Here is my interview with A P Bateman

Name A P Bateman

Anthony Bateman but I write as A P Bateman (somebody else got there first!)

Age

45 (I had to think for a while, do some sums – for some reason 36 still rolls off my tongue…)

 

Where are you from?

I was born in Cornwall and apart from some time working away and several trips travelling (I hate that term now, but I guess that’s what it’s called when you holiday for six months at a time on virtually no money!) I have lived in Cornwall all my life. If you remember to take the time and keep doing new things, Cornwall is an idyllic place to live. There are woods and moors, beaches and rivers – it’s a great place if you’re outdoorsy. But wages are low, house prices are high and job prospects are not so good. If you’re happy to trade all of that, it’s got most of the country licked.

Home for my childhood was at Watergate Bay. The seventies by the sea was pretty eclectic – surfing and skateboarding were big. We moved when I was eleven and I started private school. It was all boys, mainly boarders who didn’t see their parents for twelve weeks at a time, and pretty tough. You learned to fight or run. I wasn’t fast, so got tough. We lived in the country and for a while my dad was a gun dealer and brought his work home. I was shooting crazy and became quite a marksman. It’s followed me through life. Clay pigeon shooting is my favourite discipline.

 

 

Fiona: Tell us your latest news?

My latest novel, Shadows of Good Friday came out in March (2017). It took me 19 years to complete – it was always shelved for different reasons – now the time felt right to re-write and I did so as a 17-year prequel to The Contract Man. There’s a lot of me in the book. The protagonist is starting his career in MI6, I had just trained and started to work as a bodyguard, so there were parallels there. We were both young and eager, naïve really. The main plot of the story was worked from three anecdotes told to me while training in close protection. I worked them into a plot and I guess my writing career started right there.

 

 
Fiona: When and why did you begin writing?

I tried several times, but failed to get a plot moving. The first novel I finished was Spiral of Conspiracy in 1999. The publishers went bankrupt and I did not get the royalties I was owed. It was a blow, but I managed to secure an agent but still nothing happened. I was represented by another agent soon afterwards and he was all but there with a deal with Orion, a publisher he previously worked for as an editor, but Saddam’s regime fell and the first incarnation of The Contract Man was horribly dated. Pertinent predictions merely became fact, and that wasn’t the point of the book. Writing is nothing if not a flexible art and I later wrote ISIS and the Chinese economy into the book and it became a no.1 Amazon bestseller.

I like the control writing gives me, the creative outlet also. I own a business too and it’s reached the point where my writing has become my focus and main income. It’s time for a rethink and a fulltime career as a writer is on the cards. I’m excited, mainly because of the flexibility and time it will give me with my family, and my wife who is a teacher. Like most writers I get distracted, so I’ll have to be careful not to stare out of the window for six hours thinking about plots and bacon and waste a day’s work!

 

 

Fiona: When did you first consider yourself a writer?

Only recently. Spiral of Conspiracy was published in 1999. Business, marriage, mortgage and kids took my eye completely off of writing, plus I had taken some serious knockbacks along the way. By 2004 I had given up writing completely. I didn’t get back into the grove until early in 2015, when my wife suggested I get the manuscripts out of the attic and put something on Kindle. That book was The Ares Virus. It may sound shallow, but it wasn’t until around late 2016 when I received an Amazon all-star bonus. My monthly royalty was the most I’d earned in a month in my life, and now there was a substantial ‘gift’ from Amazon because my books were in the top 95% of pages read on Kindle. That’s when I thought, “Shit, this could happen…”

 

 

Fiona: What inspired you to write your first book?

I was working in close protection and private investigations. There was a lot of inspiration to pull on, but also long periods of inactivity. I started plotting out Shadows of Good Friday, but changed halfway through and wrote Spiral of Conspiracy. It was the best feeling to have finished a full length manuscript and many months later, when I saw it in print I was ecstatic.

 

 

Fiona: Do you have a specific writing style?

