Here is my interview with Ian S Varty

Name Ian S Varty

Age 53

Where are you from? Bishop Auckland, County Durham, UK

A little about your self `ie your education Family life etc

I was born in the North East of England, before moving overseas with my parents, my father was a member of the British Army.

After leaving school at 16, I followed my father into the military. I spent my first three months at the Royal Engineers, Junior Apprentices College at Chepstow. In a short period of time I realised this was not the right career path. It was at this point I transferred to the Royal Armoured Corps, and was badged to the same Regiment as my father.

During my 22 years’ service, of what could be described as a ‘colourful career’, I spent most of it overseas. Like everything in life you never appreciate things until they are gone.

After leaving the Forces in March 2003, I began work in the Information Technology Industry. I served my first 2 years at a Secondary School in Durham, as an IT Technician.

I have always been one for striving to better myself, I think this was my military upbringing. With no opportunities for advancement, I left the Education system and moved into the Healthcare arena.

For the next 8 years I worked for a Foundation Trust within the NHS in the North East of England. For the first few years it was all exciting and new. It wasn’t long before I realised, due to funding of the NHS, things were beginning to become strained. Resources were short, and staff both medical and administrative, were under intense pressure.

With the death of my father in April 2010, I began to question why are we here? He had been a big influence on my life, and I wanted to recount the memories I had of him.

This led me into the world of publishing, as a vehicle to not only honour my father, but to try and show some of the hardships that faces the modern soldier. The bond of friendship and brotherhood that binds these modern day knights, cannot be underestimated. It was this very point that was my beginning to my journey into authorship.

The story of ‘From Denim to Khaki’ started as a one off book. I quickly found out that it would lend itself to a Trilogy. It is fiction, but based on facts that I have experienced, or indeed others who I have served with. It details the life of a young man, from joining the army straight from school at 16. It follows his career from the ‘Cold War’ of the 1980’s, up until the Afghanistan conflict.

I am married to Andrea and have two children Siobhan aged 23 and Liam 18.

 

 

Fiona: Tell us your latest news?

I released my second book in the Trilogy “Fare Thee Well” in April this year

 

 
Fiona: When and why did you begin writing?

I began in January 2015, and wanted to tell a true account of the life of a soldier, from beginning to end.

 

 
Fiona: When did you first consider yourself a writer?

After I published my first book “Denim to Khaki in December 2015

 

 
Fiona: What inspired you to write your first book?

The death of my father in April 2010. He was a big influence on my life and we both served together in the same Regiment.

 

 
Fiona: Do you have a specific writing style?

Not really I just draw on personal experiences

 

 
Fiona: How did you come up with the title?

It highlights the changes that are made to a young person, from civilian life to a military one.

 

 
Fiona: Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?

Yes. The hardships that the modern day soldiers face, is only possible with the support of their friends and families.

 

 
Fiona: How much of the book is realistic and are experiences based on someone you know, or events in your own life?

I would say 95% of the book is realistic. It is based on personal experiences of myself and those I have served with.

 

 


Fiona: What books have most influenced your life most? a mentor?

Books published by Andy McNab and Chris Ryan made me want to tell a more realistic story of the normal everyday soldier. I had the privilege of serving under some highly motivational individuals. I think their mentoring rubbed off on me, and made me a better person.

 

 

Fiona: Are there any new authors that have grasped your interest and who is your favorite author and what is it that really strikes you about their work?

I like a varied scope of authors, and don’t have a particular favourite at the moment. I did like Stephen King, James Herbert etc in my younger days.

 

 
Fiona: Name one entity that you feel supported you outside of family members.

Knowing that my father was looking down on me, wanting me to tell the story.

 

 
Fiona: Do you see writing as a career?

No at the moment I don’t. I will reappraise this after my last book in the Trilogy is published.

 

 
Fiona: If you had to do it all over again, would you change anything in your latest book?

I don’t think so, I thought long and hard about what I was going to include, and am quite happy with it.

 

 
Fiona: Do you recall how your interest in writing originated?

My father always was good at telling stories and think he passed on that gift to me.

 

 

Fiona: Can you share a little of your current work with us?

Richard Hunter continues his career in the British Army, after having successfully completed his first ‘Operational Tour’ of Northern Ireland he is on a high. On his return, he is put through the rigors of a Junior Non Commissioned Officers Leadership Cadre. The lessons he learns and the friendships he makes only strengthens his feeling of comradeship. Who said that throwing yourself out of a perfectly serviceable aircraft, was an enjoyable experience! His time in Guided Weapons Troop, learning the mystic arts of directing a 27 kg missile, costing around £7500 onto its target, was something that would last in his memory forever. This would be a brief interlude into his becoming a fully rounded Armoured Soldier, as after a short time he would move to Reconnaissance Troop. Here he would be a member of an elite group of individuals, who were the ‘eyes and ears’ of the Regiment. His rather foolish decision to volunteer for a Long Range Reconnaissance Patrol (“Lurps”), enhanced his skills. It would teach him the very real dangers of being captured behind enemy lines. On gaining promotion he would leave Recce and continue his journey in a “Sabre Squadron” Commanding a 60 tonne Chieftain, this was the pinnacle of every tank soldier, and one that Richard had worked hard to attain. The prairies of the British Army Training Unit (BATUS) Canada, were to be his proving ground. He would have to endure extreme weather, from searing hot heat in the summer, to unbelievable cold in the winter. Having contracted frostbite on a particular cold one, his left foot would remind him of the experience for the rest of his life. As the saying goes “all good things must come to an end”, and with the restructuring of the British Army, some Armoured Regiments were joined together. On hearing who they would be amalgamating with, Richard called to mind their motto. It was “Fare Thee Well”, a very apt one for their situation. So he said goodbye to his former Regiment, and continued his journey, and who knew where that would lead?

 

 
Fiona: Is there anything you find particularly challenging in your writing?

Trying to keep original names of characters separate from the real people.

 

 
Fiona: Do you have to travel much concerning your book(s)?

I have travelled all over the world but prior to writing the book. These travels gave me inspiration for a lot of the stories included in them.

 

 
Fiona: Who designed the covers?

I did

 

 
Fiona: What was the hardest part of writing your book?

Trying to hide the characters from those people who may have known them.

 

 
Fiona: Did you learn anything from writing your book and what was it?

Yes that it requires a serious amount of dedication.

 

 

Fiona: If any of your books was made into a film who would you like to play the lead.

Daniel Day Lewis

 

 
Fiona: Do you have any advice for other writers?

Follow your dreams

 

 
Fiona: Do you have anything specific that you want to say to your readers?

If you have ever thought about writing a book, plan what you want to say, and see it through.

 

 

Fiona: What book are you reading now?

“American Sniper” by Chris Kyle

 

 

Fiona: Do you remember the first book you read?

The Hobbit

 

 

Fiona: What makes you laugh/cry?

Having fun with friends, and the poverty and strife in the world makes me cry.

 

 

Fiona: Is there one person pass or present you would meet and why?

Stephen Fry, I think he is the most intelligent interesting man alive.

 

 

Fiona: What do you want written on your head stone and why?

“Let me die in my footsteps” it was a song by Bob Dylan and I hope I have lived up to the words

 

 

Fiona: Other than writing do you have any hobbies ?

Cycling and keeping fit, and socializing with friends

 

 

Fiona: What TV shows/films do you enjoy watching?

Crime thrillers and history and nature programs

 

 

Fiona: Favorite foods / Colors/ Music.

I love eating fish, every kind imaginable, and Indian and Chinese.

 

 

Fiona: If you were not a writer what else would you like to have done?

Teacher

 

Fiona: Do you have a blog/website? If so what is it? https://dragoon799.wordpress.com/

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Ian-S-Varty/e/B0163Y8JZE/ref=dp_byline_cont_pop_ebooks_1

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Denim-Khaki-1/dp/0993434215?ie=UTF8&ref_=asap_bc

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Fare-Thee-Well-Denim-Khaki/dp/0993434223?ie=UTF8&ref_=asap_bc

Here is my interview with SH Richardson

Name SH Richardson

Age– old as the hills

Where are you from– Virginia Beach

A little about your self `ie your education Family life etc

I’m a mother of two daughters, 18 and 24. I have five fur babies, Bugsy, Nibbles, Cocoa, Shelb, and AJ. I moved to Virginia Beach in 1996 but I’m originally from Long Island, NY. I have a BS in Criminal Justice from SUNY Plattsburgh.

 

 

Fiona: Tell us your latest news?

Well, I released my first book about three weeks ago named The Junkyard Boys. I’m very happy with its reception so far.

 

 
Fiona: When and why did you begin writing?

I was laid off from a job I held for 18 years so I had some time on my hands (sarcasm). I had a story running around in my head so I decided to put it down on paper, and the rest is history.

 

 
Fiona: When did you first consider yourself a writer?

I didn’t consider myself a writer until after I published The Junkyard Boys and the readers asked for more!

 

 
Fiona: What inspired you to write your first book?

I would say unemployment but that’s not really true. Writing was something I did when I was younger and simply forgot that it was something I enjoyed. Now I remember! LOL

 

 
Fiona: Do you have a specific writing style?

Not really, The Junkyard Boys was written in the first person with alternating points of view but I would considering writing in any style.

 

 
Fiona: How did you come up with the title?

The Junkyard Boys title is vital to the story itself so I didn’t have much to think about.

 

 
Fiona: Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?

Yes, that a hero is more than just a sandwich!

 
Fiona: How much of the book is realistic and are experiences based on someone you know, or events in your own life?

So much if it is ridiculous, the lead female character Clover is me through different phases of my life. Her family dynamic is my own. For example, her father has a nickname that everyone calls him. My father also had a nickname, we never called him dad.

 

 
Fiona: What books have most influenced your life most? a mentor?

Jackie Collins was my all time favorite author! I always enjoyed her writing and it was a big influence to me.

 

 

Fiona: Are there any new authors that have grasped your interest and who  is your favorite author and what is it that really strikes you about their work?

Well, Tillie Cole is not a new author but I just adore her work. Her story contain strong alpha males which to me is the only way to write a good book!

 

 
Fiona: Name one entity that you feel supported you outside of family members.

My friend Marci was a big supporter of my work so much so that I named one of the supporting characters after her. Too bad she’s a Ho-bag! LOL

 
Fiona: Do you see writing as a career?

I see it as something I want to continue to do. I was so surprised by the reception of The Junkyard Boys that I never thought of it was a career choice just something I love doing.

 

 
Fiona: If you had to do it all over again, would you change anything in your latest book?

Yes I would hire a proof reader! I’m told there are a couple of typos and I hope to avoid that in the future.

 

 
Fiona: Do you recall how your interest in writing originated?

Much like my lead female character, I was a loner growing up and writing was something I used to occupy my time.

 

 

Fiona: Can you share a little of your current work with us?

The Junkyard boys was released about three weeks ago so right now I’m still marketing that. I have begun the outline to book two in the series and hope to start writing that within the next couple of weeks.

 

 
Fiona: Is there anything you find particularly challenging in your writing?

No not really.

 

 
Fiona: Do you have to travel much concerning your book(s)?

Not yet but I hope to be invited to a book signing event soon!

 
Fiona: Who designed the covers?

Alora Kate with SweetLush Photog

 

 
Fiona: What was the hardest part of writing your book?

Figuring out what to do with it when it was finished.

 

 
Fiona: Did you learn anything from writing your book and what was it?

Yes I learned quite a few things. Never sell yourself short and believe in your work. I’m still working on it…LOL

 

 

Fiona: If any of your books was made into a film who would you like to play the lead

Ian Sommerholder would be great as Range Reardon, the male lead in The Junkyard Boys…of course he would have to grow his hair longer!

 

 


Fiona: Do you have any advice for other writers?

Just do it!

 

 
Fiona: Do you have anything specific that you want to say to your readers?

Yes… thank you! The reception has been incredible and I’m so blessed that the readers enjoyed my very first book.

 

 

Fiona: What book are you reading now?

Nothing right now and that’s only because I’m outlining my second book.

 

 

 

Fiona: Do you remember the first book you read?

No but I’m sure it had Charlie Brown in it.

 

 

Fiona: What makes you laugh/cry?

My youngest daughter makes me laugh. She is so funny all the time. I rarely cry and if I do it probably because I hurt myself or something. I can be clumsy.

 

 

Fiona: Is there one person pass or present you would meet and why?

President Obama. I think he is the best leader this world has ever had and he seems like a down to earth king of guy that likes a good meal and a good conversation.

 

 

Fiona: What do you want written on your head stone and why ?

Nothing. I plan to live forever!

 

 

Fiona: Other than writing do you have any hobbies ?

Reading mostly

 

 

Fiona: What TV shows/films do you enjoy watching?

I love the food network. Cooking shows make me hungry but I can’t stop watching them!

 

 

Fiona: Favorite foods / Colors/ Music

Lobster is my favorite meal, blue is my favorite color, and I love old school music. Michael Jackson, Prince, Luther Vandros

 

 

Fiona: If you were not a writer what else would you like to have done?

