Here is my interview with Victoria Theia

Hello and welcome to my blog, Author Interviews. My name is Fiona Mcvie.

Let’s get you introduced to everyone, shall we? Tell us your name. What is your age?

Thanks for having me on your blog, Fiona. I’m Victoria Theia and I’m old enough to know better lol. (early thirties)

Fiona: Where are you from?

I was born and live in rainy England. (I haven’t met the queen, and I don’t drink tea….)

Fiona: A little about yourself (ie;  your education, family life, etc.)

I was a complete book and learning nerd at school and loved homework which was why I went for my teaching degree. My homelife is a busy one, spent with people who drive me crazy and who I completely adore.

Fiona: Tell us your latest news.

My eighth book released on September 13 and is called Manhattan Sugar. A contemporary romance between my sweetest hero yet who is eager to please and a former party girl who is riddled with anxiety and an intense hunger for love. I’m so in love with these two that I’m sad their story is now over.

Fiona: When and why did you begin writing?

It was completely by accident more than a handful of years ago now on social media. It started as Black Dagger Brotherhood fanfiction with good friends of mine and I fell absolutely in love with telling stories and how they made me feel. I’ve always loved reading romance so it was a natural progression to telling my own.

Fiona: When did you first consider yourself a writer?

I still pinch myself every time a reader reaches out and contacts me. I don’t think I fully believe I’m the writer they’re enthusiastic to talk to about my books.

Fiona: What inspired you to write your first book?

Up until that point I’d only ever written short vampire fanfiction, so when this ego-wielding strutting biker president came to me it was quite a surprise. I knew I had to write his story and it became a challenge to myself to fulfil a dream of writing a full novel from start to finish. I had no intentions then of ever publishing it.

Fiona: How did you come up with the title?

He is a dirty biker, and his girl goes through a journey to deliver her from ruin. So the title for this book came to me pretty early on. It doesn’t always happen that way.

Fiona: Do you have a specific writing style? Is there anything about your style or genre that you find particularly challenging?

My style is I just do what the voices tell me to, as crazy as it sounds. I’ve always written out of order. Most often the epilogue is written before anything else and then whatever scene I see first that is what I write before I forget it. I tend to have weeks worth of conversations with the main characters before the book has begun—getting to know them, taking notes and lines of dialog to use later in the chapters. And then the fun starts by piecing everything together.

Fiona: How much of the book is realistic and are experiences based on someone you know, or events in your own life?

For my latest book Manhattan Sugar I based a lot of India’s anxiety struggles on personal experience. How I’ve felt at certain times when life is a struggle, and that overwhelming fear of failures. She’s my most real heroine yet. While she is completely fictional and not biographical, I did want to give her real and raw emotions and I think every woman who reads her can identify with certain qualities of her struggles and inner fears against her own self doubt and fight to control everything she carries with her daily and feeling weak asking for help. Or at least that was my hope when I created her.

Fiona: To craft your works, do you have to travel? Before or during the process?

Nope. I go as far as my sofa to write and let my imagination run wild.

Fiona: Who designed the covers?

So far I’ve designed all my book covers myself. You become a jack of all trades being an indie-author.

Fiona: Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?

I like to include messages of hope in all my romance novels. To relay that whatever struggles and relatable problems my characters go through to reach that happy finish that it does and will get better eventually. I hope that with each novel that message is understood with each page. I’m a great believer in love and all that it encompasses for a better life.

Fiona: Are there any new authors that have grasped your interest?  Who is your favorite writer, and what is it about their work that really strikes you?

Oh, my gosh. I would be here all night listing my author goddesses I worship. I am constantly in awe of the authors I come into contact with especially on social media.

Lauren Cooper. Leigh Lennon. Jess Bryant. AJ Daniels. Maren Lee. Tessa Bailey. JD Robb. JR Ward. Amber Barden. Layla Frost. Dee Ellis. Tessa Elaine. Ruby Rowe. The list could go on and on of the ladies I admire for their amazing work ethic and their ability to make a reader happy with their epic stories.

Fiona: Outside of family members, name one entity that supported your commitment to become a published author.

I am grateful daily for the ongoing encouragement from Lauren Cooper and AJ Daniels. Every new author should have these two in their corner. And my good friend Elisha who sees everything I write in its raw form and though it’s rubbish she’s a tremendous cheerleader of all that I do. I’m not sure if people realize how a kind word of encouragement and their ability to always say the right thing when it’s needed even if they don’t realize they’ve done it, how it can carry a doubting author into finishing difficult chapters. So, I am completely grateful for the people I do have.

Fiona: Do you see writing as a career?

I would be on cloud nine if that happened. It’s what I’m working hard toward as a goal. Writing is a very solitary endeavor and it suits me completely lol.

Fiona: If you had to do it all over again, would you change anything in your latest book?

Short answer; yes. Long answer; I am never 100% satisfied with any of my writing projects. If I were to open Manhattan Sugar’s Word document now I would want to change certain words and paragraphs and whole scenes. I think it’s healthy to feel this way because it helps me strive to be better with the next book.

Fiona: Did you learn anything during the writing of your recent book?

How to set goals and stick to them no matter how busy life is. I want to be an author so that means I write, regardless of situations or excuses I might give. I also learned not all book heroes have to be a$$holes to be liked. I was super worried about Gray during the crafting of him. And a bonus; never have my heroine obsessed with cereals, because I’ll crave them all day long.

Fiona: If your book was made into a film, who would you like to play the lead?

My muses for Manhattan Sugar were: Margot Robbie and Rodrigo Guirao (look him up, ladies!! )

Fiona: Any advice for other writers?

-Keep writing. It sounds simple (and redundant to say to another writer) but even if you stumble into writer’s block or you write yourself into a corner it’s easy to give up. Keep writing. Write a brand new scene that has nothing to do with your book or project to get your flow back.

-Never be afraid to reach out to other writers who have had more experience in the game to ask questions on marketing, publishing and promotion.

-Never think you’re doing something wrong if you don’t fit into the “author do’s and don’ts.” You write your way. If that’s 400 words a day or 13 thousand. No two authors are alike. You’re doing amazing in your craft, never forget that.

-Drink a lot of coffee. So much coffee. And then drink some more.

Fiona: Anything specific you want to tell your readers?

You have made my dreams come true and I can’t find the words to fully express how joyful and happy it makes me when you tell me you like my characters or a certain book. You mean the world to me and I hope to always give you heroes to fall in love with and heroines you want to be friends with. Thank you so much for giving me a chance.

Fiona: What book are you reading now?

I’m about to fan-girl and start Layla Frost’s latest book “Give In.”

Fiona: Do you remember the first book you read?

Oh, my gosh. I wish I did! I’ve read since I was a little girl. I would devour book after book from the school library but some of my favorites were by Enid Blyton (The Naughtiest Girl series)  and Jill Murphy (The Worst Witch series)

Fiona: What makes you laugh/cry?

I don’t cry often, but I love to laugh a lot. And I find silly things the funniest.

Fiona: Is there one person, past or present, you would love to meet? Why?

For pure selfish crush reasons I’d do most anything for a good long chat with Wentworth Miller. Book related I grew up reading my first romances by Jackie Collins so I would have loved to have met her because I admired greatly her style of writing in long hand. Not that I could do it, but she was a queen.

Fiona: Do you have any hobbies?

Does internet stalking information about Wentwoth Miller count? No? Then reading. I read a little something from my bursting at the seams kindle library every night before I sleep.

Fiona: What TV shows/films do you enjoy watching?

Lucifer. The Flash. Arrow. Prison Break. The Big Bang Theory. Game of Thrones. The Great British Bake Off. The Blacklist. And any romantic comedy movie! Currently loving To All the Boys I’ve Loved Before.

Fiona: Favorite foods, colors,  music?

CARBS! Pink and poppy-upbeat music that makes me feel good.

Fiona: Imagine a future where you no longer write. What would you do?

I’d still make up stories in my head. The voices are wild and don’t ever give me peace.

Fiona: You only have 24 hours to live how would you spend that time?

I think I’d be a monster if I didn’t say with loved ones. But I’d hope I was stuffing my face with as much chocolate as I could at the same time.

