Here is my interview with Christopher Beck

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Name: Christopher Beck

Age: 35

Where are you from: Southern New Jersey

A little about your self `ie your education Family life etc: Was born in San Diego CA but raised in NJ. I’ve a step-daughter from a previous marriage whom I still see and love dearly, and have recently met a beautiful and wonderful woman that compliments me nicely and vice versa.

 

Fiona: Tell us your latest news?

I’ve just been asked to be part of an anthology about demonology but can say no more at this point. Two of my stories are featured in the recently released anthologies, PHOBOPHOBIAS, and, THE GRIMORIUM VERUM, both complied and edited by Dean M. Drinkel and published by Western Legends Publishing.

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http://westernlegendspublishing.com/books/phobophobias/

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http://westernlegendspublishing.com/books/the-grimorium-verum/

 


Fiona: When and why did you begin writing?

Been writing as long as I can remember, always had a love for it.


Fiona: When did you first consider yourself a writer?

Perhaps when I was first traditionally published. Not sure, really.


Fiona: What inspired you to write your first book?

I’ve written many short stories, poems, novelettes, and novellas, but no full fledge novels as of yet. Life in general inspires many of my works, and such was the case back in 2011 when, after years away from the written word, I wrote Lonesome Night. I was going through some hard times then and part of the tale I think was just trying to kill a whiny, needy, part of myself.


Fiona: Do you have a specific writing style?

Nope.


Fiona: How did you come up with the title?
Was fitting to how I was feeling at the time, and to the story itself.


Fiona: Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?

In Lonesome Night? No. That was for me. In other stories? I find there are things—points or sublet messages—subconsciously written in but I don’t look to use my stories as a soap box or to be preachy.


Fiona: How much of the book is realistic?

Parts…


Fiona: Are experiences based on someone you know, or events in your own life?

There’s usually a little of real life experiences peppered into most stories.


Fiona: What books have most influenced your life most? a mentor?

A number of writer friends who help and support but no overall mentor. As far as greatest influences: most of King’s and Koontz’s. NEEDFUL THINGS and 11/22/63 by the former always come to mind as well as ODD THOMAS and FALSE MEMORY by the latter. Robert McCammon’s  SWAN SONG and BOY’S LIFE, too. I could go on and on.


Fiona: What book are you reading now?

VOICELESS by Trent Zelazny


Fiona: Are there any new authors that have grasped your interest?

Trent Zelazny, Craig Saunders, Adam Millard, and Gary McMahon to name a few.


Fiona: What are your current projects?

As mentioned before, was asked to be a part of an anthology dealing with demonology. Have to do some research and figure what I want to write about.


Fiona: Name one entity that you feel supported you outside of family members.
None.


Fiona: Do you see writing as a career?
I would like it to be one for me, but it’s not that simple. Most writers, unless extremely fortunate, have a day (or night) job.


Fiona: If you had to do it all over again, would you change anything in your latest book?

Looking back at any piece of writing there’s usually something you’d like to change…but Nah.


Fiona: Do you recall how your interest in writing originated?

No. Have enjoyed it ever since I was a wee lad.

Fiona: Can you share a little of your current work with us?

Latest hasn’t been started yet. Have to do some research first.


Fiona: Is there anything you find particularly challenging in your writing?

At times, yes; other times, no. Sometimes it’s fun and the words just flow; other times it’s like having your teeth pulled. And it’s not any one thing in particular, really, it’s just sometimes good words come hard.


Fiona: Who is your favorite author and what is it that really strikes you about their work?

I can’t narrow it down to just one. Bentley Little–even though he exaggerates some in his works, he’s still pretty much on par with the truth. Robert McCammon—he’s one of the best ever yet underrated in some regards. Dean Koontz—when he’s on he’s on and can tell a helluva story. Again: I could go on and on.


Fiona: Do you have to travel much concerning your book(s)?

No.


Fiona: Who designed the covers?

James Powell has done the covers for a number of the books my stories are in.


Fiona: What was the hardest part of writing your book?

The writing part.


Fiona: Did you learn anything from writing your book and what was it?

How to be a better writer.


Fiona: Do you have any advice for other writers?

Read and write. Don’t talk. Do.


Fiona: Do you have anything specific that you want to say to your readers?

Thank you.

Fiona: Do you remember the first book you read?

No

Fiona: What makes you laugh/cry?

Funny things/sad things. :P

Fiona: Is there one person past or present you would meet and why?

There are a ton of people—writers, readers, etc—that I would love to meet if given the chance.

Fiona: What do you want written on your head stone and why?

My name, so friends and family know it’s me? ;)

Fiona: Other than writing do you have any hobbies?

Reading; walking; bike riding; walking; video gaming.

Fiona: What TV shows/films do you enjoy watching?

Hardly watch any TV these days, and I enjoy all genres of film.

Fiona: Favorite foods / Colors/ Music:

Pretty much all food. Purple. Metal

Fiona: If you were not a writer what else would you like to have done?

Beats me.

 

Fiona: Do you have a blog/website? If so what is it? Just my Facebook at this time.

 

Here is my interview with K.C. Sprayberry

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Name K.C. Sprayberry

Age 58

Where are you from Northwest Georgia

A little about your self `ie your education Family life etc  

I was born and raised in Southern California. School was private until eighth grade, and then the public high school and onto college. A change in career plans had me joining the Air Force. That became an adventure I will never forget or regret. Not only did I see places in the United States where I’d never been, but I also had a chance to explore Europe when I wasn’t on duty.

My last duty station, Luke AFB in Phoenix, wasn’t the end of my travels. About a year after my discharge, I moved to Denver, where I met up with the man who would be my second husband. From there, we migrated to Northwest Georgia, where we live in a small, rural town where everyone knows your business ten minutes before it happens. That’s when I began writing, which coincided with the birth of my youngest child.

For the first time in my adult life, I was a stay at home Mom. Not one to be satisfied with the normal day to day life of that position, I accepted my husband’s challenge to begin writing full time, to fulfill a dream I’d had since I was a child. It wasn’t long before I discovered my niche, young adult coming of age books. Not that I don’t write in other genres, the story always dictates what kind of book it will be, but I’m happiest when I’m appealing to teens with books that will capture their attention and show them different ways to handle problems.

Fiona: Tell us your latest news?

My latest YA coming of age novel, Lost & Scared, released on March 3. This book is a psychological thriller about non-custodial parental abduction. It’s heartbreaking, intense, and has moments of incredible joy. A couple of people involved in the process of writing this book told me that I had the makings for a second book, and idea I discarded, until my characters returned, demanding that I finish the story, let the world know how they moved on from what they experienced. Lost & Scared II The Hard Road Back has begun and promises to be even more intense than the first book.


Fiona: When and why did you begin writing?

The love of writing has always been with me. English was always my favorite class, compositions what I looked forward to the most. I devoured books as a child, never satisfied with the offerings for teens during the late sixties and early seventies. They were so scarce, and consisted mostly of mysteries. The stories I created then were adventures where girls didn’t stick with the expected types of jobs. They got dirty, rode bikes like the guys did, and pretty much didn’t let anyone stop them from doing what they could.

Why did I begin writing? It’s part of who I am, deeply embedded in my soul. Not writing is the worst thing I can imagine.


Fiona: When did you first consider yourself a writer?

I think in many ways, I’ve always considered myself a writer. I had a diary as a child and was always jotting down cute stories on pieces of paper. Once I learned the importance of description and balancing narrative and dialogue, I always kept a notebook at hand, to jot down thoughts, or record descriptions of places I visited.


Fiona: What inspired you to write your first book?

I’d been writing short stories for a while and had sold more than a few. But I wanted more. The vision of a book was always right there in front of me. My first attempt at a book was a great learning experience, but I soon realized it would never sell. So I began researching topics that teens found interesting and reading books on those topics, both fiction and non-fiction. After many starts and stops, Softly Say Goodbye, began to develop. Underage drinking is a problem that’s been around forever. Teens, alcohol, and vehicles are a bad combination. All these elements were good, but I needed a hook, and that took reading many novels with this as a theme, until I realized there were very few books that concentrated on the protagonist standing up against underage drinking because that’s how they felt. I didn’t want a teen who gave up alcohol and went on a crusade. I was in the market for a character who had deep seated beliefs, and was willing to take a stand because that’s how she rolled.


Fiona: Do you have a specific writing style?

I’m mostly a panster, an author who writes by the seat of her pants. I’ve tried outlining, but by chapter two, I’m off and running, away from what I planned. Yes, I do research, sometimes before I begin writing, other times while I’m in the middle of a plot point.


Fiona: How did you come up with the title?

For my current book, Lost & Scared, it took some work to come up with the right title. It was originally Gone, but there are a lot of books with that as the title. I tried every synonym of that I could think of, but they were all also taken. The next title I came up was Goodbye Forever, but that changed because the book’s ending changed. Then I worked through the plot line, read the story with an eye as to where I could figure out a title, and came up with Lost & Scared, to express the feelings of the twins who are my main characters.


Fiona: Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?

Yes, that you can stand up for yourself, no matter what you think you aren’t capable of doing. Keri, the female main character in Lost & Scared, doesn’t think she’s good at the physical stuff, that her brother, Shane, has a lock on that. Until she’s faced with escaping her worst nightmare, she leans hard on her Big Bro, but then discovers an inner core of strength and a fierce protectiveness for her younger siblings, and manages to do what has to be done to keep those children safe.


Fiona: How much of the book is realistic?

Like all of my young adult coming of age books, I work hard to add in the layers to create characters and situations that feel real, seem real, and hit the reader at a level where they begin to believe these people are real and could be friends. To do that, I have to create three dimensional characters who become as real to the reader as their own friends. There are always flaws, moments where a person can say, “Hey, I did something like that.” and the way these fictional teens extract themselves from a problem are much like any other teen would do.


Fiona: Are experiences based on someone you know, or events in your own life?

To a degree, everything I’ve experienced, or witnessed, or my children have gone through somehow finds its way into my books. It might be something small, like hanging upside down way above the ground, or finding themselves confronted by a person they’d rather avoid, but they are there, a part of the book as much as they a part of our lives.


