernow’s Titan, a biography of John D. Rockefeller

 

My current projects include a new play, now in its third draft, titled, Deception, and another new play, still in its first draft, called, Higher Education, both full-length dramas.

 

 

The most challenging part of writing for me is aiming and working for perfection.  I rewrite until I feel that every line of dialogue takes readers and audiences on a journey that will let them momentarily step out of their world and enter the world of my play.  When they leave the world of my play, I would like them to feel they have spent time with people they cared about and whose journeys offered them a new insights on reality.

Amazon Authors Page http://www.amazon.com/Lynn-Snyder/e/B00KE8KWZQ/ref=sr_tc_2_0?qid=1438244579&sr=1-2-ent

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POLITICS AND CORRUPTION

 

Blackmail

A political thriller in which a Washington intern disappears and the Ohio congressman with whom she was having an affair is suspected of being complicit in her murder.

 

 

Campaign Strategy

Political and romantic fireworks converge during a three-way race for a Congressional seat, as political professionals in opposing campaigns walk a tightrope between crises in their romantic relationships and their

political campaigns.

 

Covenants And Restrictions

A young woman disappears in a quagmire of condo corruption,

and three people turn suspicion on each other.

 

 

     COUPLES IN CRISIS

 

Lovers And Other Furnishings

In the wee hours of a New Years Day, four men find a tantalizing, bizarre invitation on their answering machines from a woman each of them used to live with, asking them to retrieve the things they left behind.  Three of them answer the call.  Goading, ribbing and clashing with each other, the men flash back to their lives with Jessica and reveal  surprises about themselves.

 

ZING ZANG

A twenty-five year marriage and a twenty year friendship are imperiled when Sam has cocktails with his friend Eli’s wife at the Polynesian Lounge in Wadsworth, Ohio, and Eli meets Claire on a flight from San Francisco to Cleveland

 

Mayan Mask

Unmasking a lie proves dangerous to friendship and two marriages.

LIMBO

A comedy in which the fear of mortality threatens the 34-year marriage of an irreverent couple when they find themselves locked into the walled patio of a synagogue.  Recriminations about a secret and about their Atheist daughters challenge them to a near breaking point, but they share something that not even a clash between Jewish and Hindu gods can match.

 

JUNK MAIL

A math professor takes revenge on the post office by scattering his junk mail on the floor, as an art professor at the same college enters to mail a letter.  Sharing memories of the days when they were young rebels in the sixties, they enjoy a brief love affair atop the scattered mail, before a bitter misunderstanding leaves the relationship, teetering in the balance.

 

 

SOCIAL ORDER UP ENDED

 

Older Than Dead

A comedy in which four youthful, lively senior Deadheads, playing Grateful Dead songs in their own band, are getting ready to  celebrate the Grateful Dead’s 30th anniversary, when they suddenly are confronted with a life-and-death decision, which they meet in the true spirit of their hero, Jerry Garcia.

 

The American Way

A farce in which a Mafia boss foils the impending downfall of organized crime by taking over charity and running it better than the do-gooders, one of whom becomes his lover and threatens to replace him.

 

BIO

Productions of Lynn Snyder’s plays include Mayan Mask at Looking Glass Theatre in New York City; Don’t Look at Theatre of NOTE in Los Angeles, Open Hydrant Theatre in the Bronx, Theatre Inspirato in Toronto, Another Country Productions in Boston and at Edinburgh (Scotland) Fringe Festival; Junk Mail at Manhattan Theatre Source in New York City; Zing Zang at Perform Theatre, San Rafael, CA; Air Pockets at Three Wise Monkeys, San Francisco and in translation at Teatro del Navile in Bologna, Italy; A Sense of Humour at Menlo Players Guild, Menlo Park and First Stage Theater Co. in Los Angeles.

Plays published online include Blackmail, Campaign Strategy, Zing Zang and a comedy, Older Than Dead.

    Published plays in print include Air Pockets and A Sense of Humour, published by Three Wise Monkeys Press and Gypsy, published by Rockford Writers’ Guild.

Lynn has had playwriting fellowships and grants from the Jerome Foundation, Theater in the Works at the University of Massachusetts, Helene Wurlitzer Foundation and Mary Roberts Rinehart Foundation.

She has worked as a reporter, editorial and feature writer for newspapers in this country and England before turning to publicity and speech writing for political campaigns in Southern California.

 

 

 

 

Here is my interview with Carlton Lamberth

Carlton Lamberth

Name  – Carlton Lamberth

Age – 59

Where are you from – NorthCarolina – USA

A little about your self `ie your education Family life etc  

 I am a retired police officer.  I spent 30 years working for a municipal police department.  11 of those years were spent in the Criminal Investigations Division as a detective and later as a detective sergeant.  Promoted to lieutenant, I spent the last 15 or so years as a watch commander in the uniform Patrol Division.  I retired in 2007.  I have as Associate in Applied Science degree in Police Science and a Bachelor of Science degree in Criminal Justice with a minor in Sociology.  I am currently married to a wonderful woman…my second marriage.  I have two children, a son and a daughter from my first marriage and two step-daughters from my current marriage.  All our children are grown and out of the house.  My wife and I  now baby our cat and dog.

 

Fiona: Tell us your latest news?  My second novel was just released

“The Devil’s Sin”.  This novel is a contemporary erotic horror tale with a crime drama twist.  I am excited to get this novel out and I have high expectations for its success. 


Fiona: When and why did you begin writing?

 I guess I’ve always had a creative side to me.  I play guitar and have written numerous unpublished songs.  In High school I too Art class and learned to paint in oils and watercolors.  My specialty became pen and ink/water color drawings.  I never really got serious about taking on writing until after I retired.  With the eBook craze and so many publishers looking for unsolicited works…I decided to give it a try.  I figured I had nothing to lose but a little time.  So I started hitting the keyboard to see what would happen!  I’ve always thought being a writer would be a great creative life.  I always loved reading the works of Tom Clancy, Harold Robbins, Ian Fleming and Patricia Cornwell to name a few.  In high school I even liked Charles Dickens and Edgar Allen Poe.  And of course my favorite author from the past…Bram Stoker, the creator of Dracula!  I love the vampires!  


Fiona: When did you first consider yourself a writer? 

Well, the jury may still be out on that one!  But seriously, in some ways I’ve been writing for the last 30 years – police reports; from simple basic misdemeanor type reports to more complicated felony type reports; ie larceny reports to homicide! But to further answer this question…I guess after my first novel was published and after it sold a few copies I felt like I had made it as a writer to some degree.  


Fiona: What inspired you to write your first book? 

Hmmm, to be honest I had been considering trying to write my first novel for a couple months but had no real theme or plot in mind.  My wife had gone back to college and in 2013 graduated from college.  I attended her graduation ceremony.  While sitting in the concourse center waiting for the ceremony to begin, an idea popped in my head.  This idea evolved into my first novel, “Lustful Consequences”!


Fiona: Do you have a specific writing style?

  Orderly Chaos!  I never really take notes.  My ideas are stored up in my head.  I sit down in front of the computer and start writing.  I never really know where I’m headed with the story or with the characters in the story.  As an example, in my first novel, “Lustful Consequences” the main character – Jenny originally was to be the antagonist in the story.  But as I continued to write and as her character evolved I began to like her and she became the story’s protagonist.  After I have written two or three chapters, I go back and self edit these chapters several times, adding and deleting.  I reach a point where I am sick of looking at my words and then I move on to writing the next chapters.  I guess I’m pretty unorthodox in my writing style.   


Fiona: How did you come up with the title?  

I never have a title when I start writing.  As I progress in the work something comes to mind.  My first novel had a different title for about ¾’s of my writing of this work.  Towards the end I decided I didn’t like the title and changed it to its present published title.  I decided on the title for my second novel after about a week of writing on this work and it didn’t change.


Fiona: Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp? 

Yes and no.  I don’t take myself too serious.  Nor do I think my novels have any type of profound message.  My first novel dealt with the consequences of lust and fatal attraction issues.  It’s erotic but it’s also a love story and a story of forgiveness.  My second novel is the classic story of good versus evil…will good triumph over evil?  Read the book and find out!  Haha!


Fiona: How much of the book is realistic?

 “Lustful Consequences” could be your next Lifetime movie taken right off the pages of the latest Dateline script!  It’s very realistic and could happen in the real world.  “The Devil’s Sin” is pure scary, horror filled unrealistic fun!  It’s full of demonic possession and doppelgangers and exorcisms. I love horror stories and I had a blast writing this one!  


Fiona: Are experiences based on someone you know, or events in your own life? 

No character is based on anyone I know in either of the novels I’ve written.  But both of my novels contain police/crime drama – so of course I based to some degree the personalities on people I worked and on my own experiences when I was a cop.  


Fiona: What books have most influenced your life most? a mentor?

