Here is my interview with Paul Levas

Name Paul Levas

Age 32

Where are you from Antioch IL

I graduated High School from Desert Vista in Ahwatukee Phoenix, Arizona in 2002. My family is from the Northern suburbs of Chicago IL. We moved to Phoenix in 1993. However, I have relocated to Tucson, Arizona

 

 

Fiona: Tell us your latest news?

Currently, I am thrilled to announce that I have a long story, The Circle I Tread, coming out on July 1st, 2016. It includes an excerpt of my debut novel 43. The Circle I Tread is a drama about a man who is shot in his self-help group, and lives to tell about it. 43 is a novel about an abused boy, Jason Dillinger, and befriend his newest neighbors. They give him this mysterious box with the number 43 engraved on it. This box shows him a new life, a life he has never seen. It breathes life into John, and John breathes his life. That will be out later this year or early 2017. I’ve also been invited to be a part of this Anthology for the International Animal Rescue donations. I have a short story included. Very proud of that. In addition, it was announced the other day, I have a collection of short stories coming soon.

 

 
Fiona: When and why did you begin writing?

I started writing at an early age, my teens. However, I didn’t get serious about making a career until I was in my early twenties.

 

 
Fiona: When did you first consider yourself a writer?

From the beginning. We all start somewhere, right?

 

 


Fiona: What inspired you to write your first book?

Stephen King, Elmore Leonard, and Quinton Tarantino.

 

 
Fiona: Do you have a specific writing style?

I really enjoy starting the action from the first sentence, instead of leading up to a specific situation. However, I use the ‘What if’ scenario a lot.

 

 
Fiona: How did you come up with the title?

The Circle I Tread involves the traits, good and bad, we develop from past family members. It is a circle that everyone treads, walks. 43? That has been confusion to some friends of ‘Why?’ It involves a major plot point for the main character, John Dillinger.

 

 
Fiona: Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?

Not one I meant to happen, but yes, there is a message in my upcoming novel and The Circle I Tread. 43? It is frustrating what abused kids go through. The Circle I Tread is basically, we are not perfect, but we’re all people that have mistakes, traits, good and bad.

 

 
Fiona: How much of the book is realistic and are experiences based on someone you know, or events in your own life?

I would say, I write what I know and see, but then my imagination takes over.

 

 
Fiona: What books have most influenced your life most? A mentor?

Stephen King has influenced me the most.

 

 

Fiona: Are there any new authors that have grasped your interest and who is your favorite author and what is it that really strikes you about their work?

I really enjoy Michael Bray. His storytelling is solid and unique, and it grips me from the start.

 

 
Fiona: Name one entity that you feel supported you outside of family members.

My high school sweetheart. Sarah. She didn’t just encourage my writing, but things in my life that led up to my career.

 

 
Fiona: Do you see writing as a career?

Of Course!

 

 
Fiona: If you had to do it all over again, would you change anything in your latest book?

No.

 

 
Fiona: Do you recall how your interest in writing originated?  

This is funny. I was in school, and saw that a classmate had SCREAM the screenplay. I left school and bought the screenplay. I went home, read it, and wrote my own short script.

 

 

 

Fiona: Can you share a little of your current work with us?

Sure, I’ll share a bit of a novel called The Vanishing Monkey.

SOLITARY

 

Porter sits at his desk in his tiny office, staring out the window at the stucco wall, and waits for inspiration. The stucco is the prison in which he’s captive: his house. In truth, his house isn’t the prison. The prison is the four-walls of his office where he goes to work every morning. The long bookshelf on his black wooden desk is where the stacked books on writing (How To Write A Novel! On Writing By Stephen King! Plot & Structure! How To Write Great Dialogue) rest beyond his IBM Word Pad. They are no service to him now like they were when he first sat at the same desk and, in five months, punched out his first published novel.

The chandelier gleams through the office, most days setting the mood perfectly, but not today. His daily ROCKSTAR energy drink rests on top the bookshelf beside his stuffed monkey. However, the inspiring taste offers him nothing. The furry-brown monkey isn’t offering him anything either.

Papers and trash litter the tile. He doesn’t care. His desk is what he cares about. His favorite author, Stephen King, stapled to the wall, offers him no guidance either. The bright yellow paper stapled above Stephen King is his own personal affirmation. I AM A WRITER. I AM PUBLISHED. MY NAME IS PORTER WILLIS! The yellow pad beside his IBM has a zero written in black ink. Above the zero, the words ‘Word count’ are written. Lucky Silver, a gift from Brenda, rests on the yellow pad, once his lucky pen, now terrorizes him with each glance.

By God I will write today. I will not again suffer this hell. Lucky Silver shall serve me, not torment me. I need that first sentence. One sentence. Then I shall control the day. It’s a new day (six weeks since that day in Night Owls) and he has to write great fiction. It means his life. What will he write? What if he puts something up for grabs? What will he decide? Right now, he only hopes the first sentence he writes today will bring the inspiration he needs.

The questions haunt him in composition hell. Every author, he figures, understands. You’d have to be a writer to understand the process of writing: creating great ideas and then working on the story until it is perfect, the courage and focus, the determination, the time. For some, it takes a few months, years for others, but no matter the time, writing takes a lot of work.

When he began writing, Porter didn’t understand the development of story, however, since purchasing and reading the books, his talent only grows.

“Then why can’t I do it now?” he asks the silent office. “Why can’t I get back into it? What is wrong with me?”

Pepper leaps to her feet and moves her muzzle under his right arm.

“How are you, girl?” he says brushing his palm over her back. Pepper licks his wrist, and gives him the droopy eyes a dog gives when their sad or begging. Porter can see her mind telling him “Here daddy, I’ll lick your wrist.” He smiles, strokes her back, and rubs her neck. Pepper’s bed has been beside his feet every day since he wrote his first novel. She’s his companion, his only companion after Brenda left, and she’s part of the inspiration. However, today Pepper’s just like the rest. No guidance. What is he going to do? He glances at the Stephen King picture. Stephen help me, I need this. I want this.

The response doesn’t come. He glances at the word count pad, as gooseflesh cover his arms and shivers terrify him. His smile fades and Pepper lies down in her bed. The blank screen of his word processor and the flashing cursor wait patiently, like always. I’m doing what I know. I’m writing what I

know, aren’t I? He doesn’t want to question himself, but six weeks of not writing a single word will do that to a writer. Plus, life without Brenda isn’t making things any better.

Porter’s thought breaks. His eyes open wide and he spins around toward Pepper. His heart thumps rapidly. YES! The image is as thick as when he wrote his first novel. Yes, he’s got an idea, a great, wonderful, spellbinding idea. In fact, it’ll blow his first book out of the water, which he needs badly.

Pepper’s eyes flutter and her body trembles. Just another dream about chasing that damn cat. He thinks, and shifts his eyes toward the blank screen and starts typing.

 

 
Fiona: Is there anything you find particularly challenging in your writing?

I can’t pin-point a certain thing, but I can tell you I earn something new everyday.

 

 
Fiona: Do you have to travel much concerning your book(s)?

Not yet, but planning to soon.

 

 
Fiona: Who designed the covers?

My friend, one of my favorite writers, Michael Bray

 

 
Fiona: What was the hardest part of writing your book?

Getting information I recieved correct.

 

 


Fiona: Did you learn anything from writing your book and what was it?

Patients.

 

 

Fiona: If any of your books was made into a film who would you like to play the lead

Mark Whalberg.

 

 
Fiona: Do you have any advice for other writers?

Don’t give up! I met a couple the other day, and the lady told me I want to write a book, but have no time. I told her. “Write one sentence, write one paragrapha a day.”

 

 
Fiona: Do you have anything specific that you want to say to your readers?  

I hope you enjoy my stories, and that you are entertained.

 

 

Fiona: What book are you reading now?

The second book in THE BILL HODGES SEREIES By Stephen King. Finders Keepers.

 

 

 

Fiona: Do you remember the first book you read?

Unfortunately, No.

 

 

Fiona: What makes you laugh/cry?

Life.

 

 

Fiona: Is there one person pass or present you would meet and why?

My grandfather. Because I’ve heard so much about him, and was a great man.

 

 

Fiona: What do you want written on your head stone and why?

I’m not sure.

 

 

Fiona: Other than writing, do you have any hobbies?

Yes, I love playing video games, poker, traveling, and road-trips

 

 

Fiona: What TV shows/films do you enjoy watching?

Favorite movie is the Back to The Future trilogy

 

 

Fiona: Favorite foods / Colors/ Music

I love Italian and Mexican food. Blue is my color, and music. Love punk rock, blues, rap, funk. Social Distortion is my favorite band. Johnny Cash, and Elvis as well.

 

 

Fiona: If you were not a writer what else would you like to have done?

Be in the business of giving back to disabled, veterans, etc.

 

 

Fiona: Do you have a blog/website? If so, what is it? Yes. https://www.facebook.com/PAULLEVAS18/?fref=ts

http://paullevas14.wix.com/authorpaullevas

 

Authors Amazon page http://www.amazon.com/Paul-Levas/e/B00BGFTX7O/ref=sr_ntt_srch_lnk_1?qid=1463620833&sr=8-1

 

Thank you.

 

Here is my interview with A. J. Chaudhury

Name  A.J. Chaudhury

Age

Almost 19

Where are you from?

I am from Assam, a north-east Indian state. I live with my mother and sister. I grew up in the hilly state of Nagaland in an agricultural research complex. It was a pretty scenic location, our quarters being located at the top of a hill, and we could look at the fields and roads and rivers spread out far and wide below. The lack of good transportation was a problem though.

Fiona: Tell us your latest news?

My historical low fantasy short “A Song of Blood” is releasing shortly. I am shooting for a release in the first week of July. After that I’ll release my novel “The Sword of Tropagia” sometime in August. After that we’ll see.

I also recently made a Facebook fan page for “A Song of Blood.”


Fiona: When and why did you begin writing?

I have always been writing. I remember writing a story with dinosaurs as protagonists when I was four years old. It was collaboration between my sister and me. It was actually a romance, where the hero dinosaur and his girl survive to the 21st century.

Yes, it super weird story though and hopefully it won’t see the light of day.


Fiona: When did you first consider yourself a writer?

I first truly considered myself a writer about five years ago, when I began writing “The Sword of Tropagia”. Before then I had written fiction too, but only when I wrote TSOF that I thought “I want to do this for a living.”