It’s becoming a little punchier. Less is more worked for Hemingway, Fleming and Chandler. The Rob Stone series are written in an American style, similar to Lee Child. This style is transcending a little to the Alex King books (an English series), which by their nature are longer, more complex stories. This transition in Lies and Retribution made for a faster read. Readers say the books are fast-moving and full of twists and turns – which is exactly as I want them to read. There are always comparisons to Lee Child, Frederick Forsyth, Gerald Seymour and Tom Clancy, but I’m A P Bateman and it’s just the way I write now. I’m not trying to copy anybody.

 

 

Fiona: How did you come up with the title?

The titles are always part of the story. It’s tricky and to date only one book has started as a title and remained that way. That was The Contract Man. Everything else has had a working title. The title eventually comes from a plot twist or something crucial that happens along the way. Shadows of Good Friday refers to the Good Friday peace agreement in Northern Ireland. The shadows aspect refers to ambiguous intentions of the IRA in the last few days – also the shadow world of the intelligence services.

 

 

Fiona: Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?

I don’t feel that important. I just want readers to enjoy them as much as I enjoyed writing them. I’m not going to be on The Man Booker Prize committee’s radar, but I’d love to be on someone’s must-have holiday reading list.

 

 
Fiona: How much of the book is realistic and are experiences based on someone you know, or events in your own life?

I trained on weapons ranges with the Union County SWAT team, in New Jersey. I trained as a bodyguard with security companies run by ex-army, police and special forces. I have completed advanced skills evasive driving courses. And I have trained in karate and various martial arts most of my life. Those are all practical skills that transcend the writing and make it onto the page. I use experiences in life, and work with them as a seed. It grows to something more ‘dramatic’ in the story. There are a few scenes that are real – the train wreck King travels past in Indonesia in The Contract Man. I saw bloated, burned bodies, train wreckage, birds feeding on the eyes – there was nobody clearing it away. The injured had been moved, but there was a transition where the dead were left and nobody supervised the accident. I had to put that into the book – it was like a bad dream. In Shadows of Good Friday, the plot is based on three anecdotes I was told. I once got lost in the jungle on Sumbawa, Indonesia and spent the night sleeping in the forest without any kit. Humid, a hundred degrees, the forest floor alive with spiders, scorpions and snakes and without any water – that went into The Island where Rob Stone is forced to survive while being hunted in similar conditions.

 

 

Fiona: What books have most influenced your life most? a mentor?

The fist adult fiction I read was Jaws. It’s so much more than a rubber shark! Small town politics, an anti-hero, an affair, overcoming fear (the fact the chief can’t swim is perfect) – the shark is the catalyst to a great story. Ian Fleming was a great inspiration with the James Bond books – completely different to most of the films. Colin Forbes got me into serious series reading, and Lee Child has always had my attention with the Reacher novels. Early in my career EV Thompson read Spiral of Conspiracy (later updated and re-released as Lies and Retribution) and he said it was one of the best modern thrillers he’d ever read. He organized a reading with his agent – who dismissed it out of hand! So much for fifty books and a forty years as a bestselling author! It was a great thing for him to do though. Meeting Lee Child and giving him a copy of The Town to read was great. He was full of praise and encouragement. A genuinely nice bloke.

 

 

Fiona: Are there any new authors that have grasped your interest and who is your favorite author and what is it that really strikes you about their work?

Blake Crouch. I read the first of his Pines trilogy whilst on holiday in France in 2013. He has had two series of Wayward Pines filmed since then. He’s had a tremendously rapid rise – I had to wait two more years to finish the Pines books as he hadn’t finished them. LJ Ross has done very well – I met her at The London Book Fair and she was extremely personable. As was Mark Dawson, who I admire for his self-publicity and promotional work. He has done well as an indie author and is just about everywhere. Lee Child has always been my go-to author for holiday reading, his success is inspirational. I get most plots before the reveal, but not Child’s. Forsyth is a good read too. He has moved with the times very well indeed.

 

 

Fiona: Name one entity that you feel supported you outside of family members.

My readers. I was surprised how many contacted me to say how much they enjoyed my work, or couldn’t wait for the next book. It’s a regular thing now and never gets old.