 Fiona: What do you want written on your head stone?

“Nothing good comes from stalking Wentwoth Miller… look where I ended up.”

Fiona: Do you have a blog or website readers can visit for updates, events and special offers?

You can find me at all these places:

Bookbub: https://bit.ly/2x5wMqL

Twitter: https://bit.ly/2x6zOLA

Instagram: https://bit.ly/2N7Ckv2

Author page: https://bit.ly/2x1eZRJ

Reader group: https://bit.ly/2NFfc6z

Goodreads: https://bit.ly/2N7LCXL

Amazon page: https://amzn.to/2x72IdH

 

Manhattan Sugar is on sale now! – https://amzn.to/2LZD7gQ

Hope you enjoy the Not-So Sugar Daddy.

 

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Here is my interview with Sandra Bolton

Hello and welcome to my blog, Author Interviews. My name is Fiona Mcvie.

Hello, and thank you.

 

Let’s get you introduced to everyone, shall we? Tell us your name. What is your age?

My name is Sandra Bolton, and this is my dog, Sam.Let’s just say we are both ‘seniors’ but young at heart.

Fiona: Where are you from?

I’m from the States, originally California, and I’ve lived in many places in between – Florida, Spain, Sicily, and Honduras. For the past 30 years, I’ve called New Mexico home.

Fiona: A little about your self (ie,  your education, family life, etc.).

I have a B.A. in education from the University of West Florida and a Master’s Degree in counseling from Highlands University here in New Mexico. I retired from teaching after 25 years. I’ve outlived a husband, a partner, and my cat, Fidel, so now it is just Sam and me in the house. We do love getting out in nature and hiking in the beautiful mountains near home. I have three great children and six amazing grandchildren who unfortunately live far away. I love cooking great meals for friends and family when they come to visit.

Fiona: Tell us your latest news.

I’ve just released my latest novel, Raven’s Cry, Book 3 in the Emily Etcitty Mystery Series. The story follows the adventures of Navajo Police Officer Emily Etcitty and her east coast musician boyfriend, Abe Freeman as they find themselves once again enmeshed in a dangerous and puzzling mystery

Fiona: When and why did you begin writing?

Unlike many authors, I never thought about becoming a writer until after my retirement, and I attended a writing class with local Southwest mystery writer, Steven Havill. One class led to another and my first novel, A Cipher in the Sand, began to emerge.

Fiona: When did you first consider yourself a writer?

Once I self-published that first novel, I was hooked and started thinking of ideas for a second book.

Fiona: What inspired you to write your first book?

I started thinking about my time as a Peace Corps Volunteer in Honduras, all the close calls and adventures I had, and I incorporated my real-life experiences into a fictional mystery story.

Fiona: How did you come up with the title?

I was stationed on the north coast of Honduras, right on the beach. The word ‘cipher’ refers to a secret or a code, which may lead to solving the mystery.

Fiona: Do you have a specific writing style? Is there anything about your style or genre that you find particularly challenging?

I do not write from an outline or even necessarily know where the story is going when I start. I guess you could call me a “seat of the panster.” Once I start writing, I am pretty disciplined and dedicate three hours a day to writing, or at least sitting in front of the computer and thinking about writing.

Fiona: How much of the book is realistic and are experiences based on someone you know, or events in your own life?

If we are still referring to “Cipher,” a large part of it is realistic and based on my own experiences. The Emily Etcitty Mysteries draw from my experiences living on the Navajo Reservation in New Mexico and teaching Navajo children. I had a unique opportunity to learn about the culture and traditions.

Fiona: To craft your works, do you have to travel? Before or during the process?

I did not travel. I relied on memory and researchand interviews with native experts who were knowledgeable about the Navajo culture.

Fiona: Who designed the covers?

I designed my first cover. The covers for books 1 and 2 in the Emily Etcitty series were designed by someone chosen by my publisher, Thomas and Mercer. My talented friend, Carita Tanner, designed the cover for Raven’s Cry.

Fiona: Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?

If there is one underlying message in all my novels it lies in the seeking of justice for the downtrodden and underrepresented minorities who have suffered at the hands of greed and power.

Fiona: Are there any new authors that have grasped your interest?  Who is your favorite writer, and what is it about their work that really strikes you?

I’m impressed with the writing of Gillian Flynn, author of Gone Girl, and that of Joe Clifford, though both are dark and brooding. It is too difficult to pick a favorite author from so many greats. I love Margaret Atwood, John Steinbeck, Elmore Leonard, and Kurt Vonnegut.

Fiona: Outside of family members, name one entity that supported your commitment to become a published author.

I have belonged to the same writing group for nearly ten years now. Besides being a great critique group and fun to share dinner and wine, we all support and encourage one another and celebrate our successes.

Fiona: Do you see writing as a career?

I can’t imagine myself not writing, but I am glad I have a pension from teaching so that I don’t starve.

Fiona: If you had to do it all over again, would you change anything in your latest book?

I might change the format somewhat – go to single spacing rather than 1 and a half that I did for older folks like me, but I am happy with the plot, characters, and flow.

Fiona: Did you learn anything during the writing of your recent book?

I learned never to quit, and was reminded once again that writing is hard work.

Fiona: If your book was made into a film, who would you like to play the lead?

For my female protagonist I would love to see one of the talented Native American actors play Emily. And for the male, Abe Freeman, a sensitive brooding type like Daniel Day Lewis or Christian Bale.

Fiona: Any advice for other writers?

My advice is to not listen to advice. Everyone has their own style, preferred routine, and work ethic. Just stick to it and try to write every day, even if it only amounts a few words. Persevere!

Fiona: Anything specific you want to tell your readers?

I want my readers to be caught up in the story and not want to put it down. Be entertained! At the same time, I want them to learn something about people and different cultures.

 Fiona: What book are you reading now?

I am reading A Heartbreaking Work of Staggering Genius by Dave Eggers.

 Fiona: Do you remember the first book you read?

No. I’ve always loved reading from the time I was able to read, and that is too many years ago. I remember being greatly moved by Grapes of Wrath.

 Fiona: What makes you laugh/cry?

Anything silly, preposterous, ridiculous, or cute makes me laugh. But, I am not moved to tears by the meanness in the world but by goodness and acts of kindness. That’s what gets me every time.

Fiona: Is there one person, past or present, you would love to meet? Why?

I am actually an introvert, so I would like to be the ‘fly on the wall’ in the same room with Barack Obama or Stephen King, or any number of people though I am not overly impressed with celebrity.

 Fiona: Do you have any hobbies?

As I mentioned before, I love to cook all sorts of good things. I maintain a vegetable and herb garden and use fresh ingredients from my garden in my cooking. I also make walking sticks from carefully gathered tree branches when I have the time. I would much prefer being outdoors doing anything to being indoors.

 Fiona: What TV shows/films do you enjoy watching?

I gave up TV over fifteen years ago, but recently bought a Roku TV so I can watch shows on Netflix and Amazon Prime. Right now, I’m watching Deadwood.

 Fiona: Favorite foods, colors,  music?

I am most comfortable with the warm earth tones: greens, oranges, and browns, kind of like the colors in New Mexico. I eat and enjoy all kinds of ethnic foods. There are very few foods I do not like. Maybe liver. And music, depends on my mood. I can’t listen to music when I write unless it’s quiet classic. Other times, I prefer some of the older standards.

 Fiona: Imagine a future where you no longer write. What would you do?

When the time comes that I am no longer writing I will probably be cremated and my ashes would be swirling in the wind over the landscape of New Mexico.

 Fiona: You only have 24 hours to live how would you spend that time?

I have an isolated cabin in a place called Bear Canyon. It’s not far from my home, so I sneak away to go there as often as I can. I’d like to spend my last 24 hours sitting in that old rocker on the deck watching the deer and the turkeys and listening to the birds and the wind singing through the trees.

 Fiona: What do you want written on your head stone?

No surrender.

 Fiona: Do you have a blog or website readers can visit for updates, events and special offers?