Fiona: What inspired you to write your first book?

There was this Dinosaur cartoon on T. V. during those days that I was absolutely crazy about. It was probably “Dango the Dinosaur” or something. Dango had somehow survived to the modern age and meets a bunch of college students and they have lots of adventures. Without the show, I fear I won’t be the story teller I am today.


Fiona: Do you have a specific writing style?

My writing style is a mixture of the writing styles of all the authors I have read. Throw in Rowling, Martin, Tolkien, Conan Doyle, Kipling, Narayan…and the list goes on.


Fiona: How did you come up with the title?

I based the title of “A Song of Blood” on “A Game of Thrones”. I figured the title should appeal to the right readers. And “The Sword of Tropagia” pretty much revolves around the sword, so the title was obvious from the start.


Fiona: Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?

Yes, ASOB explores the cyclical nature of vengeance and the true nature of myths and legends. As for TSOF, it’s just a fun fantasy novel filled with lots of adventure and is less darker than ASOB.


Fiona: How much of the book is realistic and are experiences based on someone you know, or events in your own life?

Occasionally I do throw in heavily disguised events from my own life. Mostly though it’s directly from my head.


Fiona: What books have most influenced your life most? a mentor?

The Harry Potter series. The Hobbit. Books by Kurt Vonnegut. Rigante series… so it goes.  Booksie.com is the closest thing to a mentor I have ever had. The folks there were crucial in improving my craft.

Fiona: Are there any new authors that have grasped your interest and who  is your favorite author and what is it that really strikes you about their work?

Yes, I read “The Shaman of Neroterra” a while back and thought it was great. The author, Daniel Adorno, is a new indie author and his writing style reminded me of David Gemmel, one of my favorite authors.


Fiona: Name one entity that you feel supported you outside of family members.

Reading biographies of people in Wikipedia was good support. Mark Twain, Robert E. Howard, Charles Dickens etc It feels good to know I am not the only one struggling.


Fiona: Do you see writing as a career?

Obviously! I imagine a day when I can support myself completely through my words. It would be great to be a best seller someday. But I guess that day is yet to come.


Fiona: If you had to do it all over again, would you change anything in your latest book?

Nope. Sometimes you have to let things to be as they are.


Fiona: Do you recall how your interest in writing originated?

My interest in writing originated from my late father. When I was a child he would bring story books and tell me stories of his own at bed time. So I will always be indebted to him. Without him, we wouldn’t be having this interview.

Fiona: Can you share a little of your current work with us?

There will always be blood,

And it certainly needn’t be mine.

For I love my slumber and the wine;

Let the red be washed away by the flood”- Vishva, a pov character from ASOB.


Fiona: Is there anything you find particularly challenging in your writing?

Yes, I find coming up with new metaphors a bit challenging. But I am getting better at it. The trick to getting better in this craft is to write every day, as if your life depends on it.

And it actually does.


Fiona: Do you have to travel much concerning your book(s)?

No, the travelling is mostly in my head. Most of my research is done online. At least for now I am keeping my distance from writing books that require too much of research. At the end of the day, the important thing is to keep  the reader engaged in a story.


Fiona: Who designed the covers?

Myself. The first covers I designed sucked. My covers are way superior now. It took me a long time to get to the point in cover designing I am now and I’d advice new indies it would be best to get a cover designer at the beginning. If you want to go the hard way though, like me, then first take a good long look at the covers of the bestselling books in your genre on Amazon. Next, try to create the easier covers yourself. Keep practicing.


Fiona: What was the hardest part of writing your book?

Sitting down and writing day in and day out. Without this crucial step, nobody can be a writer.


Fiona: Did you learn anything from writing your book and what was it?

Patience bears good fruits. And it’s good to make mistakes sometimes.

Fiona: If any of your books was made into a film who would you like to play the lead.

Film? … I guess I would like totally unknown actors to play the lead characters. I love it when a new actor blows me away with their acting skills.


Fiona: Do you have any advice for other writers?

Keep writing no matter what. Learn from your mistakes and improve. Find people who are willing to help you. Ignore the naysayers. There are a host of websites, softwares and groups online these days with which you can improve your craft and stay motivated.


Fiona: Do you have anything specific that you want to say to your readers?

I just want to transport my readers to a dream world of my own. I want them to have a good time and be entertained.

Fiona: What book are you reading now?

Currently I am reading “Origins of the Never: by C. J. Rutherford. With his writing skills, I fear I’ll have to give him 5 stars.

Fiona: Do you remember the first book you read?

It was probably “The Jungle Book” by Rudyard Kipling.

Fiona: What makes you laugh/cry?

Black comedy done right makes me want to laugh and cry at the same time.

Fiona: Is there one person pass or present you would meet and why?

I’ll like to meet Hitler. Anybody who wishes to write a perfect villain should meet him and know him inside out.

Fiona: What do you want written on your head stone and why ?

My head stone? … The Dreamer.

Fiona: Other than writing do you have any hobbies ?

My life revolves around my writing, although I am also interested in film making. Someday I’ll be awarded an Oscar for best director…

Fiona: What TV shows/films do you enjoy watching?

I’ll enjoy any film that feels honest/ has black comedy done right/ or is just a fun film. There is this bollywood film Haider that I am pretty obsessed with. It is a modern day adaptation of Hamlet set in conflict ridden Kashmir.

I also love fantasy films like LOTR and the Harry Potter series.

Fiona: Favorite foods / Colors/ Music

Black is my favorite color (though it’s not a color, right?). I like traditional Assamese foods and I enjoy a fusion of folk and rock music.

Fiona: If you were not a writer what else would you like to have done?

I guess painting won’t be bad. Any form of art will be good acutally.

Fiona: Do you have a blog/website? If so what is it?

I have two blogs. My author blog is http://ajcahudhury.wordpress.com/

The other is a cross promotion blog for speculative fiction authors http://freefantasygenrebooks.wordpress.com/ Any author wishing to promote their speculative fiction work will benefit from visiting it.

Also, anyone wishing to taste my writing can visit my author blog where I am offering my book “The Drabird”, a fantasy tale set in the same world as “The Sword of Tropagia”, for free.

 

Thanks for having me!

Here is my interview with Lindsey Richardson

Name Lindsey Richardson

Age 22

Where are you from

Maryland

A little about your self `ie your education Family life etc  

Hello! I am a fantasy author who lives in Maryland with my husband and our three cats. Both traditionally and self published. My four published books are part of the Magicians series (published under my maiden name: Sablowski). I work full time for an insurance company and write in my free time.

 

 

Fiona: Tell us your latest news?

I am currently in the process of finishing the rewrites for my newest and upcoming book, Clara and Claire. I’m hoping for a release in 2017!

 

 
Fiona: When and why did you begin writing?

I’ve been writing for as long as I can remember, but specifically I started writing to publish my work at the age of 12. I thought if I can write why not share it with the world? The novel I wrote at 12 never was accepted by a publisher, but at 18 I finally had a success with my second novel, Cursed With Power.

 

 
Fiona: When did you first consider yourself a writer?

At 12 when I knew I wanted to pursue the career.

 

 
Fiona: What inspired you to write your first book?

My love for literary work. I loved reading and writing. At first I started with short stories, and then finally it developed into full length novels. A lot of my work was left “on the shelf,” never finished but always there for if I ever wanted to return to it. I was inspired by authors who had made a difference with their writing simply by writing stories close to their heart.

 

 
Fiona: Do you have a specific writing style?

I usually prefer to write in first person; it allows me to connect closer with the characters and feel more involved in the story. From time to time it differs, especially depending on what I write.

 

 
Fiona: How did you come up with the title?

Here’s the brief version for each of my books…

Cursed With Power —inspired because of Celestria’s magic and how she felt towards it

Shadows and Embers —because of how Nicia felt society viewed her type of magic

Thicker Than Blood —Alaire’s belief that maybe blood isn’t thicker than water

Bloodline Inheritance —the realization that we cannot run away from who and what we are. Sometimes were born with it, sometimes it’s forced upon us, and we have to make the most out of it

Clara and Claire —wanted to keep it simple but also bring attention to the main characters

 

 
Fiona: Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?

For the entire Magicians series I wanted to open readers’ minds up to the idea that magic (and the world in general) is not simply black and white. It’s not always easy for us to determine a clear antagonist and protagonist. I wanted readers to be able to chose for themselves.

 

 
Fiona: How much of the book is realistic and are experiences based on someone you know, or events in your own life?

The Magicians series is fantasy with historical fiction. I based the places, religion, and some other aspects on what really happened during that time period. Some events and people were lightly inspired by people and events from my own life, but overall I had fun with creating a world and people entirely fictional.

This also holds true for my upcoming book, Clara and Claire. No one person or place is based on anything specific. With this book I dove deeper into the fictional world and also focused more on the mystery aspect of the story.

 

 
Fiona: What books have most influenced your life most? a mentor?

A lot of books have influenced me; I don’t think I could point out just one. As for mentors, I really looked up to successful authors. Their stories of rejection inspired and motivated me. Their wisdom with the publishing process helped me, and though I don’t know them personally I was able to connect with them because of their stories.

 

 

 

Fiona: Are there any new authors that have grasped your interest and who  is your favorite author and what is it that really strikes you about their work?

I have a lot of favorites, but I can point out two specifically who really stood out to me. John Green for his different writing style and conveying emotions in a story so well. And Tamora Pierce for her magic series that focused on different aspects of magic. She was one of many that convinced me I wanted to write in the fantasy genre.

 

 
Fiona: Name one entity that you feel supported you outside of family members.

My husband, though now he considered my family, supported me since day one (while we were dating). He’s been with me through everything, and he honestly deserves all the credit for supporting me, even when others did not believe I could do it.

Also the writing community. I had my work on Inkpop and Wattpad before it was published. Aspiring writers and just readers in general have always supported my work and motivated me to never give up.

 

 
Fiona: Do you see writing as a career?

I consider writing as my career, even though I can’t (presently) do it full time. I work on my books every single day and plan to for the rest of my life.

 

 
Fiona: If you had to do it all over again, would you change anything in your latest book?

I probably would have focused less on setting deadlines for myself (and sticking to them). Sometimes it became really overwhelming, and especially with self publishing, I’ve learned it’s better to spend as much time as you can and not rush.

 

 
Fiona: Do you recall how your interest in writing originated?

From writing short stories and then wondering what it would be like to write a full novel and have it published.