Fiona: What books have most influenced your life most? a mentor?

My mentor is my husband of more than twenty-two years. He’s always been my cheerleader, and my biggest critic. I don’t know many people who can say their spouse or significant other will tell them a book won’t work for this reason or that, but my husband does.

The books that have influenced me the most are Robert Jordan’s Wheel of Time series, anything by Robert Heinlein or Anne McCaffrey, Isaac Asimov, Franklin Dixon (The Hardy Boys), Caroline Keene (Nancy Drew), and Julie Campbell Tatham/Kathryn Kenny (Trixie Belden). The last three series are books I read as a teen and couldn’t get enough of them.


Fiona: What book are you reading now?

Beyond the Shadows by LaVerne Clark


Fiona: Are there any new authors that have grasped your interest?

I’ve known many authors since I began writing, but I have to say KateMarie Collins, Mel Massey, Margo Bond Colins, M.A. Cortez, April Erwin, and Donna Alice Patton are the tops of new authors I’ve discovered. All are fabulous and work in many different genres, which attracts me because I don’t like sticking to any one genre.


Fiona: What are your current projects?

Paradox Lost (Books 2,3, & 4), Canoples Investigations (Books 3 through 6), The Call Chronicles (Books 2 through 4), Ghost Flight, Deadly Trust, Shhh! Don’t Tell, Ghosties—Trouble to the Max, Shamed, and Lost & Scared II The Hard Road Back. I think that’s enough to list, although there are many, many more in various stages of development.


Fiona: Name one entity that you feel supported you outside of family members.

That’s hard, but I’d have to say Solstice Publishing, my publisher. They’ve believed in me since they offered me my first contract for Softly Say Goodbye.


Fiona: Do you see writing as a career?

Absolutely, there is no other way to view it.


Fiona: If you had to do it all over again, would you change anything in your latest book?

No. I’m satisfied with how Lost & Scared worked out. There are a couple of plot points that weren’t completely cleared up, but those will be taken care off early on in the second book.


Fiona: Do you recall how your interest in writing originated?

Not really. I just always wanted to write stories.

Fiona: Can you share a little of your current work with us?

Lost & Scared II The Hard Road Back focuses on Keri and Shane after they graduate high school and prepare for college. Their plans have changed, due to the events in the first book. Keri is now more focused on helping others who went through what she did, to the point where she’s pulling away from everyone. Shane just wants life to go back to normal and must learn that their normal will never be what it was before their dad took Keri and three other siblings away for four months.


Fiona: Is there anything you find particularly challenging in your writing?

Breaking away during tense plot moments. I can’t walk away, sleep, or even eat until I finish those. Usually, the whole thing unfolds in my head and I feel compelled to keep on writing until I have it perfect.


Fiona: Who is your favorite author and what is it that really strikes you about their work?

To be honest, it’s a three way tie. Robert Jordan, Robert Heinlein, and Steven King are people whose books I always try to grab and read. Two of those authors are no longer with us, but the third is still publishing and treating people to his own brand of horror.


Fiona: Do you have to travel much concerning your book(s)?

No. Most of my research is done on the computer, or the library if I need to find a book on the subject.


Fiona: Who designed the covers?

Most of my covers have been designed by Solstice Publishing’s cover artists: Kelly D. Abell, Deb Melanie, and Shelly Crocker.


Fiona: What was the hardest part of writing your book?

Knowing when to stop and end the story. I always want to go on. Most of my books are about a moment in time, and I wonder if the reader wants to know more.


Fiona: Did you learn anything from writing your book and what was it?

It wasn’t so much learning anything new, but reinforcing something I learned long ago. Always trust your feelings. Don’t accept that you can’t change things by speaking up, because that’s not always the case.


Fiona: Do you have any advice for other writers?

Never give up. Absolutely never. Keep working, but don’t expect overnight success. That rarely happens. Success comes from working hard every day, and promoting, and getting  your name known.


Fiona: Do you have anything specific that you want to say to your readers?

Thank you for reading my books. I have a worldwide fan base, as far away as New Zealand, and as close as my neighbors. I hold all of them in great esteem. If not for my fans, I wouldn’t be able to sell my stories.

Fiona: Do you remember the first book you read?

Uh, no. The first book I remember the title of is Nancy Drew and The Secret of The Old Clock. It was a Christmas gift when I was thirteen.

Fiona: What makes you laugh/cry?

I laugh over the silliness in our lives or when something is extraordinarily funny. It’s hard to pin down any one thing that will make me laugh, because I have a wicked sense of humor. Crying is something I try not to do, to avoid the clichéd “women cry over the dumbest things” commentary. If something moves me, like a recent Twitter follower whose child was taken by his non-custodial ex-wife and the website he’s dedicated to his daughter, or it can be as simple as seeing a bird dead on the ground that I grew used to seeing on my windowsill. My tears aren’t something I waste and some people have called me cold because I don’t cry at certain situations, but that doesn’t mean I’m not crying on the inside.

Fiona: Is there one person pass or present you would meet and why?

I love history, and especially history about the Wild West. If I could meet them, I’d love to confront the men from the OK Corral shootout and ask them just what they were thinking, or if they were even thinking at all. The recorded reasons behind that particular gunfight seem so silly, when viewed from a present almost two hundred years later.

Fiona: What do you want written on your head stone and why ?

“Nail the coffin shut well, or she’ll be back!”

Fiona: Other than writing do you have any hobbies ?

I love cross stitching, reading books, and would one day love to get back into gardening (flowers only). I am also an avid photographer. That’s my passion, while writing is my avocation. The photography is to relax, the writing to fulfill a deep seated need within myself.

Fiona: What TV shows/films do you enjoy watching?

I like crime dramas. Currently, I’m watching Hawaii Five-O on Netflix. The current show, I finished rewatching the one from the sixties and seventies a couple of years back. I also just finished Blood Brothers with Tom Selleck, and all of his Jesse Stone movies. I admit it. That man as Magnum captured my heart!

Fiona: Favorite foods / Colors/ Music

Lasagna, Manicotti, Enchiladas, Tacos, Pizza, pretty much any well prepared meal.

My favorite color is green, but the blue shades not the yellows.

My taste in music is all over the place. I can listen to anything good, from Jazz to Rock. If I like a song, I like a song. I don’t stick with any particular kind.

Fiona: If you were not a writer what else would you like to have done?

At one time, I toyed with the idea of being an architect, but that dream vanished fast as I approached college age. Back in the early to mid-seventies, women in that field weren’t accepted. So much has changed since that time, but there is still room for change.

Fiona: Do you have a blog/website? If so what is it?

Blog: http://outofcontrolcharacters.blogspot.com/

Website: www.kcsprayberry.com

Amazon Page : http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss_1?url=search-alias%3Ddigital-text&field-keywords=k.c.%20sprayberry&sprefix=k.c.+%2Cdigital-text

lost and scared cover art

Here is my interview with Anthony Crowley

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Name    Anthony Crowley

Age     35

Where are you from   Birmingham, England

A little about your self `ie your education Family life etc  

I did quite well with my school studies. I excelled in English, Drama, Music. I have always been passionate about those subjects. It felt natural. I was a very quiet reserved kid. I was often bullied, because I never could fit in with the crowd. I was often looked down like I was an alien. It all began to change when certain school presentations and events took place. An example, if I wrote a piece of literature to be read out on stage for the whole school. The responses felt like a healer and a great comfort. Another example of acceptance was when I sang at the end of term school concert. That was another special moment I will never forget. I felt lucky to perform songs with my musician teachers. After High School, I started a two year college diploma in retail and business. I enjoyed the learning credentials, but I still wasn’t happy. I felt like I was sinking further. I wanted to be noticed for my creative expressions. When I completed my college course I made the decision to do something which I always wanted to do. I attended several auditions which I found in the Stage newspaper. I then was contacted by a London based entertainments agent, I was contracted as an entertainer/children’s entertainer. I enjoyed that line of work, Many long hours and the pay was basic, but it was a great experience. After the holiday seasons, I moved back to the Midlands and I began an Oxford open learning diploma course in English. I studied a few other related courses and a gym instruction course afterwards. During my mid-twenties I ended up running a couple of music retail businesses, printing/distribution business. I managed to accomplish so much in a short space of time. I feel fortunate to have learned and achieved the work I have done.

 

Fiona: Tell us your latest news?

I have a new novella “The Mirrored Room” and the“Tombstones” audiobook  recently released. I am currently finishing some more writing projects, including “Infestation” which shall be featured in the “Undead Legacy” anthology, published by JEA/Wetworks. This collection will be available from 29th March 2015. My contributed story shall show my readers another style to my work. It will be exciting. I am also compiling a ten story anthology “Doomsday after Midnight” and I am embarking on a magazine project, to be titled “Dark Realms”. I have the talented assisted team of Alex S.Johnson, Dean.M.Drinkel. This shall be a publication within literary horror, but with no restrictions. We already have some leading names in horror contributing to this new venture. We are looking for the initial release hopefully Mid-year 2015.


Fiona: When and why did you begin writing?

Writing has always been a part of me from a young age. It always has felt completely natural.

 


Fiona: When did you first consider yourself a writer?

It wasn’t until I began having my work published and receiving the recognition, exposure. It was like a flash of light, which I then realized I am now an author.


Fiona: What inspired you to write your first book?

I have written several books, but recently I have released my first novella “The Mirrored Room”.  It has a Supernatural/Occult theme. I was initially inspired by psychic awareness and human personality. I watched a show on television “Crossing Over with John Edward”. Then I had the idea. I wanted to write a story where it would focus around a television psychic. On these reality shows, the psychic seems to always have the answer. I wanted to show another side to reverse psychic abilities and weaknesses.


Fiona: How did you come up with the title?

I incorporated occult practices within the story. It seemed perfect to use mirrors. They are also a reflection of all of us. It is also the anecdote of self-analysis without initially noticing one’s actions at first glance.


Fiona: Do you have a specific writing style?

I write in a variation of styles from fiction, poetry and non-fiction. I also write lyrics.

 


Fiona: Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?