I do have a blog page. I need to update it, but it has a lot of my short stories and vignettes about my life. Here is the website and my Amazon page:

www.sandrabolton.com

https://www.amazon.com/Sandra-Bolton/e/B007NX3EJ6/

 

Here is my interview with Karien van Ditzhuijzen

Hello and welcome to my blog, Author Interviews. My name is Fiona Mcvie.

 

Let’s get you introduced to everyone, shall we? Tell us your name. What is your age?

Hi, I’m Karien van Ditzhuijzen and I just turned 42.

Fiona: Where are you from?

Technically I am Dutch, but haven’t lived in the Netherlands for a long time. The last six years I lived in Singapore and before that, six years in the UK. Before that many other countries: Oman, Malaysia, France… You can say I am a global citizen!

Fiona: A little about your self (ie,  your education, family life, etc.).

I have a masters degree in chemical engineering and sustainability, but like to keep that quiet as I worry people will ask me difficult questions I have forgotten the answers to. I now combine looking after my three children with working with an NGO that supports migrant workers in Singapore and writing.  For the last 5 years I have worked very closely with migrant domestic workers, documenting their stories.

Fiona: Tell us your latest news.

This summer my debut novel ‘A Yellow House’ was published which is infinitely exciting! The book is about Maya, a little girl that together with her Aunty M (a domestic worker from Indonesia) rescues an abused domestic worker in her building. They then get drawn into helping many more women in trouble, but I won’t give much more away.

More information can be found here: http://www.monsoonbooks.co.uk/books/a-yellow-house-by-karien-van-ditzhuijze/

Fiona: When and why did you begin writing?

I started writing during my first maternity leave ten years ago. My eldest son was a good baby that slept a lot thankfully. While he was napping I wrote a children’s book about my childhood in Borneo; I really wanted to document all the adventures I had there for my children. Living in Asia and the Middle East we always had domestic workers in the house. They left their own children behind to come and look after us, which raised many questions I never asked as a child. So when I moved to Singapore with my own children I knew I wanted to write about these women.

Fiona: When did you first consider yourself a writer?

I think you always need to take yourself serious as a writer, even when you are unpublished or just starting out. If you don’t, who else will?

Fiona: What inspired you to write your first book?

My first adult novel, A Yellow House, is inspired by the women I met though my charity work in Singapore. These women are all domestic workers from countries like the Philippines, Indonesia and Myanmar. It is an immensely courageous and risky thing to do. These women often encounter difficult situations and I wanted to give them a voice.

Fiona: How did you come up with the title?

Aunty M, an important domestic worker character in my book, left a daughter behind in Indonesia. That daughter wants a solid, stone house like one of her friends has that is painted yellow. Many domestic workers go abroad to support their children, their education and daily needs. Often the first thing they do with their hard earned money is build a house for the whole family to live. The sad thing is that they can’t enjoy it themselves as they are away working. In the book the ‘yellow house’ is a metaphor for what mothers want to pass on to their daughters.

Fiona: Do you have a specific writing style? Is there anything about your style or genre that you find particularly challenging?

I like to keep my writing simple, as the subjects I broach are difficult enough and need little embellishing. Even though I write in English I think some of my first language, Dutch, might shine through. The Dutch usually have quite a tone down laid back style compared with the flourishing language you see in some nationalities. Writing about a sensitive subject like domestic worker abuse Asia as a European can be challenging. You don’t want to be seen as judgemental. This is why I selected a young girl as a protagonist. She is open-minded and naïve. I like to leave drawing conclusions up to the readers.

Fiona: How much of the book is realistic and are experiences based on someone you know, or events in your own life?

All the examples of domestic workers ill-treatment I bring up in A Yellow House are based on real life situations I encountered trough my work with domestic workers in Singapore. My protagonist Maya struggles with her cultural identity, which is something I can personally relate to having lived in so many countries, although thankfully I never encountered terrible bullying like she does. Maya’s mother is in some aspects very different from me, she is a high powered career woman in finance. Yet many of her problems are ones I can relate to: losing your temper with young children, the difficulties of balancing work and family life.

Fiona: To craft your works, do you have to travel? Before or during the process?

Absolutely! I love adding local colour and flavour to my books. To bring Singapore to life and get the readers to love the city like I do I added a lot of local favourite spots. Also local food and culture play an important role, as heritage is important in developing characters. The other important country in the book is Indonesia, some of that is also based on places I personally visited.

Fiona: Who designed the covers?

When I visited Indonesia and the village of my own domestic worker, I fell in love with her house that she bought after working in Singapore for several years. Her gorgeous house was painted a warm ochre yellow. I sent a photo of it to my publisher who passed it on to the designers. I love the result!

Fiona: Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?

There are many! To start with of course I want to make people think about the way migrant domestic workers get treated in Singapore and whether there is perhaps some room for improvement there. I don’t spell out that message but there is a lot of food for thought. Also, I wanted to show how different kinds of women struggle with balancing their own needs with that of their families. There isn’t really one right way to be a mother and it is ok to find it hard.

Fiona: Are there any new authors that have grasped your interest?  Who is your favorite writer, and what is it about their work that really strikes you?

Such a difficult question! I read a lot, and so fast I often forget what I read soon. Lately I have been reading a lot of Asian and Singaporean literature and there is so much talent out here that people in Europe haven’t even heard about. It is very refreshing to get a different perspective sometimes. Check our Amanda Lee Koe, Christine Suchen Lim, or Jeremy Tiang. And Malaysian writer Tash Aw.

Fiona: Outside of family members, name one entity that supported your commitment to become a published author.

For me, my book club has been a crucial support. It is a lovely group of women, several of then writers and editors themselves. From inspiring me to write to proofreading and moral support, finally even introducing me to my publisher – they have been there every step of the way.

Fiona: Do you see writing as a career?

Career is a big word – it is still very hard to make money being a writer. But getting a publishing deal is an important first step so yes, I definitely do. I’m hard at work on my next novel, writing is very addictive and the more people tell me they like my work, the more I want to write.

Fiona: If you had to do it all over again, would you change anything in your latest book?

There are always minor details, but nothing significant.

Fiona: Did you learn anything during the writing of your recent book?

So much, where do I start! I had written a lot before, but never a full novel. After I finished my fist draft several people said they liked it, but the feedback was also crushing. I had little idea about narrative drive, creating a character arc, tension. I had to look all that up and rewrite the whole book. Thankfully I had some great people believing in me and my book which gave me the motivation to carry on.

 Fiona: If your book was made into a film, who would you like to play the lead?

That is hard to say, as my first lead character is a ten-year-old mixed race girl and the second one an older Indonesian woman … But if we can get that hot guy from Crazy Rich Asians in a supporting role I’m very happy!

Fiona: Any advice for other writers?

Take yourself serious, and also accept that writing fiction is a skill you need to learn. You need to make the miles! Get good proofreaders and swallow their feedback, even if it is hard to handle.

Fiona: Anything specific you want to tell your readers?

Enjoy reading! Ignore the message, the morals, just read for pleasure. Anything else will follow….

 Fiona: What book are you reading now?

I typically read several books at the same time. One of them is ‘Island of Demons’ by Nigel Barley (I am going to Bali for the weekend – one of the perks of living in Singapore!). The other is ‘Wide Sargasso Sea’ by Jean Rhys.

 Fiona: Do you remember the first book you read?

Not really, I would likely have been a picture book? Maybe a Dutch Classic like Nijntje (Miffy in English) or Jip en Janneke? My parents love books too and they read to us a lot. I had several different favourite books growing up, being your classic bookworm girl. My favourite authors were Dianne Wynne Jones, Astrid Lindgren and Paul Biegel.

 Fiona: What makes you laugh/cry?

My children. In equal measure from fun or despair.

 Fiona: Is there one person, past or present, you would love to meet? Why?

 I’d love to meet Maria Herthog, better known as either Bertha or Nadra. She was a little Dutch girl that got separated form her parents during WWII in Indonesia. In 1950 there was a court case in Singapore between her biological parents in the Netherlands and her Malay foster mother. This case resulted in the biggest racial riots in Singapore ever. The story is relevant to the new novel I’m working on and so much is written about her that is contradictory that we will never know the full story. If that even exists, as I strongly believe there is more than one truth to it. Unfortunately she had a very miserable life and passed away late last century.