 

 

Fiona: Can you share a little of your current work with us?

Currently I’m preparing Clara and Claire for publication. It’s a fantasy novel with a focus on mystery. Claire is the narrator, telling us the story of Claire Kanelos’s disappearance.

 

 
Fiona: Is there anything you find particularly challenging in your writing?

The most challenging part of writing is definitely editing. I just recently finished editing, and it is hands down the toughest part. Writing can be challenging some days, but it’s easy to always get back into the beat. Editing is a whole different story. It requires patience, time, and a lot of energy. It can wear you out and isn’t at all pleasant.

 

 
Fiona: Do you have to travel much concerning your book(s)?

The only time I travel is for book signings. I’ve been to PA and VA, but for the most part I stay in MD.

 

 
Fiona: Who designed the covers?

Cursed With Power —designed by an artist at Old Line Publishing

Shadows and Embers —from goonwrite.com

Thicker Than Blood —Alivia Anders

Bloodline Inheritance —paper and sage designs

Clara and Claire —Alivia Anders

 

 
Fiona: What was the hardest part of writing your book?

The hardest part in terms of writing any of my books is always the beginning and the end. It’s the most important part of a book, and it’s always the part that changes the most during edits and rewriting.

 

 
Fiona: Did you learn anything from writing your book and what was it?

I learned the most from the Magicians series. I was so young when I started the series, and so much happens over the span of four years. I grew with the characters, matured with them, and also learned valuable lessons with them. Ever since my second book, Shadow and Embers, I’ve been self publishing my books. I’ve learned who to market, edit, rewrite, and much more all on my own. It’s not easy work, but it’s necessary to get the job done.

 

 
Fiona: Do you have any advice for other writers?

Never let rejection or age stop you. Age does not affect your writing. You can write a book at any age, during any time of your life. And rejections will only make you stronger. Use them to strengthen your work and motivate you to pursue your dreams. No one can write the book in your head except for you.

 

 
Fiona: Do you have anything specific that you want to say to your readers? 

Thank you so much for your endless support. You are the reason I continue to write each and every day. I cannot wait to share Clara and Claire with you, and in the meantime thank you for your patience!

 

 

 

Fiona: Do you remember the first book you read?

No

 

 

Fiona: What makes you laugh/cry?

My husband tells me I’m an easy person to make laugh. As for crying, it depends on the situation.

 

 

Fiona: Other than writing do you have any hobbies ?

Blogging

 

 

Fiona: What TV shows/films do you enjoy watching?

Game of Thrones, Once Upon a Time, Black Sails, Outlander.

 

 

Fiona: Favorite foods / Colors/ Music 

Pizza, mac and cheese, caesar salad

favorite color: blue

music: really anything country and rock especially

 

 

Fiona: If you were not a writer what else would you like to have done?

Be an editor or ghostwriter

 

 

Fiona: Do you have a blog/website? If so what is it?

www.lindsey-richardson.blogspot.com
My Amazon Page: http://www.amazon.com/Lindsey-R.-Sablowski/e/B009888IG8/ref=sr_ntt_srch_lnk_2?qid=1463884959&sr=8-2

Here is my interview with Renea Porter

Name : Renea Porter

Age: 38

Where are you from: born in Va, raised in OH and live in PA

A little about your self `ie your education Family life etc  :

Im married (celebrating my 15th wedding anniversary and we still act like newlyweds. I have a step son who I’m super close too that I refer to as the computer wizard.

 

 

Fiona: Tell us your latest news?

Im releasing a book on May 13th. It’s the one book that is the most personal to me. Titled: The Year I met August

 

 
Fiona: When and why did you begin writing?

Ive been creating stories in my head for years. Only started putting pen to paper in 2014

 

 
Fiona: When did you first consider yourself a writer?

When I released my first book

 

 
Fiona: What inspired you to write your first book?

The characters were in my head for a solid TWO years and finally I had to tell their story. They wouldn’t leave me be.😀

 

 
Fiona: Do you have a specific writing style?

I don’t follow the popular trends. I write what I want to read. REAL love stories. And I try to stay realistic as possible as well.

 

 
Fiona: How did you come up with the title?

My titles are pertain to the storyline. For instance Coming Back to You was about a war vet coming home from the war, and making amends with the girl her left behind.

 

 


Fiona: Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?

The Year I Met August, my message was to never settle just because you love someone, it doesn’t mean love is enough. But, what if love was enough?

 

 

 
Fiona: How much of the book is realistic and are experiences based on someone you know, or events in your own life?

Oh gosh, we are getting personal here. So as I mentioned The Year I Met August is based on REAL events, however, it is fiction to tailor to the characters. But it is my most personal book. I’d like to believe we’ve all been Murphy (female MC) at one point in time.

 

 
Fiona: What books have most influenced your life most? a mentor?

Melissa Stephens is the first person who I consider a mentor. She helped me immensely with my first book.

 

 

Fiona: Are there any new authors that have grasped your interest and who is your favorite author and what is it that really strikes you about their work?

I’m a BIG fan of Tarryn Fisher, because her stories are the least expected.

 

 
Fiona: Name one entity that you feel supported you outside of family members.

Fellow authors and the book community

 

 
Fiona: Do you see writing as a career?

Maybe one day

 

 
Fiona: If you had to do it all over again, would you change anything in your latest book?

No. They show how I’ve grown as a writer.

 

 
Fiona: Do you recall how your interest in writing originated?

Because I love book so much, and there were some themes I didn’t see much of and wanted to read.

 

 

Fiona: Can you share a little of your current work with us?

Not yet. Im still deciding what to put out next (between two books).

 

 
Fiona: Is there anything you find particularly challenging in your writing?

Researching your information (for instance PTSD for Coming Back to You. Because you want to make sure to that your characters portray their characteristics correctly.

 

 
Fiona: Do you have to travel much concerning your book(s)?

No

 

 
Fiona: Who designed the covers?

I have a few designers I go to. I don’t stick with one person.

 

 
Fiona: What was the hardest part of writing your book?

Keeping the momentum.

 

 
Fiona: Did you learn anything from writing your book and what was it?

From my latest one was that sometimes love is enough.

 

 

Fiona: If any of your books was made into a film who would you like to play the lead.

Coming Back to You, Katie Cassidy for Maura, and Taylor Kinney for Pierson.

 

 
Fiona: Do you have any advice for other writers?

Always dream big. Never stop doing what you believe in. Be ORIGINAL. I cannot stress that last one enough. Don’t follow the themes that are popular just because you think that’s what will get you to the top.

 

 
Fiona: Do you have anything specific that you want to say to your readers?

That they are AWESOME!!

 

 

Fiona: What book are you reading now?

Cross Check by Colleen Masters

 

 

Fiona: Do you remember the first book you read?

Old Yeller

 

 

Fiona: What makes you laugh/cry?

Sad stories, character deaths and lovey dovey stuff.

 

 

Fiona: Is there one person pass or present you would meet and why?

Elvis Presley. Who wouldn’t want to me the king? He broke all kinds of molds in music and society.

 

 

Fiona: What do you want written on your head stone and why?

Loving Wife, Stepmom and lover of books.

 

 

Fiona: Other than writing do you have any hobbies?

Reading and reviewing books. I particularly love romance books.

 

 

Fiona: What TV shows/films do you enjoy watching?

Hope Floats (movie), Vampire Diaries, Nashville, The Originals, The Girlfriend Experience, The Affair etc. Im a TVaholic

 

 

Fiona: Favorite foods / Colors/ Music

Foods: Spaghetti, Meatloaf, and cake! Colors: Purple, Pink and Red. Music: Pop and rap

 

 

Fiona: If you were not a writer what else would you like to have done?

Read, that was my first hobby/love. I already work a full time job outside the home.

 

 

Fiona: Do you have a blog/website? If so what is it? https://www.facebook.com/AuthorReneaPorter

Amazon Authors page http://www.amazon.com/Renea-Porter/e/B00IIYZ3PC/ref=dp_byline_cont_pop_book_1

 

Here is my interview with Carole Avila

Name  Carole Avila

Age  Uh, uhm…not important? I heard once a man or interviewer should never ask a woman any questions that have numbers: age, size, weight, etc. 😀

Where are you from  I was born and raised in Southern California.

A little about your self `ie your education Family life etc

I’m a very private person, of sorts. I feel uncomfortable about sharing personal information on the net. However, in my forthcoming book (The Long Term Effects of Sexual Abuse) and my related blog, htase.wordpress.com (Healing Through Awareness and Self Expression) I share intimate experiences and feelings with survivors of sexual abuse. So my privacy is relative to location and those things not related to abuse issues.

Fiona: Tell us your latest news?

Just this month my 500-word short story, Shadows of Oranges, won 1st place in an international contest sponsored by the City of Ventura. (It’s listed on my “Short Stories” tab at my blog: caroleavilablog.wordpress.com.)

Fiona: When and why did you begin writing?

I loved my own made-up stories (we were too poor for books) and wrote my first one in the 1st grade—four lines of hero worship about my oldest brother on newsprint paper with dotted lines. When it came back from a substitute teacher’s hand, it was marked with a big red F in the corner, with all kinds of red punctuation marks where I missed quotation marks, commas, and incorrect spelling. 6 years old and I was so ashamed! I crunched that paper up and shoved it to the farthest and darkest corner of my desk.

From then on I memorized my poems and stories. I finally wrote them down in high school but kept them hidden. One day in my late twenties, my best friend, Laura, found the notebook and wanted to know who wrote the fabulous work inside, but I thought she was making fun of me! On her deathbed 7 years later, she snapped out of a coma and grabbed my arm. She said, “Carole, I’m closer to God right now than you will ever be in this lifetime. I know you were called to be a writer. Promise me you won’t die with regret and that you’ll write.” She died the next morning. After coming out of a huge depression two years later, I decided to write professionally.

Fiona: When did you first consider yourself a writer?

Laura said I was already a writer with my first story, but once I was published I could call myself an author.

Fiona: What inspired you to write your first book? 

When my middle daughter, Jasmin, was about 8 or 9 years old, she couldn’t sleep after reading a book by R.L. Stine. I asked her what was so scary about it and she said to read it for myself. I did and didn’t find it horrifying at all. She said, “If you think you can write better, then do it.” And I did, but Death House took years to flesh out.

Fiona: Do you have a specific writing style?