I just want the reader to feel excited and entertained by the journey.


Fiona: How much of the book is realistic?

I will leave that to my readers to decide.

 

 

Fiona: Are experiences based on someone you know, or events in your own life?

Everything I create has a form or element of every day inspiration, whether the past, present, and the future.

 


Fiona: What books have most influenced your life most? a mentor?

Too many to list here, but one of my favourite reads is; Edgar Allan Poe’s “The Raven. I also enjoy anything written by Clive Barker and Jack Ketchum.


Fiona: What book are you reading now?

I haven’t had much time in my busy schedule to read lately, but when I have had a free moment, for example at Christmas, I read “Linden Manor” by Catherine Cavendish.


Fiona: Are there any new authors that have grasped your interest?

I am very interested in reading the works of Tim Dry and Barbie Wilde.

 


Fiona: What are your current projects?

I usually multi-task on several projects at any given time. Last night I wrote a new story titled “Peek-a-Boo”. It was initially to be called “The Night Men”, but I decided the themes have different directions, and it felt rather ideal to begin writing a series about a new original boogeyman-like collection, which will be realistically dark. I am also compiling my first ten story collection “Doomsday after Midnight” and a short kindle edition read, titled “Symphony of Blood”. These will be own solo releases. I have a list of several confirmed story contributions, from this present day, until May 2015, but I can’t say anything about those works yet. It will be something for the reader to look forward to. But, I do have the whole year planned out with continuous projects.

 


Fiona: Name one entity that you feel supported you outside of family members.

There are a few people I can say supported me either, with guidance, advice and words of wisdom. Three author friends, Alex S.Johnson, Laura Kitchell and Chantal Noordeloos, and music artist Gloria Estefan. I was at crossroads in  my life about three years now, I felt lost in myself, which can happen generally, but also if you’re involved in creativity, because your mind is always open to your inventive ideas, hence why emotions can also be more powerful. I had some wonderful advice and words of wisdom from Gloria. Occasionally we still message each other the odd time when we can.


Fiona: Do you see writing as a career?

It can be. Depending on how much time and how focused you can be. Especially if you have a fanbase.


Fiona: If you had to do it all over again, would you change anything in your latest book?

I would never change anything.

 


Fiona: Is there anything you find particularly challenging in your writing?

Every project differs from the next. The deeper the subject can be a healthy challenge, but the adrenalin is wonderful.


Fiona: Who is your favorite author and what is it that really strikes you about their work?

Clive Barker. As a child he would have dark imaginary thoughts within his room. I can relate to that personally myself. I enjoy Clive’s work because he has opened doors within dark horror literature, visual art and cinema.


Fiona: Do you have to travel much concerning your book(s)?

Not previously. But this year I shall appearing at HorrorConUK 2015 this July 11/12th in Sheffield. Tickets are available now.


Fiona: Who designed the covers?

I have designed all my own covers, except the artwork for my forthcoming anthology “Doomsday After Midnight”. The photographic image was supplied by Whitesnake’s Personal Assistant and creative photographer and friend, Lauren Carroll. Which I am deeply thankful for.


Fiona: Do you have any advice for other writers?

Be true to yourself and your audience. Don’t be a shadow to another.

Fiona: Do you remember the first book you read?

I have read so many varieties of books. I can’t recall.

Fiona: What makes you laugh/cry?

I am extremely humorous.  I do cry at a powerful love scene. “The Notebook” movie makes me teary.

Fiona: Is there one person pass or present you would meet and why?

Too many. I thrive on seeing people happy and enjoying life, and creative artists achieving great success.

Fiona: What do you want written on your head stone and why ?

Hahaha! It may be censored. I suppose it will read with my name initially, because I can be a bitch too, Haha! –  Anthony climbed through hell, laughed at the devil and reached earth and spat fire at the ignorant people, applauded the stately homosexuals and queens, and flew through the gates of chocolate. He was now very sweet, pollite, if you annoyed him, he couldn’t give a shite, Grown angel wings and guided by Venus onto the majestic throne. He learned ET how to phone home, Justin Beiber wanted his looks, instead he was given a liced comb.

If it was my friends who engraved my headstone it would read –

Anthony was an eccentric, entertaining connoisseur of horror

 

Fiona: Other than writing do you have any hobbies ?

My three passions have always been in writing, music, and drama. I have always wanted to experience acting. I have previously had a couple of role auditions, which were liked by the production companies, but the roles were given to someone else, who deserved it.

 

 

Fiona: What TV shows/films do you enjoy watching?

My recent favourite show is American Horror Story. I love it. I also enjoyed “The Tudors” and “Rome”. I also have wanted to see Rupaul’s Drag Race, but never managed to watch it yet.

Fiona: Favorite foods / Colors/ Music

I enjoy grilled food, Italian, Chinese, American, Mexican, and Indian, almost forgot traditional British dinners. My favourite colours are, black, red and gold.

Fiona: If you were not a writer what else would you like to have done?

 Most definitely I would be involved in full time music and composing.

Fiona: Do you have a blog/website? If so what is it?

I previously used to have a blog page. My website is currently under construction. Readers can check out my updates and latest releases via the following links.

http://www.amazon.com/ANTHONY-CROWLEY/e/B0048E5L3K/  – Official Amazon store

www.facebook.com/AnthonyCrowley.Author – Official Facebook page.

https://www.tsu.co/anthonycrowley   – Tsu network.

https://twitter.com/crowley_anthony   – Official Twitter page

https://instagram.com/anthonycrowleyauthor/    – Official Instagram page.

https://www.facebook.com/pages/Tombstones/742720739144035   – Official Tombstones page

https://twitter.com/TombstonesBook   – Official Twitter page of Tombstones.

https://www.facebook.com/DarkRealmsMagazine   – Official Dark Realms Facebook page.

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Here is my interview with Mason Cross

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Name: Mason Cross

 

Age: 36

 

Where are you from: Glasgow

 

A little about yourself, i.e. your education Family life etc:

 

I grew up in Glasgow and studied English at the University of Stirling. For as long as I can remember I’ve made up stories, and always wanted to write a novel.

 

Fiona: Tell us your latest news?

 

My first novel The Killing Season has just come out in America, published by Pegasus, and my second, The Samaritan, will be published in hardback by Orion in the UK in May.
Fiona: When and why did you begin writing?

 

At primary school – I always loved creative writing assignments and dreaming up stories.
Fiona: When did you first consider yourself a writer?

 

I think I’ve always considered myself a writer, however I’m only now starting to admit to being a writer when people ask what I do, now that I have a couple of novels under my belt.
Fiona: What inspired you to write your first book?

 

The inspiration for The Killing Season was wanting to write the kind of book I like to read. Authors like Lee Child, Michael Connelly, Raymond Chandler and John D. MacDonald were big inspirations.
Fiona: Do you have a specific writing style?

 

Not that I’m aware of – I just write the way I write and then I edit until it sounds reasonably okay. Some people have said I have quite a visual style, but it’s not something I’m consciously trying for.
Fiona: How did you come up with the title?

 

No idea – Killing Season just popped into my head early on when I knew the story would be about a sniper. I usually have a title in my head before I start writing.
Fiona: Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?

 

I didn’t set out to write a ‘message’ story in any way, but I think it’s inevitable that certain themes will bubble to the surface as you’re writing. I think The Killing Season does have a theme about the way fear can be used as a weapon: by terrorists, by serial killers, but also by governments and powerful people.
Fiona: How much of the book is realistic?

 

I’ve tried to ground the book as far as possible by using real places, real government agencies, doing research on firearms, procedure etc. I think that’s particularly important with this kind of book – you really want to ground the action sequences with some degree of plausibility. Having said that, you don’t want to spend endless pages dumping all your research on the poor unsuspecting reader.
Fiona: Are experiences based on someone you know, or events in your own life?

 

Not really. I’ve never had to track down a crazed serial killer. And I’ve never worked for a shadowy intelligence agency. Then again, I would have to say that, wouldn’t I?
Fiona: What books have most influenced your life most? a mentor?

 

The Big Sleep by Raymond Chandler, On Writing by Stephen King, Adventures in the Screen Trade by William Goldman, Black and Blue by Ian Rankin, The Big Nowhere by James Ellroy. All of those made me want to write a novel of my own.
Fiona: What book are you reading now?

 

The Black Echo, which is Michael Connelly’s first Harry Bosch book. I’m also watching the TV series which is excellent.
Fiona: Are there any new authors that have grasped your interest?

 

Steve Cavanagh’s The Defence is a fantastic legal thriller with a twist that’s coming out in March.
Fiona: What are your current projects?

 

I’m currently writing the third Carter Blake book which is called Winterlong.
Fiona: Name one entity that you feel supported you outside of family members.

 

Libraries are great places to read and write, and having that quiet space to go to is really helpful for a writer.
Fiona: Do you see writing as a career?

 

Yes, and one day I’d like it to be my only career instead of my second career!
Fiona: If you had to do it all over again, would you change anything in your latest book?

 

The new one is called The Samaritan. If I had to do it again, I’d do it pretty much the same, but I’d give myself longer to write it so it didn’t consumer my every spare moment.
Fiona: Do you recall how your interest in writing originated?

 

I think it’s something you’re born with. It was great to be encouraged by my parents and teachers though.

 

Fiona: Can you share a little of your current work with us?

 

The new book sees Carter Blake travel to Los Angeles on the trail of a serial killer who’s been preying on lone female drivers who break down at night. Blake’s seen this killer’s work before, and he knows he’s the only person who can stop the Samaritan.
Fiona: Is there anything you find particularly challenging in your writing?

 

Plotting is always something that’s difficult – you know roughly where you want the characters to get to, but sometimes getting them there plausibly and naturally is a challenge. The best thing to do is get a draft down and fine-tune the plot in later drafts.
Fiona: Who is your favorite author and what is it that really strikes you about their work?

 

Difficult to decide on any one author, but I love the way Raymond Chandler combines great mystery stories with such poetic prose, and of course his amazing turns of phrase like “A blonde to make a bishop kick a hole in a stained glass window.”
Fiona: Do you have to travel much concerning your book(s)?