I studied to become a police officer but that all went out the window right around the time I had my first child…LOL

 

 

Fiona: Do you have a blog/website? If so what is it?

No blogs or websites yet but that is something on the “New Author” to do list.

Amazon Authors Page http://www.amazon.com/SH-Richardson/e/B01EG9K4RO/ref=dp_byline_cont_book_1

Here is my interview with Mary Mack

Name Mary Mack

Age 57

Where are you from

I live in a small town in the Finger Lakes Region of New York State called Dundee.

A little about your self `ie your education Family life etc  

I am the youngest of seven children and the only girl, which meant escaping to my room with a good book often when I was a child. I have five beautiful children and six equally beautiful grandchildren. I have only a high school education but a Master’s Degree in living. Currently, I live with my wonderfully-supportive husband, Jim, and our adorable Cavalier King Charles Spaniel, Moto.

Fiona: Tell us your latest news?

I recently fulfilled a 20-year dream and published my first novel, Reasonable Regret. A suspenseful romance, it tells the story of 34-year-old, divorcee Adele Hamilton, who has just lost her young son, Spencer, to Leukemia. Beyond depressed, she decides to take matters into her own hands when she arranges for a life-altering meeting with mobster, Carl Nardone. But later, with a fresh lease on life, including a budding new love affair, Adele learns that her fate may have already been sealed if she cannot reach Nardone in time and call off their deal. And the clock is ticking.

Fiona: When and why did you begin writing?

I’ve always been an avid reader, but it was after I read Where the Heart Is, by Billie Letts, that I said to myself, “Now, why couldn’t I do that?”

Fiona: When did you first consider yourself a writer?

When I joined Cowbird.com and one of my stories was selected as the daily story to be published on page one. Cowbird.com has over 70,000 writers from 185 countries contributing daily so I was so tickled pink when my story was selected, and it somehow validated me.
Fiona: What inspired you to write your first book?

I was in a car accident about a year and a half ago and had to go to the hospital to have my neck checked out. It turned out my neck was fine, but I had a golf ball size tumor in my brain. The surgery to remove the tumor frightened me more than the actual tumor. On the operating table, I vowed to myself that should I survive the surgery I would get serious about writing my first novel.

Fiona: Do you have a specific writing style?

I’m not sure what I would call my style, but when I write I try to imagine myself telling the story to a friend. I like the end result to be relaxed and easy to read.

Fiona: How did you come up with the title?

Without giving too much away, I considered Adele’s change of heart later on in the story reasonable, a.k.a., a reasonable regret.

Fiona: Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?

Yes, absolutely: That the mentally ill can be trusted.

Fiona: How much of the book is realistic and are experiences based on someone you know, or events in your own life?

When my youngest son was placed in a state facility for the mentally ill, I felt that I had lost him. I became very depressed, like my heroine, Adele, in Reasonable Regret.
The first line of the book, “I’d like to be happy” was exactly how I was feeling when I sat down and began typing.

Fiona: What books have most influenced your life most? a mentor?

I read Gone with the Wind by Margaret Mitchell when I was 16 and it changed me. I knew then that I wanted to read more and more books, but I never developed the self-confidence to try writing myself until many years later.

Fiona: Are there any new authors that have grasped your interest and who  is your favorite author and what is it that really strikes you about their work?

I love anything by Larry McMurtry (Lonesome Dove, The Last Picture Show, Texasville) because, to me, he writes like people speak. Not too many big words that require a dictionary close by or complicated themes. He has a dry sense of humor that comes across, too, that I really enjoy. I also like it that all of his books take place in his home state of Texas. Something I intend to duplicate with my home state of New York.

Fiona: Name one entity that you feel supported you outside of family members.

Without a doubt, it was Melissa Foster, author extraordinaire who took time out of her busy schedule to mentor me. It was actually on Melissa’s Facebook page that I learned about you, Fiona. Melissa helped guide me into the world of self-publishing and taught me some marketing lessons.

Fiona: Do you see writing as a career?

I dream of writing as a career, but right now the bill collectors are, quite literally, calling my name so I will be holding on to my day job for at least five more years until I can begin writing full time at the age of  62.

Fiona: If you had to do it all over again, would you change anything in your latest book?

I wouldn’t change a thing! J

Fiona: Do you recall how your interest in writing originated?

Through reading, I love getting caught up in eloquent prose.

Fiona: Can you share a little of your current work with us?

I’m currently finishing up my next novel entitled Jerusalem Hill which takes place in 1963, in Elmira, NY. It is the story of 36-year-old Emma Riley, whom, after eighteen years of marriage and six children, learns that her husband, Mac, has run off to California with another woman. Destitute, Emma is forced to move herself and her six children into an abandoned farmhouse she finds sitting high atop Jerusalem Hill. But later, when Mac discovers that the grass isn’t necessarily greener in California, he returns home with a chip on his shoulder and an ax to grind. And Emma is straight in his line of fire.

Fiona: Is there anything you find particularly challenging in your writing?

I find filling the pages with ear-pleasing prose very challenging. I just want to tell the story and sometimes forget the very reason I like to read, eloquent prose.

Fiona: Do you have to travel much concerning your book(s)?

No, I do book signings locally as my books take place right around home.

Fiona: Who designed the covers?

I did, with the help of Createspace.com. They provided me with a template but I searched for just the right art work until I found a model that looked like Adele does in my mind for the cover.

Fiona: What was the hardest part of writing your book?

Finding the time to write was the most challenging. I work full time and have a 50-minute commute, each way, so I would sometimes be up well past midnight writing away.

Fiona: Did you learn anything from writing your book and what was it?

I learned that you can do whatever you put your mind to.

Fiona: If any of your books was made into a film that would you like to play the lead.

Oh, Amanda Seyfried as Adele, for sure, and perhaps Paul Rudd as Morgan.

Fiona: Do you have any advice for other writers?

Just sit down and tell a story, like you would to a friend, and try not to worry about every little sentence too much as you write. You can fix all of that later.

Fiona: Do you have anything specific that you want to say to your readers?

Thank you for believing enough in a first time author to shell out your hard-earned cash to buy my book. I hope you enjoy it!

Fiona: What book are you reading now?

The Girl on the Train by Paula Hawkins. I just love a good psychological thriller and Paula delivers.

Fiona: Do you remember the first book you read?

Yep! One Fish, Two Fish, Red Fish, Blue Fish by Dr. Seuss. I was in first grade.

Fiona: What makes you laugh/cry?

Funny cat videos make me laugh and Michael makes me cry.

Fiona: Is there one person pass or present you would meet and why?

I would love to meet Margaret Mitchell just to sit down and share a pot of tea with her.

Fiona: What do you want written on your head stone and why ?

That I was a good mother, because that has been my most important job.

Fiona: Other than writing do you have any hobbies ?

I enjoy quilting and interior decorating, although I rarely have time for either anymore.

Fiona: What TV shows/films do you enjoy watching?

I just love Shameless on Showtime and one of my favorite movies of all time is The Talented Mr. Ripley. Oh, to write a book like that one!

Fiona: Favorite foods / Colors/ Music

I love Mexican food, the color turquoise and Van Morrison.

Fiona: If you were not a writer what else would you like to have done?

I would have liked to have been an elementary school art teacher.

Fiona: Do you have a blog/website? If so what is it?

You can find me on Facebook at either “Mary Nugent Mack” or “Mary Mack”

Buying link http://www.amazon.com/Reasonable-Regret-Mary-Mack/dp/1523694297/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1462201807&sr=8-1&keywords=Reasonable+Regret

Here is my interview with Carter Quinn

Name Carter Quinn

 

Age 43

 

Where are you from

I grew up in a little town in Western Kansas where my grandparents farmed the same land for 38 years before he died.

 

Fiona: Tell us your latest news?

I’m really excited that we have just released a paperback version of Vanished: The Complete Trilogy. I’m waiting on formatting for the ebook omnibus too.
Fiona: When and why did you begin writing?

Like a lot of people, I started putting silly stories together when I was a kid. I didn’t take it seriously until after high school. Then I let life get in the way. I’d start stories and then put them aside or write a scene and file it away. It wasn’t until a few years ago that I decided to stop fearing success or failure and submit a story for a contest. That contest ended up being cancelled, but by then I’d started what would become my first novel, The Way Back.


Fiona: When did you first consider yourself a writer?

I considered myself a writer way back when I was working on my first, unfinished novels. What’s weird is that now I don’t really consider myself a legitimate writer. Not yet.


Fiona: What inspired you to write your first book?

I wrote a short story, “In the Crease,” for a contest. I enjoyed it so much I decided to try to finally finish a novel. The Way Back is the result.


Fiona: Do you have a specific writing style?

Honestly, I don’t have a clue. (Haha) I just write what I write.


Fiona: How did you come up with the title?

Titles and blurbs are the bane of my existence. Vanished is the only title that has come easily. My next project is Ashes to Embers, which started out as Full Measure.


Fiona: Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?

I think most of my books are about hope and growth. Every character has a road to travel, not necessarily easily, to get to his happy place. Sometimes we get distracted by what seems like insurmountable obstacles, but if we keep hope and keep trying, we can overcome anything.


Fiona: How much of the book is realistic ?

It depends on which book we’re talking about. The Way Back came from imagining if my “Eric” came back into my life. What would I do then? Out of the Blackness was very personal, but I’m not a physical abuse survivor. Vanished, of course, came from thinking about what it would be like for my mother when my father passed, which was, at the time, imminent. For some reason, though, that was the story I chose to tell him, even though he died before he could read it.


Fiona: Are experiences based on someone you know, or events in your own life?

Yes and no. There are certain moments from my life that I’ve thrown in a book or two, especially if I thought they were funny or emotional in retrospect. Fire is one of my greatest fears, especially where I was living when I was writing Fire & Rain. The scene where Eric and Travis are looking for Jeremiah came to mind easily but was difficult to put to paper.


Fiona: What books have most influenced your life most? a mentor?

I’ve read some truly incredible books, from Maxim Gorky’s Mother to Clive Barker’s Imajica. I am in awe of writers who can convince me to transcend time and space to live and breathe the worlds they create. The closest I’ve come to a mentor is a college instructor who encouraged me to find new ways to express myself with words.


Fiona: What book are you reading now?

I just finished reading Skip Trace by Jenn Burke and Kelly Jensen. It’s M/M sci-fi, which I love but can’t find enough of. I’ve got a few sci-fi novels in me, but I am absolutely terrified of them. I’m hoping repeated exposure will build courage. lol


Fiona: Are there any new authors that have grasped your interest?

There are so many new authors out there that I’ve stopped trying to keep up. I’ve even lost track of some of my old favorites.


Fiona: What are your current projects?

Currently I’m struggling with Ashes to Embers, a returning home novel. I love the story, but I’ve been having trouble convincing myself to sit down and write.


Fiona: Name one entity that you feel supported you outside of family members.

There would be no Carter Quinn if there weren’t a Marilyn Blimes. She’s my best friend and greatest encouragement—my enabler, in other words. Haha. If she hadn’t provided encouragement I believed when I was writing “In the Crease,” none of the rest would have followed.


Fiona: Do you see writing as a career?

Absolutely. It’s the one thing I’ve wanted to do since I was little. I have more books in my brain than I’ll ever be able to write.


Fiona: If you had to do it all over again, would you change anything in your latest book?

Vanished 3 is my most recent completed project. There are a couple of things I might change, giving the guys more dead ends to follow, for example, but I ran out of time. I’m still very proud of that trilogy as it stands.


Fiona: Do you recall how your interest in writing originated?

My fourth grade teacher would write a one-sentence prompt on the chalkboard once a week. We had half an hour or so to complete a story. She collected the stories and handed them back to us at the end of the year, staple-bound in construction paper. Yes, I am/was a dork, but that was one of the coolest things I’d ever seen.

 

Fiona: Can you share a little of your current work with us?

Hmm. Here’s an excerpt from the opening scene of Ashes to Embers.

 

The familiar energized exhaustion tugged at Jake as it always did at this time after a show. He could make a choice in a few minutes: down a beer and party all night or wave goodnight to the rest of the band and be asleep almost as soon as his head hit the pillow on his bed in the bus. And they would be back on the bus again tonight, as much as he dreaded the idea. They’d just finished the fourth of four sold-out concerts at Madison Square Garden. Jake was tired, but it was a triumphant fatigue. Each show had been better than the previous, but thanks to the crowd’s enthusiasm, the last one was one for the record books.

He pulled out a smile and wrapped an arm around each of the two sweaty, star-struck fans as they pressed their breasts against him, no doubt hoping for a better memento than just a photograph with the world’s biggest rock star. He didn’t so much as flinch when the more brazen one—the redhead, of course—put her hand entirely too close to his decidedly limp dick. The irony was that if he’d had more than zero interest in a woman for the night, she would have been in the running. In fact, the only fan who’d caught his dick’s attention was grinning shyly at him from six feet away. A young, college-age jock-type with full lips and a five o’clock shadow darkening his square jaw. He was a pretty boy in tight leather pants and an 80’s-style mostly mesh throwback football jersey emblazoned with the band’s tour logo from three tours back competing for attention with smooth, tanned skin.