 Well, I’ve always liked horror stories.  I read Edgar Allen Poe in my youth…even though I found his works a hard read.  Then I discovered Bram Stoker’s Dracula and I was hooked on vampires! I became a B-movie horror movie addict!  Christopher Lee was my hero!  Hahaha!  As I got into adulthood I read my dad’s novels…from writes like Harold Robbins, Tom Clancy and Louis L’Amour.  I loved their novels.  After I became a police officer I started reading Joseph Wambaugh’s police novels.  And I discovered Stephen King…I love his twisted works!  As far as a mentor though, I guess Harold Robbins and Stephen King probably had the most influence on me as far as in a literary since.


Fiona: What book are you reading now? 

“Truth or Die” by James Patterson.


Fiona: Are there any new authors that have grasped your interest? 

No, I’m kind of stuck on Patterson right now.  But if I were to offer out someone…Madison Seiver.  I haven’t read any of her works yet but I’ve seen some of her reviews and based on them she sounds like a great writer.


Fiona: What are your current projects?  

Just finished my second novel – “The Devil’s Sin”!


Fiona: Name one entity that you feel supported you outside of family members. 

Club Lighthouse Publishing has been a blessing…they gave me an opportunity and published me when no one else would.


Fiona: Do you see writing as a career? 

The jury’s still out in that one!  Hahaha!


Fiona: If you had to do it all over again, would you change anything in your latest book?

 No, I’m pretty pleased with everything.  I think it’s a pretty good story! 


Fiona: Do you recall how your interest in writing originated? 

From reading.

Fiona: Can you share a little of your current work with us?  Sure! 

MURIEL STOOD LOOKING AT her father as he lay in the hospital bed. Numerous tubes, cords and wires ran from his body to various medical monitors and automated drug dispensing machines. Her father, in a drug induced coma lay dying a slow and painful death from colon cancer. The cancer had spread rapidly throughout his body in the last few months leaving him frail and bedridden, devouring his life. He seemed so fragile and helpless now; nothing like the strong “man among men” figure Muriel remembered him to be all her life. Sickness from the cancer had deteriorated his once strong and handsome being down to a weak and frail, almost skeletal existence of a human being.

Muriel glanced over at her two sisters. Kathleen sat with her head lowered, as if in prayer. Hannah stared out the window into the dark night, her eyes red and tired from crying and lack of sleep.

Muriel’s husband walked into the room followed by Kathleen and Hannah’s husbands, each carrying Styrofoam cups in both hands.

“The coffee’s still pretty hot,” Muriel’s husband said, handing her a cup.

“Thanks Thomas.” Muriel managed a smile, but her voice crackled from the emotional build up inside her. She sipped the hot black liquid as she peered back at the all but lifeless body of her father. Kathleen and Hannah spoke softly to each other and their husbands, their conversation barely audible.

Muriel’s husband placed a hand on her shoulder and asked, “Any change?”

Shaking her head “No” Muriel leaned back, closed her eyes and rested her body next to his. “No, about the same I guess.”

Thomas smiled a sad smile and lightly kissed Muriel on the cheek. With her eyes still shut, she reminisced of a happier time when her mom was alive and her dad wasn’t sick. Those days seemed so long ago now.

* * * * *

HER MOM, DEAD FOR almost four years now from cancer that devastated the family. Her dad’s cancer surfacing almost two years ago seemed so unfair to everyone. Living in Virginia at the time, Muriel and Thomas received the bad news from Kathleen in a phone call.

“Hey sis, Kathleen here…well the test results are back. I’m afraid the news is not good. He’s got colon cancer.”

Muriel’s heart sank with her sisters words. Having lost her mom to breast cancer only a few years before, the thought of her dad now seriously ill seemed too much to bear. Cancer had struck a blow to her family once again.

The youngest of the three sisters, Muriel had turned thirty three years old a few months before her mother passed away. Now to be going through a similar illness with her dad in such a short time span seemed even more unjust. Born into a strict Irish Catholic family, Muriel’s religious upbringing and faith came into question during her mom’s illness. She became angry at God for not answering her prayers to heal her mom.

Muriel found herself in thought cursing and blaming God once again for unanswered prayers for her dad, “No, no, no. This isn’t fair God. Not my dad sick from cancer too. Why can’t our family get a break? I can’t lose him too. Patrick Doherty is a good man…he doesn’t deserve this. You could heal him if You wanted to. Damn You if You take him from me too. Why should I pray to You–a God who is so cruel?”

Now in transition in a move from Richmond to Charleston, Muriel and her husband somehow found time to include trips to Charlotte to visit her dad as he battled the disease. Originally from Charleston, her parents moved to Charlotte right after Muriel was born. Fortunately her two sisters continued to live in or near her father; Kathleen and her husband living in the city of Charlotte, Hannah and her husband in Greensboro. Being close, they were able to assist her father on a more regular basis during this trying time.

On one of their final moving trips to their new home in Charleston, Muriel got a call on her cell phone from Kathleen:

“Sis, y’all better get to the hospital. Doctors say dad doesn’t have much more time.”

Although less than two hours from Charleston, Thomas turned the car around and they headed back north to North Carolina. Muriel and Thomas had brought their two children with them this trip with plans to show them their new home in South Carolina. That would have to wait now.  “The Devil’s Sin”.

 


Fiona: Is there anything you find particularly challenging in your writing?

 I tend to write the way I talk…I have to watch myself!  Hahaha!


Fiona: Who is your favorite author and what is it that really strikes you about their work?

  I guess my favorite writers are Harold Robbins, Tom Clancy and Stephen King.  King continues to amaze me in the amount of work he puts out in such a short period of time! 


Fiona: Do you have to travel much concerning your book(s)?

 No not yet.  I hope the novels continue to do well to justify that someday! 


Fiona: Who designed the covers?

 T.L. Davison from Club Lighthouse Publishing.


Fiona: What was the hardest part of writing your book?

 Hmmm, maybe the self-editing…I’m very critical of me.


Fiona: Did you learn anything from writing your book and what was it? 

Hmmm, from my latest novel, “The Devil’s Sin”, maybe don’t make Satan mad!  Hahaha!


Fiona: Do you have any advice for other writers?

  Hang in there, keep trying, never give up or listen to someone who tells you you can’t write! 


Fiona: Do you have anything specific that you want to say to your readers?

 I hope you enjoy my novels.  It means a lot to me when someone spends there hard earned cash on something I wrote.  I want them to feel they got their money’s worth! 

Fiona: Do you remember the first book you read?

  Hmmm….no but maybe the Bible.

Fiona: What makes you laugh/cry?

 Life!  J

Fiona: Is there one person pass or present you would meet and why?

  Charles Dickens!  I love “A Christmas Carol”!  It’s my favorite Christmas story and movie (the George C. Scott version).

Fiona: What do you want written on your head stone and why?

 He enjoyed life and didn’t take it too serious!

Fiona: Other than writing do you have any hobbies?

  I play guitar, I read and I do woodworking.

Fiona: What TV shows/films do you enjoy watching?

 I love the History Channel; I watch tons of movies on Netflix; Yes, I watch Family Guy!  Hahaha!  My favorite movie is Forest Gump!

Fiona: Favorite foods / Colors/ Music:

 Spaghetti; blue; Rock & Roll especially The Beatles and the Allman Brothers Band.

Fiona: If you were not a writer what else would you like to have done?

 Hmmm…well I was a cop for 30 years, does that count?  Hahaha!

 Fiona: Do you have a blog/website? If so what is it?

  No, but I am on Google+; Facebook; Twitter and Linkedin.

Amazon Authors Page http://www.amazon.com/Carlton-Lamberth/e/B00NP0M6T0/ref=sr_tc_2_0?qid=1438156570&sr=1-2-ent

Lustful ConsequencesThe Devil's Sin

Here is my interview with Lilly Christine

lillychristine

Name Lilly Christine

 

Age I don’t say anymore!

 

Where are you from;

 

I’m originally from Philadelphia, PA, just like Tess Bamberger, the heroine in my debut novel “Crashing Into Tess”

 

A little about your self `ie your education Family life etc  .

 

I’m second oldest in a family of seven. I’ve always loved horses, dogs and cats, so my hero and heroines do too. My favorite toys as a kid were my Johnny and Jane West stable, rocking horse, and I loved Big Valley. I read a ton as a kid; it was my favorite escape. I also drew and made dollhouses, all of which comes in handy when I dream up characters and create plots. I love all of my characters; their struggles seem real to me, and writing their stories feels like therapy.

 

Fiona: Tell us your latest news?

 

I’m just about to embark on a national book tour, following the journey Tess takes in Crashing Into Tess, along Route 70 Philadelphia to Denver. Tour dates are July 30-August 4. I invite readers to follow the tour on my “Where’s Lilly?” Facebook Event Page.


Fiona: When and why did you begin writing?

 

I have a BFA in fine art; I was sick with Lyme’s disease for awhile. On day, stuck in bed, I didn’t have a book to read so I wrote a story.