 

Not as much as I’d like to. I’ve been to the US a few times, so was able to use those experiences as well as doing additional research. In general, I always like to visit new places and meet new people.
Fiona: Who designed the covers?

 

The excellent marketing team at Orion – I had nothing to do with the covers besides agreeing with them that they look great!
Fiona: What was the hardest part of writing your book?

 

Getting the time to write – forcing myself to finish the project was hard at times, but definitely worth it.
Fiona: Did you learn anything from writing your book and what was it?

 

I learned that if you write a little bit every day, you end up with the first draft of a novel quicker than you think. I also learned that it’s important to plot in advance, but it’s fine to jettison some ideas in favour of better ones that crop up as you write.
Fiona: Do you have any advice for other writers?

 

Try and write every day, even if it’s only a little. Finish things – there’s no way to tell if something is good or bad until you’ve got to the end. Lastly – read a lot!
Fiona: Do you have anything specific that you want to say to your readers?

 

I hope you enjoy the books, and thank you for reading!

 

Fiona: Do you remember the first book you read?

 

I think it was one of the Narnia books, or possibly the Three Investigators: The Secret of the Vanishing Treasure

 

Fiona: What makes you laugh/cry?

 

I like comedies, and still find South Park pretty funny. Crying is something I don’t do as much, but I guess I well up at the end of Stand By Me and of course Armageddon.

 

Fiona: Is there one person past or present you would meet and why?

 

I’d love to meet Stephen Spielberg. Historical figure wise I think the Duke of Wellington or Julius Caesar would be interesting to meet.

 

Fiona: What do you want written on your head stone and why?

 

I’m not sure, but hopefully my age is in triple figures.

 

Fiona: Other than writing do you have any hobbies?

 

Reading comics, cooking, listening to music. I also like exploring cities on foot – getting lost and having a wander around to the parts most people don’t go to.

 

Fiona: What TV shows/films do you enjoy watching?

 

Thrillers. The new Bosch show on Amazon Instant Video is fantastic. Right now I’m enjoying Arrow and The Flash, and The Walking Dead is always fun. I’m really looking forward to the final episodes of Mad Men later this year. My favourite film of all time is probably Goodfellas, North by Northwest or Raiders of the Lost Ark, depending on how I’m feeling.

 

Fiona: Favorite foods / Colors/ Music

 

Favourite food is probably Italian, when push comes to shove. Luckily we have tons of great Italian restaurants in Glasgow. My favourite colour has always been red, specifically the deep red of fire engines (and blood). Music-wise I like rock, blues, soul, jazz, country. I haven’t really paid attention to the charts since X Factor became a thing.

 

Fiona: If you were not a writer what else would you like to have done?

 

I’d like to be a film director, or possibly work in advertising (as long as it was the 60s and on Madison Avenue).

 

Fiona: Do you have a blog/website? If so what is it?

 

Yep!

 

Website: www.carterblake.net

 

Blog: http://masoncrossbooks.blogspot.co.uk

 

Amazon page http://www.amazon.co.uk/Mason-Cross/e/B00FWO52KC/ref=dp_byline_cont_pop_book_1

 

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Thanks for the questions!

 

Here is my interview with Matt Shaw

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Name

Matt Shaw. Although I sometimes joke about and put The Matt Shaw.

Age

34.

Where are you from

Southampton, England. Don’t come here. It’s a shit hole.

A little about your self `ie your education Family life etc  

Married with no kids (thank God), no education having walked out of college two weeks before my A-Levels because I just couldn’t be bothered with them. One hundred percent dedicated to writing and my readers.

 

Fiona: Tell us your latest news?

At the moment it’s all about films. I have sold the rights to three of my books now (Sick B*stards, SEED and Love Life) with two more being negotiated at the moment. That on top of having my stories translated into Korean, for the market over there… Things are pretty manic at the moment!

Fiona: When and why did you begin writing?

My dad hurt himself once. He did something to his back which basically laid him up for the whole of my summer holidays, back when I was 12. I spent those months fetching him drinks, playing games and – when he was resting – working on my first novel. It is possibly the worst thing you’d have ever seen but I was proud and it didn’t stop me from sending it off for people to read. People who then sent it back, telling me to pay attention at school. Not sure what they were insinuating.

After that the writing bug kicked in. Mum gave me her old (un-used) typewriter and I’d always be there bashing away on it, until I was given a little computer and crappy printer. At this stage though, it was more about writing screenplays. I only started writing books when I was about 25.

I was seeing psychiatrists for anger issues and they prompted me to write a diary. Instead of that, I wrote an autobiography (which turned into ‘im fine’). I found an online publishing company who’d put it out there for me and – as soon as it started selling – I started turning my old screenplay ideas into books. Writing was great because it helped rid me of my many demons. Although – funnily enough – psychiatrists told me NOT to write horror!!! Little did they know…

Fiona: When did you first consider yourself a writer?

I still don’t. There are better technical writers out there than me. I am just a storyteller. For adults.

Fiona: What inspired you to write your first book?

Boredom in those summer months when I was looking after the old man. I started because there was nothing else to do and… I loved every minute of it. Never looked back!

Fiona: Do you have a specific writing style?

I like to mix and match it but I am known for writing in the first person perspective. I like it because it lets you put the reader into the head of the main character. Now make that main character a psychopath and you can take your readers to some interesting places and force them on journeys which make them uncomfortable.

Fiona: How did you come up with the title?

Over 70 titles now… It varies. Sometimes they come to be before I even have a story and sometimes something sticks when I’m penning the book. There is no exact science although I do try and think of something that catches the eye (Sick B*stards, PORN, WHORE, Rotting Dead F*cks, MONSTER)…

Fiona: Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?

I don’t want messages in my story. I’m not here to preach. I just want a fun, enjoyable read with which they can escape every day life for a while.

Fiona: How much of the book is realistic?

My books usually have a little realism thrown in as it makes the horror more extreme. I avoid over the top monsters, I prefer the understated bad guy (think Norman Bates in Psycho).

Fiona: Are experiences based on someone you know, or events in your own life?

As a writer it’s hard NOT to include your life experiences in your writing. For example, a lot of my male leads have ‘interesting’ relationships with their father. I myself have been disowned by him (funny that, considering I was just talking about the summer all those years ago).

Fiona: What books have most influenced your life most? a mentor?

Roald Dahl influenced me. The way he puts a sting in his tales, the darkness bubbling away under the surface. Seriously, if you’ve not already gone through his adult short stories – you need to! Amazing reading, right there.

Fiona: What book are you reading now?

Graham Norton – The Life and Loves of a He-Devil. Very funny, very informative. Makes me want to move out to Ireland.

Fiona: Are there any new authors that have grasped your interest?

There are names I see crop up here and there but, I’ll be honest, I haven’t read their work yet because I am too busy. I am flying backwards and forwards to America soon for work so I am sure I’ll get plenty of reading down then. I actually want to start with my co-writers stuff though – Michael Bray. I’ve bought some of his books and got him to sign them ages ago and keep promising myself to read them but find I lack the time! It can be frustrating. I’m really behind with films I want to watch too.

Fiona: What are your current projects?

I have just released The Big Blue (trapped at sea story), Michael Bray and I have MONSTER coming out in mid-March which is extreme horror, then I have Don’t Read done and dusted for a May release and I’m working on another extreme called ASHES.

Once these are out of the way I will be continuing with my third erotica book too in the Red Cover Series.

Red Cover books = erotica

Black Cover books = extreme horror

Other covers = just good books :P

Fiona: Name one entity that you feel supported you outside of family members.

The support I get on Facebook, on my author page in-particular. The messages I get are great! Love them and hope they never stop.

Fiona: Do you see writing as a career?

It’s hard to go but so far I am doing okay from it. My bills are paid and that’s all that matters. If you come in expecting to make mega money, you’re in the wrong industry. And don’t forget, just because one book might sell well – it doesn’t mean it will continue to do so! You need to keep working hard, staying ahead of the game – and competition – every step of the way.

Fiona: If you had to do it all over again, would you change anything in your latest book?

I regret nothing.

 

Fiona: Can you share a little of your current work with us?

As much as I would love to, I don’t think it entirely appropriate given the fact I don’t know who will be reading this. Let us just say – the bit I am writing at the moment (from ASHES) features a cannibal folding a freshly ripped out tongue around a victim’s plucked eyeball. A tasty sandwich as the bleeding victim watches on. It’s not pretty.

 

Fiona: Do you have to travel much concerning your book(s)?

My books have landed me with this itinery at the moment:

March7th-8th – Chester, March 11th – London, March 14th – Leeds, March 15th – Nottingham, March 20th-22nd – Cardiff, March 24th – Tennessee and then June 1st through to the 8th I am in New York so… At the moment – very busy.

Oh and July is London for a week and October is Bristol for a couple of days.

The majority of these are either film related or to do with Comic Cons where I am signing books for folk. I enjoy travelling though because I try and meet up with my readers. At the moment I am trying to give back to them. They’ve given me their time (and pennies in supporting my work) so I feel like I owe them. In May I am taking a reader and her husband for a meal, I’m giving out more and more free signed books, I’m surprising someone at a do they’ve to attend (they have no idea I will be popping along) and I recently met with a couple of readers in London for drinks. It’s fun!

Fiona: Who designed the covers?

I do the Black and Red Cover books and Mark Kelly does my normal covers, at least the vast majority of them anyway. Top bloke and I always recommend him to authors. His prices reasonable and timeframe prompt.

Fiona: What was the hardest part of writing your book?

Starting. Just because you have the idea and passion – there is nothing worse than the empty page on the screen. At least later, when you’re into the book, you can feel like you’re making some good progress with it! At the beginning you just think, ‘I’ve got loads to do!’

Fiona: Do you have any advice for other writers?

I am frequently asked for advice and I try my best to give it. I have set up a Facebook page called So you want to be a writer. Their best bet is to go there and ask questions. I run it with Michael Bray (traditionally published) Graeme Reynolds (author and publisher) and Chris Barnes (audiobooks) so… We’re pretty geared up to answer most questions thrown at us.

What I will say here though is, if you’re in it for the money or to get famous: QUIT.