 Fiona: Do you have any hobbies?

Well, as mentioned before, reading! And traveling, nature, hiking, eating out at Asia’s great hawkers.

Fiona: What TV shows/films do you enjoy watching?

Occasionally my husband and I like doing some Netflix binging but it can be hard to find something we both like as our tastes are so different. Recent favourites are ‘The Affair’ and ‘Thirteen Reasons Why’.

 Fiona: Favorite foods, colors,  music?

I love, love, love Asian food! Can’t imagine moving away from here yet as I’d miss the food too much, Asian food in Europe is nowhere near as good. And my favourite colour: yellow, of course!

Fiona: Imagine a future where you no longer write. What would you do?

 Gardening, keeping animals, campaign for sustainability and human rights.

Fiona: What do you want written on your head stone?

A head stone is too formal for me. I’d rather be cremated and have my ashes spread over some beautiful nature. My books will be my legacy.

Fiona: Do you have a blog or website readers can visit for updates, events and special offers?

 Yes, it’s: www.bedu-mama.com

I blog here about expat life in Singapore, traveling, food and of course updates about my book!

You can also follow me on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/KarienvanDitzhuijzenAuthor/

Or Instagram @karienvd

Here is my interview with Louise Burfitt-Dons


Hello and welcome to my blog, Author Interviews. My name is Fiona Mcvie.

Hi Fiona. You’re running a great blog.

Let’s get you introduced to everyone, shall we? Tell us your name. What is your age?

I’m Louise Burfitt-Dons.  I was born in the 1950s in Kuwait.

Fiona: Where are you from?

My parents were from Hertfordshire in the UK.  I’ve lived in many different countries, including Australia and France.  My home is now Chiswick, London.

Fiona: A little about yourself (i.e., your education, family life, etc.).

I’ve been married for 36 years to the love of my life.  He’s a New Zealander called Donald andan ex-pilot. He started his flying career in the New Zealand Air Force and went on to fly commercially forAustralian airlines Qantas. We have two grown up daughters Brooke and Arabella (though I still see them as babies. All mothers do.)

Fiona: Tell us your latest news.

I’ve just published a thriller with a political background called The Missing Activist.

Fiona: When and why did you begin writing crime fiction?

When I was a child I met Ian Fleming who came to Kuwait to write a book on the State of Kuwait. He befriended my father, who my mother said IF referred to as a living James Bond because of his desert-bound activities and collection of spiders and snakes. (There’s a book in this.) A couple of years ago I embarked on writing thriller fiction and IF was my mentor (all those years later).  His photo is in my study.

Fiona: When did you first consider yourself a writer?

Although I’ve been a freelancer (journalism, PR,) I first really only understood the importance of the written word after I set up an anti-bullying charity in 2000 to help children bullied at school. Researching from a range of sources, I produced a small leaflet called “Tips for Teens”. This  comprised practical information sourced from a range of people, including martial arts instructors, SAS, doctors and wise individuals who’d found a way of coping with intimidation.  They were run out on a copy machine. After public speaking events, people literally tore these leaflets from my hands. It was nothing to do with my brilliant writing style, but more about the information I’d managed to source.Like their kid’s lives depended on it. And who’s to say it didn’t?You have to put on paper something original, useful, worth reading. If it needs to be said or sourced and you’ve done that—and people are reading it— then you’re a writer.

Fiona: What inspired you to write your first novel?

I was a political candidate in the UK General Election of 2015.  A young supporter who campaigned for me took his life because of bullying by a senior member of the party.  It drove me to write this novel which closely tracks the realities of political life today.

Fiona: How did you come up with the title?

At the end of the book (which I had originally entitled The List) I realised the story, which is a complex mystery/thriller with six points of view, several murders and a massive existential threat to the UK Government, was still about A MISSING ACTIVIST.  It was the right title.  You don’t find out what’s happened to him until the very end.

Fiona: Do you have a specific writing style? Is there anything about your style or genre that you find particularly challenging?

As I’m also a screenwriter, the pace is fast and there are many end of chapter twists and turns.  So my style would be classified ‘journalistic’.   I find the genre can be a little too light at times, so I’ve added a depth to my work via research to cover social and contemporary political issues.Even though crime is essential an easy read I believe you have to offer the reader some original background research.

Fiona: How much of the book is realistic and are experiences based on someone you know, or events in your own life?

Yes.  My book  is based on my personal experiences of  political life and what I’ve learned from test cases over the many years I’ve been involved with victims of bullying and other social causes which light up our world today. Of course I also draw on the many extraordinary colourful characters I’ve met over my life, from every walk of life.  Zin ah Al-Rashid, for example, a bi-polar personality and major character in The Missing activist is drawn on a girl I shared a flat with forty years ago.

Fiona: To craft your works, do you have to travel? Before or during the process?

I have to research quite thoroughly as I am extending my own persona l experience. Yes, I will often visit locations and soak up the vibes. The settings for The Missing Activist are all places I have been to, if only to research the book.

Fiona: Who designed the covers?

A talented artist from Bulgaria designed the cover to The Missing Activist.

Fiona: Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?

We are all affected by the group decisions and the communities we are rooted in.The Australian aboriginal tribal practice of the Kurdaitcha (the executioner) is as alive and well in modern society as it ever was. To learn more about what it is and how it impacts, you’ll have to read the Missing Activist.

Fiona:  Who is your favorite writer, and what is it about their work that really strikes you?

I have a diverse range of literary icons. Doris Lessing, for example, for the honesty in how she wrote about women. Agatha Christie, Dorothy Sayers and Ruth Rendell for their trailblazing crime work.  Modern authors like Anne Cleeves for her ability to have her books adapted by creative TV writers.  James Paterson, for his industrial production of accessible-to-all thrillers. Past authors like PG Wodehouse for his brilliant humour, which keeps me amused.Also young writers of the future like Emma Kline, who impresses me – The Girls was brilliant.

Fiona: If you had to do it all over again, would you change anything in your latest book?

No.

Fiona: Did you learn anything during the writing of your recent book?

That you can find a plausible side to any character, whatever evil they’ve committed.

Fiona: If your book was made into a film, who would you like to play the lead?

Karen Andersen? I haven’t given that any thought to date – but someone spunky and intelligentlyamusing, but definitely with vulnerability.  I’m not into kickass female protagonists. I think the real strength in women lies in the complex mix of the above, characteristics.

Fiona: What book are you reading now?

Eric Ambler the Mask of Dimitrios. A thriller first published in 1939 but it is just as fresh today and a hallmark.

Fiona: Do you remember the first book you read?

Jack and Jill. Then all the Enid Blighton books, like Famous Five, Secret Seven.

Fiona: What makes you laugh/cry?

I’ve got a British sense of humour. How to describe it? If someone is saying something which makes absolutely no sense at all, but with a straight face, they’re probably joking. That’s us Brits.  We love irony, understatement (to the enth degree and lashings of self-deprecation (See P G Wodehouse.)

Fiona: What TV shows/films do you enjoy watching?

All the box sets. I think the current collection TV drama is superlative.  Too many to single out one in particular. My recent script The Ext Next Door hits the screens next year.  Also Maternal Secrets, starring Kelly McGillis, Kate Mansi and Brooke Burfitt, which I co-wrote with Lucinda Spurling is a Bermuda thriller which has won several awards. Everyone today is enjoying staying in with Netflix or a Lifetime movie while they enjoy a home cooked dinner or take away.

Fiona: Favorite foods, colors, music?

Hot curries, but then chilled and ice cream sundaes.   My favourite colour since childhood has been yellow (golden yellow rather than lime yellow).Dinah Washington style jazz is my favourite music.

Fiona: Imagine a future where you no longer write. What would you do?

Continue to run Act Against Bullying if I can make life more bearable for some.

Fiona: Do you have a blog or website readers can visit for updates, events and special offers?

www.louiseburfittdons.com

I’m on Goodreads Goodreads

My Amazon author page Author Central

Twitter Twitter

Facebook Facebook page

 

Here is my interview with Tamara Leigh

Hello and welcome to my blog, Author Interviews. My name is Fiona Mcvie.