I would say that in any kind of book, cliffhangers are important to keep the reader interested, and that’s what I’ve tried to incorporate in all my works.

Fiona: How did you come up with the title?

The title of Eve’s Amulet-Book 1 came up as a name for the time travel device. “Eve” is in honor of the first woman and the device is an amulet.

The title Death House came up as the answer to a chapter where I needed a cliffhanger. The main character, Adley, corrects a boy she met, Victor, when he mispronounces the name of her grandmother’s mansion, Capilla Manor. Adley says it sounds like “ca-pill-a,” like to swallow a pill. Victor tells her she is the one saying it wrong. It’s “ca-pea-ya,” and in Spanish it means Death House. (Mortuary.)

Fiona: Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?

I didn’t realize it at the time, but my books are all about people, primarily women, discovering their inner strength and becoming the person they were meant to be. My books stress the need for self-improvement and living a happy and fulfilling life.

Fiona: How much of the book is realistic and are experiences based on someone you know, or events in your own life?

I have never met a writer who didn’t put a little bit about themselves or their experiences into every character, or a little bit about what they want in themselves. I am working on a novel where I took my worse traits and highly exaggerated them in every character. For instance, I never felt pretty enough or skinny enough. That insecurity is blown up in my main character who is a plastic surgery addict.

And yes, I use my own experiences and real life people as models for my characters—but I give them a lot of anonymity.

Fiona: What books have most influenced your life most? a mentor?

Because I grew up impoverished, I never got to visit the library more than a couple of times. (It was  too far to walk.) In 7th grade a girl named Denise let me borrow the first book in the Nancy Drew series, and my love for the written word was cemented. Every time I finished a book, Denise would trade me for the next one.  I think this is how I fell in love with cliffhangers.

As far as mentors go, I met Ray Bradbury and had the privilege of speaking privately with him for two hours at what was the UCLA Bookfest. Fortunately for me, they inadvertently put him at the wrong table and no one knew where to find him. I asked him at the end of our conversation, when people discovered where he was at, what was the one thing he could tell me to insure my happiness and success as a writer. He leaned slowly forward, looked me in the eyes and said, “Write.”

Fiona: Are there any new authors that have grasped your interest and who is your favorite author and what is it that really strikes you about their work?

Naming a favorite author is like asking me to name my favorite food, song, child, or pet. I’ve noticed in the past few years I’ve migrated toward young adult book series and to those book that grab the reader in the first line. Among my many favorites are Vampire Academy, Hunger Games, Harry Potter, Great & Terrible Beauty, and the “City of…” series by Cassandra Clare. I love the Diana Gabaldon historical Outlander series, as well as Terry Goodkind’s Wizards series.

I am struck by writers who hold my interest by the very first line in a story, and can make me so anxious that I can’t decide to put the book down or keep reading. I love well written plotlines and language that doesn’t insult my intelligence.

Fiona: Name one entity that you feel supported you outside of family members.

Besides Laura, the first and best motivating forces for my writing have been my children, my closest friends over the years, and then the writing community, in person and online. I never felt that it came from inside my family of siblings and relatives; if anything they encouraged me to get a “real job” before I considered writing seriously.

Fiona: Do you see writing as a career?

For me, yes, but it became easier to write with adult children out of the house.  Also, I have the luxury of writing while my physical needs are met through my relationship with my boyfriend.

Fiona: If you had to do it all over again, would you change anything in your latest book?

My latest work was Death House. I would shorten and spice up the first few chapters. In literary fiction one can write at a slower pace, but in genre fiction, it seems the audience wants the story to move faster.

Fiona: Do you recall how your interest in writing originated?

It’s one of my clearest memories! The first book I read (at age 3—a self-taught reader) was a fantasy romance entitled, “Go, Dog. Go!” A girl dog tries to impress a boy dog with her hat while a bunch of other dogs drive cars and have great fun. Toward the end of the book, they all drive off to a dog party in a huge tree. The horizon was drawn with nothing more than a black straight line across the page, but I wanted to know what was beyond it. Then at the end of the book, the girl and boy dog drive into the sunset in a sportscar and I wanted to know where they were headed. My curiosity was so strong, I’d imagine them in different scenarios, maybe driving to a park and holding hands at a picnic. Maybe they’d sail away to a far off land. I was destined then to create stories.

Fiona: Can you share a little of your current work with us?

I am currently working on Eve’s Amulet-Book 2. In Book 1, Mandy time travels to the old southwest to 1845. In Book 2, Mandy’s cousin, Nicole, travels to medieval England. In Death House II, the sequel, the main characters only appear a few times in the book and a new family is introduced to the horrors that started at Capilla Manor.

I’m also working diligently on my abuse book. That one will have a lot of personal experience and is a tough one to write.

Fiona: Is there anything you find particularly challenging in your writing?

I am easily distracted by interruptions. I can see why authors need to get away from their homes to write. It can be annoying to have the creative flow interrupted. I can’t listen to music while I write because I get involved with the lyrics or melody, and it takes me away from my story.

Fiona: Do you have to travel much concerning your book(s)?

I should, but I like writing too much! It would be wonderful to have an agent booking writing gigs, but for now I feel compelled to finish my books.

Fiona: Who designed the covers?

I did. They’re easy to make. The main thing is as an author, we can’t get hung up on what exactly the characters look like or the exact setting. We need to give the “flavor” of the book on the cover.

Fiona: What was the hardest part of writing your book?

At the risk of sounding arrogant, nothing. Death House and Eve’s Amulet-Book 1 really wrote themselves as I simply typed what popped into my head, but I did a lot of editing. A lot. However, Eve’s Amulet-Book 2 requires a lot more research and has been less inspired. I guess the angelic writing force out there thinks I can handle it myself.

Fiona: Did you learn anything from writing your book and what was it?

From Death House I realized the amount of unwarranted fears I had. Many, like the demon in my book, were all made up in my mind. Fear has kept most of my dreams away, and I don’t want that to happen anymore. In Eve’s Amulet-Book 1, I gained a new confidence in my writing ability. I learned that I could write a good story, not just tell one.

Fiona: If any of your books was made into a film who would you like to play the lead

In Eve’s Amulet-Book 1 I’d chose a young version of Andie McDowell. I love her smile, and enjoyed what I’ve seen of her personality in interviews. Plus, Mandy has the same beautiful curly hair. In Death House, I think any of the young starlets today could play Adley, but Victor would be played well by a teenage version of Taylor Lautner or Antonio Banderas.

Fiona: Do you have any advice for other writers?

Plenty! But for now, the first thing I’d say is what Ray Bradbury said to me—just write. I’ve written at least one small thing every day of my life, be it a single line from a future story, or the name of a potential character. I carry a small notepad in my purse so I have no excuse to miss an inspirational moment. At worse, I’ll type key words in my notes on my phone.

Second, don’t shun a good critique. Let go of taking it personally and grow yourself a thick skin. Your work deserves it more than your ego. Just because you have an MFA in creative writing or are an English professor, doesn’t mean you’ll be a good writer. Listen to the input of others about your work and take the suggestions that will help you and leave the rest. If more than one person says the same thing, be open to change.

Third, don’t be in a hurry to get your work published. It’s better to get a well-crafted work finished with tons of editing, than to put out a bad piece of work that may tarnish your writing credibility from the get go. Take your time crafting the most excellent story ever, and allow people to see your drafts without fear of plagiarism, which is a rear-ended compliment (that allows lots of publicity!) Just keep all your old versions and files to prove ownership until after you’re published and your work is established.

Fiona: Do you have anything specific that you want to say to your readers?

Please help support my love of writing and buy my books! In turn, I will continue to entertain and/or inform you with my work.

Fiona: What book are you reading now?

Two fabulous works: Breaking Wild by Diane Les Becquets and Sanderia Faye’s amazing debut novel, Mourners Bench. Both of these women have strong lead characters, are exceptional public speakers, and have amazing personal background stories to share.

Fiona: Do you remember the first book you read?

I remember the first 4! 1): “Go, Dog. Go.” 2): Hop on Pop. 3): One Fish, Two Fish, Red Fish, Blue Fish. 4) The Secret of the Old Clock, first in the Nancy Drew series. These were the only books I read in my childhood until the 7th grade, when the parochial school I attended opened its own small library.

Fiona: What makes you laugh/cry?

Great conversations with friends, amazing books and films, people’s stories of themselves and their pets—they make me do both.

Fiona: Is there one person past or present you would meet and why?

Who wouldn’t want to meet Jesus Christ or his mother (what an amazing lady Mary was to raise such a son!)

Fiona: What do you want written on your head stone and why ?

I’ve never given that much thought, other than wanting to be cremated (ashes to ashes and all), but I’d like to be remembered as a writer, a mom, and as a woman worth emulating. I’m working on the latter!

Fiona: Other than writing do you have any hobbies?

I love to read, paint, create, grow flowers (not pull weeds), and meditate.

Fiona: What TV shows/films do you enjoy watching?

I rarely watch TV, but when I do, it’s HGTV or a mega-series like Game of Thrones. I wait until a series plays out and then after hearing how good it is, I’ll watch all the episodes continuously before starting another, mostly crime shows like Dexter, Criminal Minds, and NCIS. I really liked Breaking Bad and Prison Break.

Fiona: Favorite foods / Colors/ Music

Again, you’re talking a long list, but among my favorite foods: Indian(mid-eastern), Thai, Japanese, Chinese, and I’m a carnivore. Nothing like an excellent steak, medium-rare. (It’s got to be excellent Mexican food to compete with mine or my mom’s!) Colors: purple, indigo blue, fushia, and burgundy. Music—that’s another big category. Some favorites include: Linda Ronstadt, Creed, Queen, Evanescense, Frank Sinatra, Nat King Cole, Amici Forever, Everclear, Bruce Springsteen, Carrie Underwood, Chaka Khan, Eydie Gorme, Garth Brooks…like books, this list runs the gamut and seems endless.

Fiona: If you were not a writer what else would you like to have done?

For 35 years I’ve been an intuitive life coach, primarily supporting survivors of abuse.

 Fiona: Do you have a blog/website? If so what is it?

For writing: https://caroleavilablog.wordpress.com/ and for sexual abuse, https://htase.wordpress.com/ . My website is http://www.caroleavila.com/  but it’s getting revamped.

I am open to answer questions and connecting to other writers. For those interested, my e-mail address is:  info at caroleavila dot com.