Fiona: Do you have anything specific that you want to say to your readers?

Nah. They annoy me.

Obviously joking. I love my readers and have got to know a good load of them on my Facebook page over the years. I thank them for their time and ongoing support and hope that it continues. Like I said, this is the year I am giving back to them so hopefully they’ll be meeting me or getting weird presents from me within the coming months! They’re the best bunch of people and I honestly love it when they get in touch!

Fiona: Do you remember the first book you read?

Peter and Jane. It was a school book. Peter and Jane sit on the swing. Peter pushes Jane.

I always wanted to rewrite it and sneak them into school. Peter pushes Jane. Jane breaks her neck. Peter shags her corpse.

I used to get so excited when I got to the next book. Sad really.

Fiona: What makes you laugh/cry?

I lack empathy apparently but I get upset when animals are hurt. Laughing, I don’t tend to laugh a lot unless someone trips up.

Fiona: Is there one person pass or present you would meet and why?

Billy Connolly. The man is my hero. The way he tells his stories, his outlook… Top bloke. Can you make it happen?

Fiona: What do you want written on your head stone and why ?

I want a digital gravestone. Days Dead: (Digital number that changes daily) Status: (changes daily)… things like ‘Not getting any better’

Fiona: Other than writing do you have any hobbies ?

Alas, at the moment I have no time. I am a writing machine! When I finish one book, I jump into the next. I have over 70 titles out there now. By the year end, I want 100.

Fiona: What TV shows/films do you enjoy watching?

I love Sons of Anarchy, Dexter and Sopranos. The Walking Dead is sometimes amazing and sometimes dire but I still stick with it. For now…

Fiona: If you were not a writer what else would you like to have done?

Actor and film director. I have made my first film (a short called MENU, based on the short story of the same name from ‘Scribblings From a Dark Place’) and it was a good experience. A childhood dream to make my first film accomplished!

 

Fiona: Do you have a blog/website? If so what is it?

www.facebook.com/mattshawpublications

www.mattshawpublications.co.uk

Amazon Page http://www.amazon.co.uk/Matt-Shaw/e/B0034OVM56/ref=sr_tc_2_0?qid=1425493810&sr=1-2-ent

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Here is my interview with Aria Michaels

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INTRO:

I am Author Aria Michaels and in addition to be a wife and mother of six, I am also a creator of worlds, instigator of literary mayhem, and stealth assassin of fictional characters. I grew up and have lived in the Midwest nearly my entire life, though someday I hope to set up on a tropical island in the Bahamas where there is no snow. I love caramel macchiato, sweet red wine, bruschetta with mozzarella, and it is entirely possible that I am addicted to all things apocalypse.

 

Less than a year ago, I walked away from a “comfortable” job in higher education (ok, so maybe the universe pushed me) to finally pursue my lofty, albeit life-long, ambition of being an author. It was LITERALLY the scariest thing I have ever done in my life. As insane and overwhelming as it was at the time, I can honestly say I have never been happier. It took me six months to write my first book, Killshot (Icarus Series, Book One) and the positive response spurred me on to write my second. Before The Sky Fell (An Icarus Series Novella) released on February 16th of this year, and I am currently hard at work on Icarus Series Book 2.

 

Fiona: Tell us your latest news?

I am quite proud to say that I had my very first author signing event this month and it was a smashing success! It was absolutely surreal for me getting to meet readers and fans in person, to physically sign their books and answer their questions. I can hardly believe that it has only been five months since I hit PUBLISH on my first novel. If that weren’t exciting enough, I was just booked to do an author signing at a Barnes & Noble, which from what I have been told is quite a feat for an Indie. I am still reeling at the positive response and overwhelming outpouring of support for my work, and I can never express my gratitude enough to those that have been there for me along the way.


Fiona: When and why did you begin writing?

I actually “published” my first book when I was in third grade…and by publish, I mean I wrote and illustrated a story in crayon and my teacher made a copy on the Xerox machine (yes, it was the 80’s) and gave it to my grade school librarian for people to check out. *laughing*

Thankfully, my writing has gotten a bit more sophisticated over the years. I am currently focused on the YA dystopian genre. Killshot, my first novel in the Icarus Series, is actually based on a reoccurring nightmare I have had pretty much my whole life. The dangers in the dream change over time, but there are a few constants; there is always fire and I am always running, but I am never alone. No matter how scary the dream gets, I have always had a small group of friends and loved ones by my side.


Fiona: When did you first consider yourself a writer?

I will let you know when it happens. Honestly, I still have a hard time wrapping my head around it all. I took a risk, a BIG one, when I decided to dive into this writing thing head first without my floaties, and I am still in shock at how amazing it has all been. Still, I think the moment you get too comfortable and start feel like you are safe, that is when you start to sink.

Fiona: Do you have a specific writing style?

If I had to define it, I would probably call my writing style Complete Emersion. The way I write puts you into the mind and body of my characters. You don’t just see what they see…you feel the heat from of the smoldering fires and smell the smoke and decay. You feel every beat of their heart and stomp of their foot- every victory, and every heartbreak. You don’t just feel for the survivors. You BECOME a survivor.


Fiona: Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?

Yes, and it is a simple one. No matter your circumstances, no matter your fate…You are never more than one choice away from a different future.


Fiona: How much of the book is realistic?

The vast majority of the story is very realistic, which I believe is part of the appeal. I did an insane amount of research on solar flares and extreme weather, and I even subjected myself (and my oldest two sons) to a “survivor-cation,” last summer. We went off the grid, with nothing but a backpack of simple supplies, and survived…for a weekend. *laughs*


Fiona: What books have most influenced your life most? a mentor?

That is a tough one to hone in for me, because I am a total book junkie. Have been my whole life, actually. If I had to pare it down, I would say that one of my biggest influences is Elle Casey. Her Apocalypsis series is one of my all-time favorite dystopians and it’s one I go back to over and over again. She has successfully spanned the genres, which is something I fully intend to do, as well. As for mentors, there is one amazing woman that helped me through the beginning stages of this whole adventure and without her patience and fountain of knowledge and experience, I would likely still be banging my head; Meredith Wild. Our genres may not match, but our sense of humor and our appreciation of the written word do. Without her help in the beginning, who knows where I would be?


Fiona: What book are you reading now?

I am super excited about this one and I have been waiting for it for what seems like ages. My friend, and fellow YA author, Logan Keys has written a book called Gods of Anthem, and I have been given the honor and privilege of BETA reading for her (I may or may not have begged for it). I won’t spoil it for you, but I will say it is AMAZING, and I can’t wait until she gets to share it with the rest of you!


Fiona: Name one entity that you feel supported you outside of family members.

I am a rebel, so I am going to name two. The first is Jordan White, my PA and Blogger extraordinaire (YA Madness Book Blog). She has not only been the best assistant an indie-girl could ask for, but she is also an amazing friend and I thank my lucky stars, every day, that I found her…or maybe she found me. I also want to give a big shout out to Wendy and Claire (who also happens to be my amazing editor) over at Bare Naked Words. They sort of adopted me right from the get, spear-headed my first major social media and blog campaign, and have been a major part of my life ever since. Their unrelenting support has been one of the major contributing factors in the success I have had so far.


Fiona: Do you see writing as a career?

Absolutely!


Fiona: Is there anything you find particularly challenging in your writing?

Honestly, the most challenging part about writing is the complete and utter lack of silence in my world. As I mentioned, I have six boys and they are all under the age of thirteen, so…well, you do the math. I will say this, though; it’s never boring, and they are an endless source of inspiration.


Fiona: Who designed the covers?

Kari Ayasha at Cover to Cover Designs. She is amazing to work with, and probably one of the most patient people I have ever met. She worked with me on every detail, until there wasn’t a hair (literally) out of place. I couldn’t ask for a more talented artist!

http://www.covertocoverdesigns.com/

Fiona: Do you have any advice for other writers?

WRITE. I know it sounds obvious, but the best advice I was ever given was to just sit down, put pen to paper (or fingertips to keys) and write. Don’t listen to the nay-sayers, don’t feel the need to explain yourself, and don’t try to be perfect. It doesn’t all have to make sense in the beginning. In fact much if it likely won’t. Some of the best ideas were born during a “brain vomit” session where I rambled incoherently into a notebook.

 

Always keep your eyes open. I get inspiration from just about anywhere, and I don’t always have the option to stop what I am doing, and write it down. Still, I am not willing to walk away from any idea that may fuel my story, so I have learned to get creative. I use the voice-to-text feature on my cell phone, spout off those crazy ideas as they come to me, then send myself a text message. It’s really fun to open up the conversation I had with myself at the end of the day and read through the mental mayhem. Sometimes its complete nonsense, and others its absolutely beautiful.

Fiona: Is there one person past or present you would meet and why?

Laura Ingalls Wilder. As a child I was absolutely enthralled with her Little House on the Prairie series. I identified with Laura on so many levels and to this day, I absolutely love her writing. I was in third grade when I read my first LHOP book, and it’s no coincidence that I also began writing then. She inspired me.

Fiona: Other than writing do you have any hobbies ?

I love drawing, painting, and sculpting. I have been an artist my entire life, but I also enjoy playing in the dirt with my kids, watching zombie flicks with my husband, and sipping wine by the fire with friends.

Fiona: What TV shows/films do you enjoy watching?

I am completely hooked on The Walking Dead, but I also love The 100, Supernatural, and…my guilty pleasure, Archer.

Fiona: Favorite foods- Garlic Chicken with Brocolli and fried rice

            Favorite Color- Black

            Favorite Music- I love soulful R&B, like Adele, Fiona Apple, and Ed Shiran.

 

Fiona: If you were not a writer what else would you like to have done?

I have done a little bit of everything already…I worked for a university for 8 years, and a long time ago I worked in Special Education. I have done sales, interior design, home improvement, and I was even a bridal consultant for a minute or two. Who knows where I would be right now, if I wasn’t writing…super hero, maybe?