Fiona: When did you first consider yourself a writer?

 

I felt bona fide in 2013 when the first chapter of Crashing Into Tess won the Toronto Romance Writer’s Catherine Award.


Fiona: What inspired you to write your first book?

 

Libra Press calls Crashing Into Tess a “James Herriot meets Bridget Jones”. I love animal stories, so making Tess a veterinarian was a no brainer. I wanted it to be a sort of coming of age story, and a little madcap besides. The struggles of Tess forging out on her own in a new place, small town drama,  her overprotective parents, his ex-wife, the confused little girl all sort of related to situations I’d experienced. And I needed a hero at the time, too. Jake became sort of reluctant hero, older and by no means as niave as Tess, but with an inscrutable character and really concerned for her and loving in a very unselfish way.


Fiona: Do you have a specific writing style?

 

I’m a pantser, and I obsess. By the time my “first draft” is finished, the book is finished. I use the first third of the book to get to know my characters, and that informs their journey. I start with a synopsis, but it usually changes as I write and replot. I’m experimenting with voice to text software as a way of generating a first draft, so it’s not so hard on my wrists and shoulders; time at the keyboard can be painful, literally.


Fiona: How did you come up with the title?

 

Crashing Into Tess came from my idea for the inciting action, and the Dave Matthew’s tune that Tess and Jake dance to, Crash Into You. When I discovered “Jake” the  “McGreers” series was born, because of course I wanted to continue to develop a whole bunch of heroes who were as benevolent and generous and supportive of their women.


Fiona: Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?

 

In “Crashing Into Tess” , Tess learns patience and perseverence: I wish I could say with patience and perseverence, we’ll all find a Jake, but I do think you’ve gotta believe in love, and it takes time for things to fall into place.  I try to write romances that read like real life; maybe a little funnier, but I want my readers to feel the same heart and passion and confusion my characters do as they fall in love. I also write women who aren’t fluffy, or two dimensional. My novels aren’t just about getting “the guy”, the quality of the relationships between the women matter, too. Aunt Olivia and Jake’s ex Vicki and Alice and Cassie have an impact on Tess’s life, as do her sister and mother. It’s the same with the rest of the McGreers Series, Daisy and Daphne are sisters and best friends, and the love and friendship they offer Janie and Lulu and Lindsay has an impact; the men in their lives are awesome, but finding true love isn’t enough. Women need real women friends to feel happy and satisfied and understood.


Fiona: 
How much of the book is realistic?

 

Crashing into Tess and the rest of the McGreers are about as realistic as romance novels get; I’ve dealt with chemical dependence, the challenges of step parenting, “mean girls” , vicious gossip, and big life changes. The rest of the McGreers is the same. I particularly love Kyle and Janie in Loving Lulu; Kyle’s back from Afghanistan and suffering the effects of a head injury and PTSD, and Janie’s a sexual abuse survivor. My characters triumph through adversity, and that’s what my readers want to read.  Those of us that love romance novels aren’t reading for some sobering commentary on today’s society; there’s already too much of that on the news as it is. What romance novels can do is to remind us of how the human spirit can triumph, especially when helped along by love and understanding and compassion.


Fiona: Are experiences based on someone you know, or events in your own life?

 

I totally write from life experience, but nothing is taken straight from life. My female characters definitely show aspects of my personality, secondary characters are people I know or wish I did, and my male heroes are some amalgam of the best of the men I’ve loved.


Fiona: What books have most influenced your life most? a mentor?

 

I read Jane Austen exhaustively, and I’ve tried to imbue my stories with the best aspects of her books; the faithful female friends, the sometimes comedic aspects of expectation vs. reality in interpersonal and town/ group situations, and the very real love the hero shows the heroine. On the other end of the spectrum, I also love Annie Proulx. I love the grit and simplicity of her prose, her incredibly efficient characterization just through a few lines of dialogue; so often what isn’t said is as important as what is. To me, she’s one of the consummate Western writers.


Fiona: What book are you reading now?

 

I just re-read “Little Ray of Sunshine” by Lani Diane Rich, and “Girls Guide to Hunting and Fishing” by Melissa Bank.

 


Fiona: What are your current projects?

 

I’m working on a very funny series of holiday shorts all based in Philadelphia, the first a New Year’s Eve story called “It’s a New Year, Baby!” and “Eva Smashing and Dashing” about a penniless heiress on a New England island inspired by “Grey Gardens” and Lindsay Lohan. I’ll release McGreers #7 “Candi for Christmas” a new adult story featuring Tess’s cousin Candace Bamberger and Jake’s cousin Shane McGreer, a professional snowboarder, and McGreers #8 “My Kinda Bull” pairing geologic petroleum engineer Heath McGreer with Julio’s sister, Greenpeace activist Christina Rodriguez.


Fiona: Name one entity that you feel supported you outside of family members:

 

I’ve gotten amazing support from other romance writers, from story feedback to career advice to just general camraderie. My readers are also incredibly supportive; I love my social media communities.


Fiona: Do you see writing as a career?

 

 It’s really more of a passion than a career, although to be financially successful, a writer needs talent, timing, luck, good feedback, and most of all, perseverence.


Fiona: If you had to do it all over again, would you change anything in your latest book?

 

I’m re-plotting Eva, so yes. The last novel I released was “Whole Lotta Bull” McGreers #6, and there’s nothing I’d change; sometimes I sneak a peak at it so I can re-read the Hank and Daisy wedding scene. I thought I wanted to change something about the book that preceded it, McGreers #5, but then I read it and decided not.


Fiona: Do you recall how your interest in writing originated?

 

Massive consumption of books as a kid: I read on the bus to school, during spelling tests in school, on the bus home and finished my book instead of my homework!

 

Fiona: Can you share a little of your current work with us?

 

This is from “My Kinda Bull” when Heath spots Christina: 

 

He pulled the white truck clearly labeled with the Oil and Gas Engineering firm’s logo into the parking lot at Hawk’s, too hungry and tired to care about the Greenpeace crew, maybe feeling a little reckless, himself, after what he’d seen in ANWAR. The fact he’d gotten no sleep didnt’ help.

“Will you look at those hippies?” his partner scoffed.

“Hey man, just leave ‘em alone. We’re done here tomorrow, and I don’t want trouble.” Heath glanced at the scene outside through his rear view mirror, sizing things up.

A striking girl was speaking to the Greenpeace crew. Dark-haired, red cheeked, her petite frame was shapeless in layered gore-tex. A fancy digital camera around her neck, she wore jeans and boots and looked very in charge.

Why does she look so familiar?

Heath shook his head, trying to clear the cobwebs after three days of mostly work and little sleep.

There was no way he knew this girl, three hundred miles into the Arctic circle. His attraction was some bad combination of sleep-and-woman deprivation. She was just too pretty, that was all, and he hadn’t had a real girlfriend since college-another thing his mother didn’t like about his vagabond professional lifestyle, besides the bad food and crazy sleep.  

 


Fiona: Is there anything you find particularly challenging in your writing?

 

I love being immersed in story; it’s a bit of an addiction, I’ll admit. When I’m not creating I get antsy.

 


Fiona: Do you have to travel much concerning your book(s)? 

 

My travels have definitely inspired my settings; each setting is a made up place, but it’s very firmly anchored in places I’ve been. I also keep very active Pinterest boards for each character, and this helps with setting ideas and descriptions, too.


Fiona: Who designed the covers?

 

I do. It’s a selfish pleasure.


Fiona: What was the hardest part of writing your book?

 

Letting go; I always choke two thirds in and the scenes come slower.  I have a hard time finishing.


Fiona: Did you learn anything from writing your book and what was it?

 

The biggest surprise is that I can write a book that pleases me immensely, and then when I share it with my readers, they are as excited as I am.

 

Fiona: Do you have a blog/website?

 

If so what is it? I’m very active on Facebook at Lilly Christine and Crashing Into Tess, @LillyChristine1 on Twitter, and my website is LillyChristine.com

 

Amazon Authors page http://www.amazon.com/Lilly-Christine/e/B00GLY93A2/ref=sr_tc_2_0?qid=1438149557&sr=1-2-ent

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Here is my interview with Christa Lynn

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Name Christa Lynn

Age: Young enough to still have fun, old enough to know better.

Where are you from; Atlanta Georgia, USA

A little about your self `ie your education Family life etc

I’m married and have a 16 year old son and a 20 pound yorkie. I work a full time job and write in what little spare time I have.

Fiona: Tell us your latest news?

I recently re-released all 5 of my books as an Indie author. New covers (except one) and updated formatting.

Fiona: When and why did you begin writing?

I’m an avid reader, and stories were pouring into my head, so I decided to put it all down. My first book remains hidden and collecting dust.

Fiona: When did you first consider yourself a writer?

I’m not sure I do now. I write yes, but I don’t consider it a career. But it hit home when I held my first paperback.