The flash went off and Jake bent down to drop a ravishing kiss on the lips of each of the squealing fans. He nudged them forward, already refocusing on the boy, and allowed Randy Meade, the tour manager, to hustle them away.

The jock approached hesitantly, stopping a respectful few inches away. Jake wrapped an arm around the young man’s solid shoulders and pulled him closer. “Don’t be shy,” he encouraged with a grin. “What’s your name?”

“J-Jayden.”

“Sexy name,” Jake whispered, allowing his excitement to build. He savored the tingle in his balls as his dick began to lengthen in anticipation. He allowed his hand to wander down the kid’s ribs, over his waist to his hips, which he turned more fully towards him. He gripped the jock’s ass and forced his crotch against Jake’s hip. Yeah, the kid was definitely happy to see him.

Jayden caught ahold of Jake’s waist to steady himself as Jake pulled him up on his toes.

“You want me, Jayden?” Jake growled the question as his hand continued to explore the young man’s ass.

The shudder that raced through the jock’s firm body was as much an answer as his breathy, “God, yes.”

“Good,” Jake soothed, rocking the kid’s groin against him again. “Tell Randy I said to tell him ‘Mercy.’ He’ll get you where you need to be. Now smile wide for the camera, baby.”


Fiona: Is there anything you find particularly challenging in your writing?

I’m a procrastinator, so making myself actually sit down and do it, especially in poor weather. I’m very much solar powered. If I can sit outside and write, I’ll do it all day. If I have to be confined to a room, it’s like pulling teeth. Also, I’ve found I require a desk. Can’t do it sitting on the couch or in the recliner anymore.


Fiona: Who is your favorite author and what is it that really strikes you about their work?

Armistead Maupin is one of my absolute favorites. When I was just coming out way back in 1992, his Tales of the City series literally saved my life. I could finally find people in literature I could identify with. It was amazing.


Fiona: Do you have to travel much concerning your book(s)?

Not yet, thankfully. I’ve mostly set books in Kansas or Colorado where I’ve lived. Vanished was set in San Francisco, which I’d visited years ago. Thankfully I have a friend who lives nearby to correct me when I was wrong. I need to go back.


Fiona: Who designed the covers?

Most of my covers are designed by Scott Latimer of SJL Graphics. He’s a friend from an evil day job I once had. He actually did Out of the Blackness by hand. Into the Light and The Bridge were done by my fellow author JK Hogan, who’s a fantastic graphic designer.


Fiona: What was the hardest part of writing your book?

Convincing myself whatever I’m writing isn’t trash. It’s part of the process. I love it, I hate it, I finish it. Hopefully somewhere in there I start to like it again.


Fiona: Did you learn anything from writing your book and what was it?

Gosh, I’ve learned something different from each book. The hardest lesson is that no matter how many times I go over it, a mistake or two will sneak through. Also, don’t panic if the Ugly First Draft is short. I always add 10-20% in the second draft.


Fiona: Do you have any advice for other writers?

Read, write, read about writing. Then take only what works for you and shut out the rest.


Fiona: Do you have anything specific that you want to say to your readers?

Thank you for hanging in there when I’ve tried different things.

 

Fiona: Do you remember the first book you read?

No. It was undoubtedly a history or biography. I didn’t “believe in” fiction until I was in high school. I only read nonfiction growing up. Yes, I was that kid.

 

Fiona: What makes you laugh/cry?

I cry at the drop of a hat or a Hallmark of Folger’s commercial. It’s ridiculous. I’m very sentimental. I love to laugh, but I find most “comedies” don’t do much for me. I like smart humor.

 

Fiona: Is there one person past or present you would meet and why?

Thousands of them for a million different reasons and they all depend on my mood!

 

Fiona: What do you want written on your head stone and why ?

I want to be cremated, so I’m not sure I’d have a headstone. If so, I’d love for it to be shaped like an open book. On the verso page, etch the first page of my most popular book. Leave the recto page for my biographical junk.

 

Fiona: Other than writing do you have any hobbies ?

I read, tend to my Belgian Malinois, Dutchess, and take in the madness that is US politics.

 

Fiona: What TV shows/films do you enjoy watching?

I’m obsessed with Quantico. I love the Chicago trilogy, PD, Med, and Fire. Also Rachel Maddow. I’m not a movie-goer, but I do like to watch them via Amazon Prime.

 

Fiona: Favorite foods / Colors/ Music

Favorite food is ice cream. Favorite color is green. Favorite music is whatever soothes or inspires me at the moment. (Currently it’s Adele and David Nail. Last summer it was Savage Garden, believe it or not.)

 

Fiona: If you were not a writer what else would you like to have done?

If I couldn’t write novels, I’d love to be a songwriter. Alas, brevity is not my friend.

 

Fiona: Do you have a blog/website? If so what is it?

www.carterquinnbooks.com

 

Bio

Carter Quinn was born and raised in a very small Western Kansas town where cattle vastly outnumber humans. He came out in 1992, when doing so was still considered an act of rebellion. He discovered M/M in 2010 and started writing again after a fifteen year break. Now he’s told Corporate America to kiss his books. Carter again lives in cattle country, entirely too far from his beloved Colorado Avalanche.

 

Contact Info

www.carterquinnbooks.com

carterquinnbooks@gmail.com

facebook.com/CarterQuinn

goodreads.com/author/show/5607272.Carter_Quinn

On Twitter: @Carter_Quinn

http://www.amazon.com/Carter-Quinn/e/B008JGF9NU/

 

Generic Buy Links

Amazon US: http://www.amazon.com/Carter-Quinn/e/B008JGF9NU/

Amazon UK: http://www.amazon.co.uk/Carter-Quinn/e/B008JGF9NU/

Smashwords: https://www.smashwords.com/profile/view/cqbcarter

Kobo: https://store.kobobooks.com/search?Query=carter+quinn

B&N: http://www.barnesandnoble.com/c/carter-quinn

ARe: http://tinyurl.com/lbyzbcs

CreateSpace: http://tinyurl.com/jhdpw2y

Audible: http://tinyurl.com/jdgflts

 

 

Here is my interview with Dawné Dominique

Name:  Dawné Dominique (I also write under the penname of D. Thomas Jerlo)

 

Age:  Old enough to know better, but still do it anyway.  : )

 

Where are you from:  Center of Canada

 

A little about yourself, your education, family life, etc.: 

 

I’m the middle child of four, with a twin sister who’s forty-five minutes older than I am. (*sigh* my mom has always liked her best). I currently work as a contracted paralegal three days a week. The rest of my time is spent trying to write the next best-seller and creating cover art for several publishers and numerous Indie authors.

 

Fiona: Tell us your latest news?

 

I just received the rights back to my vampire series called The First.  It’s not your typical paranormal, erotic, mystery, romance, and my vampires certainly don’t sparkle. It’s adult, bloody and sexy as hell. I blend biblical facts with fiction to give a plausible explanation as to where, how and why vampires and vilkacis (which I call wolves) came into existence.


Fiona: When and why did you begin writing?

 

I’ve been an avid reader my entire life. It was my way to escape the stuff that was happening in my life. From there I decided to write my own stories. It wasn’t until Grade 12, when my English teacher persuaded me to continue with it. She was the only one who told me I had talent.


Fiona: When did you first consider yourself a writer?

 

When I finished writing my first fantasy novel. Throughout my life I can honestly say that I started about twenty plus novels. I just never finished any of them. Life usually got in the way. Then I joined a writing forum. In less than eight months I finished a 200k+ epic fantasy novel. That’s when I realized I had patience and perseverance to write a book and be an actual writer. So I quit my job, gave up everything to concentrate on becoming a published author. I learned all I could. It took me less than two years and both of my first submissions were accepted by two different publishers.


Fiona: What inspired you to write your first book?

 

My job. I was so stressed that by writing and escaping into the world I’d created gave me peace and solace. It also gave me the gumption to finish my first novel.


Fiona: Do you have a specific writing style?

 

I have to hope that I’ve developed my own style of writing, but I have been compared to Anne Rice. Greatest compliment ever!


Fiona: How did you come up with the title?

 

Which one? *chuckles* Titles come to me as I write a novel. I never know what it will be called until about halfway through the writing process.  It has to title itself, so to speak.


Fiona: Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?

 

Not really. I write for enjoyment. There is one constant, however: good versus evil. Not all my endings are happily ever after.


Fiona: How much of the book is realistic and are experiences based on someone you know, or events in your own life?

 

I have to confess that there’s quite a bit of me in every book. My daughter was aghast after she read Dark Diary because she believed Aiden Blackmore, the cop in the book, was her father. OMG! (If you read the book, you’ll know why I write OMG!)  I believe every writer, whether consciously or unconsciously, interjects a large portion of themselves into every novel they pen. They’ve given birth to it. It becomes their baby. It could be something as subtle as a personality trait or they write about a character they wish they could be (for me that would be Daniella Rolfe). Writers write what they know about. Plain and simple.


Fiona: What books have most influenced your life most? A mentor?

 

The two most influential authors for me were J.R. Tolkien and Anne Rice. I know. Two large spectrums of genres and writing styles, but their novels swept into worlds I never wanted to leave. They were unique. I hope that my books do the same for my readers.


Fiona: Are there any new authors that have grasped your interest and who is your favorite author and what is it that really strikes you about their work?

 

See answer above. I’ve recently discovered Sheri Fredricks, Natasza Waters, Morgan Wyatt (she writes under several pseudos), Nora Ash, Bob Bickford, Colette Saucier, and Ophelia Bell, to name a few.  They have unique writing styles and fantastic story-telling skills. If you haven’t read them, I suggest you do. You won’t be disappointed.


Fiona: Name one entity that you feel supported you outside of family members.

 

Traci Markou. We met in my writing forum. We used to write in the same genre and critiqued each other. She was offered a publishing contract before I was and I was so proud and happy of her. She pushed me; she encouraged me; she beta-read. She was everything an aspiring author needed. It wasn’t long before I became published myself. And I have her to thank for it.


Fiona: Do you see writing as a career?

 

Absolutely. I work three days a week as a contracted paralegal. The other four days are committed to writing and cover art.


Fiona: If you had to do it all over again, would you change anything in your latest book?

 

I’ve been nicknamed the Revision Queen, so that might tell you a lot. *smiles* There’s always something I want to change, whether it’s the cover (I’d be a cover artist’s worse nightmare), a sentence structure or two, but the story itself? No.


Fiona: Do you recall how your interest in writing originated?

 

I read Pippi Longstocking. I wanted to be just like her. So I created my own version of her. I called her Patti Livingston.

 

Fiona: Can you share a little of your current work with us?

 

I’m currently working on two projects: One is my vampire series called The First series. Eden’s Hell, Dark Diary, Kindred Blood and Crimson Cries had all been previously released, but since I received my rights back for them I’m making some changes to coincide with the fifth and final novel that I’m currently in the process of writing.  I’m hoping to re-release them within a year.

 

The other project is one half of the epic fantasy novel I wrote called Dark Prisoner: The Divenean Key, which is currently in copyedits. I’m hoping to release this one this summer. It’s classic fantasy: mage’ic, wizards, kingdoms at war, battles and demons. This one has been a labor of love. I wrote it in 2001. It’s time to share it with the world.


Fiona: Is there anything you find particularly challenging in your writing?

 

I have a habit of missing small words like “that”, “the” etc.  It’s very frustrating.  My hands don’t catch up with my brain. Even when I proofread, my brain sees the word is there when it’s not.

 

Fiona: Do you have to travel much concerning your book(s)?

 

I wish!  But no. However, I am a research fanatic. For Kindred Blood I researched for months England and Scotland maps in order to get street names and locations correctly described. I’m kind of anal about research. If you’re writing a book you have to have your facts right.


Fiona: Who designed the covers?

 

That would be me. *blushes* I’m known more for my cover art than as an author. You can check out a small portion of my cover art here:  www.DusktilDawnDesigns.com


Fiona: What was the hardest part of writing your book?

 

Every book is unique in its writing challenges. One might be a character. Another the scenery. One thing I do find challenging is trying to catch up with my brain.


Fiona: Did you learn anything from writing your book and what was it?

 

I’ve learned never to give up. With every book there were (still are) times when I’ve though that all I’ve written for the past month is crap. Then I pull on my big-girl panties and forge ahead. Not everyone will like what I write and that’s okay. But one must learn to have faith in themselves and not give up.

 

Fiona: If any of your books was made into a film who would you like to play the lead

 

That would be my character Daniella Rolfe. And the actress would be Angelina Jolie, hands down. I’m not a big fan of hers, but Angelina has similar physical attributes as Daniella, a kick-ass attitude (think Tomb Raider), and that steely ice-green stare. I always thought she’d make a great 1000+ year vampire.


Fiona: Do you have any advice for other writers?

 

As I mentioned above, don’t give up. Walk away from your computer and don’t look at your writing for a couple of days. Work on something else.  Then go back to it.


Fiona: Do you have anything specific that you want to say to your readers?