 

 

Fiona: Do you see writing as a career?

Definitely.

 

 
Fiona: If you had to do it all over again, would you change anything in your latest book?

No. Not in terms of plot. To be honest, with Kindle and print on demand paperbacks, we indie writers have the facility to tweak. I had earlier books edited and re-uploaded when it was apparent there were a few typos. I have made small changes with some books. I added a few sentences and felt better about the plot because of the changes.

 

 

Fiona: Do you recall how your interest in writing originated?

I thought it would be a great way to make a living. They say if you enjoy your work, then you’ll never work a day in your life. I have found that true of writing.

 

 

Fiona: Can you share a little of your current work with us?

It’s another Alex King thriller (book 4) and a good deal of it is set in Cornwall. To be honest, it’s a pretty good concept and not been done before to my knowledge. It would make a good film pitch, so I’m keeping the plot under my hat! It fits the world well right now. Alex King was a hardened, weary assassin in the first book and I’m humanizing him a little with this story, giving him a detective role and creating a bit of tension between his fiancé and another character. I think to create longevity the character has to develop and grow with each story. Don’t get me wrong, he’s as cold and ruthless as it gets and he’ll be getting his hands dirty at some point.

 

 

Fiona: Is there anything you find particularly challenging in your writing?

I avoid sex scenes! I use it as a scene change, or come back to it with an insight into how a relationship consolidates because of the sex. Obviously people get close through the story, sometimes it’s progressed and sometimes it hasn’t. In all honesty my books are so full of life-threatening situations and dramatic pace leading towards an ultimate danger, there isn’t really time for it. There are abusive scenes and reference to rape in Shadows of Good Friday and that was really horrible to write. And there was torture and the threat of sexual torture in The Contract Man, those scenes were difficult to write as well.

 

 
Fiona: Do you have to travel much concerning your book(s)?

With the exception of Northern Iraq in The Contract Man, I have visited every country in my novels. I feel it’s important to get the feel for a location, especially the people. I spent quite a few months in Indonesia, Australia and America and I’ve been to lots of countries in Europe. I like to add a location where we’ve holidayed as a family as well. It immortalizes a great time we’ve had together and I like that.

 

 

Fiona: Who designed the covers?

Spiffing Covers. They are excellent to work with and have a real attention to detail. I designed my first self-published cover. I was pleased with it, but knew that I would have to cough up some money to get to the next level. My sales virtually tripled overnight when The Ares Virus cover was changed.

 

 

Fiona: What was the hardest part of writing your book?

Just finishing a book is a relief. The re-write gives me the greatest pleasure – putting meat on the bones. Some books have taken me to the edge because I have had to juggle a family, writing and my business throughout. I went a few months with only a few hours’ sleep each night because I was writing until 1 or 2am and up for work at 6.30am. Sometimes I would get up at 5am to get some words down and tidy a scene. But it’s writing fiction, I’m not after medals and it’s my choice. It’s what has to be done to finish a book. It’s important to me, because the goal has always been to write as a sole career. Now I’m close. Nothing infuriates me more than someone telling me, “I’d love to write a book, but I just don’t have the time…” No, you just haven’t got what it takes.

 

 

Fiona: Did you learn anything from writing your book and what was it?

If you’re going to be a writer, you don’t quit. Some things in life need letting go. Like a job or relationship that makes you unhappy. Or friends who stab you in the back. But not writing. Never. It will be the hardest thing you’ve ever done and at times you will question whether you can do it and whether you will remain sane. Ultimately, you can only call yourself a writer if you finish the story and engage the reader.

 

 

Fiona: If any of your books was made into a film who would you like to play the lead?

I’d love to play the lead! But as I’d also love the film to be a success, I’d hand it over to Hugh Jackman. He’s play King well. I like Gerard Butler for Rob Stone.

 

 

Fiona: Do you have any advice for other writers?

Be careful who you take advice from and why they are giving it.

 

 

Fiona: Do you have anything specific that you want to say to your readers?

Thanks for reading, and I hope to keep you as my readers for a long time to come.