 

Fiona: Do you have a specific writing style?

I write in first person and sometimes dual POV. Two of my books are in the male and female POV.

Fiona: How did you come up with the title?

I just chose something that told the story. My first book, Running from Destiny is about a girl being pursued by a man way out of her league, and she continues to run from him. But he was her destiny, and she accepts that in the sequel, Accepting Destiny.

Fiona: Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?

Yes: in Running from Destiny, my tag line is “never cover yourself.” Ally is short and not a model, but she learns to become comfortable in her own skin. This novel also touches on eating disorders.

In Reprisal and Requital, both females are strong and go through a lot. It’s about never giving up.

Seeking Clarity is a riches to rags story, teaching people that money can’t buy happiness

Fiona: How much of the book is realistic?

In Running from Destiny, Ally is ME in her inner monologue…it’s a lot of how I am, though the story is fictional.

Fiona: Are experiences based on someone you know, or events in your own life?

Not really, but it could be experiences that others have been through and can related to.

Fiona: What books have most influenced your life most? a mentor?

I like any book that strays from the norm. I love Iris Johansen and other erotic writers, but my favorites ones are one you don’t see every day. So many subjects have been done, I like to follow my heart and not the mainstream.

Fiona: What book are you reading now?

Sloth, buy Ella James

Fiona: Are there any new authors that have grasped your interest?

I honestly don’t pay attention if they’re new or seasoned, if the book interests me; I’ll buy it.

Fiona: What are your current projects?

I’m currently working on Chance of a Lifetime, about a middle aged woman who finds herself single after 23 years of marriage. She makes a change and moves away, meeting Chance….and possibly her chance of a lifetime.

Fiona: Name one entity that you feel supported you outside of family members.

My PA, Rosa McAnulty, my friend Lisa Roth and my entire street team, Christa’s Devious Divas. So many others that I’d need another page to list them.

Fiona: Do you see writing as a career?

If at some point I start making money? Maybe. But authors like me make very little, so in the beginning it’s not about the money. It’s about getting your name out there and gaining a following. Bills need to be paid, so I’ll continue on the career path I’m already on.

Fiona: If you had to do it all over again, would you change anything in your latest book?

I might have made it longer, but after leaving my publisher I had the chance to make a few changes in all of my books before re-releasing them.

Fiona: Can you share a little of your current work with us?

You can find the prologue on my Facebook page.

Fiona: Is there anything you find particularly challenging in your writing?

Sex scenes. They may look easy, but keeping it fresh and not the same old same old, is harder than it looks. The story flows well, but when it comes to the intimate moments, my brain freezes.

Fiona: Who is your favorite author and what is it that really strikes you about their work?

Fiona: Do you have to travel much concerning your book(s)?

I have attended three author signings, but to be honest/, they aren’t cheap. I may do more in the future though, for the right event.

Fiona: Who designed the covers?

JM Walker designed my new covers with the exception of Seeking Clarity. That cover was designed by my prior publisher and I got permission to continue to use it.

Fiona: What was the hardest part of writing your book?

Writing the book. Yes, it’s hard. And finding the time to do it.

Fiona: Did you learn anything from writing your book and what was it?

I learned that authors put a lot of time and effort into their craft. These stories don’t just pop out of nowhere and find their way onto paper. There is a lot to it.

Fiona: Do you have any advice for other writers?

Never give up. As people have told me, this is not a race; it’s a marathon. Also, EDIT your work. There’s nothing worse than finishing your book, publishing it and then reviews start coming in criticizing the editing. Yes, it’s expensive but will be worth the investment in the end.

Fiona: Do you have anything specific that you want to say to your readers?

I love all of my readers, some have been with me since I started this venture 2 years ago. Some tell me they’d read the phone book if I’d write it.

Fiona: Do you remember the first book you read?

The first book that stands out is Brave New World by Aldous Huxley. I also read a lot of Nancy Drew mysteries growing up.

Fiona: What makes you laugh/cry?

My friends and family make me laugh, and cry.

Fiona: Is there one person pass or present you would meet and why?

I’d love to sit down with my dad. He passed away before I was able to tell him I had published a book.

Fiona: What do you want written on your head stone and why ?

I don’t want a headstone. I want to be placed in a bio-degradable container with a seed for an oak tree, and grow in a lush green field.

Fiona: Other than writing do you have any hobbies ?

I don’t have a lot of time to do much else, but I’ve just started making my own swag. So that’s been fund.

Fiona: What TV shows/films do you enjoy watching?

I have two men in my house, I don’t get to watch much TV.

Fiona: Favorite foods / Colors/ Music

I love most anything you can eat, lol. And I like a variety of music from pop to rock.

Fiona: If you were not a writer what else would you like to have done?

As with Sydney DeCarlo in Reprisal, I wanted to be a PsyD. Or a Criminal Psychologist/Criminal Profiler, but life got in the way.

Fiona: Do you have a blog/website? If so what is it?

http://authorchristalynn.com/

But it’s in need of updating.

All books banner NEW.1

 

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www.smarturl.it/runningchristalynn

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www.smarturl.it/acceptingchristalynn

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www.smarturl.it/reprisalchristalynn

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www.smarturl.it/seekingchristalynn

 

 

Here is my interview with Linda Naomi Baron Katz

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Name   Linda Naomi Baron Katz

Age – 46

Where are you from? Flushing, NY

A little about your self `ie your education Family life etc

I was born on March 21, 1969, raised in the Jewish Faith where both my parents sent me to a Modern Orthodox Day School (Yeshiva).  When I was 15, my family moved to Fair Lawn, New Jersey where I attend a public school and a Hebrew School.  At 18, I went to Queens College and studied Economics and Sociology.  After college, I tried to get a job but was unsuccessful and made me very depressed which triggered my mania. At 24 I suffered a nervous breakdown and was diagnosed with bipolar disorder.  Being a modern orthodox woman, I soon discovered how biased and stigmatized the orthodox community was towards mental illness.  This made me struggle hard to find someone who would understand what I was experiencing.  I finally met someone who also had a mental illness. His name is Charles Katz and is the best husband and partner close to my heart.

 

Fiona: Tell us your latest news?

 I recently published a children’s book that I coauthored with my husband, Charles Katz titled Peter and Lisa: A Mental Illness Story.  It is about two adults with mental illness who sought help through medication and support by family and friends. It is a story that children will love and learn that people with mental illness can recover.  My other book, which is my first book was published in March 2012. It is titled Surviving Mental Illness, My Story.  It is a memoir of my experiences growing up with bipolar disorder and how I achieved recovery.


Fiona: When and why did you begin writing?

I began writing a few years ago. I realized that I had a story to tell and started writing my own recovery stories in a newspaper called New York City Voices.  A consumer journal for those with mental illness.


Fiona: When did you first consider yourself a writer?

I first considered myself as a writer when my first article in New York City Voices was published. It was titled, My Fears in Overcoming Bipolar Disorder.


Fiona: What inspired you to write your first book?

I wanted to be remembered but also to educate the public that recovery is possible with mental illness.  It was also important to help break through the fear and stigma that so many have of mental illness.


Fiona: Do you have a specific writing style?

No. My writing is simple.


Fiona: How did you come up with the title?

I wanted something that was meant to describe my recovery and the word Surviving was perfect because it show that I am a survivor of mental illness. Therefore, I titled it Surviving Mental Illness.


Fiona: Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?

I would like readers to remember that mental illness is treatable and people can recover and be active in society just like everybody else.


Fiona:
How much of the book is realistic?

  Most of my experiences that I went through are real but some characters I had to make up. Like my cousin Sharon because my own sister did not want to be included so I had to come up with another name.  But everything else is true.


Fiona: Are experiences based on someone you know, or events in your own life?

Yes most of my experiences are based on what happened in my own life even when I wrote my second book, Peter and Lisa: A Mental Illness Story, which is fiction. It is based out of real life experiences.


Fiona: What books have most influenced your life most? a mentor?

Books on mental illness – especially those who have written their own recovery stories.


Fiona: What book are you reading now?

Reis’s pieces. A book about a professor experiencing schizophrenia.


Fiona: Are there any new authors that have grasped your interest? 

Not as of yet.


Fiona: What are your current projects?

Right now, I am focusing on promoting both books.


Fiona: Name one entity that you feel supported you outside of family members.

My therapist always supports me and helps me figure out problems on my own that build my character and self esteem.


Fiona: Do you see writing as a career?

Not really.  Because I can not make money of it, although some do. I just did it to make people more aware about mental illness.


Fiona: If you had to do it all over again, would you change anything in your latest book?

No, I like the fact that my children’s book is easy to read and simple for children to understand.


Fiona: Do you recall how your interest in writing originated?

No. Probably in high school.

Fiona: Can you share a little of your current work with us?