Thank you, Fiona, for this wonderful opportunity to answer your insightful questions!

Buy link to Death House:  http://www.amazon.com/Death-House-Carole-Avila/dp/1626942080?ie=UTF8&qid=1463777181&ref_=tmm_pap_swatch_0&sr=8-

Buy link to Eve’s Amulet-Book 1:  http://www.amazon.com/Eves-Amulet-~-Book-1/dp/1626940568/ref=asap_bc?ie=UTF8

 

Here is my interview with Mary Calmes

Name Mary Calmes

Fiona: Tell us your latest news?

My new novella, Chevalier, the sequel to Romanus, will be released on the 27th of May and my next marshal book will be out in September.


Fiona: When and why did you begin writing?

I began writing when I was 12, and they were stories that always had two men in them but seldom a female love interest. My mom used to ask, where are the girls? Clearly I had a path in mind.


Fiona: When did you first consider yourself a writer?

I still don’t consider myself a writer because Anne Rice is a writer. Hemmingway is a writer. S. E.  Hinton is a writer. I write but to say that that’s what I am just doesn’t connect in my brain. I don’t know why the distinction between saying writer and that I write is important but it is in my head.


Fiona: What inspired you to write your first book?

It’s funny but I saw this ad with Mathias Lauridsen for Gucci Pour Homme II back in 2007. I remember I was walking through Dillard’s and there was this ad and I stopped walking and stared at that beautiful man and never once thought wow, I’d love to meet him, but instead thought, what is his story? He became Jory and that was it.


Fiona: Do you have a specific writing style?

I’m a pantser which for me is not great because it means once I have the names of my people, I just sit down and write. There are much better ways to write but plotting doesn’t work for me at all.


Fiona: How did you come up with your titles?

Without supervision I come up with horrible, awful titles like Frog. So my editor names the books now or I steal them from friends. I got Lay It Down from Rhys Ford because she said she wasn’t using it. She might have used it later on but it’s too late now. Little bit of thievery right there.

 


Fiona: Is there a message in your novels that you want readers to grasp?

My one message in all my novels is the same, that true love will overcome all odds. It’s shmoopie but I’m a romance writer, I could never be any other kind. I don’t have it in me.


Fiona: Are experiences based on someone you know, or events in your own life?

All of my books have certain instances that have really happened and most of my people are based on those I know but very loosely. Like sadly, I don’t know any marshals though I’d love to. I’d also love to see the marshal office in Chicago but they said no on several occasions.


Fiona: What books have most influenced your life most? A mentor?

I wish I had a mentor, that would have been awesome but sadly I never found one. As for books, there are many. Probably the most important one was The Outsiders by SE Hinton. That book came along in the 6th grade when I was not at all enjoying the other books we had to read and it opened my eyes to not only the fact that I loved to read but of first person POV and that a girl could write about boys. It was a game changer for me.


Fiona: What book are you reading now?

I just finished First and First by Santino Hassell and as always, loving it. I own all three in paperback. Right before that, I read Power Play by Avon Gale. I love the Scoring Changes series and have all those in paperback as well.


Fiona: Are there any new authors that have grasped your interest?

New to me are Roan Parrish, Avon Gale, and Max MacGowan. I’ve been reading and loving their books.


Fiona: What are your current projects?

I’m sequeling this year so the marshals, Conrad’s book and the last L’Ange book.

 

Fiona: Do you see writing as a career?

I think anything can be a career if you love it. I have a friend who said he was going to play video games for a living and he does. He tests them and that’s his job. I have another friend who works for the FBI as a graphic designer. Why the FBI needs a graphic designer, I don’t know, but he loves it. So I consider writing my career because I love it and a writer was all I ever wanted to be. I’m all about the dream job. I have another friend who cuts hair for a living and transforming people, making them feel beautiful, is his dream job. I love that.


Fiona: If you had to do it all over again, would you change anything in your latest book?

I always think I should have made a novella longer so that’s probably it. Longer.


Fiona: Do you recall how your interest in writing originated?

I wrote stories for my family and read them to them at night because we were a bit poorish so sometimes there was money for electricity and sometimes not. When it was not, the stories helped to entertain them.


Fiona: Is there anything you find particularly challenging in your writing?

The challenge is in being a pantser when I’m not sure where the story is going and I have to wait for an idea. When I wrote with Cardeno C, the structure of plotting really worked. CC is a plotter and I’ve never written that fast in my life. It was fantastic. But that was worked out together, not just me. It would be wonderful to have someone to plot all my novels.


Fiona: Do you have to travel much concerning your book(s)?

I don’t travel that much which is why on rely on places I’ve been, except Egypt and Mongolia, to place a novel. I’m trying to bust out of San Francisco and Chicago and my friend Susan is helping me with a Pinterest board to expand my horizons to new locales that I haven’t been to.


Fiona: Who designs your covers?

I’ve been super lucky to have the super talented Reese Dante do most of my covers with the incredible Anne Cain doing the others. We’re so fortunate at DSP to have such amazing cover artists.

Fiona: What was the hardest part of writing your book?

The hardest part of writing any book is figuring out what the most important part is, like what you really want to say about the couple, and making sure that that’s what gets shared.


Fiona: Is there one person pass or present you would meet and why?

I would really love to meet Dave Grohl and talk creativity with him and thank him for all the inspiration I’ve gotten not only from his music but also from just the story of the band and the ups and downs of his vision.

Fiona: What do you want written on your head stone and why?

I’d like it to say, her lies a good mother, good wife, good sister, good daughter and good friend. Then people who don’t know me will know I tried really hard and that my children loved me. J

Fiona: What TV shows/films do you enjoy watching?

I am a die-hard Hawaii Five-O fan because I ship McDanno big time. I have watched Supernatural since the very first episode and raised my children on it, along with Buffy and Angel which probably explains a lot. I watch Grimm, Lucifer…I feel a theme here…and Penny Dreadful.

Fiona: Favorite foods / Colors/ Music

If it’s bad for me, that’s the food I like which is why I’m not a skinny person, my favorite color is maroon, crimson, all those dark, gothic reds and my favorite music is all over the place from The Foo Fighters to Nina Simone.

Fiona: If you were not a writer what else would you like to have done?

If I wasn’t a writer I would probably still be at FedEx where I worked for 18 years because I loved all my c-corkers so much.

 

Fiona: Do you have a blog/website? If so what is it?

Website: http://www.marycalmesauthor.com/

Blog: http://www.marycalmesbooks.com/

DSP Author Page: http://www.dreamspinnerpress.com/AuthorArcade/mary-calmes

Here is my interview with Jöel J. Gerber

Name: Jöel J. Gerber

Age: 36

Where are you from

I am from Hurricane, WV. Now residing in Charleston, WV.  Growing up Hurricane is where that took place. I began writing when I was five years old and I started writing poetry. Through the years I continued writing poetry up until three years ago, when I published my very first poetry book which was a dedication to the memory of my father. Since then, I have tried my hand at philosophy and novels. My books thus far, are, Poetry from The Beat of a Heart: In Words Combined To Make “The Art”, Dangerous Curves which is a mystery romance novel and the first in a series which will be followed by the prequel which is On My Way To You and then the sequel The Road You Leave Behind. My other books are The Poetic Side of Me and The Journey into A Poet’s Muse.

 

 

 

Fiona: Tell us your latest news?

I have just released this week The Poetic Side of Me Volume One and The Journey into a Poet’s Muse which is half philosophy and half poetry.

 

 


Fiona: When and why did you begin writing?

I started writing at the age of five. I am not entirely sure why I started writing I just know one day out of the blue it just happened and I’ve done so ever since.

 

 
Fiona: When did you first consider yourself a writer?

I first considered myself a write the moment I started writing philosophy and then my novel. I used to think that I was merely just a poet but that is not the case anymore.

 

 

 

Fiona: What inspired you to write your first book?

My first book came to me when I was half asleep and I just started typing and then I saved what I typed and when I woke up in the morning I realized that I had written my first chapter in what would be Dangerous Curves.

 

 
Fiona: Do you have a specific writing style?

Not really. I write in the way that many can relate and that is the best way I know how to explain.

 

 
Fiona: How did you come up with the title?

It just came to me. I would like to think that God inspires me to do the things I very much enjoy.

 

 
Fiona: Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?

Yes, there is. Even the things that people may think are impossible may actually be possible as long as you do your best with who you are and what you have.

 

 
Fiona: How much of the book is realistic and are experiences based on someone you know, or events in your own life?

90%. Jayse would be like myself and Camille is very close in comparison with my fiancée in real life.

 

 
Fiona: What books have most influenced your life most? a mentor?

When I was in Middle School my theater teacher Mrs. McCracken influenced me a lot as well as my other teachers and my family and friends.

 

 

Fiona: Are there any new authors that have grasped your interest and who  is your favorite author and what is it that really strikes you about their work?

Yes there is two. Casey L. Bond and Rachel Brownell. Casey and I went to school together and she has some wonderful books. Such as Devil Creek and Shady Bay.

 

 
Fiona: Name one entity that you feel supported you outside of family members.

Allison Stephenson, she is my fiancée and she believes in me and I love that.

 

 
Fiona: Do you see writing as a career?

Yes, I do.

 

 
Fiona: If you had to do it all over again, would you change anything in your latest book?

No I would not. It does exactly what I wanted it to do and I am proud of it.

 

 
Fiona: Do you recall how your interest in writing originated?

It originated at five when I started writing poetry.

 

 

Fiona: Can you share a little of your current work with us?

Yes, I can. In Dangerous Curves, it is basically the reconnection of two people who do not realize they were once connected due to circumstances that made them forget the part of their lives when they were teenagers and young adults.

 

 


Fiona: Is there anything you find particularly challenging in your writing?

Sometimes staying concentrated doesn’t come easy.

 

 


Fiona: Do you have to travel much concerning your book(s)?

No I do not but maybe in the future I will.

 

 


Fiona: Who designed the covers?

Most of the covers I have done myself.

 

 


Fiona: What was the hardest part of writing your book?

Trying to get it to come together was getting my book to come together.

 

 


Fiona: Did you learn anything from writing your book and what was it?

I learned that I was no longer a poet…I was a writer.

 

 

 

Fiona: If any of your books was made into a film who would you like to play the lead

Benjamin Walker as Jayse Dillon and Kirsten Dunst or Sarah Michelle Gellar as Camille Henderson.

 

 
Fiona: Do you have any advice for other writers?