 

 

Fiona: What book are you reading now?

I’m writing, so I don’t read anything else. The last book I read was I am Pilgrim.

 

 

Fiona: Do you remember the first book you read?

The Little Red Hen. About a thousand times!

 

 

Fiona: What makes you laugh/cry?

My children.

 

 

Fiona: Is there one person past or present you would meet and why?

Present: I met Lee Child recently, that was awesome. To meet a writer who sells a book every twenty seconds is incredible.

Past: I’d like to meet Hitler. I’d love to know what he was thinking and what his ultimate plan was. When and why he felt justified to do what he did in the holocaust. Only one of us would leave the room alive, but it would be an interesting conversation.

 

 

Fiona: What do you want written on your head stone and why?

Bugger, I wasn’t ready!

 

 

Fiona: Other than writing do you have any hobbies?

Shooting, martial arts, a host of water-sports.

 

 

Fiona: What TV shows/films do you enjoy watching?

I sometimes lose myself in discovery documentaries that seem ridiculous like Gold Rush, Deadliest Catch, Alaskan Bush People, Mythbusters – but it’s dangerous, before long you’re watching some guy making a living buying junk in a container. They can make a show out of anything now. I enjoy crime drama and definitely The Walking Dead! All the James Bond films and good action-adventure films.

 

 

Fiona: Favorite foods / Colors/ Music

Bacon, steak, sausage and more bacon/blue and green/anything with a good beat and guitar rift –so generally rock bands

 

 

Fiona: If you were not a writer what else would you like to have done?

It’s hard to imagine now that I’m writing. Anything else now would be second best. As my website says –a secret agent, astronaut, deep sea diving cowboy would be the ultimate. That would be pretty cool.

 

 

Fiona: Do you have a blog/website? If so what is it?

Amazon author page:

https://www.amazon.co.uk/A-P-BATEMAN/e/B00TIS48AI/ref=dp_byline_cont_ebooks_1

Website:

http://anthonybateman1.wix.com/author-blog

Facebook:

@authorapbateman

Here is my interview with Cheryl Butler

Name  Cheryl Butler

Age  40…something

Where are you from?          

I live in a small village halfway between Maidstone and Tunbridge Wells in Kent and have lived here for nineteen years. I’m married with two gorgeous young boys and a beautiful step-daughter. I left school with seven O-Levels, determined I was done with education but, although I have had many, many jobs since, I have never quite found anything that I wanted to stick with. I have, however, found many true friends through work, so I’ve been lucky. I always wanted to do something creative and have tried several outlets but, again, nothing lasted…until now, but it’s all-consuming and I need to find a way to organise my time better! Both my husband and I have large families and we see them as often as we can, although our children’s activities seem to dominate our time so life is pretty busy.

 

 

Fiona: Tell us your latest news?      

My first novel, A Proclivity To Prurience, is due for release April 28th and I am so excited, though slightly apprehensive as this is all very new and unfamiliar.

 

 

 

Fiona: When and why did you begin writing?      

I started writing my first novel two years ago after my husband suggested it and a close friend encouraged me, but before that I’d written monthly reports, for three years, on the activities of my sons’ pre-school for local magazines and the occasional article for local newspapers and, although I loved it, when I stopped, I didn’t consider writing anything else until my husband’s suggestion.

 

 
Fiona: When did you first consider yourself a writer?     

I’m still waiting for that…but if Proclivity does well, I have several ideas waiting to be explored.

 

 
Fiona: What inspired you to write your first book?         

I had an idea that I tried to ignore but couldn’t and told my husband and he suggested I write a book. When I finished laughing, I spoke to a close friend and she agreed, so I started writing, expecting to complete maybe five chapters but a year later, I’d written two books.

 

 
Fiona: Do you have a specific writing style?

Yes, I think so – very direct but very elaborate at the same time, which contrasts well.

 

 
Fiona: How did you come up with the title?

I wanted something obscure but appropriate so played around with many titles before settling on this one. It’s one of the things that kept me awake and I was halfway through my second book and had a title for that one before I finally decided on the first.

 

 
Fiona: Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?