 

Thank you!

 

Fiona: What book are you reading now?

 

It’s called Continuum by Sheri Fredricks. It’s a short erotic fairytale romp based on the classic tale of The Frog and the Princess. Damn, that woman can write. Erotica and hilarious.

 

 

 

Fiona: Do you remember the first book you read?

 

Black Beauty. I’ve never forgotten it.

 

Fiona: What makes you laugh/cry?

 

I laugh when my friends and family are happy. I cry when they’re sad and hurting.

 

Fiona: Is there one person pass or present you would meet and why?

 

Abraham Lincoln. I’m Canadian, so I know that’s a little weird, but the man held ideals and beliefs that were beyond his time. He fascinates me.

 

Fiona: What do you want written on your head stone and why?

 

Self-explanatory:  Everything in this life happens for a reason and because of it we learn never to take anything for granted.

 

Fiona: Other than writing do you have any hobbies?

 

Cover Art. *giggles* I like to powerwalk when I can.

 

Fiona: What TV shows/films do you enjoy watching?

 

Right now, Lucifer. It’s a new show, but I love the guy who plays Lucifer. He’s perfect. The show is about the Devil that takes a vacation. Where does he go?  California, of course.  I also make time for Games of Thrones, and I’m biting at the bit for the return of Penny Dreadful. I don’t watch a lot of television. I do love any vampire and/or werewolf movie, but not the cheesy ones.  It took everything in my power to get through Twilight.

 

Fiona: Favorite foods / Colors/ Music

 

Food:  Anything Italian

Colors: Red and black

Music: Classic Rock-and-Roll and Blues

 

Fiona: If you were not a writer what else would you like to have done?

 

I’d like to have been an artist/painter. All the artwork in my house is my own, including the six foot painting in our living room.

 

Fiona: Do you have a blog/website? If so what is it?

 

I’d love for you visit me.

 

www.dawnedominique.com

 

www.dthomasjerlo.com

 

www.DusktilDawnDesigns.com

 

Amazon Authors page http://www.amazon.com/Dawn%C3%A9-Dominique/e/B003BE8MMK/ref=sr_tc_2_0?qid=1462079082&sr=1-2-ent

 

 

 

Here is my interview with Brandy L Rivers

Name:  Brandy L Rivers

Age: 37

Where are you from: Born and raised in the Pacific Northwest. Always lived in Washington around the Puget Sound area.

A little about your self `ie your education Family life etc:

I’m happily married with three kids, and a little dog. I went to some technical school but didn’t go to college. I spend most of my time with family and friends, and of course reading and writing. Yes, I love reading, and not only romance. 

Fiona: Tell us your latest news?

I just released a contemporary romantic suspense called Falling Star. It’s the second in the Combustible series.

One day of hell and Ella Cross left behind her old life as an actress. She wants nothing to do with who she was and moves to a small town to get away from the media and her stalker. Trent Ward is a small town fireman who wants to unravel his new neighbor’s mystery. Sooner or later secrets always come out, but can they survive the truth?

I’m working on my next Others of Seattle book now, but I’m not going as fast because my husband has been in the hospital the last few weeks and will be here a little longer.


Fiona: When and why did you begin writing?

I’ve always written. I didn’t take the dive into publishing until three years ago. If I don’t write, I tend to go a little crazy. My characters won’t leave me alone.


Fiona: When did you first consider yourself a writer?

When people started responding to my first book, either through email, messages, or reviews. Seeing how much people loved my characters and my world really made me feel like I did something right.


Fiona: What inspired you to write your first book?

My characters wouldn’t shut up. They wouldn’t go away. I was dreaming about them, and finally had to sit down and put them on paper.


Fiona: Do you have a specific writing style?

I’m not sure how I would describe it but yes. Third person close is where I’m most comfortable because I love to dive into my character’s heads. I tend to focus more on my characters and not as much on the surroundings.


Fiona: How did you come up with the title?

For the newest book? My main character was a movie star, and she feels like she’s fallen from the high of acting thanks to the media and her stalker. At times Ella feels like she’s falling apart. And of course she winds up falling for Trent. There were so many reasons Falling Star fit for their story.


Fiona: Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?

The message sort of develops as I write and go back through the book. This one had a couple. Trent is in the same place with his sister as I am with a friend. I’m hoping my friend gets through her trials, but she’s not in the same place Tina is in. The second is to stop assuming. Both Ella and Trent have moments they expect certain reactions that they don’t receive. They have to take a step back and reevaluate and accept what’s really happening. And there was one more, at least a little, that people can surprise you. They aren’t always what they seem. Sometimes you need to take a step back and look at the person or situation objectively.


Fiona: How much of the book is realistic and are experiences based on someone you know, or events in your own life?

Nothing in the book is based off a particular person or events, though some of the emotions and thought processes for some of the characters are influenced by things I’ve encountered. That might seem like it is, but it’s pretty separate. I took things I’ve seen and delved into what if’s and taken things further, if that makes sense.


Fiona: What books have most influenced your life most? a mentor?

I’m not sure how to answer that. I draw a lot of things from different books, they make me think, take me on a trip, but I’m not sure I can say they have influenced my life so much. As for a mentor, my mother, who always believed I could do whatever I wanted to do. And I’m doing it now.

Fiona: Are there any new authors that have grasped your interest and who is your favorite author and what is it that really strikes you about their work?

There are so many great authors I love.

I love how Rebecca Brooke dives into her characters and stories. She writes mostly contemporary romance, and a little paranormal. In fact, we wrote Cursed Vengeance together and I found we work well together. We are working on a sequel now. But she gets into her characters’ heads, and thinks a lot like me. So it’s easy to dive into her world.

I love the world Sarah M Cradit has built. She pulls you in, and wraps you up with all these great characters and their family history. I love it.

Kym Grosso has created her own paranormal world I love as well. She started writing contemporary which is just as good.

LB Dunbar builds her series in a very tight knit community. I love the way she pulls her characters together.


Fiona: Name one entity that you feel supported you outside of family members.

Bloggers in general. Especially Lydia from HEA Bookshelf. My first book was her first paranormal book. I’ve hooked her. And when I tried contemporary, she was right there backing me. She’s been extremely supportive.

And my street team, Rivers Others. They are amazing. Great women, all very supportive. They’ve joined the crazy train and cheer me on.


Fiona: Do you see writing as a career?

Yes, it’s what I do full time, other than being a mother of course.


Fiona: If you had to do it all over again, would you change anything in your latest book?

Nope. I’ve found that arguing with my characters gets me nowhere. There were things I had planned on doing differently, but that didn’t work out the way I planned. The story worked out so much better because I followed my gut, and my characters.


Fiona: Do you recall how your interest in writing originated?

With reading in kindergarten. When I didn’t like I story I wanted to write my own. Not rewrite the story I just read and fix it the way I wanted, but to write my own stories because my head was more fun than the books I was reading then. Don’t get me wrong, there are so many books I love, but I had a very overactive imagination very early, and young books are great but I wanted bigger adventures.

Fiona: Can you share a little of your current work with us?

I’ve told you some about Falling Star. I loved writing Ella and Trent. I was nervous because Ella is a movie star and I didn’t want to write something totally unbelievable. I wanted to dive in, get things right and tell their story. I’m planning more in Combustible.

Right now, I’m writing Storm Wrath. It’s the 6th book in Others of Seattle and will follow Kellan and Zoe’s story. It’s going to be huge, taking us further than I’ve gone. A lot of it won’t take place in Seattle, but considering they have their work cut out with ending an ancient curse that nearly wiped out an entire race, it seems fitting there would be more travel.


Fiona: Is there anything you find particularly challenging in your writing?

Contemporary. There is so much more research. I’m one of those readers, especially in contemporary that get held up on details. I had to figure out a side character’s story in Falling Star before I could move it forward. And no, I didn’t get real deep into Metcalf’s background, but that will come up when I get to his book, and I will definitely get to his book.


Fiona: Do you have to travel much concerning your book(s)?

Nope. I don’t do much traveling. Three kids in school, busy husband at work. And right now I had to cancel a signing due to my husband’s health issues. Don’t worry, he’s recovering, but it’s going to be a long road.


Fiona: Who designed the covers?

I design my own covers. I’m not sure I would be very good describing what I want to another party, so it works out that I do my own. I get an idea in my head and can go with it.


Fiona: What was the hardest part of writing your book?

The ending. Always the ending. It’s a struggle to figure out how to tie up the little things in a way that doesn’t leave people wondering why I missed obvious thing, but hopefully give an idea of who may be next. At least when I know for sure who would be next.


Fiona: Did you learn anything from writing your book and what was it?

All about the suits firemen wear, stalker laws in California, videotaping laws, PTSD and all sorts of interesting things.

Fiona: If any of your books was made into a film who would you like to play the lead.

Oh boy, I have no clue. This is hard. Every single one of my characters have a very distinct look. There really is only one character who looks like a particular actor, and that was Kyle in Heart on Fire. Taylor Kinsey, and all because I saw a thirty second promo for Chicago Fire months before it premiered and all the sudden the story played through my head. And yeah, Kyle is a fireman, but no, not like Taylor’s character Severide.


Fiona: Do you have any advice for other writers?

Don’t give up. Keep writing. Listen to your characters. They tend to know best.

Fiona: Do you have anything specific that you want to say to your readers?

You all have been amazing. Thank you for reading my books. And I love to hear from you.

Fiona: What book are you reading now?

The Truth of Trystan Lyons by LB Dunbar. I’m over halfway, but life has kept me from finishing just yet. It’s great so far, and the third in the series.

Fiona: Do you remember the first book you read?

Um, no. I have read a little of everything. I remember loving the Choose Your Own Adventure books, into JRR Tolkien. Then Stephen King, VC Andrews, Anne Rice. Yeah, and that was all from ten to thirteen.

Fiona: What makes you laugh/cry?

It truly depends on my mood and what’s going on.

Fiona: Is there one person past or present you would meet and why?

I would love to pick F Paul Wilson’s brain. I love the tangled web he’s woven between multiple series.

Fiona: What do you want written on your head stone and why?

Lol, I have no clue. Honestly, I’m not going to be here, so at present, I don’t care what’s on it.

Fiona: Other than writing do you have any hobbies?

Reading. I don’t consider writing a hobby anymore. I used to knit, but I’m too busy writing to do that anymore.

Fiona: What TV shows/films do you enjoy watching?

Heartbeat. I love that show. Game of Thrones. The Walking Dead and Fear the Walking Dead. Yes, I watch Talking Dead too. That’s really about it. I don’t watch much TV. I get behind on shows then I don’t bother going back.

Fiona: Favorite foods / Colors/ Music

Salmon, seafood, good pizza, chocolate cheesecake.

Purple, green, blue.

Lots of rock, indie, alternative, and a few others mixed in. I listen to a huge amount of different things.

Fiona: If you were not a writer what else would you like to have done?

 I did tech support for a major software company for years. I like writing better.

Fiona: Do you have a blog/website? If so what is it?

www.brandylrivers.com

 

Links

 

Amazon author page – www.amazon.com/author/brandyrivers

 

HEART ON FIRE

Amazon http://myBook.to/HeartonFire

Nook http://bit.ly/1qbxnSk

Googleplay http://bit.ly/1oPRGeJ

iTunes – http://bit.ly/1n3YO7H

Kobo – http://bit.ly/1Cb0WRk

 

 

FALLING STAR

Amazon – http://amzn.to/1mG2nqR

Googleplay – http://bit.ly/1Ubex8N

iBooks – http://apple.co/1WuLz2l

Nook – http://bit.ly/1L61nry

Kobo – http://bit.ly/1Q4nDST

 

 

NIGHTS EMBRACE

Amazon – http://myBook.to/NightsEmbrace

Nook – http://goo.gl/gxT1rq

Smashwords – http://goo.gl/FL6Hxq

Kobo – http://goo.gl/CoqDOX

iTunes – http://bit.ly/1ivXjw7

Googleplay – http://bit.ly/1xKW601

 

PINE BARRENS PACK

Amazon – http://myBook.to/cursedvengeance

iBooks – http://apple.co/1P6b4Y7

Nook – http://bit.ly/1ShO864

Kobo – http://bit.ly/1YrIAK2

 

Come get lost with the Others

http://brandylrivers.com

www.facebook.com/brandylrivers

www.twitter.com/brandylrivers

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Here is the list of my books, 

Combustible
Heart on Fire (Book 1)
Falling Star (Book 2)
 
Others of Edenton
New Beginnings (Prequel)
In Too Deep (Book 1)
Shadows Fall (Novella)
Shadows of the Past (Book 2)
Fated Love (Novella)
Falling Into Place (Book 3)
Breaking Free (Book 4)
Mending Scars (Book 5)
Labor of Love (Novella)
Light in Darkness (Book 6)
Blissful Agony (Book 7)
Deep Trouble (Novella)
Entangled Darkness (Book 8)
 
Others of Seattle
Nights Embrace (Book 1)
Storm Mistress (Book 2)
Accepting Fate (Book 3)
Red Queen (Novella)
Seductive Solutions (Novella)
Changing Destiny (Book 4)
Coming Together (Book 5)
 
Spin off of Others of Seattle
Summer Rhythm
 
Pine Barren’s Pack
Cursed Vengeance

Thank you for reading,

Brandy L Rivers

Here is my interview with D. Nichole King

Name D. Nichole King

Age 34

Where are you from Iowa, United States

I was born and raised in the great Midwest. I graduated from Central College, a private liberal arts college in Pella, Iowa, with a degree in Psychology and Chemistry. As of this June, I will have been married to the love of my life for fourteen years, and together we have four children and currently reside in central Iowa.