Here is an excerpt from my book, Surviving Mental Illness:  In 1993, I had my first manic attack.  The first time this happened frightened my family, yet in my mind, I was on top of the world.  It started with Al, the boy that I had an infatuation with during college.  I could not get him out of my mind.  I heard a variety of voices in my head, but none of them were as powerful as those I heard about Al.  I though these voices were real, so I listened to them.  I told my friends that Al was my boyfriend, when in reality he was not.  When I volunteered at Forest Hill Community House, a senior citizen center, I met an elderly woman who I thought was Al’s grandmother, and a young woman who I believed was his sister.  Once, when the community house took the senior citizens to Flushing Meadows Corona Park to visit a museum, another racing thought about Al came to my mind.  In this thought, I believed I was getting married to him and having his five children.  When I told these things to my friend, she told me that Al did not have a sister and that I was not going to be married to him because he did not feel the same way.  Can you imagine what my friends thought of me?


Fiona: Is there anything you find particularly challenging in your writing?

There were some parts that were so emotional to write about-things that I considered private. Having to share them with the world was most challenging and courageous.


Fiona: Who is your favorite author and what is it that really strikes you about their work?

I think my favorite author was Karen Tyrell because she went into great detail about her mental illness in her book, Me and Her.  I thought it was interesting that she thought of her bipolar disorder as the “Her” like it was another person.


Fiona: Do you have to travel much concerning your book(s)?

I have only travelled locally within New York City area.  I speak at conferences, synagogues, mental health organizations, etc.  I would like to travel more often if my schedule would permit me.


Fiona: Who designed the covers?

My publisher, Outskirts Press.


Fiona: What was the hardest part of writing your book?

Sharing most private thoughts.

Fiona: Did you learn anything from writing your book and what was it? 

I learned that writing my book was also another form of therapy.  Every time I read it, I feel proud that I am contributing a subject that is most heartfelt to society.

Fiona: Do you have any advice for other writers?

 Do not worry about how much money you will make on the book, it’s the exposure and education to others that is most important.

Fiona: Do you have anything specific that you want to say to your readers?

Continue to strive for success.  Have faith and never give up hope.

Fiona: Do you remember the first book you read?

 Honestly, no.

Fiona: What makes you laugh/cry?

 My husband’s sense of humor makes me laugh at times.  I cry when I feel very overwhelmed at times.

Fiona: Is there one person past or present you would meet and why?

I think I would like to meet Al again to test if we still had some sort of friendship between us eventhough I fear he may trigger my illness.

Fiona: What do you want written on your head stone and why ?

 Beloved and devoted wife, daughter, and sister.  Famous Author and Mental Health Advocate.  This describes who I am and what I have accomplished with my life.

Fiona: Other than writing do you have any hobbies ?

I like to read, exercise, watch TV, go to concerts, etc.

Fiona: What TV shows/films do you enjoy watching?

Current shows – The Originals, The Vampire Diaries, Two and a Half Man, etc.

Fiona: Favorite foods / Colors/ Music

Pizza, Frozen Yogurt/Ice Cream, Chicken and Rice/ Red and Blue/  Classic Rock and Country Music.

Fiona: If you were not a writer what else would you like to have done?

If I could have been a social worker or teacher that is probably what I would have done.

Fiona: Do you have a blog/website? If so what is it? 

My website is :  http://www.surviving-mental-illness.com

Amazon Authors page http://www.amazon.com/Linda-Naomi-Katz/e/B007QN9CEY/ref=dp_byline_cont_pop_book_1

 Cover sheet of my bookPeter & Lisa - Cover Photo

 

Here is my interview with Buck Stienke

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Name  Buck Stienke

Age   66

Where are you from?  Born in Houston, Texas

A little about your self `ie your education Family life etc  

I was the second of four children, with one older sister and two younger brothers. My dad loved flying and owned a series of small single engine aircraft. He put me in the right seat of an Eroupe, and would let me fly it from the right seat at age 5. I loved buzzing the beaches of Galveston.

We lived in Houston until I was 10, and moved to Lake Buchanan, Tx (in the hills of central Texas) My father worked for Southwestern Bell Telephone company as a PBX (private branch exchange or switchboard) installer and commuted over sixty miles to work. When Lyndon Johnson was elected, two years later, my father was appointed as the Communications Manager at the LBJ Ranch. He would often have to drive to Austin switch to a company car and then drive to the LBJ Ranch, another 60 miles. That didn’t work out well, therefore, in 1962, we moved to Austin.

In November of 1963, Lyndon became President following the Kennedy assassination. My father was required to work every day at the ranch and remain there overnight when Lyndon was at home there. (Dad was in charge of the radio, television, telephone and military secured lines (AUTOVON) and their 24/7 maintenance.) We moved into a house on 450 acre plot of ground inside the LBJ Ranch, a couple of miles from the LBJ ranch house during Christmas break my senior year in high school.

Following graduation, I attended the University of Texas as Austin for one year and was involved in the US Air Force Reserve Officer Training (ROTC) program. I flew my first military aircraft, a C-47 Gooney Bird,  the week after I turned 18.

While in high school, I had applied for the USAF Academy (comparable to the Royal Air Force College Cranwell) and was accepted the next year. I was a member of both the Rifle Team and Rubgy Team until a severe neck injury force me to retire from that sport. I graduated from there on the Dean’s List with a degree in Engineering Management and subsequently attended Air Force Undergraduate Pilot Training.

I served 8 years in a variety of flying and staff jobs, ending my career at the 12th Air Force HQ as an Air Operations Staff Officer in the Tactical Air Command (Now called Strike Command.)  I had to opportunity to fly ground attack, air to air and photo recce missions as well as Electronic Counter Measure missions training the air defense radar controllers.

As an interesting side note, I play professional football for the Austin Texans for two seasons, while I was still in the USAF.

Many of my friends left the Air Force and went to work for Delta Air Lines, I followed suite. My pay had been frozen in a misguided federal Whip Inflation Now campaign when inflation was running over 21%. I flew a succession of air carrier aircraft including the Boeing 727, 757, 767, Lockheed L-1011, and Douglas MD-88, MD-90. In both domestic and international service.

I met my wife Carolyn while working there. We’ve been married for 33 years.

I began writing screen plays, acting and producing movies 8 years ago. Presently, I’m the owner of Lone Star Shooting Supply, a full service gun store, and am CEO of our publishing company Timber Creek Press.

Fiona: Tell us your latest news?

Ken Farmer and I are finishing the last three chapters of our latest military action book Black Eagle Force : ISIS. It’s the latest in the BEF series. We have another two or three books in the works: Bass and the Lady – a western with Bass Reeves, and Pterodactyls in the Desert a follow-up to Marshall Lefavors and my Marine Fighter pilot saga, and as usual a few more sci-fi stories for Darrell Bone, our detective in the Legend of Aurora series..


Fiona: When and why did you begin writing?

I wrote short stories in high school and military Standard Operation Procedures, and plans for Search and Rescue in the Tactical Air Command. I began writing screen plays and producing movies 8 years ago.  Ken Farmer’s friend asked us to write a screen play for his HUGE novel “Verdict: In Search of a Crime”. We knocked it out in a few weeks and got rave reviews from a script supervisor at Disney.  He told us it usually take s Hollywood types a year to do the same thing. I replied, “Could have done it in half the time if I could only type faster.” Ken and I looked at each other after that exerience and came to the same conclusion simultaneously: “Hell, we could write a novel!” We wrote over a dozen novels together and each has written a individual book.

 


Fiona: When did you first consider yourself a writer?

Good question. When we wrote our first novel and submitted it, neither of us knew that 99% of all submissions were rejected. We knew nothing of ebooks. Two publishers agreed to take our first book , therefore we selected one and went with them, not knowing it would take them a YEAR to get it into print.

In the meantime, we wrote two additional books. We decided to start out own publishing company instead. We had studied the business, got ourselves an education in marketing and distribution and found a way to get them to the market faster.

Once we go the book on Amazon, we entered Eye of the Storm in the North Texas Book Festival and won Best Adult Fiction category. The next two action adventure books took off and started selling in ebook. The fourth book Blood Ivory, hit the market and in two weeks became a Hot New Release in Amazon Kindle lists. We didn’t know it but the power of the digital marketplace took effect. Blood Ivory went to number 260 in all of Amazon Kindle sales and number two in War and Military. It brought all of our books into the top 100 in category and brought us a paycheck for five figures for that month’s sales. I suppose that’s when I could finally call myself a writer.


Fiona: What inspired you to write your first book?

 Writing the screen play for John Eastman was an inspiration.


Fiona: Do you have a specific writing style?

I like third person books. It gives me the freedom to help the reader feel that they are there inside the action. I want them to see, hear, feel ,taste and smell what the characters do.


Fiona: How did you come up with the title?

Titles come  somewhat from the subject matter. We want them short and hopefully ones that draw interest.


Fiona: Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?

Our books are written from a particular point of view, but we want first and foremost to entertain the reader. The only overarching message would be good triumphs over evil.
Fiona: How much of the book is realistic?