The best advice I can give is to not ever give up. Always do your best with what you have and who you are.

 

 

 

Fiona: What book are you reading now?

I was reading The Choice

 

 

Fiona: Do you remember the first book you read?

The first book I read was a Goosebumps book. As a kid, I was a big fan of R.L. Stine.

 

 

Fiona: What makes you laugh/cry?

The same as what makes most laugh/cry

 

 

Fiona: Is there one person pass or present you would meet and why?

Nicholas Sparks so we can discuss his books together. He is a very talented author and I enjoy his books and movies so much.

 

 

Fiona: What do you want written on your head stone and why ? 

Here lies a man who’s done the best he could with who he was and what he’s had.

 

 

Fiona: Other than writing do you have any hobbies ?

Rock Collecting and Stamp Collecting

 

 

Fiona: What TV shows/films do you enjoy watching?

I enjoy watching Nicholas Sparks movies and NCIS, Psych, Murder She Wrote

 

 

Fiona: Favorite foods / Colors/ Music

My favorite foods would have to be green beans, mashed potatoes, grilled chicken, meat loaf and pizza. My favorite color is green and I like most genres of music but country is my favorite.

 

 

Fiona: If you were not a writer what else would you like to have done?

I would have liked to be a singer.

 

 

Fiona: Do you have a blog/website? If so what is it?

Yes, I do have a blog and my blog is located here. https://authorjoeljgerber.wordpress.com/

http://www.amazon.com/Poetic-Side-Me-1/dp/1533293236/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1463634075&sr=1-1

 

http://www.amazon.com/Poetry-Beat-Heart-Words-Combined/dp/1499339216/ref=sr_1_2?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1463634075&sr=1-2

 

 

Here is my interview with Lisa Bilbrey

Name: Lisa Bilbrey

Age: 40 and proud!

Where are you from: A small town in Texas. We now have two stoplights instead of one!

A little about your self `ie your education Family life etc  

I’m a mom of three, married to my high school honey for 20 years. I’m a football mom, baseball mom, basketball mom, mom to a proud geek, nerd, and Star Wars lover.

 

 
Fiona: When and why did you begin writing?

I started writing about ten years ago after an intense bout of insomnia. I’ve always had these little stories inside my head, so I figured I’d write them down. I fell in love with the craft, with the passion, and can’t imagine ever not writing.
Fiona: When did you first consider yourself a writer?

I don’t know. When I was younger, I struggled a lot in school and never thought I’d be smart enough to write. I’ve had to teach myself a lot about grammar and sentence structure. In fact, I’m still learning new things every day.

 

 
Fiona: What inspired you to write your first book?

I had a dream about this woman standing on the beach. She was upset, crying, and the wind was blowing her hair around her, the sky was dark and gray. There were lots of lightning and thunder and when she looked back at me, somehow I knew that her emotions were fueling the weather. Thus Angel’s Heart was created. However, it’s not the first book I published. I hit a snag about half way through and ended up writing Life’s Unexpected Gifts for an anthology.

 

 
Fiona: Do you have a specific writing style?

I don’t know that I have a style per se… I just can’t hop around from chapter to chapter. I need to start at chapter one and write everything in order. Also, I used to be a fly by the seat of my pants kind of gal, but lately I’ve found that using a basic outline helps me stay on track.

 

 
Fiona: How did you come up with the title?

I have so many different titles, it just depends on the books. Angel’s Heart were because of the plot, Awakenings because of the sexual awakenings between the characters. Life’s Unexpected Gifts because the main character is being wooed by a secret admirer. Um, The Journey Collection because of Travis’s journey throught the series. A Season of Change because of the shift between spring and summer, and how it correlates to Meredith’s life. The Apartment because of the plot setup, and Broken Hearts & Dusty Dreams because it sounded good in my head, lol.

 

 

 
Fiona: Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?

I write so many different types of books: Paranormal, suspense, Young Adult, Erotica, Contemporary, but the one thing that is the same is the need for acceptance. My characters don’t always feel loved and cherished, I tend to abuse them more than I should, but I love being able to break them down and build them back up. I believe in love and passion and magic.

 

 
Fiona: How much of the book is realistic and are experiences based on someone you know, or events in your own life?

I can’t say any of my books are 100% real or unreal. I think there are parts of all of them that are based on people who have influenced my life, in good and bad ways.

 

 
Fiona: What books have most influenced your life most? a mentor?

Oh, probably the Awakenings Series simply because I really had to break out of the normal man meets girl and they fall in love mind-set and really challenge myself to think outside of the box.

 

 

Fiona: Are there any new authors that have grasped your interest and who  is your favorite author and what is it that really strikes you about their work?

I have so many favorite authors. J.K. Rowling will always be one of my favorites. I also like Veronica Roth, Stephenie Meyers, V.C. Andrews, but I find myself leaning toward more indie authors lately. Lindsey Gray is one that I will read everything she writes. Same for Sydney Logan, R. E. Hargrave, M. B. Feeney, and so many more.

 

 
Fiona: Name one entity that you feel supported you outside of family members.

I’ve been lucky to make a handful of really amazing friends. Rhonda, Michelle, Nicole, Leigh, Tina, Kerry…. They’re always there for me, always ready to listen to me bitch and moan, but also to tell me to stop being a crybaby and get back to it.

 

 
Fiona: Do you see writing as a career?

Absolutely. It has to be. It may not be my only career, but it’s just as much as business as my day job is.

 

 
Fiona: If you had to do it all over again, would you change anything in your latest book?

I wouldn’t change any of my books. They aren’t for everyone and I’ve been blessed to not get too many bad reviews, but the ones I have gotten gave me a lot of insight that I carry onto my next project.

 

 


Fiona: Do you recall how your interest in writing originated?

I’ve always had stories inside my head that I would play over and over as I drove, or went to sleep. So, I decided one night to attempt to write one of them out…. And it was bad. Like really bad, but I grew and matured as a writer and that’s all we can ask of ourselves.

 

 

Fiona: Can you share a little of your current work with us?

This is a bit from my new Zoe Mack Series:

“You’re a fucking cop!” Donald screeched, struggling to get away from the officer who had him pinned against the wall.

Zoe walked over to him, placed one hand on the cool plaster, and leaned toward him. “That’s right, Donnie-boy. I’m a cop, and I know you’re the bastard who is responsible for the rape of at least four women you met through Loveland’s Dating Service. Probably more. And the DNA we’re going to get off your glass from Shuko’s will be more than enough to make sure you don’t see the outside of a six by eight for a long, long time.”

“You stupid bitch,” Donald snarled, lunging for her, but the officer holding him was able to keep him from moving more than a couple of inches.

“Take him to central booking,” Zoe told the officer before walking away from both of them.

Her captain — Jeffery Nelson — was leaning against the back of the van when she exited the building, his arms folded in front of his chest, and a smirk on his lips.

“What’s so funny?” she asked, knowing he’d heard everything said between the two of them thanks to the wire she was sporting.

“You just love antagonizing them, don’t you, Mack?”

“I do,” she admitted with a nod. “I’ll get the paperwork done in the morning, if that’s okay.”

Captain Nelson smiled. “Sure you’re okay?”

“Yeah, I’m fine,” she insisted.

Captain nodded. “I’ll see you first thing in the morning then.”

Zoe agreed with a tilt of her head and looked back over at Donald, who was being loaded into the backseat of a black and white, but her attention was pulled to the man leaning against the back the police car: Jax Shaw. He stared at her, a look of yearning on his face, a look she couldn’t return.

Once upon a time — and not that long ago — he’d been her comfort, her solace from a world that overwhelmed her. But not anymore, not after he betrayed her like many others in her life had. So, rather than allowing herself to let him hold her, she turned and walked in the other direction.

Twenty minutes later, and a stop at the corner market for a few groceries, including a nice, cheap bottle of wine, Zoe was trudging up the steps of the three story brownstone she had called home for the last six years.

As she dug her keys out of her purse, Zoe shifted her eyes to the small, two inch by three inch business card that had been taped to her door. In large, gold letters the words: Federal Bureau of Investigation. And below that was the name: Special Agent Elijah Stone. Beneath his name were his work number, his cell number, and three words that had been handwritten: I need you.

 

 

 


Fiona: Is there anything you find particularly challenging in your writing?

I find that too often, my characters are too sappy. Toughening them up is hard for me.

 

 
Fiona: Do you have to travel much concerning your book(s)?

I wish! I would love to be able to travel more, but I do a lot of research and study as many pictures as I can.

 

 
Fiona: Who designed the covers?

JC Clarke designed the covers for the Awakenings Books. Sidney Kalney designed the cover for The Journey Collection. Laura Braley designed the covers for the First Angel’s Heart Book and for Life’s Unexpected Gifts. I designed the covers for the second Angel’s Heart book, A Season of Change, Broken Hearts & Dusty Dreams, and The Apartment.

JC Clarke is definitely my go-to designer, though. She’s amazing and such a blessing to work with.

 

 
Fiona: What was the hardest part of writing your book?

The writing wasn’t all that hard, it’s the getting people to buy it that is a challenge.

 

 
Fiona: Did you learn anything from writing your book and what was it?

To have patience, an incredible amount of patience.

 

 

Fiona: If any of your books was made into a film who would you like to play the lead

Oh, That’s hard. I’ll stick with the Awakenings Series and say Zoe Deschanel for Elle, Amy Adams for Sadie, Alex Pettyfer for Callum, and  Fernando Noriega for Derek.

 

 
Fiona: Do you have any advice for other writers?

Just keep writing. When it gets hard, when you doubt that you’re good enough, when you want to quit, just keep writing.

 

 
Fiona: Do you have anything specific that you want to say to your readers?

Thank you for reading my silly stories and allowing me to be a part of your lives. I’m blessed to have each and every one of you.

 

 

Fiona: What book are you reading now?

I’m not reading anything at the moment. I struggle to switch from writer mode to reader mode.

 

 

Fiona: Do you remember the first book you read?

Reading was never easy for me so my mom would sit down with me and read The Happy Kitten over and over. Eventually I started reading Nancy Drew, Sweet Valley High, The Babysitters Club.

 

 

Fiona: What makes you laugh/cry?

My children. There rarely is a day where I’m not laughing, often leading to crying because of them.

 

 

Fiona: Is there one person pass or present you would meet and why?

I’d love to meet J.K. Rowling and just thank her for letting me read her books.