Fiona: Tell us your latest news?

It’s been a long time coming, but I’m currently wrapping up the final book in my YA urban fantasy series, The Spirit Trilogy. I’m super excited to share this last book, The Soul, and I hope fans of the series will love it as much as I do!


Fiona: When and why did you begin writing?

I’ve always been an avid reader. In fact, I can’t remember not having a book in my hands. During high school, I’d even read as I walked from class to class. Yeah, I was that girl. Sometime in jr. high, I thought, “Why not?” So I grabbed a notebook and pencil and started writing. After I finished that one (I’m not sure I ever actually finished it, to be honest) I went to the next one, but after that I gave up and stuck to reading. I didn’t lose my passion, I just didn’t think I was any good at it. Fast forward to 2008, after my second son was born. A story popped into my head again, and I couldn’t let go of it. So I sat down at the computer and began to type. The Spirit poured out of me, and I immediately started in on The Body. But then life happened, and I set them both aside. It wasn’t until January of 2013 that my husband reminded me of these stories and said I should pursue publishing them. I worked hard on edits and rewrites of book #1, then started sending it out to agents and publishers. In December of 2013, I received two offers of publication. The next month I signed, and lo and behold, The Spirit was published by Limitless Publishing in April 2014. I haven’t stopped writing since.


Fiona: When did you first consider yourself a writer?

I don’t know, really. I guess maybe when I got a publishing contract. The moment was so surreal. I couldn’t believe anyone would want to publish something I had written.


Fiona: What inspired you to write your first book?

As crazy as it sounds, a weeping willow tree. It was dusk and I was driving home from my in-laws house with my kids in tow, and there, on the corner of their property, sat two weeping willow trees. And I thought, “What a perfect for a ghost to sit and contemplate life.” The story grew in my mind, and The Spirit Trilogy was born.


Fiona: Do you have a specific writing style?

I write how I think. I consider myself the narrator of my characters’ stories. I write what they see, how the feel, what they experience. I get into their heads. Style-wise, I let the characters dictate that. It’s their story, not mine.


Fiona: How did you come up with the title?

Titles are funny things for me. Sometimes the title is so obvious and other times I have the whole story finished before something hits me. I have a few stories in my head that are just titles at the moment.


Fiona: Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?

Hope is always a big theme in my books. Hope is such a beautiful thing, and in the midst of pain and suffering, sometimes it’s the only thing we have.


Fiona: How much of the book is realistic and are experiences based on someone you know, or events in your own life?

I think there’s always a piece of someone I know in a character. Sometimes I’ll have someone specific in mind that helps me better understand one of my characters, and sometimes I’ll need a specific trait or personality that someone I know has, and that can help me build the character better. As for experiences, the answer is yes and no. Some personal experiences I’ll use, but I’ll twist it a little.


Fiona: What books have most influenced your life most? a mentor?

So many! But in the world of writing, I always, always come back to one author who has been my biggest influence, my greatest inspiration–Lurlene McDaniel. I grew up on her books, devouring them as fast as I could. It was because of her and her books that when I went off to college, my original plan was to major in pre-med, then go on to medical school to become a pediatric oncologist. I didn’t go in that direction, but now, as I write, I still credit her for my love of reading and the direction my books take. I want to inspire people the way she inspired me.

Fiona: Are there any new authors that have grasped your interest and who  is your favorite author and what is it that really strikes you about their work?

Oh goodness! How much time do we have? LOL! I almost feel cliché to rattle off my list of Colleen Hoover, Kim Holden, Amy Harmon, K.A. Tucker, Cheryl McIntyre. They have this awesome ability to draw you into their stories and make you feel for the characters.


Fiona: Name one entity that you feel supported you outside of family members.

The first people who come to mind are my writing group. They are such a talented group of authors, and I’m in awe of their skills—Sunniva Dee, Laura Thalassa, Angela McPherson. The are always there for me, good or bad, and I can talk to them about anything. I don’t know if I’d be writing if it weren’t for them. It would definitely be much more difficult, that’s for sure.


Fiona: Do you see writing as a career?

For me, it’s a career, it’s a hobby, it’s my own personal form of therapy. I can’t not write.


Fiona: If you had to do it all over again, would you change anything in your latest book?

I always want to change things about my books. I feel like with each book, I get better, I learn more about my craft. There’s always, always room for improvement.


Fiona: Do you recall how your interest in writing originated?
(I’ll skip this one, if that’s okay, since I answered it in my long-winded paragraph above. LOL!)

Fiona: Can you share a little of your current work with us?

Of course! This is from The Soul, the last book of the Spirit Trilogy.

“I look like Godzilla’s wife,” I said to myself, peering into the full-length mirror behind my bedroom door. I picked at the blue graduation gown that was big enough for me and my Siamese twin. I pulled the material out at my sides as far as it would allow to prove my point to the mirror. The reflection seemed to agree with me. Unfortunately, the Villisca school board did not.

Fashion fail of the century.

Seriously, these robes needed to be redesigned a hundred years ago. I mean, I understood the whole school spirit thing, but why couldn’t I wear one of the fifteen Villisca Blue Jays t-shirts I’d inherited over the course of my one year here? That would demonstrate more school pride than this atrocity.

Besides, graduating today was not my idea. I had no intention of walking across a stage to receive my diploma. Rumor had it, if you didn’t show up they’d mail it to you, so I didn’t see why the fanfare was necessary. The hell that was last month was still fresh on my mind and this whole graduation celebration didn’t seem worth the mental effort.

Especially when tomorrow I’d be leaving.

I slipped my feet into white flip flops, giving nothing but a passing glance at the new two-inch footwear Mom had requested. I might as well be comfortable at the very least.

I did a little foot-modeling at the mirror. “That’s more like it.”

I took one last glimpse at my tent-reflection, grimaced, and swung the door open. Lucas, with his fist raised to knock, stood on the other side. His glowing green stare ran the length of my body and back up before he lowered his hand.

“Now that is sexy.” He nodded his approval, a small smirk the tell-tale sign of his teasing.

I glared at him. “Oh shut up.”

“No, I’m serious. Very hot.”

I went to slug him, but he disappeared and I hit at air. From behind me, strong, cool arms circled my waist and pulled me against a solid body. He dipped to my neck, and his lips brushed over my skin.

“I love you, Carrie,” he said out loud. Then, in my head he added, “You don’t have to come with me tomorrow. You can go home with your mom.”

            Since we’d returned from Jessica’s funeral, Lucas hadn’t let an opportunity to convince me to stay behind while he ventured off to North Carolina pass by. He wanted to protect me, and I knew that. It was sweet. But I had proved time and time again that I could take care of myself—with a little help.

Plus, Lucas’s soul-search wouldn’t only affect him. Half of his soul now resided in me. He needed me.

“Not a chance. I’m going with you,” I said, like I had every time. “I meant it when I said we’d do this together.”

I spun around in his arms, facing him. I lifted up on my tip toes and kissed him. “I love you, Lucas Reynolds, and I’m not giving up on this. We’ll find your soul and we’ll find a way to be together.”

 


Fiona: Is there anything you find particularly challenging in your writing?

Each book comes with its own set of challenges. In finishing up a series, I think the most challenging part was making sure I answered all of the outstanding questions, didn’t have any contradictions from book to book, and that I tied a nice, pretty bow at the end.


Fiona: Do you have to travel much concerning your book(s)?

I haven’t so far. I’ve down a few local signings, then last year I few down to Savannah, GA for a signing there. I’ll be in St. Louis this September for Penned Con!


Fiona: Who designed the covers?

The Spirit Trilogy Series had dual designers. Eden Crane Designs did the first cover, and Ashley Byland of Redbird Designs did the second cover. My publisher arranges these, and the cover for the third book is not yet ready. I’ll give a small hint though: I’m requesting it be green.


Fiona: What was the hardest part of writing your book?

For this book, time. We recently moved to a new house, so finding the time to simply sit down and write was super challenging.


Fiona: Did you learn anything from writing your book and what was it?

The Soul has a big forgiveness theme, and there’s one line in the book that really stuck out to me after I wrote it.
“The hardest part of forgiving someone is convincing yourself that you need to.”

Fiona: If any of your books was made into a film who would you like to play the lead

Some really, really great new actor/actress. J


Fiona: Do you have any advice for other writers?

Write. Write more. Keep writing.


Fiona: Do you have anything specific that you want to say to your readers?

Thank you. Thank you for your support. Thank you for your patience in waiting for this last book. Thank you for taking a chance on a new author. I can’t tell you how much that means to me.

Fiona: What book are you reading now?

I just finished reading Addiction by Angela McPherson last night, and then on May 2nd, I’m starting a buddy read of Night Shifts Black by Alyson Santos.

Fiona: Do you remember the first book you read?

The first book that made a big impact on me was Matilda by Roald Dahl.

Fiona: What makes you laugh/cry?

I cry at everything, seriously. I’m such a crier. My kids make me laugh, as do cat videos and videos of people injuring themselves (sorry!) on YouTube.

Fiona: Is there one person pass or present you would meet and why?

I’d love to sit down and have dinner with Jane Austen. She was an amazing woman whose books have impacted millions.

Fiona: What do you want written on your head stone and why ?

There’s always hope. Because there is. J

Fiona: Other than writing do you have any hobbies ?

I love to sing and dance. I’m also a huge scrapbooker, and like most scrapbookers, I’m waaaaaay behind!

Fiona: What TV shows/films do you enjoy watching?

My family absolutely loves The Avengers movies. Well, superhero movies in general. I like action and fantasy. When I’m by myself, I do quite enjoy a good chick flick.

Fiona: Favorite foods / Colors/ Music

I like good food, and I like a good variety of food, but I’ll never pass up a medium-rare steak gilled up by my husband. My favorite color is blue, and I love all genres of music.

Fiona: If you were not a writer what else would you like to have done?

 I’d go into marriage and family counseling.

Fiona: Do you have a blog/website? If so what is it?

www.dnicholeking.com Go check it out!

The Spirit (Spirit Trilogy #1): http://www.amzn.com/B00JX4EM6C

The Body (Spirit Trilogy #2): http://www.amzn.com/B00NMY10PK

Love Always, Kate (Love Always #1): http://www.amzn.com/B00JGWV3WW

Love Always, Damian (Love Always #2): http://www.amzn.com/B00XQGSRUK

Eight Days: A Love Always Novella: http://www.amzn.com/B00QXO0YCQ

Breaking Through: http://www.amzn.com/B016YPU2IY

Here is my interview with Pete Klismet

                                               

 

Today I’m interviewing Pete Klismet who is the author of three books, with more to follow.  Here’s a pic of the book covers:

 

 

 

Pete, tell us a little about yourself… where you grew up etc.

 

While I was born in Stevens Point, Wisconsin, my folks moved to Colorado (Denver area) when I was about 3.  Consequently, I consider myself to be a Colorado ‘native.’  Good enough for the girls I go out with!  My wife, the estimable Miss Nancy knows the latter wouldn’t happen.  I went to Catholic schools (yes, the ones with nuns and Christian Brothers) and received a partial football scholarship to an all-boy’s Catholic high school in the area.  Regrettably, while I had been a 2nd team All-City quarterback , the guy who was 1st team was my competition.  He eventually went on to be a 2nd team All-America QB at the Univ. of Wyo., leading them to the Sugar Bowl and an unbeaten season!  He was a little bit better than me.  I wound up at a public high school, but eventually quit in the 11th grade.  More on that later, but believe-it-or-not, it turned out to be one of the best decisions in my life.

 

How about your family life etc. – brothers, sisters, what your dad did.

 

I have 3 sisters and 1 brother, all younger than me.  Three of my siblings either attended or graduated from college.  Impressive when one considers we grew up in a lower-middle income home.  We essentially grew up in Englewood, CO, a Denver suburb.  My dad was a skilled brick mason and part-time contractor who completed the 8th grade.  That was the standard for the time he was in school, then he immediately went to work on the family farm in Wisconsin.  Mom completed high school in Superior, WI, and eventually attended Tulane University.  That alone was enough to impress me and tell me I needed to go to college.  Odd when you consider I didn’t make it through high school!

 

How about your education….what did you do after high school?

 

Two months after I turned 17, my best buddy and I enlisted in the Navy.  We went our separate ways after boot camp, he onto aircraft carriers, me onto something much smaller – submarines…..the old type….diesel/electric boats of WWII vintage.  They were called “Pig Boats” for a reason.  But I didn’t care.  The sub service was highly selective and, at that time, the best in the Navy.  SEALS had barely been invented then.  Plus, we got ‘hazardous duty pay’ and serving on those boats, we deserved it.