Our novels are extremely realistic, save some facets of the science fiction. Even those aspects are based in known physics and medicine. In many cases we merely extrapolate what is to take it where what could be . Our historical fiction books often times use real places and events, with an insertion of the characters into what may have happened to one or more individuals. For example, our first book, Eye of the Storm, opens with a south Texas ranch being invaded by the forces of Santa Anna en route to the Alamo in March 1836. We know he had to cross somewhere as he left Mexico City and travelled to San Antonio de Bexar. We picked a likely spot and placed a family in his path. His actions thereafter were consistent with a campaign he made years before.


Fiona: Are experiences based on someone you know, or events in your own life?

 Yes. We try to use our own experiences in as many places as we can. The realism is tangible.


Fiona: What books have most influenced your life most? a mentor?

As a child, such classics and Robinson Caruso, Moby Dick, and A Tale of Two Cities, engaged my fantasies.


Fiona: What book are you reading now?

 I’m almost embarrassed to say I’m so busy writing and recording that I spend almost no time reading. I don’t even watch TV and cancelled most of my cable connections beyond basic.


Fiona: Are there any new authors that have grasped your interest?

 Haven’t spent much time reading other people stuff.


Fiona: What are your current projects?

 Pterodactyls in the Desert is written, requires edit. Black Eagle Force: ISIS is in the final stages of initial writing and rewriting. Bass and the Lady is only in Chapter 2. My follow-on to Devil’s Canyon has around 30,000 words if memory serves me. I’m on Chapter 1 of the Audio Recording of Devil’s Canyon.


Fiona: Name one entity that you feel supported you outside of family members.

Facebook and Writer’s Roundup. We did receive support a couple of national organisations: Haunted Falls won 1st Place in the 2013 Laramie Awards competition for Chanticleer Book Reviews. Hell Hole and Across the Red are finalists in that category this year. Across the Red was a top 3 finalist in the Elmer Keaton Award.


Fiona: Do you see writing as a career?

It can be a career. A body of work requires time and dedication. Once your brand name in established, a steady income can be expected if you keep adding to the series. A writer must plan to help promote his or her works.  In most cases, the books don’t sell themselves until the reading public had heard good things about your work. Word of mouth is great, social media is wonderful.


Fiona: If you had to do it all over again, would you change anything in your latest book?

Nope.


Fiona: Do you recall how your interest in writing originated?

In high school, I think it was an English class assignment that required me to produce a short story. Got an A+, must not have been too awful. My book Devil’s Canyon was inspired by a song that I wrote and perform. Forgot to mention, I’m a singer / songwriter and have been doing that for a long time.

Fiona: Can you share a little of your current work with us?

 Coming up in September, ISIS will be our next one.

WHITE HOUSE

SITUATION ROOM

One Hour Later

 

“Roland, what the hell do you mean, ransom?” President Carlos Benedict thundered.

The tall, slim chief executive with sleep still showing on his face, was on his feet at the announcement from Roland Perry, head of the National Security Council. Also in the underground crisis center were Secretary of Defense Jack ‘Burner’ Stewart, Director of the CIA William Weber, Chairman of the Joint Chiefs USMC General Clark Winston, Chief of Staff, Victoria Garnett and the others, both military and civilian that were present at the initial briefing—the rest of the NSC weren’t able to get there, this time of night.

“Mister President, the following conditions are demanded by the representatives from ISIS…First, the amount of fifty billion in gold.”

A low murmur went out from the assembled leaders.

“Second, the United States must permanently terminate all military and financial assistance to the state of Israel.”

“Not happening,” muttered SecDef Stewart, loud enough for the President to hear.

Benedict’s eyes narrowed as he shot a look at Burner. “Anything else?”

Perry nodded. “Lastly they demand all US military personnel be removed from Iraq, Afghanistan, Bahrain…” he glanced back down at his list. “…Qutar, and the United Arab Emirates within forty-eight hours.”

The room erupted in a mishmash of cross-talk. The President raised his hands. “Hold it down…hold it down. Are you certain they mean only forty-eight hours?”

“Actually, the timetable is only forty-six hours and twelve minutes. They threaten to kill Secretary Kines if all their demands are not met.”

Benedict sank back down in his chair, overwhelmed at the demands. “I think we can negotiate this thing down. That’s always the best thing to do.”

Burner seethed as he unzipped a leather bound attaché folder and removed several pieces of paper. His eyes narrowed as the representative of the State Department, Assistant Secretary for Middle East Affairs Ibrahim Al Hassan offered his input.                                “Mister President, I believe your idea has great merit. As a gesture of our good will, I would like to make a suggestion.”

“Thank you, Ibrahim. Your background, originally being a native of Saudi Arabia becomes invaluable at a time like this. What is it you propose?”

“The move must be a bold one, something our counterparts in Syria will recognize as a significant stepping stone toward peace.”

Benedict nodded in agreement. “Go on.”

Al Hassan tugged at his closely cropped goatee. “I propose we withdraw the Fifth Fleet from the Persian Gulf, Red Sea, Arabian Sea, and parts of the Indian Ocean and return Carrier Strike Group Nine, led by USS Abraham Lincoln to its homeport. Nothing would telegraph our intentions anymore clear.”

Burner’s jaw dropped. He glanced at General Winston who was shaking his head in disbelief as well. Benedict continued to nod as a semblance of a smile came to his lips.

“Hold it right there,” Burner Stewart interjected forcefully. He rose to his feet. “Mister President…With all due respect, this whole fiasco with the ISIS is your own fault.” His tone clearly showed there was no respect intended.

Other members of the council—except for the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs—looked at him slightly aghast at his directness.

“Your administration has directly funded Islamic extremism for the past three years and destabilized a half dozen countries.” He flipped down a printout of the initial authorization for military assistance to an interim Islamic government in Egypt. “Five billion dollars, including F-16 fighter and Abram tanks for the Muslim Brotherhood in Egypt…Your so-called Arab Spring.”

The Director of the CIA glanced at Secretary Al Hassan whose eyes were shooting daggers at the retired four star general.

“Three hundred and sixty million dollars to the Libyan insurgency that took down Moamar Qaddaffi. Undoubtedly the exact same folks that killed Ambassador Stevens a few months later in Benghazi. By the way, there are still almost 4,000 Stinger missiles missing from that abortion of a deal.”

“That’s quite enough, Secretary Stewart,” the President said with an edge to his voice. It was crystal clear that even though he was out of his league as the Commander in Chief, the man hated being challenged or having his failures pointed out in any fashion.

“No it is not,” Burner continued. “What about the two hundred and seventy million dollar blank check Secretary Kines wrote to those guys back when they were the, quote, freedom fighters trying to overthrow Syrian President Assad? Those are the same guys who a year later captured Mosul, Iraq and now control over a third of that country, plus half of Syria and parts of Turkey.

“They call themselves ISIS…Islamic State of Iraq and Syria!” He pointed a finger at the president. “You can’t even exhibit the guts to call them Islamic…What the hell is that? They call themselves Islamic, but you can’t?” Burner’s anger caused the veins to pop out slightly on his temples as he glared at his boss.

 


Fiona: Is there anything you find particularly challenging in your writing?

The technical aspects of military hardware are quite different from those I flew in and against. I spend quite a bit of time researching those facets to incorporate them into the writing. The same goes for historical fiction ( our westerns) I want the fact to be as close as we can get them. (I have a pet peeve with Hollywood when then they show a lever action Winchester model 1892 in an Indian battle taking place in 1870!)


Fiona: Who is your favorite author and what is it that really strikes you about their work?

I like Dale Brown for his competence in military and political science. Clive Cussler spins a great yarn and ties current events to things that took place thousands of years ago. Dan Brown writes extremely well, even though the theologians go crazy. Hey, chillax (new word) Folks it’s called FICTION!


Fiona: Do you have to travel much concerning your book(s)?

 Book signings and public appearances usually take less than 10 days per years. We also teach acting, writing and voice over work and that takes about another 10 days a year.
Fiona: Who designed the covers?

We design our own covers. Hooray for Photoshop!


Fiona: What was the hardest part of writing your book?

Finding time, Typing. I wish someone would invent telepathic typing! Voice activated systems can’t identify myriad of foreign names we use and punctuation and format is a whole different thing!


Fiona: Did you learn anything from writing your book and what was it?

The power of visualisation, the ability to see the book unfold  before your eyes is key. We teach the same thing to actors. If you as a writer don’t feel it, neither will the reader. I once sat down and knocked out 10,000 words in five hours. I didn’t even get up to go to the loo, as you Brits might say. I was not in Gainesville Texas. I had been, though some form of transcendental meditation, transferred to the Indian Ocean were I, as my four characters, was fighting Somali pirates aboard a cruise ship that had been captured. I blocked out all other inputs and focused on the story.


Fiona: Do you have any advice for other writers?