 

Let’s get you introduced to everyone, shall we? Tell us your name. What is your age?

My name is, Tamara Leigh and my age… Well, I’m more than two score but certainly not three. Close enough.

 Fiona: Where are you from?

I grew up in the foothills of Lake Tahoe. Twenty-some years ago, my husband and I moved with our first son to the Nashville area where our second son was born. We’ve been here since.

 Fiona: A little about yourself (ie,your education, family life, etc.).

Though I hold a master’s degree in Speech Language Pathology, for the past twenty-five years I’ve been a full-time, published author. I’ve been married thirty years, and my husband and I have two amazing adult sons.

 Fiona: Tell us your latest news.

This past June, the eighth book in my Age of Faith series, THE RAVELING, released as a #1 Hot New Release on Amazon. I’ve just finished writing MERCILESS, the first book in my new Age of Conquest series which tells the origins of the Wulfrith family during the Norman Conquest of England in 1066. I’m beginning edits now and anticipate a November 2018 release.

Fiona: When and why did you begin writing?

Having had many a play date with reading throughout my childhood, I began writing seriously as a teenager.

Fiona: When did you first consider yourself a writer?

Probably when a figured out how to hold one of those fat pencils and make marks on paper.

Fiona: What inspired you to write your first book?

My love of reading, and especially books in the romance genre.

 Fiona: How did you come up with the title?

The title of my first book was Worth Dying For, which fit the medieval romance beautifully, but my publisher, Bantam, changed it to Warrior Bride. More marketable, apparently. And it was a bestseller.

Fiona: Do you have a specific writing style? Is there anything about your style or genre that you find particularly challenging?

I’m a pantser—little outlining, writing mostly by “the seat of my pants.” The majority of each of my books are handwritten, then typed into the computer and edited. The greatest challenge I face is interruptionwhen I have my head down and pen on paper. A measly five minute interruption can take a half hour or longer to get back in the groove.

Fiona: How much of the book is realistic and are experiences based on someone you know, or events in your own life?

I don’t believe it’s possible for an author not to insert her experiences and emotions into her stories, so in some measure or other, my books are realistic. And for those things I haven’t experienced—research, research, research!

Fiona: To craft your works, do you have to travel? Before or during the process?

Though I would love to travel for hands-on research, research books and the internet make the world so accessible I can do most of it from my writing desk.

Fiona: Who designed the covers?

The amazing Ravven

 Fiona: Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?

In one word—hope.

Fiona: Who is your favorite writer, and what is it about their work that really strikes you?

I have several, but two come first to mind—historical authors Sharon Kay Penman and Bernard Cornwell. Goodness, they can tell a tale!

Fiona: Outside of family members, name one entity that supported your commitment to become a published author.

That would be my first agent who not only secured my first 4-book contract with a major publisher but provided detailed feedback on the manuscript.

Fiona: Do you see writing as a career?

I certainly do, though only after transitioning from traditional to indie publishing did it become supportable.

Fiona: If you had to do it all over again, would you change anything in your latest book?

There’s always room for improvement, but there’s nothing significant I would change. I believe Sir Elias and Honore of THE RAVELING found their perfect Happily Ever After.

Fiona: Did you learn anything during the writing of your recent book?

Oh so much. I thought I knew the scope of the Norman Conquest to begin writing MERCILESS. Not even close. And there’s much more research needed for the next book in the series.

 Fiona: If your book was made into a film, who would you like to play the lead?

Hmm, which book? How about my upcoming release, MERCILESS.The lead to play Cyr D’Argent…perhaps Liam Hemsworth.The lead to play Aelfled daughter of Soren…Margot Robbie. Yes, Australians. I may be a little biased.

Fiona: Any advice for other writers?

Read. Write. Read. Write. Read. Write.

Fiona: Anything specific you want to tell your readers?

I so appreciate you joining me on my writing journey. You inspire me to put pen to paper every day.

 Fiona: What book are you reading now?

William the Conqueror by David Bates

 Fiona: Do you remember the first book you read?

Might that be Dick and Jane?

 Fiona: What makes you laugh/cry?

My guys make me laugh. Injustice makes me cry.

 Fiona: Is there one person, past or present, you would love to meet? Why?

King Henry II’s queen, Eleanor of Aquitaine. She was a woman ahead of her time.

 Fiona: Do you have any hobbies?

Writing. Kinda cool it became a career, hmm?

 Fiona: What TV shows/films do you enjoy watching?

The Last Kingdom, The White Queen, and The White Princess are among my favorites.

 Fiona: Favorite foods, colors,  music?

Food—does pumpkin spice latte qualify? Color—I don’t have a favourite though black is always slimming. Music—A Little Chaos soundtrack, Enya, Sarah Brightman, and many others.

 Fiona: Imagine a future where you no longer write. What would you do?

READ!

 Fiona: You only have 24 hours to live how would you spend that time?

With my loved ones.

 Fiona: What do you want written on your head stone?

Beloved wife, mother, believer, word architect.

 Fiona: Do you have a blog or website readers can visit for updates, events and special offers?

Website: www.tamaraleigh.com

Amazon Author’s Page: https://www.amazon.com/Tamara-Leigh/e/B000AP9A2E/ref=dp_byline_cont_pop_ebooks_1

 

Here is my interview with Cameron Bane

Hello and welcome to my blog, Author Interviews. My name is Fiona Mcvie.

 

Let’s get you introduced to everyone, shall we? Tell us your name. What is your age?

 Cameron Bane formerly published under the name John Robinson. We now write under the pen name of a husband (John) and wife (Barb) duo who write some of the most audacious fiction on the planet. As for our age, let’s just say we are of the age of accountability.

Fiona: Where are you from?

We live in the state of Ohio in the USA.

 Fiona: A little about your self (ie,  your education, family life, etc.).

Ladies first! My wife is a professional singer, writer, editor, music teacher, composer, actor, mother, grandmother, sister, and aunt. She began playing the piano by “ear” at age three. She studied voice and drama at the Cincinnati Conservatory of Music, andgraduated from Eastern Kentucky University with a degree in music. I hail from the hills of Kentucky, andgraduated from Eastern Kentucky Universitywith a degree in broadcasting. I’m a writer, editor, music lover, father, grandfather, and brother. We have two grown sons, two teenage grandsons, and a beautiful daughter-in-law. We’re always telling each of them, the world became a better place the day that you were born. We’re animal lovers, avid readers, and MAJOR coffee lovers!

 Fiona: Tell us your latest news.

We’re putting the finishing touches on our very first science fiction novel, Full Burn.

Fiona: When and why did you begin writing?

We both began writing at a very early age. Why? Because we couldn’t NOT write.

Fiona: When did you first consider yourself a writer?

I would say that was when we were writing our first novel, Until the Last Dog Dies. It sounds odd, but as we were writing it, we simply knew.

Fiona: What inspired you to write your first book?

We were always telling stories, so we decided to try it professionally. To our amazement, it worked!

 Fiona: How did you come up with the title?

The phrase, until the last dog dies, is an old Southern one, and basically means to keepgoing and never give up.

Fiona: Do you have a specific writing style? Is there anything about your style or genre that you find particularly challenging?

We suppose our writing style would be best described as suspense thrillers laced with deep characterization, action, humor, and romance. Each story runs the gamut of emotions. What we find particularly challenging is doing some of the research, and time issues.

Fiona: How much of the book is realistic and are experiences based on someone you know, or events in your own life?

They are all partly realistic, and some of the charactersare amalgamations of people we’ve known, and experiences we’ve had.

Fiona: To craft your works, do you have to travel? Before or during the process?

Sometimes, and it’s all grist for the mill.

Fiona: Who designed the covers?

Our publishers.

Fiona: Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?

There are several messages, but primarily to never pass up an opportunity to tell those you lovehow much you love them. And it may sound trite, but be true to yourself, and as Winston Churchill said, never, never, never give up.

Fiona: Are there any new authors that have grasped your interest?  Who is your favorite writer, and what is it about their work that really strikes you?