 

No sooner had I finished boot camp and went to sub school in New London, CT, than I took my GED tests.  Thanks to a great early education, I finished in the 90th percentile in each dimension.  When I got out of the Navy, I submitted my scores to the State of Colorado, and was awarded a high school equivalency diploma.

 

The Navy began what someone once characterized as a ‘very colorful’ life.  We were the 1st sub in the Tonkin Gulf (proud member of the ‘Tonkin Gulf Yacht Club’!!) after the conflict seriously heated up in 1964.  I got to visit quite a few foreign countries *(Japan, Australia, Philippines, Thailand) which began my life-long quest for more travel.

 

I’ll assume you didn’t make the Navy a career?

 

Heavens no.  I wasn’t the ‘military type.’  They threw some nice inducements at me such as a pretty fair sized re-enlistment bonus.  While that was a decent amount of money, I turned it down.  The next offer was the U.S. Naval Academy, (one year of prep school and then the academy).  I had saved quite a bit of money while in the Navy with the intention of going to college when I got out.  And that’s exactly what I did.

 

So you got out of the Navy and went right into college?

 

Yup.  I had to wait a few months, but I worked for my dad and made pretty good money providing his bricklayers with brick and mortar all day.  Pretty hard work, but I was young and making triple the minimum wage, so I was doing just fine.  I worked for him on weekends and summers while I was in college.  With what I’d saved and made working, it was no problem making payments for tuition and books.  But at that time, the state college I attended was on the quarter system and cost $95 per term.  Or about $400 if one attended during summer.  Which I did and finished in 3 years.

 

What was your major in college?

 

By a strange stroke of luck, I registered late and there were some ‘Police Science’ classes available.  So I took the ‘Intro’ class and added several more general ed classes to fill out my schedule.  I found the first Police Science class interesting, so I claimed that as my major with minors in both Psychology and Sociology.  The latter turned out to be a wise decision about 15 years later, as I’ll explain.

 

And after college, what happened?

 

The Ventura Police Dep’t in California was recruiting 4-year colleges for people majoring in Police Science or something related.  At the time they were the only police department in the country (and perhaps the world) which required a Bachelor’s Degree.  I did the testing they wanted and did pretty well I suppose.  During a Christmas break I drove out there and interviewed.  Plus looked over the department.  The town was beautiful, about 60 miles north of L.A. and right on the coast.  Great place to live and work it seemed.  They were hiring seven officers in June of that year, right after I finished school.  Since my testing had put me on top of the list, I got an offer before I graduated.  So that worked out well.  When I was in the Navy I liked California, so it wasn’t hard to go back.  I was married by then and my wife, who was a teacher, was pregnant, so having a job locked up was perfect timing.

 

So how did that part of your career go?

 

Pretty well I suppose.  I finished 1st in my police academy class and was promoted to detective after 1 ½ years on patrol, and to sergeant in 2 ½ years.  All record times.  I started working on a Master’s Degree in Criminal Justice at Calif. Lutheran University, completed that and went to work on a 2nd one.  I finished that one in Public Administration at the Univ. of Southern Calif.  My intent was to eventually be the police chief in Ventura or elsewhere.  While going to school at USC, I was in classes with some guys from the LAFBI office.  They encouraged me to apply and eventually I tested 4th of about 10,000 people in the USA.  That got me an appointment as a Special Agent.  So I spent about 9 years as a cop and just over 20 as an agent.  It all worked out fairly well.

 

My 2nd book, FBI Quantico (The real story of the FBI Academy) by ‘Agent X,’ is about my experience and training as a new agent.  No one has ever written such a book.  Just as a clue – the training was extremely inadequate.  But the In-service schools the FBI offered were great.  I was trained as a Firearms Instructor, Hostage Negotiator/Trainer, a few others, most importantly I was selected to be one of the FBI’s first group of field agent/profilers.  That formed the basis for my 1st book “FBI Diary: Profiles of Evil.”

 

And then I assume you retired from the FBI?

 

That’s correct.  Nearly 30 years in law enforcement was enough fun for me.  I’d always wanted to use my degrees and experience to teach.  Not long after I retired I was hired as a full-time instructor at a small community college here in Colorado.  A few years later, Pikes Peak Community College in Colorado Springs offered me a position as Criminal Justice Dep’t Chair and Associate Professor.  In a lot of ways, that was the best job I ever had.  Yes, including THAT other one!

 

As you look back at your life – is there any one thing you’d change?

 

For a kid who grew up in a lower-middle income home and quit high school, I guess I’d have to say I acquitted myself pretty well.  Some have called my life ‘colorful,’ and indeed it was.  Had I not been so bored in high school and applied myself, I suppose I could have been a doctor or lawyer, or some other high-level position.  However, I think when people find out what I did with my life, particularly having been in the FBI, they’re probably more impressed with that.  It’s a pretty mysterious job with more than its share of mystique.  People have all sorts of pre-conceived ideas from TV, but none of that is close to accurate.  As I look back, I think I did all right in the final analysis.

 

Do you remember the first book you read?

 

I don’t.  My mom used to read Robert Lewis Stevenson books to me and she said I could recite some passages when I was about 2 years old.  That probably doesn’t count.  My guess would be the first book I read was a sports biography of some famous baseball player.  I loved biographies, learning about other people’s lives fascinated me.  In fact, when we were forced to read “A Tale of Two Cities,” in high school, I hated it because I wanted to read what I liked.

 

Do you recall how your interest in writing originated?

 

Even as a kid I loved to write.  If told in school to write a sentence, I’d write a paragraph.  If told to write a paragraph, I’d write a mini-short story.  I never minded doing term papers or writing in English classes.  I’m one of those rare critters who loves both English and Math.  I did plenty of writing in college and graduate school and loved it.  Some of my reports from the police department, I’ve been told, are legendary.  I once arrested a Catholic priest for drunk driving.  Thinking I might be up against the Vatican lawyers in court, I wrote the longest report in the history of VPD!  He pled guilty.  With the experiences I had as a cop and agent, I kept notes, thinking that I would eventually write a book.  I’m up to three now and there isn’t any end in sight.  And, they’re all non-fiction.  I really admire and respect all of you out there who can and do write fiction.  I don’t have to make stuff up.  The truth is much stranger than fiction.  If you read “FBI Diary: Profiles of Evil,” and/or “FBI Diary: Home Grown Terror,” you’ll see exactly what I’m talking about.

 

If you were not a writer what else would you like to have done?

 

For 30 years I did what I was cut out to do.  The writing I do is for fun and I really don’t make that much money from it.  There are some good tax write-offs though, because there is a lot of research necessary to write books.

 

The only other thing I would have liked to have done as a career was to be a sports broadcaster.  However, at the time I was finishing college, sports hadn’t exploded as it has today.  Thus, even though I was given an opportunity to attend a broadcasting school, I had a job in hand with VPD, and made the smart decision to take the bird in the hand.

What inspired you to write your first book?

 

The first two cop-related books I ever read were “The New Centurions,” and “The Onion Field,” both by Joseph Wambaugh who had been a sergeant on LAPD.  After I read ‘em I remember thinking to myself, “I can do that.”  Thus, the idea was fomented in my middle 20’s.  Had to go through a whole lot of career stuff and work as a college professor before I finally got published.  The wait was worth it.

 

Do you have a specific writing style?

 

I write like I am – silly and irreverent.  I see humor in most situations, but I’m not stupid about it.  “Home Grown Terror” is the first of my three books that is more serious than silly.

 

If there would be any advice I’d give to new authors, that would be – write like you are.  Don’t try to copy someone else’s writing style.  It won’t work, and besides your style may be better than theirs.  Be yourself.  Things will then flow a whole lot better.

 

Who is your favorite author and what is it that really strikes you about their work?

 

Right now it’s probably Nelson DeMille.  Some of the reason for that is he’s like me – uses appropriate humor and doesn’t throw ‘f-bombs’ all over the place.  That’s a word I refuse to use in my books.  Just don’t see a point in it.

 

Another no-no for mystery or crime writers is using the term ‘vic’ when talking about a victim.  If someone close to me was killed and an officer referred to them in that way, I’d knock ‘em on their butt!

 

Are there any new authors that have grasped your interest? 

 

Being part of a writing community (or ‘tribe’), I know a whole lot of writers and have read some of their books.  It’s really hard to single anyone in particular out, but a woman in Utah by the name of Karla Jay is simply terrific and the more she writes the more of a favorite she will become.  She’s coming out with a new book, and I’ll probably rob the FedEx truck on the way to the bookstore to get it!  I am constantly bugging her to get another one published after I read her 1st book, “Speaking in Tongues.”  (I hope that’s the name or Karla will kill me)!!!

 

Can you share a little of your current work with us?

 

I’m now writing a college textbook on “Criminal Profiling” – don’t have the exact title yet.  Because of the way I am, it will be anything but a ‘traditional’ college text.  It’s going to be something more interesting and challenging than the garden-variety texts we all read in college.  I’m going to do it exactly as I did my classes……give them the theory, then a case study and have them apply the theory in trying to ‘profile’ the case.  I also think many members in the public will enjoy it.  So that’s my current project.  I have others waiting in the wings.

 

If any of your books was made into a film who would you like to play the lead role?

 

Denzel Washington would be good in “Profiles of Evil.”  Chris Pine would be another candidate.  I love him.  He should be the next James Bond.  Jeremy Renner would also be good in “Home Grown Terror.”  As to the middle book, which is being remodeled with new cover and back page, it would have to be someone fairly young to replicate the age of New Agent trainees at the academy.

 

Do you have a blog/website? If so what is it?

 

No blog.  Too busy writing and doing other things to devote time to running one.

My website is:  www.criminalprofilingassociates.com

I’m on Facebook as Pete Klismet and “Pete Klismet Author FBI Series of Books.”  Stop by and say whattup!

Here is my interview with Amber Scott

 

Name  Amber Scott

Age: No way, Jose.

Where are you from

I’m originally from Reno, NV and my family are third generation Nevada born – a rarity. I’ve lived in Phoenix since 1999. I fell in love with the lightening storms and sunsets here.

 

 

Fiona: Tell us your latest news?

I’m about to – finally – complete a work in progress that seriously sidetracked my muse for the last two years, putting a couple of series’ on hold. It’s called Fostering Magic and I’m debating on releasing it under a different pen name. It’s a Young Adult and not at all the steam level I usually write. It’s basically foster care for witches. Think Harry Potter…in a trailer park. LOL

 

 
Fiona: When and why did you begin writing?

I began writing when my son was about ten months old because as a stay home mom, I needed some sanity. I also read No Plot, No Problem by Chris Baty, founder of NanowriMo. I had wanted to write for as long as I could remember but never actually commited to doing the actual typing it all out part. After finishing my first novel, a really terrible thing that will never see the light of day, I knew one thing. I love writing.

 

 

 
Fiona: When did you first consider yourself a writer?

I considered myself a writer all of my life. I considered myself a novelist when I finished my first full length draft.

 

 

 
Fiona: What inspired you to write your first book?

It’s funny, I saw a YouTube video of Stephen King talking about reading the book that makes you think, hell, I could do better than this. I also had that moment. I read a book and thought, that wasn’t complicated. Let me finally try this.

 

 
Fiona: Do you have a specific writing style?

I used to. I was a plotter, a list maker and Goal Motivation Conflict outliner. I wrote each scene with a chapter in mind and a rhythm. Then along came Fostering Magic and my muse turned everything on its head. I get scenes out of order, I struggle to sense where the chapters should break. It’s unnerving but I keep handing over the wheel to the story and it’s working out.

 

 

 


Fiona: How did you come up with the title?

I love titles! A whole story can spring forth out of a title. They just come to me from music or funny little bits of things I learn along the way in life.

 

 

 


Fiona: Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?

For Fostering Magic the message is that magic is in all of us. It is everywhere, in everything. We just have to learn to harness it.

 

 

 
Fiona: How much of the book is realistic and are experiences based on someone you know, or events in your own life?

One of the characters, Brenda, is based on a friend of mine. An incredibly fabulous dance instructor who leaves sparkles wherever she goes.

 

 

 
Fiona: What books have most influenced your life most? a mentor?

All of Johanna Lindsey’s titles. Love them all. The Notebook by Nicholas Sparks. I also love neuroscience and metaphysical books. My Stroke of Insight is amazing.

 

 

 

Fiona: Are there any new authors that have grasped your interest and who  is your favorite author and what is it that really strikes you about their work?

I loved The Dead Key by DM Pulley. LOVED. I’m a big Ann Charles fan. I literally laugh out loud at some scenes. She writes characters you feel like you know, like you could gossip about to another friend.

 

 

 
Fiona: Name one entity that you feel supported you outside of family members.

The Romance Writers of America Dessert Rose Chapter gave me the tools and network of other authors to become the writer I am today.

 

 
Fiona: Do you see writing as a career?