 Find a niche where you want to write and dive in. Who are your readers? What do they like? Write series of books, not a single title.  Learn the basics of format and the Chicago Manual of Style. Know when to ignore it! Write what you know and get it out for the public to decide if THEY like it. (Your mother and best friend might lie to you!) The more you write, the faster you’ll get better at it. Me merciless in your editing! We use a gauge when considering  a passage (or chapter!) Does it further the story? If not lose it.


Fiona: Do you have anything specific that you want to say to your readers?

 I hope you enjoy our books! Don’t start one late at night. You’ll probably be mad that you lost so much sleep. Seriously! Some people have a hard time putting them book down as they are fast paced.

Fiona: Do you remember the first book you read?

No.

Fiona: What makes you laugh/cry?

Various thing as different times make me laugh. Human fail abilities and dumb stunts often crack me up. (What did you think would happen? Where did you think you’d land when (not if) your skateboard slipped of the railing?)

Fiona: Is there one person pass or present you would meet and why?

Not really.

Fiona: What do you want written on your head stone and why ?

Don’t want a headstone.

Fiona: Other than writing do you have any hobbies ?

 Music, song writing with guitar. Run a cat clinic for fostering stray kittens and making them adoptable pets. Designing and building  custom rifles, and suppressors.

Fiona: What TV shows/films do you enjoy watching?

Watch very little TV ever.

Fiona: Favorite foods / Colors/ Music

 I’m a gourmet cook with a professional stove. Love to make Texas style Barbecue  (Beef Brisket, beef ribs, pork baby back ribs) as well as Tex-Mex cuisine.  My wife and I been having fun making custom popsicle treats lately, as it’s been so hot in Texas this month.  I like the primary colors, and listen mostly to country music.

Fiona: If you were not a writer what else would you like to have done?

I wish I would have started acting a lot earlier that I did. It’s fun when you are with a creative bunch of people.

 

Fiona: Do you have a blog/website? If so what is it? No time for a blog.

http://tinyurl.com/Buck-sAmazonPage
http://tinyurl.com/Buck-Stienke-B-N
http://timbercreekpress.net
http://blackeagleforce.com

BassLadyRED NewA EISIS Cover 3C

Here is my interview with Val Tobin

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Name – Val Tobin

Age – Fifty-three

Where are you from – Ontario, Canada

A little about your self `ie your education Family life etc  

A Canadian who hates winters, I muddle through by spending as much time as possible snuggled up with a book.

I studied literature and philosophy at the University of Waterloo, then switched to computers and got a diploma in Computer Information Systems from DeVry. While I worked in the computer industry, I received a Bachelor of Science in Parapsychic Science from The American Institute of Holistic Theology (AIHT). I’m currently working on a thesis for a master’s in Parapsychology from AIHT.

During those years, I also became a Reiki Master/Teacher and an Angel Therapy Practitioner® with Advanced Standing trained by Doreen Virtue, PhD in Kona, Hawaii.

I have two kids and three grandkids, and live with my husband and cat.

Fiona: Tell us your latest news?

My third book was recently published on Amazon. It’s a romantic suspense novel called Injury.

The one-sentence summary: A young actress at the height of her career has her personal life turned upside down when a horrifying family secret makes front-page news.


Fiona: When and why did you begin writing?

I started writing fiction seriously in 2012. Before that, I had a lot of false starts or only focused on non-fiction. I contributed a story to the non-fiction Hay House book Angel Words by Doreen Virtue and Grant Virtue.


Fiona: When did you first consider yourself a writer?

I’ve always considered myself a writer, because I’ve always been writing something. But I didn’t consider myself an author until I published my first novel.


Fiona: What inspired you to write your first book?

My fascination with UFOs inspired me to write my first novel.


Fiona: Do you have a specific writing style?

My writing style is my written voice and reflects my personality.


Fiona: How did you come up with the title?

I came up with the title for my first novel by brainstorming on what and who the story was about. “Experiencer” was a term coined by Dr. John Mack to describe the UFO abductee experience in a non-threatening way. It’s controversial, and some abductees don’t like to use it. They prefer abductee, because they say it more realistically reflects what they endure.


Fiona: Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?

The novel explores a number of themes, but I want my readers to take from it what they will and not what I dictate.


Fiona:
How much of the book is realistic?

I hope not much of it is realistic or we’re in trouble.


Fiona: Are experiences based on someone you know, or events in your own life?

A few of the experiences are based on true events, either from someone I know or on events in my own life. But most of it is pure fiction.


Fiona: What books have most influenced your life most? a mentor?

The Lord of the Rings, Atlas Shrugged, Gone with the Wind, Watership Down, and so many other books I can’t list them all, have influenced my life. An author friend has helped me a lot and served as a mentor.


Fiona: What book are you reading now?

Carnal Innocence by Nora Roberts, The Terminal Man by Michael Crichton, and A Whisper in the Shadows by Tom Falwell. Yes, I read multiple books at once. It’s a terrible habit, but I can’t stop. I squirrel books around the house and in my purse. Falwell’s book is the indie novel I’m reading on my computer.


Fiona: Are there any new authors that have grasped your interest?

I recently discovered Gillian Flynn, Michael Connelly, Jennifer Young, Tom Benson, and John Erwin. I’ve got a growing list of authors whose books I want to read, including Rhoda D’Ettore, Sharon Brownlie, Nico Laeser, Max Power, Silas Payton and many more. There are a lot of talented authors out there just waiting to be discovered.


Fiona: What are your current projects?

I’m currently working on my fourth novel, Gillian’s Island. It’s a romance: A headstrong divorcee forced to sell her island home falls for the handsome and arrogant new owner.


Fiona: Name one entity that you feel supported you outside of family members.

Archangel Gabriel.


Fiona: Do you see writing as a career?

Yes, definitely. Whether it’ll be able to support me, I don’t know, but it’s what I do.


Fiona: If you had to do it all over again, would you change anything in your latest book?

No. I like it the way it is.


Fiona: Do you recall how your interest in writing originated?

My mother used to read us stories at home when we were kids, and my father would tell us a story at bedtime. It was always the same story, because he only had the one in his repertoire, but we didn’t care. I became fascinated by stories and wanted to create them myself.

Fiona: Can you share a little of your current work with us?

Gillian’s Island is still in first draft, so it’s too raw to expose to the public, but I can share a bit of Injury, which was released in May:

Eyes closed, sheet covering her face, Daniella Grayson groped for the phone and dragged the receiver to her ear. “Hello?”

“This is Tobey Ames from TNN, Miss Grayson. Do you have any comment on last night’s arrest of your mother?”

Were she not so hung over, Dani would’ve bolted up. Instead, she drew her legs to her chest, assuming the fetal position. “No comment.” The hand that held the phone dropped to the bed. Thumb probing for the “End” button, she found it and disconnected the call.

The phone rang again as she contemplated whom to call first. This time, she let it go to voice-mail. The machine in the living room clicked on after the third ring. The message and beep played, and John Madden, her manager, came on, sounding intense. “Dani. Are you screening? Pick up. I’ve been getting calls about your mother … ”

Dani sat this time, resting her aching head on bent knees, and answered. “What’s going on, John? Tobey Ames just called, asking about my mother’s arrest.”

“I don’t know the details yet. They’re accusing your mother of killing your father twenty years ago. You would have been what, then? Five?”

Silence. Dani tried to understand what John was telling her. “My father left us when I was five.” Dani’s mouth went dry, and her hands and feet grew cold. “Lilli was a bitch from hell.” Nausea threatened and her spine prickled as she processed the awful news. Could it be possible? Oh, God. “She’s capable of it. If they’ve arrested her for killing Daddy, she probably did it.” An edge of hysteria had crept into her voice.

“Listen,” John said. “Don’t answer the phone or open the door until I get there. I’ll call the lawyer on my way over, and we’ll figure this thing out. There must be a mistake.”

Dani said goodbye to John and hung up the phone. She shivered as she slipped out from under the covers and got out of bed. A glance at the clock on her nightstand showed seven-twenty in the morning. No wonder she felt like shit—she’d just gotten into bed at four-thirty, helped up to her apartment once again by her trusty chauffeur, what’s his name? She always had trouble remembering. Oh, yeah, Cope.

Good looking as hell, but too young for Dani’s tastes, and her employee, so she barely gave him a second glance. But he was kind and helpful and made sure she got home safely no matter how drunk she was.

Dani grabbed her bathrobe and snuggled her naked body into the warm terry cloth. As she slid her feet into a pair of slippers, the phone rang again. She returned to her nightstand and disconnected the phone. It continued to ring in the living room until the machine kicked in.

She listened for the caller’s voice.

“Hello, Miss Grayson. It’s Mark Rutherford of ASN. John Madden suggested you give me an exclusive interview. I’d love to hear your side of the story. Please call me back at … ”

Dani shook her head in disgust while Rutherford recited his phone number. She pulled the plug on the living room phone as well. Anyone she’d want to talk to could call her cell.