We don’t have one favorite author, but a whole hatful. These include Nelson DeMille, Dean Koontz, Robert Crais, and Douglas Preston and Lincoln Child.

Fiona: Outside of family members, name one entity that supported your commitment to become a published author.

Our friends.

Fiona: Do you see writing as a career?

Yes, that’s our goal.

Fiona: If you had to do it all over again, would you change anything in your latest book?

The publisher chose the cover; it was not the one we wanted. My wife says it wasn’t finished. I said it was!

Fiona: Did you learn anything during the writing of your recent book?

Our aim is to improve our craft with each book.

Fiona: If your book was made into a film, who would you like to play the lead?

Hugh Jackman would NAIL it.

Fiona: Any advice for other writers?

Always please yourself.

Fiona: Anything specific you want to tell your readers?

 We should all make it our purpose in life to not tear people down. Instead, build them up.

Fiona: What book are you reading now?

I’m re-reading The Mote in God’s Eye, by Larry Niven and Jerry Pournelle, and my wife is re-reading The Red Door, by Dean Koontz

Fiona: Do you remember the first book you read?

Not really.

Fiona: What makes you laugh/cry?

Our children and grandchildren, and the beauty and awesomeness of the universe we live in.

Fiona: Is there one person, past or present, you would love to meet? Why?

 Mark Twain. He was a terrific writer.

Fiona: Do you have any hobbies?

Music.

Fiona: What TV shows/films do you enjoy watching?

We like movie classics, including the greats of Alfred Hitchcock. Our favoriteTV show is Justified.

 Fiona: Favorite foods, colors,  music?

My wife’s favourite colors are jewel tones, and mine are the blues. We like Chinese and seafood the best. We both love classical music and classic rock.

 Fiona: Imagine a future where you no longer write. What would you do?

Create music and teach.

 Fiona: You only have 24 hours to live how would you spend that time?Praying, and loving our family.

 Fiona: What do you want written on your head stone?

Either, “See, I told you I was sick”, or “You’re standing on my chest …”

 Fiona: Do you have a blog or website readers can visit for updates, events and special offers?

 Our website is www.cameronbanebooks.com. On it you’ll find a tab for our works, and links to the same. There is also a tab for our blog.

https://www.amazon.com/John-Robinson/e/B001JP8TR6/ref=dp_byline_cont_ebooks_1

 

https://www.amazon.com/Pitfall-Cameron-Bane-ebook/dp/B012LTNGEY/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1537135847&sr=1-1&keywords=Cameron+Bane&dpID=51T5UAYxMuL&preST=_SY445_QL70_&dpSrc=srch

Thanks for having us, Fiona!

Here is my interview with Frank Kusy

Hello and welcome to my blog, Author Interviews. My name is Fiona Mcvie.

Let’s get you introduced to everyone, shall we? Tell us your name. What is your age?

Thanks for inviting me on to your blog, Fiona. My name is Frank Kusy and I’ve just become a Beatles song at 64!

Fiona: Where are you from?

I’m a Londoner, born in Balham, though my parents were from Poland (father) and Hungary (mother).

Fiona: A little about your self (ie, your education, family life, etc.)

I graduated from Cardiff university in 1975, had a short stint in publishing (Financial Times), then travelled to Asia on business and for leisure for the next 30 years. My dad died when I was two, and my mother unexpectedly passed away on my wedding day. She is much missed.

Fiona: Tell us your latest news.

Recently retired, I’m embarking on a new career as a carer – presently looking after a young man with learning difficulties.

Fiona: When and why did you begin writing?

I wrote my first book ‘Jessie the Cat’ when I was 8 years old. I like cats.

Fiona: When did you first consider yourself a writer?

I always wanted to be a writer. I found a ‘Book of Memories’ I wrote when I was ten which said I wanted to be a writer!

Fiona: What inspired you to write your first book?

My first published book, ‘Kevin and I in India’ (1986) was inspired by a 3 month tour of India with a character called Kevin. India hated Kevin and Kevin hated India. It was comedy gold.

Fiona: How did you come up with the title?

My title was ‘Back Passage to India’, but my publisher – Jean Luc Barbanneau of Impact Books – didn’t like it for some reason. ‘Kevin and I in India’ was his idea.

Fiona: Do you have a specific writing style? Is there anything about your style or genre that you find particularly challenging?

I write memoirs and cat books. Both draw heavily on my real life experience. My writing style can probably best be described as ‘chatty’ and ‘self-deprecatingly humorous’ (my wife says I have no shame!). I find fiction challenging.

Fiona: How much of the book is realistic and are experiences based on someone you know, or events in your own life?

All my books have a large degree of real life experience in them, though I do have at least one ‘composite’ character in them, sometimes three or four!

Fiona: To craft your works, do you have to travel? Before or during the process?

I have a six-book series based on my travels in India and SouthEast Asia. Most of them draw heavily on the bag of Walkman tapes I took for my research.

Fiona: Who designed the covers?

A lovely lady called Ida, who lives in Norway. Her company is Amygdaladesign.

Fiona: Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?

I’ve been a Buddhist for half my life, so I’ve included quite a lot about Buddhism in my books. Particularly about how dynamic inner change (not meditative gazing at navels) can lead to dramatic outer change and contribute to the peace of the planet.

Fiona: Are there any new authors that have grasped your interest? Who is your favorite writer, and what is it about their work that really strikes you?

I’ve been reading quite a lot of psychological thrillers lately – mainly hand-me-downs from my wife – but I haven’t kept the authors in my head, sorry! My favourite writer of all time is Jerome K. Jerome – his ‘Three Men in a Boat’ has defined and inspired my writing style. So funny!

Fiona: Outside of family members, name one entity that supported your commitment to become a published author.

Nobody in my family wanted me to become a published author (‘Why don’t you get a proper job?’…my mother). Come to think of it, nobody outside my family did either…even when I was published.

Fiona: Do you see writing as a career?

Yes, I do. I’m never happier than when I’m writing, and never more despondent than when I’m not.

Fiona: If you had to do it all over again, would you change anything in your latest book?

My latest book, ‘Life before Frank’, is a (hopefully amusing) account of my childhood days. Looking back on writing it, I would certainly have to change the height of my typing chair. It gave me a permanent stoop.

Fiona: Did you learn anything during the writing of your recent book?

Yes, I learnt that my Polish father nearly killed a bear by tossing it a pack of cigarettes. I also learnt to replace hyphens with semi-colons.

Fiona: If your book was made into a film, who would you like to play the lead?

Oh, that’s easy. Russell Brand!

Fiona: Any advice for other writers?

Yes, don’t be afraid to put your work out there. Take criticism without crying and perfect your art. I truly believe there is a book in most people!

Fiona: Anything specific you want to tell your readers?

I write to make people smile, so if any of my books give you a giggle you’ve made my day. My week, if you happen to leave a little review on Amazon.

Fiona: What book are you reading now?

‘Mythos’ by Stephen Fry. It’s a humorous take on the Greek myths, which I studied as part of my university degree.

Fiona: Do you remember the first book you read?

‘Five Children and It’ by E. Nesbit.

Fiona: What makes you laugh/cry?

Just about anything makes me laugh, mainly my cat. I can’t remember the last time I cried – probably over a soppy movie.

Fiona: Is there one person, past or present, you would love to meet? Why?

I’d love to meet Jesus. I’d have my Sony Walkman handy and write down what he actually said rather than what numerous gospels reported him saying between 200 and 400 years after his death.

Fiona: Do you have any hobbies?

I play bridge with little old ladies. I also go to senior Pilates classes. Both activities are hilarious.

Fiona: What TV shows/films do you enjoy watching?

My wife and I are addicted to ‘Eastenders’, though our current guilty pleasure is ‘Bodyguard’.

Fiona: Favorite foods, colors, music?

As all my friends know, I love sausages. I could honestly live on them. My favourite colour is maroon, and I don’t listen to music any more – it distracts from my writing.

Fiona: Imagine a future where you no longer write. What would you do?

Reach for the Valium.

Fiona: You only have 24 hours to live how would you spend that time?