 

Fiona: Do you have a blog/website? If so what is it?

www.ariamichaels.com

Amazon page http://www.amazon.com/Aria-Michaels/e/B00OBJVDSY/ref=ntt_athr_dp_pel_1

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Here is my interview with K.S. Smith

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Name K.S. Smith is my penname, but on a daily basis I go by Kym.

Age 28

Where are you from Tampa, FL

A little about your self `ie your education Family life etc

I was born and raised in Tampa and have spent my entire life here with my family. I met my boyfriend when I was 17 and we are still dating, maybe one day we’ll take the plunge and get married!  After graduating I was accepted to the University of South where I studied Criminology. In between writing I am a full time employee at a law firm in Tampa and I absolutely love it.

 

Fiona: Tell us your latest news?

The third book in my co-written Hourglass Series by Megan C. Smith and I just released on Feb. 19th, Hourglass Cubed. SO far it’s been a hit, anyone who has read it has loved it and that is really all I can ask for.


Fiona: When and why did you begin writing?

I started writing as a child. I just loved putting my thoughts to paper.


Fiona: When did you first consider yourself a writer?

 I first considered myself a write when I published One Night With Him, my debut novel. It launched me into the Indie world and I’ve considered myself a real writer ever since.


Fiona: What inspired you to write your first book?

 My best friend and co-author, Megan C. Smith and I were hanging out one night and we got on the topic of writing. We both shared that we loved to write and after a few glasses of wine decided that we’d both write a book. So we did.


Fiona: Do you have a specific writing style?

I think I’m all over the place, with no particular style. I have heard from several readers that they love my writing style, whatever it may be, so as long as I am pleasing them, I’ll try to keep doing it.


Fiona: How did you come up with the title?

The Hourglass Series title started with the first book. The two best friends Savannah and Brooke both worked for a high end fashion magazine and we wanted a catchy name. Megan and I both made lists of potential names and Hourglass was our favorite.


Fiona: Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?

 I think the message in all of my books is that friends and family come first, no matter what.


Fiona: How much of the book is realistic?

I’d say 50/50. Megan and I like to pull from our real lives, but also like to keep it fictional.


Fiona: Are experiences based on someone you know, or events in your own life?

Some are, some are not. It just depends on the situation.


Fiona: What books have most influenced your life most? a mentor?

 I love Nicholas Sparks, his work is amazing. His stories, to me, are flawless. They may not all end well, but they evoke real feelings and emotions and I just adore that.


Fiona: What book are you reading now?

 I am currently reading Nina Levine’s Storm MC – I am a huge Sons of Anarchy fan and I missed Jax, so I asked around for a good MC book and her name was one I continued to see!


Fiona: Are there any new authors that have grasped your interest?

I haven’t read anything from new authors as of late, but I love when a new author makes his/her debut and just knock it out of the park.


Fiona: What are your current projects?

 I am currently wrapping up my first Alpha Male book, Thrasher. I love it and can’t wait to publish it in April.  I am also working on the spin off series of Hourglass with Megan C. Smith and a new secret project.


Fiona: Name one entity that you feel supported you outside of family members.

Hands down Megan C. Smith, although, she really is family. So I think outside of her I would say, Rachel Van Dyken. She has been with me every step of the way since the beginning and I cannot thank her enough!


Fiona: Do you see writing as a career?

 I see it more as a hobby. I love to write, but I have that personality where if it were to become my job it wouldn’t be as fun and I wouldn’t enjoy it as much.


Fiona: If you had to do it all over again, would you change anything in your latest book?

Not a thing. I love Luke’s story. His character is so real and it just shows that change is possible when your future is at stake.


Fiona: Do you recall how your interest in writing originated?

I wanted to remember my dreams forever, so I wrote them down. I still have journals from when I was in middle school with pages and pages of dreams.

Fiona: Can you share a little of your current work with us?

I am currently working on Thrasher, it is scheduled to release in April and I cannot wait. Duke Thrasher is a Marine with a secret. He is a badass and I wish he was a real person so I could date him. J


Fiona: Is there anything you find particularly challenging in your writing?

 I get writers block a lot. That is the best part about co-writing, when I do, I can go to Megan and bounce ideas off of her and get myself back on track.


Fiona: Who is your favorite author and what is it that really strikes you about their work?

Nicholas Sparks – his work, to me, is perfect. Every story captures every emotion that I have and I just love that about him.


Fiona: Do you have to travel much concerning your book(s)?

 I am lucky enough to travel to signings all over. They are so much fun and I love meeting new authors!


Fiona: Who designed the covers?

Laura Heritage from PS Cover Designs has designed all of my covers thus far. Her work is amazing.


Fiona: What was the hardest part of writing your book?

I love supporting characters, but when I’m done with a story I want to be done. I have found that I am really good at making my readers fall in love with my supporting characters and then they always want more about that person. I finish the book and think, finally , it’s done. But then I’ve got them beating my door down for the next book in the series. So my stand alones usually turn into series.


Fiona: Did you learn anything from writing your book and what was it?

 Not everyone is going to love my work and that is okay. I don’t love everything I read. As long as I can make one person smile I’ve done my job.


Fiona: Do you have any advice for other writers?

 Keep it up. Do not get discouraged. It’s easy to look at established writers and get jealous that they are tearing up the ranks on Amazon, NYT, USA, etc. Don’t be jealous, they have worked their butts off. You’ll get there one day. Just remember Rome wasn’t built in a day. It takes all of us time to make it to that level. 


Fiona: Do you have anything specific that you want to say to your readers?

 I LOVE YOU!!!  If I could have a huge party and fly all of you to it I totally would. But most importantly, thank you, thank you for your support. It truly means the world to me.

Fiona: Do you remember the first book you read? The first book I remember reading was a Babysitters Club book. I don’t remember the name, but I do remember the guy…he was my first book boyfriend.

Fiona: What makes you laugh/cry?

 I have really weird humor, dry humor. The Office is my favorite show, that makes me cry tears of laughter.  Surprisingly books don’t make me cry. I feel so deeply for the characters, but I can’t cry because I know they are fictional. Megan tells me I’m heartless! J I’d like to think she’s just joking. LOL

Fiona: Is there one person past or present you would meet and why?

Ok, I know people usually give really good answers to this question, but I’m going to be honest…I’d love to meet Charlie Hunnam, but he’d have to be in character as Jax Teller from Sons of Anarchy and the meeting would at least require a make out session and ride on his Harley!

Fiona: What do you want written on your head stone and why?

This is a hard one…I’m going to have to go with something along the lines of that cliché dash quote, Your life is made up of two dates and a dash, make the most of the dash. I’d want mine to say something about my dash and how awesome mine was!

Fiona: Other than writing do you have any hobbies?

I love hanging out with my family and friends, there is a core group of us and we literally spend every weekend together. We love to grill out and we take turns hosting it at a different house each weekend. I also am very involved with the Military and support them through a non-profit near and dear to my heart.

Fiona: What TV shows/films do you enjoy watching?

Scandal is my all-time favorite show right now, but I also love Heart of Dixie, Shameless and Rookie Blue.  As for movies, I love a good chick flick and comedy.

Fiona: Favorite foods / Colors/ Music

 Cheese, couldn’t live without it. I literally eat it every day. My favorite color has and I think always will be pink! I’m super girly. I just love country music. Who would think an Italian girl is obsessed with country, but I so am. And of course, Taylor Swift’s 1989 album, it’s all I listen to currently.

Fiona: If you were not a writer what else would you like to have done?

I’d be a supermodel (if I was skinny – lol). I just love dressing up and getting my hair and make-up done…like I said, I’m a total girly girl.

 

Fiona: Do you have a blog/website? If so what is it? I have a Facebook, that’s about it.  J

https://www.facebook.com/kssmith23

Friend Me on FB at https://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100005059306332

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Hourglass – currently FREE – http://www.amazon.com/Hourglass-K-S-Smith-ebook/dp/B00LVBJOYK/ref=sr_1_fkmr0_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1425421064&sr=8-1-fkmr0&keywords=hourglass+series+smith

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Hourglas Squared – currently .99 cents – http://www.amazon.com/Hourglass-Squared-K-S-Smith-ebook/dp/B00OHUNOR0/ref=sr_1_fkmr0_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1425421064&sr=8-2-fkmr0&keywords=hourglass+series+smith

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Hourglass Cubed – http://www.amazon.com/Hourglass-Cubed-K-S-Smith-ebook/dp/B00TRHW22Q/ref=sr_1_fkmr0_3?ie=UTF8&qid=1425421064&sr=8-3-fkmr0&keywords=hourglass+series+smith

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One Night With Him – http://www.amazon.com/One-Night-Him-K-S-Smith-ebook/dp/B00GFD8LCU/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1425421082&sr=8-1&keywords=one+night+with+him

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Fighting For Her – http://www.amazon.com/Fighting-Her-K-S-Smith-ebook/dp/B00RNM65NE/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&qid=1425421082&sr=8-3&keywords=one+night+with+him

 

 

 

 

 

Here is my interview with Patrick Freivald

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Name Patrick Freivald

Age Old enough to have gray in my beard

Where are you from Rural Western New York, in the middle of 6600 acres of state forest

A little about your self `ie your education Family life etc  I’m the tenth of eleven children, an identical twin married to another identical twin. I have a bachelor’s degree in physics and a masters in Deaf education, and for my day job I teach physics, robotics, and American Sign Language.

Fiona: Tell us your latest news?

My novel JADE SKY was just nominated for the Bram Stoker Award®! An ass-kicking, terrifically gory horror-thriller, the sequel BLACK TIDE comes out April 17th from JournalStone.


Fiona: When and why did you begin writing?

I’ve told stories my entire life, but writing for publication was my twin brother Phil’s idea. He suggested we do it, and I went along with it. After a long and rocky road, our novel BLOOD LIST was published last year. In the meantime, while Phil has decided to concentrate on other things, I’ve published three more novels, a bunch of short stories, and a graphic novel (in Dark Discoveries magazine, with Joe McKinney).

Fiona: When did you first consider yourself a writer?

That’s an odd question. A writer is someone who writes, in the same way that a jogger is someone who jogs. I’m an erstwhile and unenthusiastic jogger, but I’ve always been a writer of some kind or another.