She sank onto the couch, switched on the TV, and clicked over to the news channel. An eternity seemed to pass before the stories cycled to the one about her mother. Finally, the newscaster returned to the headline news.

A somber Toby Ames faced the camera, eyes filled with compassion. “Ms. Lillian Capshaw, mother of Oscar-nominated actress Daniella Grayson, was arrested last night in her apartment in Toronto on charges of first degree murder in the death of her husband Paul Grayson. Grayson’s skeletal remains were discovered yesterday morning in a capped well at a Sharon, Ontario residence once rented by the family. Ms. Capshaw was taken into custody late last night.”

Dani’s childhood home flashed on the screen behind the reporter. Plywood covered the windows, and two police cars sat in the driveway. Video footage of Dani appeared on the screen next, showing her exiting a limousine.

The newscaster continued in voiceover. “Miss Grayson, seen here arriving at the premiere of her movie, the Academy Award-winning best picture Injury, lives in Los Angeles and has not commented on last night’s events. We will update you as the story progresses.”

Dani flicked to a channel that focused more on entertainment news. After a few minutes, her photo appeared behind the news anchor, and he gave the same spiel as Ames had though without the premiere clip.

The footage then switched to a taped interview with Gregory Henderson, caught leaving a restaurant with a date. Dani swallowed past a lump in her throat and hugged herself, terrified of what Henderson might say.

Always an attention hog, Henderson leaned toward the female reporter and into the microphone. “No, I haven’t talked to Dani. She’s not speaking to me these days.”

Dani noted the slight slur in his speech. Henderson’s arm rested around the shoulders of a gorgeous blonde, who looked delighted to be with him, getting her fifteen minutes of fame.

“Did you meet Lilli Capshaw when you were dating Miss Grayson?”

“No ma’am.” Henderson swayed and steadied himself by leaning on his date. “Dani kept me all to herself.” He looked into the camera. “Call me, sweetheart. I’m here for you, baby.”

The date lost her look of delight.

After a few more inane questions from the reporter and more slurred responses from Henderson, the interview wrapped up.

What an ass. Dani switched off the television, recalling the premiere. She’d stepped out of the limousine and had smiled for the cameras while voices of people she didn’t know had cried out for her to look their way.

She hooked her arm through Greg Henderson’s and hoped her four-inch heels wouldn’t catch on the red carpet. “Greg,” she whispered, “don’t let go of my arm.”

He smiled at her. “Relax, baby. I’ve got you covered.”

Dani loved tall men. At five-foot-ten, she usually looked most men in the eyes—looked down on them, let’s be honest—especially in four-inch heels. Henderson was the perfect height for her, and their chemistry on screen and high-profile romance off screen had helped make Injury the hit of the season.

She tried to get in front of the cameras as much as possible and had worked hard at looking particularly stunning for that premiere. Her body-hugging gown had shown off her slender figure. She’d let her long, dark hair hang loose in a wild and carefree way that took hours with a curling iron to achieve.

Maybe my father is watching this, she’d thought, as she always did when she put herself on display in public. It’s why she put herself on display in public.

Daddy’s never seen me. All those times, I thought he’d see me and feel sorry he left us, and he wasn’t even alive.

The doorbell rang. John.

She unfurled from the couch and waited for him to enter. When the door didn’t open, she walked over, reached for the deadbolt, and then remembered John’s warning to not open the door. She checked the peephole. Nothing there. If that was John, he wouldn’t be hiding. She waited. The doorbell rang again, but whoever was there took pains not to be seen.

Dani left the door, went to her room, and opened her closet. There’ll be a media feeding frenzy. What am I going to wear?

Did it matter? Yes, she supposed it did, but it felt strange to know that her father wasn’t out there somewhere perhaps noticing her and thinking about contacting her.

At eighteen, she’d tried to find him, to ask him why he’d turned his back on her. She could understand that he’d want to escape controlling, abusive, obsessive Lilli. Dani herself had moved out of her mother’s home at sixteen. But Dani was a child when her dad had disappeared, and she’d taken the rejection and ensuing lack of contact personally.

The knocking on the door penetrated her thoughts. How’d that asshole get into the building? Multiple fists pounded the door, she realized. More than one asshole was out there in the hall stalking her. Then she heard voices arguing, demanding. She hopped back into bed, pulled the covers under her chin, and waited.

A key rattling in the door told her John had arrived. Dani sighed and slid out of bed. Peering out of her bedroom, she waited for him to step inside. John, handsome, rugged, older. But assertive, protective, kind. She itched to touch him.

Would he sleep with her now she was over twenty-one? It’d been five years since she’d tested those waters. When she’d first hired him to be her manager, she’d thrown herself at him.

She’d almost fired him when he’d rejected her, then had decided she didn’t give a shit after all. One by one, she’d seduced his associates, until she’d gotten it out of her system. The older men had been eager to accept the offer of her young body.

When John had complained, like he had any right to say anything about whom she fucked, she’d told him to butt out. He’d almost quit on her then, and she’d had to beg and plead and promise the moon to keep him as her manager. Fear of him abandoning her reined in her reckless, wanton behavior, and she’d battled to keep him in her life.

They’d had a holy alliance since then, focusing on her career, which had skyrocketed. She’d kept her attraction to him locked away, taking it out only in the darkest of nights when she took comfort from and pleasured herself on thoughts of him.

But now that ache for him was back, fierce, hot. Dani slid a hand down her robe and loosened the knot on the belt at her waist. The robe parted slightly, exposing her body in a thin, vertical line of curves and shadows. Her nipples hardened, and she parted her lips.

She tilted her head to the side and watched John struggle to shut the door as hands holding microphones jammed themselves into the opening, and voices shouted her name. John pushed against the door, and a man cried out in pain. The arms disappeared, and the door slammed shut.

“Don’t worry, Dani. I’ve alerted security. They’ll be gone soon,” John said, his back to her.

The normality of seeing him there shook her back to reality, and she closed the robe. When he turned to her, she faced him head on. “John.” Her voice caught in her throat, and his name came out low and throaty, but it was grief, not lust that did it. “What happened to my father?”


Fiona: Is there anything you find particularly challenging in your writing?

Fitting everything else I have to do in around it.


Fiona: Who is your favorite author and what is it that really strikes you about their work?

Tolkien. I fell in love with The Lord of the Rings when I was fourteen and have read it countless times since then. He has a clean style that’s captivating and emotionally moving.


Fiona: Do you have to travel much concerning your book(s)?

No, though I’d love to travel more.


Fiona: Who designed the covers?

Patti Roberts of Paradox Book Covers: http://paradoxbooktrailerproductions.blogspot.com.au/


Fiona: What was the hardest part of writing your book?

Killing my darlings.


Fiona: Did you learn anything from writing your book and what was it?

There are mistakes new writers make that are common, such as using filtering words like know, look, see, hear etc. You can pull the reader in by avoiding those in most cases.


Fiona: Do you have any advice for other writers?

Make sure you get an editor to review your work. Editors are gold.


Fiona: Do you have anything specific that you want to say to your readers?

Thank you for reading my novels and giving me your feedback.

Fiona: Do you remember the first book you read?

Not a specific one, but the first books I read were Dr. Seuss books.

Fiona: What makes you laugh/cry?

My husband makes me laugh. He’s got a great sense of humour. My brother is pretty hilarious, too. Some of the terrible things I read in the news make me cry.

Fiona: Is there one person pass or present you would meet and why?

Jesus. I have a lot of questions for him.

Fiona: What do you want written on your head stone and why ?

I don’t want a headstone. My husband can scatter my ashes somewhere.

Fiona: Other than writing do you have any hobbies ?

Reading. Studying.

Fiona: What TV shows/films do you enjoy watching?

X-files was my favourite TV show. I also enjoyed Fringe, Breaking Bad, How I Met Your Mother, Friends, Seinfeld, Frasier, and Cheers. I’m watching all the X-Files again before the new episodes come out and Third Rock from the Sun on Netflix. I like action films, some comedies, classic films, and dramas. I love the Lord of the Rings movies, for the most part and the first three Bourne movies.

Fiona: Favorite foods / Colors/ Music

Hungarian food, Mexican food, and chocolate.

Yellow was always my favourite colour (you can tell I’m Canadian by the way I spell “colour” and “favourite”).

I prefer rock music to any other kind. I listen to Q107, a classic rock station.

Fiona: If you were not a writer what else would you like to have done?

I was a software/web developer for ten years. I don’t want to do anything other than write.

Fiona: Do you have a blog/website? If so what is it?

My website is: http://www.serenitynowgifts.com/

My Amazon page is: http://www.amazon.com/Val-Tobin/e/B00KC5S69K

Facebook Author page: https://www.facebook.com/valtobinauthor

Smashwords page: https://www.smashwords.com/profile/view/valtobin

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