Frantically assemble all the notes on my new book (about my new career as a carer) and send them off to my publisher. Then, in the last hour, I would chanting Nam-myoho-renge-kyo for all my loved ones, for world peace, and for a smooth transition from this life to a next one where I could create most value.

Fiona: What do you want written on your head stone?

I’ll be back.

Fiona: Do you have a blog or website readers can visit for updates, events and special offers?

Yes, I do, but I’m too lazy to update it. Readers can most easily find me on Facebook.

Amazon Authors page UK https://www.amazon.co.uk/Frank-Kusy/e/B001K8PXYO/ref=sr_ntt_srch_lnk_1?qid=1537131208&sr=1-1

Amazon Authors page USA https://www.amazon.com/Frank-Kusy/e/B001K8PXYO/ref=sr_tc_2_0?qid=1537131226&sr=1-2-ent

Here is my interview with Lauren Cooper

Hello and welcome to my blog, Author Interviews. My name is Fiona Mcvie.

 

Let’s get you introduced to everyone, shall we? Tell us your name. What is your age?

Lauren Cooper, Early Twenties.

Fiona: Where are you from?

Wales, Great Britain. NO, it’s not in England…..

Fiona: A little about your self (ie,  your education, family life, etc.).

I have a History Degree from the University of South Wales, I currently work as an Accounts assistant. I’m married with a little boy and our home is total chaos with the help of our dalmatian.

 Fiona: Tell us your latest news.

 My latest news is the release of my newest book, Delia Bay. It is releasing on Amazon on September 20th in both Ebook and Paperback format. I’ve had such great feedback on it so far, but that doesn’t make it any less nerve wracking sending it out in the world.

Fiona: When and why did you begin writing?

 I’ve been writing for a few years now, but it was never anything serious. I decided in November 2016 to take part in NaNoWriMo and hit the fifty thousand words pretty quickly on first book, Powerless. I then decided to carry on and publish it! It isn’t the best, but it will always be special to me because it was my first. I hope one day to go back and edit it.

Fiona: When did you first consider yourself a writer?

I still don’t really! Is that weird?Delia Bay is my third book and probably the one I’m most proud of but it still doesn’t seem real.

Fiona: What inspired you to write your first book?

A lot of my own emotions and personal life experiences went into Amelia’s backstory and with the help of NaNoWriMo it came to life.

Fiona: How did you come up with the title?

It came to me whilst I was writing the book.

Fiona: Do you have a specific writing style? Is there anything about your style or genre that you find particularly challenging?

More so now with Delia Bay, I have to delve into my own emotions and experiences to drag them out in my characters. It isn’t easy but the outcome is kinda lovely!

Fiona: How much of the book is realistic and are experiences based on someone you know, or events in your own life?

Delia Bay is based a lot around my own experiences with Mental Health and I hope that through this book just one person will see that it will all be okay.

Fiona: To craft your works, do you have to travel? Before or during the process?

 No, but being out and about certainly helps with the creative/ brain storming process!

Fiona: Who designed the covers?

I did, with some help from my tech-savvy sister.

Fiona: Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?

Delia Bay is quite emotional, I thought it was too much at first but my readers seem to enjoy it. I want people to know that, no matter what things will get better. Maybe not drastically but they will improve. For someone on the outside looking it, be mindful that someone may be fighting a never-ending battle in their heads. Mental Health is invisible but the wounds are deep.

Fiona: Are there any new authors that have grasped your interest?  Who is your favorite writer, and what is it about their work that really strikes you?

V. Theia and her delicious, woman eating Bikers – The Renegade Souls MC.

AJ Daniels and her dark Famigilia Series almost makes you swallow your own tongue!

Fiona: Outside of family members, name one entity that supported your commitment to become a published author.

V Theia & AJ Daniels.

Fiona: Do you see writing as a career?

 Not right now. It’s a hobby I hope to continue for many, many years.

Fiona: If you had to do it all over again, would you change anything in your latest book?

Probably add some more to the ending…..

Fiona: Did you learn anything during the writing of your recent book?

Yes. How a character can make you gain 20000 pound in a week.

Seriously, yes I learned a lot! Delia Bay was my first full cover that I made that actually worked! I read it and re-read it a bazillion times to the point where I hated it and thought people would too. I had to trust myself which is very hard to do.

 Fiona: If your book was made into a film, who would you like to play the lead?

 My inspiration fort Reid was Doros Pan – He’s a model.

Fiona: Any advice for other writers?

 Just write it. Write now. Edit later. Seriously, it will be the best thing you ever do.

Fiona: Anything specific you want to tell your readers?

 I love you all so, so much. I can’t express how much it means to me that you take the time out of your days to read my words.

 Fiona: What book are you reading now?

 Nothing right now, but I just finished V Theia’s Manhattan Sugar – It was amazing!

 Fiona: Do you remember the first book you read?

 Probably not my first but my favourite childhood book that I read over and over again was ‘When Hitler Stole Pink Rabbit’ by Judith Kerr.

 Fiona: What makes you laugh/cry?

My little boy cracks me up most days…..being two he also makes me cry a lot! Haha!

 Fiona: Is there one person, past or present, you would love to meet? Why?

Right now, Henry Cavill because I want to eat him alive.

Past, and probably more realistically it would be Marie Stopes. I find her to be such an inspirational woman with a keen eye for detail and for Women’s Rights, I studied her a lot at University and would love to just say Thank You.

 Fiona: Do you have any hobbies?

 Writing is my go to, but I like to go for long walks on the beach with the toddler and dogo.

 Fiona: What TV shows/films do you enjoy watching?

I could watch re-runs of Friends all day long. Right now, I’m waiting on the next season of American Horror Story to start!

 Fiona: Favorite foods, colors,  music?

 Anything with Cheese! Music – anything but my go to is rock. My favourite color is black.

 Fiona: Imagine a future where you no longer write. What would you do?

 Cry a lot.

 Fiona: You only have 24 hours to live how would you spend that time?

Drunk, High and with all my book boyfriends.  Sorry Hubs – you can join us too.

On a serious note, I’d probably just spend it with close family and friends surrounded my really nice smelling wax melts and a Pumpkin Spiced Latte.

 Fiona: What do you want written on your head stone?

Death by orgasm.

 Fiona: Do you have a blog or website readers can visit for updates, events and special offers?

You can follow me on:

Instagram

Twitter

Facebook

My website: https://www.authorlaurencooper.wixsite.com/

 All of my books are available on Amazon worldwide!

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Lauren-Cooper/e/B001KI1OS8/ref=sr_tc_2_0?qid=1537127095&sr=1-2-ent

https://www.amazon.com/Lauren-Cooper/e/B001KI1OS8/ref=sr_tc_2_0?qid=1537127201&sr=1-2-ent

Delia Bay is releasing 20th September but is available for Pre-Order!

 

Here is my interview with Jenna Greene

Hello and welcome to my blog, Author Interviews. My name is Fiona Mcvie.

 

Let’s get you introduced to everyone, shall we? Tell us your name. What is your age?

Hi! My name is Jenna Greene and I’m 36 years young.

Fiona: Where are you from?

I’m from Lethbridge, Alberta Canada

Fiona: A little about your self (ie,  your education, family life, etc.).

I’m a middle school teacher, which means I’m part crazy, and I write in the evenings after I’ve wrangled my toddler into her bed.

Fiona: Tell us your latest news.

I have two releases coming this fall.

The first is the third book in my YA fantasy series. The first book is titled IMAGINE, the sequel is titled REALITY, and the third installment, which is being released in October, is called HERITAGE.

 As well, I have a new series being released in November, called REBORN.

Fiona: When and why did you begin writing?

 I think somewhere around grade two or three. A teacher told my parents I had a talent.

Fiona: When did you first consider yourself a writer?

 Probably when I was seventeen and I had a short story published, or after my first book was published.

Fiona: What inspired you to write your first book?

 It was inspired by the passion of my roommates and an odd day-dream I had.

 Fiona: How did you come up with the title?

 The title connects with the ending of the book … so I can’t give too much away.