Fiona: What inspired you to write your first book?

BLOOD LIST, about a serial killer trying to save his father’s life, was an experiment, and not even my idea. I don’t know that inspiration is as important as nose-to-the-grindstone work. I only write when and if it’s fun, and never wait around to “feel inspired.” Inspiration is, by and large, a gimmick used as a negative, an excuse not to write.


Fiona: Do you have a specific writing style?

Quite contrary to my interview style, my prose tends toward the sparse—using as few words as possible to convey what I want to convey, and letting the reader’s imagination fill in the details. It doesn’t work for everyone, but it works for me.


Fiona: How did you come up with the title?

I hate titles. They’re one of the hardest things to come up with. JADE SKY was inspired by the drug, Jade, and the fact that those behind it want to rule over the world, thus blanketing the sky with their influence. It’s not obvious from the title.

My original idea for the sequel was JADE SCARS, but my publisher rejected it as too similar to the first Matt Rowley book, so I had to come up with another. My friends helped me, and I couldn’t tell you who ultimately came up with BLACK TIDE, but it works and I’m quite happy with it.


Fiona: Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?

I like to write fiction that can be read on multiple levels. If you want a fun ride that leaves you breathless at the end, you can have that. If you want commentary on government power, drug addiction, and the price of power, you can have that, too. One of the great joys of writing is seeing what different people get out of the stories I’ve written.


Fiona: How much of the book is realistic?

The premise is that a drug turns people into Hulk-like superhumans, but aside from that conceit—and the twist about a third of the way in—I try to ground everything else in reality. As a physicist, I had great fun taking an unrealistic premise and then making sure everything around that premise remains consistent with it.


Fiona: Are experiences based on someone you know, or events in your own life?
Not in the slightest. “Write what you know” is terrible advice.

 


Fiona: What books have most influenced your life most? a mentor?

I couldn’t say. My favorite books range from A MOTE IN GOD’S EYE to CARRION COMFORT to LUCIFER’S HAMMER to PATIENT ZERO to JOHN ADAMS to the DEAD WORLD series. Then there’s WHEN TRUE NIGHT FALLS and A SONG OF ICE AND FIRE and A CROWN OF STARS and…


Fiona: What book are you reading now?

SHORT BUS HERO by Shannon Giglio. It’s pretty epic.


Fiona: Are there any new authors that have grasped your interest?

Some of the new-to-me authors that I’ve really enjoyed include Rena Mason, Stephen Graham Jones, Mercedes Murdock Yardley, Benjamin Kane Ethridge, John F.D. Taff….


Fiona: What are your current projects?

BLACK TIDE, the sequel to JADE SKY, comes out in April, and an anthology called NEVER FEAR should be out some time later this month. I’m working on the third book in that series, due on Halloween, as well as an unrelated novel, MURMURS IN GLASS, about a violinist trying to escape the consequences of summoning a demon as a teenager. I’ve got several short stories going, a novella for a military sci-fi anthology due in July, and I’m working with Joe McKinney to adapt one of his short stories (and one of my favorite stories) to graphic novel form for Dark Discoveries Magazine.

Yeah, um, deadlines. I’ve got those!


Fiona: Name one entity that you feel supported you outside of family members.

The Horror Writers Association (www.horror.org) is one of the most supportive, awesome organizations in the world. Just an amazing group of people, and terrifically helpful in every aspect of my career.


Fiona: Do you see writing as a career?

Yes. Writing is fun, but a lot of what goes along with getting and being published I would not do were I not making a run for the big time.


Fiona: If you had to do it all over again, would you change anything in your latest book?

Nope. I wouldn’t have submitted it were BLACK TIDE not how I wanted it. Now ask me that again in a year or two….


Fiona: Do you recall how your interest in writing originated?

I’ve always been an avid reader and writer, but I got into writing for publication because my twin brother Phil said we should write a novel. So we did, and now I’ve written four more!

Fiona: Can you share a little of your current work with us?

Here’s a snippet from my short story FORWARD BASE FOURTEEN, which will be out in NEVER FEAR.

A warning blip chimed, and a green dot turned red in Sarah DeSouza’s vision.

Droplets streaked her visor, fogged opaque in the New Phoenix humidity so that only her HUD gave any useful information—temperature, vitals, team position, the seventeen rounds left in her magazine, and an endless stream of data from the trackdrones stationed around Forward Base 14. Sweat matted her hair under the helmet, the pungent tang of wet dog and body odor an unwelcome reminder that their last supply drop came too long ago, and with too little.

“DeSouza, status?” Sergeant Brett Jackson’s voice in her ear carried a razor’s edge buried under gravel, both harder and more fragile than months past.

“Track nine went offline.” She punched directions into the keyboard and fine-tuned them through the neural link. “I’m shifting eight and ten to cover the sweep.”

“Battery?”

“Likely. It’s been leaking H-gel since the last attack.” Their most vital and scarcest resource, hydrogen stabilized in a fire-retardant gel ran the microfusion reactors that powered everything from their rail guns to the trackdrones to the AC units and refrigerators, to the massive terraformers that loomed in skies a thousand miles to the south.

Not that they had any AC or refrigerators, or more than a dozen trackdrones left.

She licked her lips. “When do you think they’ll hit us, Sergeant?”

“Server’s offline, private. Predictive models—”

“When do you think, Sergeant?”

Jackson sighed. “Any time. They’re wearing us down before the headshot.” He paused, then, “And we’re about as worn down as we can get.”

Her heart skipped. “You think we have a chance?”

He said nothing for far too long. “No. Do your duty, private. It’s all that’s left.”


Fiona: Is there anything you find particularly challenging in your writing?

I have to put a lot of energy into keeping my details straight, because I’m not a naturally organized person.


Fiona: Who is your favorite author and what is it that really strikes you about their work?

Them’s fighting words! In all seriousness, I like far too many authors to try to pick a favorite.


Fiona: Do you have to travel much concerning your book(s)?

Every year I go to as many cons as I can, including World Horror Convention, Scare-a-Con, and New York Comic Con, as well as Book Expo America in New York City. I try to squeeze in library and school appearances, too.


Fiona: Who designed the covers?

That depends on the covers! In every case it’s someone who the publisher chose (and paid)—by and large I’m quite happy with them.


Fiona: Do you have any advice for other writers?
Learn the rules, so that when you break them you’re doing it on purpose. Read a lot, both inside and outside your genre. Don’t take too much advice from other writers.


Fiona: Do you have anything specific that you want to say to your readers?

Have fun!

Fiona: Do you remember the first book you read?

I don’t.

Fiona: What makes you laugh/cry?

People.

Fiona: Is there one person pass or present you would meet and why?

 Richard Feynman, because he was a brilliant physicist, an amazing speaker, and seemed a darn fun guy.

Fiona: What do you want written on your head stone and why?

I do hope nobody wastes money on getting me a headstone. Plant a tree or something!

Fiona: Other than writing do you have any hobbies?

I’m a teacher, I run a competition robotics team, I’m a beekeeper, and a play a lot of Warhammer 40K.

Fiona: What TV shows/films do you enjoy watching?

Mostly sci-fi and the like, though to be honest I don’t watch a whole lot of either.

Fiona: Favorite foods / Colors/ Music

 Chicken wings, purple, progressive rock.

Fiona: If you were not a writer what else would you like to have done?

I’m doing it!

 

Fiona: Do you have a blog/website? If so what is it?

http://patrick.freivald.com

 

Amazon page http://www.amazon.com/Patrick-Freivald/e/B006N2B4YK/ref=dp_byline_cont_pop_book_1

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Here is my interview with Eve Vaughn

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Name: Eve Vaughn

Age: Old enough not to answer that, lol

Where are you from: Originally a southern girl from North Carolina but now living in the cold of the Philly Suburbs

A little about your self `ie your education Family life etc:  I’m a NYT and USA Today Bestselling Author, living in the burbs with family  

 

Fiona: Tell us your latest news?

 Latest News is my upcoming release, The Kyriakis Legacy, the second book in my Kyriakis shifter series


Fiona: When and why did you begin writing?

 I started writing when I was a kid, because I’ve always been an avid reader so when I didn’t have anything to read or when I was grounded, I made up my own stories.


Fiona: When did you first consider yourself a writer?

I considered myself a writer when my first book was published.


Fiona: What inspired you to write your first book?

I wrote my first book when I was a teenager because I enjoyed writing but I have no idea what ever happened to that book. It’s probably in my parents basement.


Fiona: Do you have a specific writing style?

 I don’t have a particular style exactly, I just write the kind of books that interest me.


Fiona: How did you come up with the title?

I choose titles based on the theme of the book.


Fiona: Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?

 If the reader can find a message in my stories, that’s great, but I mainly write for entertainment


Fiona: How much of the book is realistic?

Most of my books have some realism to them but they’re mainly fiction.


Fiona: Are experiences based on someone you know, or events in your own life?

 No one specifically


Fiona: What books have most influenced your life most? a mentor?

 Way too many to name.


Fiona: What book are you reading now?

 Currently, I’m not reading anything. With a heavy writing schedule it’s hard finding the time, but looking forward to vacation so I can enjoy a good book.


Fiona: Are there any new authors that have grasped your interest?

 My TBR pile is so daunting, I haven’t had a chance to read old or new authors.


Fiona: What are your current projects?

 Right now I’m working on the last book in my vampire series, as well as a sequel to a contemporary book I wrote a couple years ago.


Fiona: Name one entity that you feel supported you outside of family members.

The readers have been overwhelmingly supportive.


Fiona: Do you see writing as a career?

 Definitely


Fiona: If you had to do it all over again, would you change anything in your latest book?

No because I can look back on my old work, I can see how much I’ve progressed as a writer


Fiona: Do you recall how your interest in writing originated?

I can’t remember when I didn’t want to write.

Fiona: Can you share a little of your current work with us?

 my upcoming release is is a shifter book about a woman who is commitment phobic and the Alpha determined to make her his


Fiona: Is there anything you find particularly challenging in your writing?

Balancing family, and social life with writing


Fiona: Do you have to travel much concerning your book(s)?