 

 

Fiona: What do you want written on your head stone and why ?

Nothing. I want to be cremated.

 

 

Fiona: Other than writing do you have any hobbies ?

I love to read, clearly. I’m also addicted to jigsaw puzzles and I like to crochet.

 

 

Fiona: What TV shows/films do you enjoy watching?

Musicals! Never lose me a viewer if you throw in a catchy song.

 

 

Fiona: Favorite foods / Colors/ Music

Foods: Crab legs

Colors: Red

Music: Too many to say one, but I’m in love with Violin by Amos Lee.

 

 

Fiona: If you were not a writer what else would you like to have done?

Probably just be bored out of my mind, lol. I’m also a librarian, so I can’t imagine a world without books.

 

 

Fiona: Do you have a blog/website? If so what is it?

You can find my blog at: www.lisabilbrey.blogspot.com I love to spotlight other authors and their books!

Amazon Authors Page http://www.amazon.com/Lisa-Bilbrey/e/B0073U40XI/ref=sr_ntt_srch_lnk_8?qid=1361337159&sr=8-8

Here is my interview with Samita Sarkar

Name Samita Sarkar

Age 27 (but forever 21)

Where are you from?

I have lived in Canada all my life and I’ve been writing for as long as I can remember. After I finished my Bachelor’s degree in Professional Writing at York University in Toronto, what began as a childhood hobby turned into an adult’s obsession, and I started freelance writing and working on books.

Fiona: Tell us your latest news?

I just released my first book titled I Am the Ocean, a travel memoir. It’s about a solo backpacking trip I took to the United States in my early twenties. Limited by budget, I travelled by bus, slept on couches, and stayed in hostels. All I brought with me were a few clothes, a travel journal, and a copy of The Bhagavad Gita, which is a core spiritual and philosophical book.

More than just a vacation, this trip was also an important time of spiritual growth and personal development for me. I met amazing people, saw wonderful things, and had a lot of time to reflect during a time when I was feeling particularly lost in life.

Fiona: When and why did you begin writing?

I’ve been writing all my life. It’s just a natural way that I express myself.

Fiona: When did you first consider yourself a writer?

An introvert by nature, all I’ve ever wanted to do was read or write. I’ve had a writer’s callus for as long as I can remember; my parents tell me that I was born with it.

Fiona: What inspired you to write your first book?

Years after my trip when I was feeling sentimental, I leafed through my travel journal, and I realized that I already had a book. Of course, I spent months honing the manuscript, but I owe it all to my travel journal. Now, I never travel without one.

Fiona: Do you have a specific writing style?

My writing style can be very curt. I try to write clearly and concisely. People tell me that I have a distinctive voice.

Fiona: How did you come up with the title?

In The Bhagavad Gita, Lord Krishna shows his friend Arjuna his universal form and says “…of bodies of water I am the ocean.” Although Krishna is beautiful, his friend becomes overwhelmed by his presence. This is exactly how I felt about my journey along the coast of the Atlantic Ocean. Although the trip was beautiful and pivotal, it was also scary.

Fiona: Is there a message in your memoir that you want readers to grasp?

Before this journey, I had a habit of always wondering what I was going to do next. What kind of job was I going to get? Where would I live? From this trip, I learned that it’s okay to not be in control. Actually, it’s an illusion to think that we have control over our lives. All we can do is our best and leave the rest to God. When something isn’t working out the way that I expected, I remind myself that I’m not in control and that my time in this life is limited and precious. As Thich Nhat Hanh says, “smile, breathe and go slowly.” It’s a good way to travel and a good way to live.

Fiona: How much of the book is realistic?

Whoever reads this book will get access to my inner thoughts. It’s a very personal book. However, some names and details were changed to protect the privacy of others.

Fiona: What books have most influenced your life?

The Bhagavad Gita. It’s a philosophical book spoken by the Lord that teaches us how to live our lives. The main message is to realize that we are souls and not our physical bodies and that the material world is temporary. This book is a good reminder of how important it is to live in the present moment and think positively.

Fiona: Are there any new authors that have grasped your interest? Who is your favorite author and what is it that really strikes you about their work?

Mark Childress is one of my favorite authors. He has a unique style and likes to write from the perspective of a female anti-hero. His books are also set in the Deep South, which is a place I fell in love with after my trip along the coast.

Fiona: Name one entity that you feel supported you outside of family members.

God was with me throughout my entire journey along the east coast of the United States, so though it may seem like I did some crazy stuff, I was never scared. I always felt protected.

Fiona: Do you see writing as a career?

Writing is all I do. When I’m not working on my next book, I do freelance writing for businesses. I think I would fall apart without writing.

Fiona: If you had to do it all over again, would you change anything in your book?

My writing style will change with time, and I just have to accept that. One thing I may try the next time around is to submit the manuscript to Publishers Weekly before the release date.

Fiona: Do you recall how your interest in writing originated?

No. I’ve been writing since I could hold a scented marker, so it must have been in a previous life.

Fiona: Can you share a little of your current work with us?

Absolutely. I’ll share a little piece from when I first arrived at my final destination, Miami. I had travelled as far along the coast as I could go, and I started to feel lonely because I was having a hard time making friends and the bus driver seemed totally spooked when she saw that I was a solo female traveler, advising me right away to make friends with other girls. (Soon after, thanks to Lord Krishna, I met a group of really cool girlfriends.) Here is how I felt when I first stepped off the bus after a long ride from Georgia:

I walked to the hostel.

Make friends with girls. Take them everywhere.

Make friends with girls. Take them everywhere.

I heeded the bus driver’s words, making them my new mantra.

I checked in to my room, which I was sharing with eight other women. I booked it for three nights. When I went in to drop off my stuff, no one was in the room.

Bags with wet bikinis and sandy clothes were strewn everywhere. Even the floor was full of sand.

I left my stuff in the room and went down to the main floor with just my handbag.

“Can you point me to the beach?” I asked the two Norwegian men behind the counter, who had checked me in just five minutes before.

“Yes. You go outside, and you turn left. Keep going for about thirty seconds.”

“Awesome, thanks.”

I sat on the beach with my journal and my Gita, while people around me sat on the shore with cans of beer and bottles of liquor. Couples kissed in the water. I sat by myself, admiring the wonderful, terrible, beautiful, and deadly ocean.

…Of bodies of water I am the ocean.

—The Bhagavad Gita, 10.24

I had nothing to fear, because the most powerful person in the world, the Supreme Lord Krishna, was my friend. I knew that sooner or later, he’d send along some other companions for me too.

Fiona: Is there anything you find particularly challenging in your writing?

I try to draw a balance between showing and telling. I’m very opinionated, particularly when it comes to animal rights, and my views come through in my writing. I try to describe my experiences more than I state my views outright because I don’t want to come off as preachy. Although, there’s a spiritual element to my book so there’s no doubt that some people will find it preachy.

Savannah, Georgia

Fiona: Do you have to travel much concerning your book(s)?

Not at the moment, although I wouldn’t mind it. Travel is what inspired the book!

Fiona: Who designed the cover?

I did. It’s a photograph of the travel journal I took on the road with me.

Fiona: What was the hardest part of writing your book?

Making sure that I was descriptive enough. Sometimes my writing style can be terse.

Fiona: Did you learn anything from writing your book and what was it?

Because it was my first book I learned a lot about the publishing process so that for my next book, I’ll know exactly what to do with no hiccups. The coolest part was that I got to officially register as a publisher with the Canadian government.

Fiona: If any of your books were made into a film, who would you like to play the lead?

I wouldn’t want to pick the actress. That person would be playing me, and I think I’m too self-aware to make the right choice about something like that. It’s better if someone else with a different perspective chooses her.

Fiona: Do you have any advice for other writers?

Just keep going. If you don’t know what to write about, then keep a journal. Writing isn’t like riding a bicycle; it gets harder if you go a long time without doing it, so it’s important to push through the writer’s block.

Fiona: Do you have anything specific that you want to say to your readers?

I want to let them know that it’s okay to not be in control. All we can do is trust God to guide us and enjoy the moment.

NYC

Fiona: What book are you reading now?

I’m reading The Good Girl’s Guide to Getting Lost by Rachel Friedman. It’s a travel memoir about a young woman who buys a ticket to Ireland on a whim, and ends up on a year-long travelling journey.

Fiona: Do you remember the first book you read?

Not exactly, but in my childhood I loved J. K. Rowling, Kit Pearson, and C. S. Lewis. Those were some of the authors that really made a mark on me in my early years.

Fiona: What makes you laugh/cry?

A good book can make me do both!

Fiona: Is there one person past or present you want to meet and why?

I’d love to meet Kurt Cobain. He sang to his own tune during a time when rock music was full of machismo and the other big names were Tommy Lee and Axl Rose. When I was in high school, he was my first feminist role model. His music influenced me so much because I really felt that he was on my side.

Fiona: What do you want written on your head stone and why?

I want to be known as someone who made a difference for the animals. I’m a strong supporter of animal rights.

Fiona: Other than writing do you have any hobbies?

I like being outdoors, reading books, baking, and doing yoga.

Fiona: What TV shows/films do you enjoy watching?

Desperate Housewives is a guilty pleasure. I also like sitcoms like Friends, 2 Broke Girls and The Mindy Project.

Fiona: Favorite foods / Colors/ Music

Food: rice and dal, popcorn, butternut squash ravioli. But as long as it’s vegetarian, I’m not picky.

Colors: blue and pink.

Music: classic rock and reggaeton.

Fiona: If you were not a writer what else would you like to have done?

 I can’t imagine. I think I would go insane without writing.

Fiona: Do you have a blog/website? If so what is it?

You can connect with me at my personal blog at samitasarkar.com or my business website at www.blossomswriting.com.

Here is my interview with Hannah R. More

Name: Hannah R. More

Age: 56

Where are you from?

Me: I was born in St. Louis, MO; but moved to Santa Fe, NM when I was 13.

A little about your self `ie your education Family life etc.

Me:  I am currently single, been divorced for over 12 years. I have three grown children. Two boys and one girl. My girl is currently in a PhD program in Genetics in Chicago and will soon be traveling to Jordan for a weeks vacation with friends. My sons are multi-faceted guys who can build or fix anything! Houses, cars, electronics, you name it, they can do it.