Fiona: Do you have a specific writing style? Is there anything about your style or genre that you find particularly challenging?

 I write in short bursts, because I don’t have a lot of time on my hands, but I make good use of that time. I also have to wear a tiara to get in the ‘zone’. I like fantasy because it doesn’t require much research, though I have to keep a lot of notes so that there is consistency between books.

Fiona: How much of the book is realistic and are experiences based on someone you know, or events in your own life?

The locations are from my head, but the characters are aspects of myself, people I know, or people I wish I knew.

Fiona: To craft your works, do you have to travel? Before or during the process?

 I don’t have to travel, but it’s a benefit that I have travelled a lot in my life.

Fiona: Who designed the covers?

 My publisher, Champagne Books, has a phenomenal cover artist named Trisha Fitzgerald.

 Fiona: Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?

 That imagination and creativity is vital.

Fiona: Are there any new authors that have grasped your interest?  Who is your favorite writer, and what is it about their work that really strikes you?

 I love Maureen Fergus’ Gypsy King series and I loved Veronica Roth too.

Fiona: Outside of family members, name one entity that supported your commitment to become a published author.

 My best friend’s loyal support. Hi Rachel! (waves)

Fiona: Do you see writing as a career?

 I do. It isn’t my primary career yet, but I hope someday it will be.

Fiona: If you had to do it all over again, would you change anything in your latest book?

No, I’m pretty proud of everything I’ve written. I could be a more ruthless editor sometimes.

Fiona: Did you learn anything during the writing of your recent book?

 I learn something from writing every book.

 Fiona: If your book was made into a film, who would you like to play the lead?

 Can I play it?

Fiona: Any advice for other writers?

 Stuart McLean once said, “Put yourself in a position where you have to write.” I agree. Set goals for yourself.

 Fiona: Anything specific you want to tell your readers?

 Hi! Thanks for taking the time to discover my wild and wacky thoughts. I’ve done my best to create a great adventure.

 Fiona: What book are you reading now?

 The Marrow Thieves.

 Fiona: Do you remember the first book you read?

 Hmm… Probably a She-ra: Princess of Power picture book.

Fiona: What makes you laugh/cry?

 My daughter.

 Fiona: Is there one person, past or present, you would love to meet? Why?

 Cool. Can I meet She-ra? No? Darn.

 Fiona: Do you have any hobbies?

 I dance and I dragonboat.

 Fiona: What TV shows/films do you enjoy watching?

 Big Bang Theory, Handmaid’s Tale, and Outdaughtered.

 Fiona: Favorite foods, colors,  music?

 Lasagna. Violet. Broadway tunes!

 Fiona: Imagine a future where you no longer write. What would you do?

 Scream.

 Fiona: You only have 24 hours to live how would you spend that time?

 Show my daughter everything I possibly could.

 Fiona: What do you want written on your head stone?

“Don’t step on me.”

 

Fiona: Do you have a blog or website readers can visit for updates, events and special offers?

www.facebook.com/jennabutrenchukgreene

www.jennagreene.ca

 

https://www.amazon.com/Imagine-Jenna-Greene-ebook/dp/B012DZH4S0/ref=sr_1_2?s=digital-text&ie=UTF8&qid=1537122535&sr=1-2&dpID=51YyUhRCQQL&preST=_SY445_QL70_&dpSrc=srch

https://www.amazon.com/Reality-Jenna-Greene-ebook/dp/B01L2XYH8E/ref=pd_sbs_351_1?_encoding=UTF8&psc=1&refRID=DGXZP7KMWMSBJ860VEE2

https://www.amazon.com/Heroine-Jenna-Greene/dp/1530769507/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&qid=1512500873&sr=8-3&keywords=jenna+greene

 

Here is my interview with A.R. Moler

Hello and welcome to my blog, Author Interviews. My name is Fiona Mcvie.

 

Let’s get you introduced to everyone, shall we? Tell us your name. What is your age?

A.R. Moler  and  old enough to remember when floppy discs were state of the art

Fiona: Where are you from?

Maryland in the U.S.

Fiona: A little about your self (ie,  your education, family life, etc.).

I’m chemistry professor for a Community college in Virginia

Fiona: Tell us your latest news.

The next episode in the Inches of Trust series will be coming out with JMS books in December or January. It’s called “I Thee Wed”.

Fiona: When and why did you begin writing?

Middle school. Because I wanted to tell stories that interested me.

Fiona: When did you first consider yourself a writer?

Professionally? 2007

Fiona: What inspired you to write your first book?

Reading a mass market paperback so badly written I swore I could do better—hence “Now I Could Drink Hot Blood” was born

 Fiona: How did you come up with the title?

Stolen from the bard himself. A quote from Hamlet

Fiona: Do you have a specific writing style? Is there anything about your style or genre that you find particularly challenging?

I tend to write a lot of jargon heavy Urban Fantasy or contemporary based romance that features people is high tech, high stress jobs

Fiona: How much of the book is realistic and are experiences based on someone you know, or events in your own life?

That’s a loaded question. I am something of an adrenaline junkie and done everything from zip lining to motorcycle riding to learning to fire a handgun in the name of research.

Fiona: To craft your works, do you have to travel? Before or during the process?

I do travel a fair bit and write both while traveling and then after

Fiona: Who designed the covers?

98% of my self pubbed ones are designed by me. Otherwise it’s the publishing house

Fiona: Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?

Love and romance isn’t about the “plumbing”, it’s the person you fall in love with.

Fiona: Are there any new authors that have grasped your interest?  Who is your favorite writer, and what is it about their work that really strikes you?

I read a lot. I think I’ll dodge the new author q, but my favourite… it’s probably a toss up between Roger Zelazny and Katherine Kurtz. I seldom re-read books, but those authors I do. I even named kid #2 after characters in Kurtz’s Deryni universe.

Fiona: Outside of family members, name one entity that supported your commitment to become a published author.

My BFF/ editor Susan

Fiona: Do you see writing as a career?

Yes, granted a secondary one because I’ve been teaching chemistry way longer

Fiona: If you had to do it all over again, would you change anything in your latest book?

For “Primary Next of Kin” the latest one already out – maybe add a scene or two

Fiona: Did you learn anything during the writing of your recent book?

Details about how Delta force organizes their teams

 Fiona: If your book was made into a film, who would you like to play the lead?

Chris Vogel

Fiona: Any advice for other writers?

Butt in chair and finish what you start

Fiona: Anything specific you want to tell your readers?

The Division P series will likely exceed 20 books whenever I decide I’m actually finished with it.

Fiona: What book are you reading now?

The Ship of the Dead by Rick Riordan, because my daughter and I are reading it simultaneously. (We homeschool)

Fiona: Do you remember the first book you read?

Pegasus and Belleraphon. And made my mother crazy trying to help me pronounce Greek names.

Fiona: What makes you laugh/cry?

Really subtle sarcastic humor

Fiona: Is there one person, past or present, you would love to meet? Why?

John Barrowman. He acts. He writes. He’s hysterical, in your face, creative and out.

Fiona: Do you have any hobbies?

I cook,  sew and crochet.

Fiona: What TV shows/films do you enjoy watching?

I’m dying for the next season of Strike Back to start

Fiona: Favorite foods, colors,  music?

Sushi! Burgundy, European techno

Fiona: Imagine a future where you no longer write. What would you do?

Nothing. I’d be dead.

Fiona: You only have 24 hours to live how would you spend that time?

Fly to London, go to the British museum, have lunch in my favourite bookstore and go shopping on Portobello Rd

Fiona: What do you want written on your head stone?

Life is not a journey to the grave with intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well-preseved body. But rather skid in broad side, totally worn out & proclaiming Wow, what a ride!

Fiona: Do you have a blog or website readers can visit for updates, events and special offers?

http://armoler.com/ and if you subscribe to my newsletter through the website, you will receive periodic free episodes of the serial “Wishing on the Moon.”

 Here’s the latest one already out.   https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07D7HMNW2

And here’s the link on amazon         https://www.amazon.com/A.R.-Moler/e/B005H7HVTO/ref=sr_ntt_srch_lnk_1?qid=1537119002&sr=8-1