About two of three times a year, I attend conferences


Fiona: Who designed the covers?

I’ve used several cover artists. The artist who did my last several covers was Erin Dameron Hall from EDH Graphics


Fiona: Do you have any advice for other writers?

 If it’s something you want to do, do it. Read a lot of books, hone your craft, make sure to research publishers before submitting or good editors if you want to self publish


Fiona: Do you have anything specific that you want to say to your readers?

 Thank you all for your continued support

Fiona: Do you remember the first book you read?

No, but I remember reading a lot of Dr. Seuss

Fiona: Is there one person pass or present you would meet and why?

Oprah, maybe she’ll give me a car

Fiona: What do you want written on your head stone and why ?

 Here lies Eve, she had to leave

Fiona: Other than writing do you have any hobbies ?

I like to read and play video games

Fiona: What TV shows/films do you enjoy watching?

The Walking Dead, People’s Court, Judge Mathis

Fiona: Favorite foods / Colors/ Music  :

 Pizza, Green, all kinds of music

Fiona: If you were not a writer what else would you like to have done?

 Married someone really really wealthy

 

Fiona: Do you have a blog/website? If so what is it?: www.evevaughn.com

Amazon Page http://www.amazon.com/Eve-Vaughn/e/B00958JX42/ref=ntt_athr_dp_pel_pop_1

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Here is my interview with Christopher Challice

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Name: 
Christopher Challice

Age: 38

Where are you from: Peterborough, Ontario, Canada

A little about your self your education Family life etc

I grew up in a little town called Cobourg by Lake Ontario. My father died when I was 12, my Mom raised by brother and I by herself. As kid I spent a lot of time in my own little world, fantasy novels and role playing games facilitated that.

I left Cobourg to attend Trent University in Peterborough Ontario and I got my B.A. in English. Afterwards I earned a diploma in computer programming and analysis from Sir Sanford Fleming College. I also met the love of my life Jennifer Doleman, we’ve been together for over 12 years.

I’ve had many jobs: house painter, camp counsellor, phone tech support technician and quality assurance annalist. Though all this I’ve written and told stories. In the past few years I’ve been giving it a go professionally.

 

Fiona: Tell us your latest news?

I’ve teamed up with Andrew Valkauskas to write Seith and Sword, a novel for his Fate of the Norns rpg setting. Right now it’s a kickstarter, when its funded it’ll be a fully published work.


Fiona: When and why did you begin writing?

Right after my dad died. I was filled with regret, sorrow, anger and loneliness. I wrote fantastical stories to console myself. As I got older I shared these through games and written works. This helped me get out of my funk; I grew up, made friends and am now very happy with my current circumstances.


Fiona: When did you first consider yourself a writer?

I was a camp councilor and storyteller in Jungle Cat World, Orono. I crafted my own mythology from the animals in the zoo and acted them out for the campers. They loved them and this gave me the confidence to know my stories are worthwhile.


Fiona: What inspired you to write your first book?

The plight of the Jotun in Norse mythology. If you read the Eddas carefully you’ll see that they’re not a simple stories of good and evil. Yes, Jotun can be greedy and dangerous but so can the Gods. At the beginning of Fate of the Norns: Ragnagrok Andrew Valkauskas spells out the Jotun grievances and they have a very a strong case.

Given this I wanted to write a story that held sympathy for the ‘bad guys’.


Fiona: Do you have a specific writing style?

I trade flowery language for plot. My style is direct and tells as much as possible with the fewest words. At my best I can guide you through a lifetime’s journey in a single chapter.


Fiona: How did you come up with the title?

Seith and Sword a play on sword and sorcery. Seith is a type of magic in Fate of the Norns: Ragnarok. Its practitioners draw upon the spirit world to affect the physical. It’s a dangerous power full of awesome narrative potential. The main character uses it to great effect.


Fiona: Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?

People, at their very nature, are good. However, that doesn’t’ stop them form making terrible decisions and causing all sorts of bloodshed and chaos.


Fiona: How much of the book is realistic?

It’s set in the Viking age but won’t be historical realism. I’d describe it as a mythic Norse saga. All the characters are human with realistic goals and motivations. However, their actions will be larger than life. Might, magic, valor, all that will be very common.


Fiona: Are experiences based on someone you know, or events in your own life?

Oh yes. As a child I felt like an outsider. The protagonists of this novel are also outsiders.


Fiona: What books have most influenced your life most? a mentor?

Stephen King’s Gunslinger series. His Roland is mythic but also real and grounded. If I can be half as good as Stephen King is I’ll have achieved something.

 


Fiona: What book are you reading now?

The Prose Edda of Snorri Sturlson, translated by Arthur Gilchrist Brodeur.


Fiona: Are there any new authors that have grasped your interest?

Jim Butcher. His stories are dark and mystical but have a gritty, common man undercurrent that I like.


Fiona: What are your current projects?

Seith and Sword of course.

Before that I was working on two pojects: A series of comedic adventure books about powerful sorcerers, and a novel about the Norse Goddess Hel growing up in the underworld.

These projects have been put on hold until after I finish Seith and Sword.

If Seith and Sword does as well as I believe it will, I hope to work with Andrew on other projects.


Fiona: Name one entity that you feel supported you outside of family members.

My big brother, from the big brother’s organization, David Bayette. He helped me deal with growing up without a dad. Without him and my Mom, I don’t know what I would have done.


Fiona: Do you see writing as a career?

For the past few years I’ve tackled writing as my part time job. Thanks to that I’ve written a lot, more than I have at any other period in my life.


Fiona: If you had to do it all over again, would you change anything in your latest book?

Not as of yet.

 


Fiona: Do you recall how your interest in writing originated?

I had a vivid dream that I was flying a starship. I wrote it down and discovered how much I loved doing it.

 

Fiona: Can you share a little of your current work with us?

Vanadis and Gamli are the sole survivors of a seith curse that wipes out a prominent Nibelung family. The Nibelung hero, Hardegon the Trusted, pursues them across the Baltic Sea.

It’s told from Vanadis’ and Gamli’s perspective so I hope the readers emphasize with them. The only thing is, Hardegon’s not an evil man. Given the information he has, he has every right to hunt them.

This’ll be a grim tale but not joyless. Desperation and bloodshed will be broken apart by moments of joy, love and laughter. If I do my job right the readers will see this conflict as a wonderful tragedy.


Fiona: Is there anything you find particularly challenging in your writing?

I get way wrapped up in my own perspective. I see so clearly what’s in my head that I sometimes forget key parts in scenes. Fortunately I have merciless proof readers who’ll point out when my work’s missing clarity.


Fiona: Who is your favorite author and what is it that really strikes you about their work?

Hands down Stephen King. He brings the horrifying and fantastic to the real world in ways that I can’t help but admire.


Fiona: Do you have to travel much concerning your book(s)?

Nope. I do everything from my H.Q. here in Peterborough.


Fiona: Who designed the covers?

Natasa Ilincic, she’s done work with Andrew before in Denizen’s of the North. I love her cover of Seith and Sword.


Fiona: What was the hardest part of writing your book?

I have a very tight schedule and as such won’t have much free time until this book’s done.


Fiona: Did you learn anything from writing your book and what was it?

How to organize. I drafted a solid plan in a short time, it’ll serve me well


Fiona: Do you have any advice for other writers?

Write at least an hour every day for the rest of your life. It’s worth it.


Fiona: Do you have anything specific that you want to say to your readers?

Thank you. My primary concern is weaving a story you’ll love and remember.

 

Fiona: Do you remember the first book you read?

The first novel I ever bought was Wizard’s Bane by Rick Cook. It’s the story of a computer programmer who becomes a wizard in a fantasy world. I was learning the basics of computer programming at the time and as such I could relate.

 

Fiona: What makes you laugh/cry?

Goofy stories that have sudden bits of tragedy. Take One Piece by Eiichro Oda , the sorrowful back-stories of his characters get me every damn time.

I also once burst into tears at Sarah Sanderdon’s Magic Garden. I heard it on YouTube and thought it as the song the spirit of death sings to children who are killed in war.

 

Fiona: Is there one person pass or present you would meet and why?

I’d like to talk with my grandpa Clifford Challice. I should have seen him more often while he was alive.

 

Fiona: What do you want written on your head stone and why ?

“My labor is no easier but now I know I’m not alone.” It’s a line from my favorite song. Lady In Black by Uriah Heep.

 

Fiona: Other than writing do you have any hobbies ?

I’m an avid table top gamer. I play several games a week

Also, I’m cursed with a love of Nintendo DS rpgs, so convenient.

 

Fiona: What TV shows/films do you enjoy watching?

Goofy, heartful anime such as Eiichro Oda’s One Peice.

The History Channel’s Vikings. I watched 1 episode, five minutes later I purchased both seasons through iTunes.

My favorite movie is Treasure Planet,

 

Fiona: Favorite foods / Colors/ Music

Food: Porcupine, it’s a sort of meatloaf with rice, grains of rice stick out of it giving it it’s name. Lemon meringue pie. The lasagna carbonara my friend Savior made.

Also plain tomato soup. I had heart surgery when I was five. Campbell’s Tomato soup was the first thing I ate when they got me off the machines.

Color: Black, but I got an excuse: I’m red/green color blind.

Music: Mythril and symphonic metal. Political rap. Folk music.

 

Fiona: If you were not a writer what else would you like to have done?

Definitely voice acting.

 

Fiona: Do you have a blog/website? If so what is it?

Yes, check out http://www.taoofchall.wordpress.com . You can read many of my stories and articles there.

PENDELHAVEN
http://www.pendelhaven.com
http://twitter.com/avalkauskas
FATE OF THE NORNS
http://www.fateofthenorns.com
http://www.facebook.com/fateofthenorns
http://rpg.drivethrustuff.com/index.php?manufacturers_id=3107
http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/avalkauskas/denizens-of-the-north
http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/avalkauskas/fate-of-the-norns-gulveig
http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/avalkauskas/iron-runes-of-power
http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/avalkauskas/fate-of-the-norns-ragnarok-20th-anniversary-editio

https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/avalkauskas/seith-and-sword
Twitter #FOTNR

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