It’s great when it is a career. That means it is earning money. But I write anyways. I daydream, I jot down, I type away regardless of income. (Though possibly with less urgency.) It’s who I am. I’m always inside a story in my head, tinkering.

 

 
Fiona: If you had to do it all over again, would you change anything in your latest book?

Every book I’ve written I look back and can see areas to improve. At a point you have to just let it be and trust you told the story you saw in the best way you could, so that others can have that experience of it, too.

 

 
Fiona: Do you recall how your interest in writing originated?

I don’t. I just remember telling my mom at age four or so that I wanted to be a writer. I knew it in my bones even then.

 

 

 

Fiona: Can you share a little of your current work with us?

Zacharia Bunches the IV perked his ears left and south, alert for signs of the father coming in to check on this sleeping un-angle. Theadora Milner. What had happened to the wide eyes and sweet wonderment two years ago to this day?

Just like her, it had up and left. Probably in the middle of the nighttime unlight just like her, too.

He twitched his whiskers and hopped up onto her chest. “Tsk.” His ward. His responsibility. He’d woken to the bad belly feeling, hop-toed a peek to see where she’d be and what had this rabbit found?

Goners.

“I’ve got a bad feeling ‘bout today, miss.”

No bunny should witness his first sunrise in two years time whilst pacing the lawn fretting over his ward. He should not see a sunrise at all! Not for another month be! Sixteen is what they agreed. Not a day sooner out of his warren.

Not that a hidden hole in a magical made knapsack could be deemed much of a warren. His mistress had done her best to make the canvas hole comfortable. Games, cushion, all the carrots and chocolate a rabbit could eat.

But this? This would not do. Not do at all. Not in the plan. Not at all.

The only thing she could offer to make it right would be a thick, dirt dusted carrot between his teeth.

He paused his pace and flopped down on the lawn. Today was the perfect day for a perfect day. The morning sun warmed his spot and white fur. A fall breeze ruffled his longy-long ears. Zachariah Bunches IV breathed in the earthy scent of autumn taking over the fragrant summer air making it hard to stay angry.

Maybe angry was overrated. After all, she had come back. After all, he’d not have known to even check except for the yuck in the gut. She was back now, safe and sound. No harm done. He could sneak back in the pack and await the correct day to arrive.

What was a few more minutes between a bunny and the sun, after all?

He might just stretch his legs out long and lay there all day. Yes, yes like that. A good gaze up into the thick boughs swaying above him would also do nicely, too, the leaves shivering, the shadows dappling over his paws and nose. Lovely little shadows.

Dancing.

Leave it to a filthy witch to suck his perfect away.

The terrible squeaking croak is what gave her away. What on earth had made such an awful sound? The awful sound triggered alarm. His hind legs tucked in, readying to spring. There, at the top of the front steps. A toad in two hands. The two hands because there stood the witch. Her tall boots, her tattered skirt, she looked like a storybook. But her witchy clothes weren’t what gave her away. Her smelly smell did.

She stunk. Like lies and scrambled eggs.

Yes, okay. The very violet sparks and matching smoke from the spell she cast upon Theadora Miller’s front door clued him in a bit, too. Yep.

The witch was here.

Dirty shirts! The witch was here!

Bunches pulled his body in tighter. Curses and stones. If the witch got in fast, he might not make it back to the pack. This was the one he’d been warned about. Had to be. The one that would come for Miss Thea.

Why hadn’t he heard her approach? Darn it to bits. No mortal’s shoes so softly stepped as a witch’s set upon sneaking. The patchwork bag slung over her shoulder looked like she’d mugged Mary Poppins. The mishmash of bright blue here, yellow stitched there, a confusion of color.

That kind of stitch sewed in far more than material and thread. That bag had magic stitched in it. Magic like the wretched toad that squawked in her hands.

Magic like his own burrow sewn into the very backpack Thea took each day. The one her mama made. Today it would go, too, when the witch took her away.

The desperate croaking sent a new ripple of panic right through to his rabbit tail. Not a muscle moved save his heart. What to do? Thumpity thump thump the beat knocked.

Oh, his selfish. Oh, hammering fear. Think, think, think. He cowered low into the tall grass, daring not one hop. Not a single whisker twitch. Not yet. If she spotted him, she’d know immediately, he was no ordinary rabbit.

He watched as the witch held the toad aloft, its long legs didn’t even search for a foothold. The tall, wide door sat closed and Thea and her dad, Hugo, could not be warned. Liquid trickled from the toad. The drips scalded the wood planks. Hiss!

There was one thing a rabbit on the guard could do – he would find a way to keep his vow and duty.

The day had come. He extracted his attention from the witch, from the whine of the toad and the splash-hiss on the wood. Her murmured words carried on the once lovely breeze, tainting it.

If he hip-hopped quick to the rear of the two-story house whence he came, surely, he could make it back through the doggy door, up the stairs, back to the pack. He could not fail. He could not let his miss leave without him. Surely, he would get there just in time. In the nick of it!…

 

 

 
Fiona: Is there anything you find particularly challenging in your writing?

Fitting writing into every day. I love it, don’t get me wrong, but so many other things come first. Kids, work, cleaning, family, friends.

 

 

 
Fiona: Do you have to travel much concerning your book(s)?

I’ve not traveled for my writing career in a few years now. I’m not sure it’s effective as a means of promotion until you reach a certain level of fan demand.

 

 

 
Fiona: Who designed the covers?

For the most part, me. I had the awful experience of an artist giving my hero a mullet once and I vowed to never let that happen again. Sometimes I use an artist but I find it incredibly fun to create what I already see in mind while writing it.

 

 

 
Fiona: What was the hardest part of writing your book?

The first draft. Once I have the bones, I can really edit and mold what I see in my head, but the first draft is a bit like feeling around in a dimly lit room.

 

 

 
Fiona: Did you learn anything from writing your book and what was it?

I learned to have patience with myself.

 

 

 

Fiona: If any of your books was made into a film who would you like to play the lead

Every book has actors already cast in my head! LOL. Except for Fostering Magic. Maybe it’s because the characters are younger? Thea would likely be played by a Disney star. Her cohorts, too.

 

 

 


Fiona: Do you have any advice for other writers?

Keep writing. No matter what. Write with the dream of making it big and with the true unconditional love that makes it okay if you don’t. Let yourself love it.

 

 
Fiona: Do you have anything specific that you want to say to your readers?

Yes. Thank you. No, the deepest thank you that words can’t convey. I’m continually amazed that I even have fans! But the notes asking when the next book is out, the emails that let me know what I do matters. It makes every blank page worth facing.

 

 

 

Fiona: What book are you reading now?

I am reading the latest Ann Charles release. The chick keeps getting better and throwing some shockers into each one.

 

 

 

Fiona: Do you remember the first book you read?

The first book I read that knocked my socks off was A Gentle Feuding by Johanna Lindsey. But the first first book ever? Maybe Mouse and the Motorcycle.

 

 

 

Fiona: What makes you laugh/cry?

My kids crack me up. Tragedy that befalls others makes me cry. Missing my dad. Most recently, every time I hear the song Purple Rain. #ripPrince

 

 

 

Fiona: Is there one person pass or present you would meet and why?

Prince. Purple Rain was my first cassette tape. His songs are on my life’s soundtrack, tied to so many moments. And there is so much I didn’t know about him.

 

 

 

Fiona: What do you want written on your head stone and why ?

I’m not sure I actually want a headstone. Maybe…. “Boo!”

 

 

 

Fiona: Other than writing do you have any hobbies ?

Nope. (Writing is not a hobby, in my opinion.)

 

 

 

Fiona: What TV shows/films do you enjoy watching?

I love Comedies. RomCom. Loved the Hunger Games series. It varies. Just not horror. I get scared.

 

 

 

Fiona: Favorite foods / Colors/ Music

Coffee. Chocolate. Cake. Blue of almost any shade. A pretty eclectic mix. I use music to write so I like to find the lesser known stuff.

 

 

 

Fiona: If you were not a writer what else would you like to have done?

Hairstylist. I have shaky hands, though, so there went that dream.

 

 

 

Fiona: Do you have a blog/website? If so what is it?

http://amberscottbooks.com

Amazon authors page http://www.amazon.com/Amber-Scott/e/B003NI0QPA/ref=dp_byline_cont_ebooks_1

 

 

 

Here is my interview with C.M. Albert

Name C.M. Albert is my publishing name. My friends call me Colleen.

Age 42 & proud of it!

Where are you from I’m originally from upstate New York, near the Adirondack mountains and Lake Ontario. Beautiful, but cold. Have migrated down south ever since to warmer climates and now call North Carolina home.

 

Fiona: Tell us your latest news?I just released my first book, Faith in Love, and was thrilled when it hit #3 on Amazon’s Kindle Worlds Hot New Releases list. I was blown away. But more importantly, I’ve been getting amazing reviews from readers about how the book has really touched their lives, helped them make decisions, and really just struck a chord with them – all from a contemporary romance novella! That’s why I write, so those reviews mean more to me than a number on a list.


Fiona: When and why did you begin writing?

I’ve been writing since I was a young girl. English was always my favorite class and reading has always been my favorite past time. I started writing fiction seriously and for myself  (not just for magazines or Corporate America) after my son was born in 2006. I started a YA urban fantasy / paranormal romance and have shelved it several times to get it just right. I put my writing career on hold for several years when I launched my copy editing career as The Grammar Babe. I made many new friends and learned a ton about writing and what works or doesn’t in the self-publishing world through the amazing clients I worked with. I’ve lessened my editing work load over the last year so I could finally focus on my own writing and dream of becoming a published author.


Fiona: When did you first consider yourself a writer?


I’ve always considered myself a writer. Because whether you publish or not, if you are writing, you are a writer. I have always written poetry, articles, online content, speeches, PR material, blog posts, you name it. Then I branched out a few years ago and wrote for a few online fiction collaborations and had a short story published under my pen name (at the time) in a book of short stories. Now, I’m focused on my own novels and am enjoying the writing process. I consider myself a published author now, but in my heart, I’ve always been a writer.


Fiona: What inspired you to write your first book?


I’ve had about five works in process over the last ten years, but never forced myself to finish any of them. I was raising my family and editing, so it was easy to put off finishing one and just doing it already! I believe everything happens for a reason and there is divine magic in the timing of things. This was the right time for me to publish because I have so much more confidence in myself as a woman and a writer now than I did in my 20’s or 30’s. I have a stronger, better writing voice now too, so I’m glad it worked out the way it has.

What inspired me to finally write this book, Faith in Love, was an opportunity my dear friend and fellow author Stacy Eaton brought to me (for which I’m forever grateful). It was a chance to write a novella that tied in to Melissa Foster’s Remingtons Kindle World. I used to edit for Melissa Foster and am a huge fan of her contemporary romance series, so this was a no brainer for me! What it gave me was a deadline (which I clearly needed) and a gentle way to ease into the self-publishing world. It was the best decision I ever made.


Fiona: Do you have a specific writing style?


It’s definitely a blend of humor, sexiness, and romance, with a little tug at the heart strings. My strength is definitely in building my characters and in their dialogue. I seriously live and breathe them while they are in my head. I write across genres though, so I have several works in progress this year that are either contemporary romance or  paranormal/dark fantasy. I also have the Guardian Trilogy (the one I mentioned earlier) that is YA, and a children’s picture book I need to shop around to agents. I think the main thing to know about my writing is that light and love will always win. There will always be hope of some sort for my readers.


Fiona: How did you come up with the title?


For the Remingtons Kindle World, it had to have Love in the title for branding purposes, just as Melissa Foster’s books do. That way readers could easily know it was a part of her “world.” I knew right away that I wanted to write about a spiritual healer (Celeste) and a broken man who has sworn off love. I think the idea of finding your faith in love again just grew out of that.


Fiona: Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?

I think just that you always have choices in life, and you always have divine help if you’ll but ask for it. It’s not a religious book, but it’s certainly one that has a strong spiritual theme because of the main character’s profession as a holistic healer. And that no matter how broken we feel at times, my wish would be that we can find hope again, let love back into our hearts (whether it’s romantic love or not). Sometimes we have to let go and stop trying to control how something is going to happen for us, and just open our hearts to the realization that it can. In other words, we just need to have a little faith.


Fiona: How much of the book is realistic
and are experiences based on someone you know, or events in your own life?

Very little about the book is based on events in my own life or anyone else’s life that I know. It is truly fiction. That said, I do also happen to be a Reiki practitioner who believes in angels and holistic healing. So even though my life and career is not centered around it as it is for Celeste, there is a small part of my heart and beliefs that are reflected in her character.


Fiona: What books have most influenced your life most? a mentor?


My favorite book ever is The Outsiders, by S.E. Hinton. It has one of the best opening lines ever* and is very poetic in its story telling. There’s a dance between societal class differences, teen angst, poverty, forbidden romance, and it just pulls at the heart strings.

Every book I have ever edited has influenced me in some way as well. One of my top ten favorite books ever is Melissa Foster’s Have No Shame. It was such a beautiful forbidden love story that accurately reflected a period of time during the Civil Rights movement. It was brave, heart wrenching, and just plain fantastic.