I however, have a black thumb and can’t grow a thing to save my life. And I would rather do my taxes than exercise. I love God and am a very religious person. But I make a point of trying not to judge others and keep an open mind when it comes to inter-religious cooperation and peace activities. When I am not writing I read, watch movies and care for my elderly mom.

For over twenty years, when I was married, I lived ‘off the grid’ in a house we built with our own hands. We had solar power and had to haul water from 5 miles away for ten years before we could drill a well. And my first child was a home birth with a midwife.

 

 

Fiona: Tell us your latest news?

Me: I am currently writing the sequel to Day’s Son. This continues the story of my heroines best friend, Dr. Megin Ramirez, and the other two hybrid vampires we met in the first book. Day’s Son focused on the Vampire King who became a hybrid through illegal experimentation against his will and the human detective Emily Connelly who joins with him to solve his mystery.

There will only be the one sequel, Day’s Daughters. Then I will continue writing on a few other very different stories: a contemporary romance, a contemporary Elf fantasy and a Dragon epic.

 

 
Fiona: When and why did you begin writing?

Me: I always wrote, but having kids and a family took all my creative energy. It wasn’t until I had a dream one morning after recovering from a month of homelessness that I started writing down what became Day’s Son. Over the course of another month I wrote by hand in those composition notebooks about two thirds of the story. I wrote ten hours a day, at least, sometimes non-stop. It was a time where I felt almost possessed by the story and just couldn’t stop.

 

 
Fiona: When did you first consider yourself a writer?

Me: When I was 8 years old I found a poem written by Hannah More and thought it was a sign! She was a religious author in the 1700’s or 1800’s. Anyway, I was fascinated and have always kept stories going in my head. Now I have the time and freedom to put them to paper.

 

 
Fiona: Do you have a specific writing style?

Me: I don’t know! I know I am getting some criticism from a few friends to change my writing style in a few places. I think they don’t like where I write the way people speak, instead of sticking to proper spellings and grammar. I dropped out of school after 8th grade and later got my GED. However I did go to St. John’s College in Santa Fe, a classical Liberal arts college where I learned ancient Greek and had to translate to English! I got very good grades and none of my professors complained of my writing style. There you would write a paper in a math class!

 

 
Fiona: How did you come up with the title?

Me: I wanted the title to have something to do with the fact that a vampire could now be alive and see the day again. At first I considered Daybirth, but changed it to Day’s Son. Part of my thinking is that the Vampire King believes vampires were created by God for a purpose and are ‘children’ of God, therefore he is a ‘son’.

 

 
Fiona: Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?

Me: I try to write about love and marriage centered on God. That sexual love is beautiful and created by God for a couple to enjoy without shame or judgement, but that that kind of true love can only come within a committed eternal relationship. Hence, the only sex I write is between married couples. I also want to show a natural organic relationship between people and the internal mind where they meet God.

 

 
Fiona: How much of the book is realistic and are experiences based on someone you know, or events in your own life?

Me: Well the sex descriptions are based on my own experiences! But all the characters are a little bit of me. The names are from people I knew in my life, my best friends from my childhood, Emily and David.

 

 
Fiona: What books have most influenced your life most? a mentor?

Me: The first has to be The Hobbit and Lord of the Rings. It was the first time I read something that was so magical! I was transformed into another world and discovered I could escape the miserable reality of my life at the time, at least for a while. Then my studies of different religions and their writings. I was raised atheist and was fascinated by the different teachings and religious beliefs of others. I absolutely love C.S. Lewis, the man, and was greatly influenced by The Great Divorce. My writing is very different, of course. I don’t really have a mentor.

 

 

Fiona: Are there any new authors that have grasped your interest and who  is your favorite author and what is it that really strikes you about their work?

Me: There are so many! I have to say Patricia McKillip, Patricia Briggs, Rob Thurman and Ilona Andrews are my CURRENT favorites. I love the honest expression of dark emotions and strength, especially for kick-ass women! Women can have dark emotions and desires that are honest and powerful without being bad or wrong. These authors portray that side of human nature without making it synonymous with evil.

 

 
Fiona: Name one entity that you feel supported you outside of family members.

Me: The only one who has never let me down is God. I don’t want to get into details, but I have been betrayed, neglected, abused and thrown away by most of the people in my life, those who should have been there for me and weren’t. You could say I know have trust issues. I don’t get close to people easily. So I have gone it alone.

 

 
Fiona: Do you see writing as a career?

Me: I see writing as my happiness, my freedom, my sanity. If it makes money, then yay! I would like it to be a career, but I write because it makes me happy. It is the only thing that does and that doesn’t depend on another person.

 

 
Fiona: If you had to do it all over again, would you change anything in your latest book?

Me: I just finished another re-edit to fix a few awkward sentences and some inconsistencies. I will be uploading it to my publisher as soon as I can fix some technical problems. One of the fixes was the whole left/right thing. I am left handed so think of left as dominant. But this culture uses right as dominant, so when I hear O’s see ‘right’ I am thinking ‘left’ because that is my dominant side. So I had both left and right written down when referring to Emily left hand. I missed it and had to fix it in several places. I know you think I’m crazy now!

 

 
Fiona: Do you recall how your interest in writing originated?

Me: Not really, it was always there.

 

 

Fiona: Can you share a little of your current work with us?

Me: Day’s Daughters picks up where Day’s Son leaves off. Dr. Pierce, the vampire inventor of the V-virus vaccine and Synthetic  (artificial blood) that allowed the vampires to come out to the world and safeguard humans from being turned, is now a hybrid as well and is working with Emily best friend, the human doctor Megin Ramirez, to create a new vaccine to protect vulnerable humans from the magic that is now flooding the earth after the ‘Merging’ that took place at the end of Day’s Son. Megin herself is changing and inheriting a magical legacy she didn’t know she had. But her new magical abilities will allow her to safely be with hybrid vampire Steve Pierce. Steve has been desperately lonely searching for a life partner smart enough to match him in intellect and good enough to keep him in line. He has been bored to tears with the Vampire women not already mated and despaired of finding his match, until he created the hybridization process and changing himself before the events of the first book took place. Now he has the freedom to search amongst human women and he has found what he wants with Megin. She, however, has conditions.

 

 
Fiona: Is there anything you find particularly challenging in your writing?

Me: Impatience. I want to be able to write everything down as fast as I think it. Sometimes I trip over my own fingers. Then the editing, and re-editing, again and again and again. I am a perfectionist and am horrified I let some mistakes get by me in my first book. That said, I also struggle with finding just the right word. Sometimes I am just not satisfied with the available words to convey a certain meaning or feeling.

 

 
Fiona: Do you have to travel much concerning your book(s)?

Me: I don’t travel at all. I am my mom’s full time caregiver and would need someone to cover for me with her. That can sometimes be arranged, but I am also currently poor!

 

 
Fiona: Who designed the covers?

Me: T.E. Ridener at tanyawrites@hotmail.com.  She was really easy to work with and helped me find just the right images and colors. I will use her for Day’s Daughters as well.

 

 
Fiona: What was the hardest part of writing your book?

Me: Believing it was any good. I mean I thought it was great but when someone reads it and says how amazing it is, all of a sudden I realized how much I didn’t believe in myself.

 

 
Fiona: Did you learn anything from writing your book and what was it?

Me: I learned that self publishing is not as hard as I thought it would be. The process of telling a story helps you tell the next one better.

 

 

Fiona: If any of your books was made into a film who would you like to play the lead?

Me: I have no clue. Just that if someone is of color that an actor of color plays that part. No white girl playing hispanic!

 

 
Fiona: Do you have any advice for other writers?

Me: Just write. Don’t give up. If you are frustrated, step away and do something else for awhile, then come back to it.

 

 
Fiona: Do you have anything specific that you want to say to your readers?

Me: I love you all! Be patient with me, I take my time writing to get things just right for. I do not churn out stories every couple months. I am not that kind of writer.

 

 

Fiona: What book are you reading now?

Me: Right now I am slogging through a book of a dozen stories by a dozen authors. Some are good but, unfortunately most are dreck. So I won’t name it! I just skip the really bad ones.

 

 

Fiona: Do you remember the first book you read?

Me: It was actually one of those misogynistic detective stories by John D. MacDonald! I think I was nine or ten? The children’s book I most remember reading on my own was The Three Robbers. Just fantastic. I still have it.

 

 

Fiona: What makes you laugh/cry?

Me: What makes me laugh? Silly things kids do. I like humor like the Princess Bride and Deadpool. I hate the kind of humor that is whiny or at the expense of others, like Funniest Home Videos, hate that. It is not funny to see a poor guy get hit in the balls!

What makes me cry? Children being hurt, in danger, or losing their mom. To this day I cannot watch Bambi.

 

 

Fiona: Is there one person past or present you would meet and why?

Me: I would love to meet C. S. Lewis, Isaac Asimov and my namesake Hannah More. I have already met Sun Myung Moon, before he died. That was pretty amazing.

 

 

Fiona: What do you want written on your head stone and why ?

Me: Loving and faithful daughter of God, sister, wife and mother. Because I hope that I will have been all those things by the time I die.

 

 

Fiona: Other than writing do you have any hobbies ?

Me: Reading. I make leather and cord macrame necklets. I sketch in charcoal and I have this idea for pvc sculpture that I will get into when it gets warmer and I can afford the materials.

 

 

Fiona: What TV shows/films do you enjoy watching?

Me: I love Dr. Who, Sherlock, Person of Interest, Supernatural and Big Bang Theory. Any superhero movie or tv show. I loved Lois and Clark, Pushing Daisies and Dark Angel. My daughter and I really got into Monk.

 

 

Fiona: Favorite foods / Colors/ Music.

Me: Food, eggs benedict, homemade soup and homemade bread. Also chocolate.

Color: gray. Because clouds.

Music: classic and pop rock, and celtic. Love bagpipes!

 

 

Fiona: If you were not a writer what else would you like to have done?

Me: Singer. I would like to have had voice training. I love to sing and have a good ear. But I am good at giving spiritual guidance and have done that to a limited degree. I think a career as a spiritual counselor would suit.

 

 

Fiona: Do you have a blog/website? If so what is it?

Me: I do not have a blog or website, just a facebook page. https://www.facebook.com/AuthorHannahRMore40/?fref=ts

Buying link

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/617994
https://itunes.apple.com/us/book/days-son/id1088421331?mt=11
https://store.kobobooks.com/en-us/ebook/day-s-son
http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/days-son-hannah…/1123478782…

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