I also love poetically written YA novels; I’m highly touched and inspired by how an author writes. Their word choices and phrasing affects me deeply. There are so many beautiful ways to express a thought, and when an author can do that in a unique and powerful way, it leaves an impression on you. Some of my favorite YA authors are Jandy Nelson, Colleen Hoover, Katja Millay, John Green, and Tahereh Mafi.

In terms of the fantasy genre, I am in love with K.N. Lee’s Eura Chronicles series and Rosehead by Ksenia Anske. As for other genres, I absolutely loved Gone Girl, A Girl Named Zippy, The Idiot Girls’ Action-Adventure Club, all things Bertrice Small and Nora Roberts, Beloved, and Me Before You. There are probably a hundred I’m forgetting. I take a little something away from every book I’ve ever read.

As for a mentor, I’m extremely lucky to have several strong and amazing women authors in my life whom I know I could turn to in an instant for advice, a laugh, or lessons learned. Melissa Foster always offers solid, wise advice. She is like the Queen of Indie Publishing and has experience on both sides of the fence (traditional and indie). She is highly motivated to help indie authors on their journeys and started her two businesses, Fostering Success and World Lit Café, for just that purpose. She’s someone I definitely look up to and go to for advice. Stacy Eaton is like that for me, too. I know I could go to her with the stupidest question and she would be there for me, be a straight shooter, and somehow make me laugh! And my dear friend and author K.N. Lee. She has hustled and busted her ass to get where she is as an author. She has put in her time, learned many valuable lessons along the way, and is like super woman with her non-stop work ethic. She has great experience not only in writing, but in the PR and Marketing company she owns, The Book Nymph, to help indie authors succeed and get their ranks up. Just a gem.

*Opening line: “When I stepped out into the bright sunshine from the darkness of the movie house, I had two things on my mind: Paul Newman and a ride home.”
~ The Outsiders, by S.E. Hinton.

 

Fiona: Are there any new authors who have grasped your interest and who is your favorite author and what is it that really strikes you about their work?

The author who has piqued my interest the most is Ksenia Anske. She is an indie author who just vomits every part of her life, writing process, and horrific life experiences into the world in the most beautiful, touching, and inspiring way. She was also an author whom I edited for over the course of a few years: the Siren Suicides Trilogy (full set), Rosehead, and Irkadura. The thing about her writing is I think you either love it, or you won’t “get it.” I get it. It is extremely dark based on a culmination of life experiences in Russia with an abusive family, and that colors and influences many of her novels’ themes. I think what strikes me most about her work is that she’s not afraid to “go there” with the darkness and ugliness of some people’s characters. She doesn’t hide behind political correctness or worry about what her readers will think. She writes the character, no matter how vile or dark.

She is raw, funny, humble, a completely open book, a strict and dedicated writer and reader of her craft, and wicked smart. She observes, learns, and grows like no author I’ve ever seen. She’s a freaking genius. Oh, and she both sells and gives all of her books away for free. Yes, I said FREE.

I think my favorite all around writer is Colleen Hoover, and not just because we share the same name. I devour every one of her books the minute it comes out, and I always pre-order and buy all of her books in paperback. She writes a combo of YA/NA with romantic elements, and also there is always a twist so it’s not predictable. She has an amazing way with words too, and her sense of humor is evident in her witty, sharp, intelligent characters. I always get the infamous and coveted book hangover after reading one of her books, where I feel decimated for a few days and can’t even pick up another book because I’m still noodling over and stuck on hers! They’re that good.


Fiona: Name one entity that you feel supported you outside of family members.


The biggest is probably my Colleen’s Angels Street Team and Beta Reading group. It has been building slowly, but I feel like I know each and every one of them as a close friend by now. They have been very honest, extremely supportive, and have cheered me on in a way I didn’t realize I needed and came to appreciate more than I ever could have imagined. They are a special group of women in my life. I’d give them the moon and the stars if I could.


Fiona: Do you see writing as a career?


Absolutely. It’s my main focus right now. I just can’t write as fast as the ideas are coming! It comes second to raising my kids, but it is definitely a rollercoaster ride I have jumped on and have no intention of getting off of anytime soon.


Fiona: If you had to do it all over again, would you change anything in your latest book?

Not at all. I’m sure someone can find fault in it, I’m not perfect after all. But I love, love, love Celeste and Egan and their love story. I’ve had so many readers tell me they wished Celeste’s business was real and that they could go there.


Fiona: Do you recall how your interest in writing originated?


My mother was always a writer, editor, and reader, so I know she sparked and nurtured that in us as well. But I always received very positive feedback from teachers on papers I wrote encouraging me to continue writing and that I had a good “voice.” I think that passion that my mother started in me while I was young, combined with encouragement along the way, really helped solidify that interest for me. I also had a pretty tumultuous childhood in many ways, and I think reading and writing were my ways to escape and find the good in the world. Somewhere safe for me to disappear and immerse myself for a few hours.

Fiona: Can you share a little of your current work with us?


I am currently putting the finishing touches on Book 1, Part 1 of a dark fairytale series I’m creating called the Dark Woods series. This first book is called Redd’s Descent and they are all a dark paranormal retelling of classic stories combined with a little Celtic folklore, and always with a twist of some kind. Redd’s Descent comes out at the end of May 2016.

Here’s a small snippet:

“Fiona,” she whispered. “My name is Fiona.”

“Redd,” he answered. “I want to know what happened to ye, fair Fiona, but we need to hurry and leave these woods before dark. Bad things happen in these trees after nightfall.” The fear that clouded her eyes and the way she hunched down into Redd’s grip told him that she’d had a taste of those bad things, and his heart ached for her. He couldn’t imagine how she was still alive.

“Sacrifice,” was all she said, and then he knew. She was someone’s sacrifice to the dark woods creatures.


Fiona: Is there anything you find particularly challenging in your writing?

Not really, other than to just be true to the characters and not over analyze what readers may or may not like about them. It’s fiction after all, and you have to write the truth into your characters’ motivations, even if you don’t like or agree with them.

And as an experienced editor, I also have to force myself not to over edit as I write.


Fiona: Do you have to travel much concerning your book(s)?

I haven’t had to yet. But my first book, Faith in Love, is an Amazon Kindle World exclusive, so there are no paperback copies. It wouldn’t make for a good book signing or convention table! I’ll wait to see how my book sales and readership grows in the future to determine how many events I’ll participate in. At the end of the day though, my kids come first and travel would be hard on the family.


Fiona: Who designed the covers?

Zoe York designed Faith in Love to be consistent with the other Remingtons Kindle World books that launched in March 2016. There were 18 in total! I got to choose my cover photography, and Zoe did an amazing job bringing it all together. She will also create my novella cover for Kaira Rouda’s Laguna Beach Kindle World that I have coming out on 7/7 called Last Night in Laguna.

Anna Croswell of Cover Couture is creating my cover for Redd’s Descent and will hopefully create all of the covers for the Dark Woods series. She has great vision, creativity, and execution, so I can’t wait to revel the cover when it’s done!


Fiona: What was the hardest part of writing your book?

Just trusting the process. Sometimes my brain would start creating and wanting to write a chapter not in order and I would try to resist it, but I didn’t want to lose the creative spark when it was hot. So I just gave in and wrote chapters when they arose, even if they were out of sequential order. It was easier than I thought bridging them, and was just a good reminder for me to let go of so much control and allow the creative process to happen organically.


Fiona: Did you learn anything from writing your book and what was it?

I learned that when my intentions are pure and in alignment with my soul’s highest good and God’s plan for me, things come easily. When I ask for my angels’ help, the words just start to flow for me. I’m a little enamored with ritual, so when I begin to write I usually light a creativity candle, have a huge citrine point nearby, and say a prayer to Saint Gabriel before I open my book. She’s the archangel who supports creativity and the arts. It may be hooey, but it feels good and works for me.

Fiona: If any of your books was made into a film who would you like to play the lead

This one is easy for me because for Redd’s Descent I have had Michael Fassbender in my mind and as my muse from day one. I don’t always do this, but Redd was created in his image (Redd’s just maybe a little beefier and taller). I drool over am enamored with Micahel Fassbender.


Fiona: Do you have any advice for other writers?

First and foremost it would be to just write. If you believe you have a book in you, do not give up. I am 42 years old and my dream of becoming a published author just came to fruition for me. It’s never too late. I love this quote from Jodi Picoult:

“You might not write well every day, but you can always edit a bad page. You can’t edit a blank page.”


Fiona: Do you have anything specific that you want to say to your readers?

Thank you. Thank you for taking a chance on a new writer, thank you for your reviews (I read every one of them), and thank you for your ongoing support. Knowing I have made a difference in people’s lives and that they now consider me a new favorite author means more than anyone will ever know. Thank you for giving up a small sliver of your time to read my book(s). I am honored and have so much gratitude for you all.

Fiona: What book are you reading now?


Well, I just finished K.N. Lee’s Night of the Storm. It is epic fantasy and is part two in the Eura Chronicles. It did not disappoint after I fell in love with book one, Rise of the Flame. So I literally just started the first chapter of The Good Girl by Mary Kubica. It has dark twists and turns with a promise of being in the same category as Gone Girl…so I have high hopes for it.

Fiona: Do you remember the first book you read?

No, but some of my early picture books that left a huge impact on me are: Murgatroyd and Mable by Wesli Court, Girls Can Be Anything by Norma Klein, Chicken Soup and Rice by Maurice Sendak, Kevin’s Gramma by Barbara Williams, and Shel Silverstein’s A Light in the Attic and Where the Sidewalk Ends.

Fiona: What makes you laugh/cry?

My kids. Not a day goes by that I don’t laugh because of them, and I cry the hardest when moments seem to be slipping away too fast and I’m trying to grasp them with futility.

Fiona: Is there one person past or present you would meet and why?

So many. But I have to say that Jesus would be high on my list. I’m not overly religious, but I think he had so much right with his love and compassion, and I’d love a sit down and chat with him to find out what his feelings are on so many of the controversial issues today and how he feels about people using his name to justify their beliefs. Was the bible interpreted in a way that was loyal to how he lived, what he truly believed, and what he taught to others? And, at the end of the day, does it really just boil down to the love, light, kindness, and compassion we show to all others?

Fiona: What do you want written on your head stone and why ?

Oh sheesh. This is a tough one since I don’t want to be buried. But if I want something said about me, it would probably just be that I was kind, I never gave up, and that I made a difference to others. I do know I don’t want a traditional funeral. I want a roudy Irish wake with people laughing and remembering me with humor over stories; and I want someone to play “If I Ever Leave This World Alive” by Flogging Molly. Now that would be a fun way to celebrate my life!

Fiona: Other than writing do you have any hobbies?


Reading? Ha-ha! I also love to walk and hike, play tennis, spend time with my kids and husband—especially outdoors, watch movies, organize, write letters by hand, take pictures, and spend some quiet time connecting with God and my angels.

Fiona: What TV shows/films do you enjoy watching?

I love fantasy and intrigue shows like Alias, Heroes, X-Files, Blindspot. I also love some reality TV shows like The Bachelor and Bachelorette, The Voice, Extreme Makeover. I love most anything when it comes to movies, but I lean toward action/fantasy/paranormal/superheroes (Lord of the Rings, The Huntsman, Avengers), dark stuff like Gone Girl, or romantic comedies.

Fiona: Favorite foods / Colors/ Music

Foods: Apples, cheese, fresh Vietnamese, pasta, asparagus
Colors: Red is my first love, but I am enamored with turquoise/teal and Pantone 206c, which is kind of a hot pink/fuchsia blend.

Fiona: If you were not a writer what else would you like to have done?

All of the things I’ve ever wanted to do, I’ve done. I’ve been in banking, training design and development, communications (which is what my BA is in), marketing and PR, and book editing (which I still have my hands in some). I loved every job. I’m also a Reiki practitioner, which keeps me balanced and allows me to do my energy work and keep that side of my personality and belief system in my day-to-day life. There’s no other job I wish I had done in my life. I find ways to fulfill those needs in other ways, like volunteering as a sub in my kids’ schools, working with a non-profit, or making time for photography.

Fiona: Do you have a blog/website? If so what is it?         


Yes, this is mostly my Blog site and I am in the process of designing a full Web site as a landing spot, but I blog here: http://cmalbert.blogspot.com, and am very active on Facebook at: www.facebook.com/cmalbertwrites.

Direct short link to my book: http://Smarturl.it/RemKW_Faith
Amazon author page: http://smile.amazon.com/C.M.-Albert/e/B01CFCT62S/ref=sr_ntt_srch_lnk_1?qid=1461692891&sr=8-1

Other social media:

Twitter: https://twitter.com/colleenmalbert

Pinterest: https://www.pinterest.com/GrammarBabe

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/cmalbertwrites

Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/14931260.C_M_Albert

Blog: http://cmalbert.blogspot.com/
Grammar Babe Web page: http://www.colleenmalbert.com/

 

Thank you so much for having me! Your interviews are always so fun and thought provoking. I really appreciate this opportunity.

 

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