Yes: don’t judge people by their actions or your own standards. None of us knows how we would react in a given situation unless we have experienced it and even then, our own personalities and how they have been shaped dictate our responses.

 

 
Fiona: How much of the book is realistic and are experiences based on someone you know, or events in your own life?

None! The characters, their experiences and behaviour are completely fictitious, I’m happy to say!

 

 
Fiona: What books have most influenced your life most? a mentor?

None, really. I’m always captivated by autobiographies, especially when they are completely honest – an insight into someone that you hold in high-regard is often therapeutic.

 

 
Fiona: Are there any new authors that have grasped your interest and who is your favorite author and what is it that really strikes you about their work?

Since I’ve been writing, I have read very little because I don’t have the time, but I enjoyed Paula Hawkins’ The Girl On The Train. My favourite book is Wuthering Heights – like everyone else, I was enthralled by the complexities of the story, but especially because of the time it was written and because it was written by a young woman who had no experience of the lives she was writing about. I don’t have a favourite author…apart from Rob Osborne, of course and having already read the manuscript for his book, Anything Is Possible, I’m looking forward to reading it again when it’s published.

 

 
Fiona: Name one entity that you feel supported you outside of family members.

My family could not have been more supportive, but my friends have been amazing too. Amanda, one of my closest friends, has spent the past two years listening to me talk about nothing else and every time doubts crept in, she would patiently encourage me to keep going. She also read my first two books before I found a publisher and is currently reading the third. Another friend, Tracey, helped me with research, without any clue as to what she was getting involved with, as did Amanda’s dad, Paul. Rob and his wife, Marsha – my closest and oldest friends – have been as excited for me as they have been for Rob.

 

 
Fiona: Do you see writing as a career?

Yes – I have never found anything else that I want to spend every spare minute of the day and night doing and still not tire of it. There are two more books to complete the story of the characters in Proclivity and I have started a fourth unconnected book. I have ideas for at least three more stories after that so that should keep me busy for a while.

 

 
Fiona: If you had to do it all over again, would you change anything in your latest book?

Probably! I’m a perfectionist so I’ve rewritten it dozens of times and would probable do so again if I had the chance but it’s too late now! I’m currently rewriting the follow-on which I will no doubt rewrite another two or three times before I’m happy…and then maybe again, just to be sure!

 

 
Fiona: Do you recall how your interest in writing originated?

Yes – to get rid of a niggling idea so I could get on with other things…but that didn’t happen, I just carried on writing. If it hadn’t been for my husband’s suggestion and continuing support, I may never have started.

 

 

 

Fiona: Can you share a little of your current work with us?

Yes – it’s a story about a young man’s obsession with his best friend’s mother and the repercussions of his fixation. It’s very direct, explicit and intense but the writing style fits with the characters…I hope. It’s the first of three books that focus on the uncompromising attitudes and lives of two main characters and those caught up in their questionable exploits.

 

 
Fiona: Is there anything you find particularly challenging in your writing?

Yes – time, mainly. Some days I can spend two hours trying to write a single paragraph because I can’t find the right words or phrasing; luckily, that doesn’t happen too often but when I reread the difficult parts, it’s generally worth the time spent.

 

 
Fiona: Do you have to travel much concerning your book(s)?

Not yet but I have a meeting with my publisher this week in Leicester so that’s a bit of a trek.

 

 
Fiona: Who designed the covers?

My publisher, The Book Guild – I wanted something subtle and they delivered.

 

 
Fiona: What was the hardest part of writing your book?

Having the confidence to continue with something that I knew could be controversial and would offend some. At times I felt it I should soften it, but I honestly believe it’s more authentic and necessary as it is to portray the characters accurately.

 

 
Fiona: Did you learn anything from writing your book and what was it?

That I could do it. I’ve never considered writing before because I felt I should have a complete outline before I started and I struggle with that. I don’t plan beforehand, I have a simple idea that unfolds as I write. I can’t formulate the story and characters first because the plot and personalities develop as I go along and it works for me…I just wish I’d realised that sooner!

 

 

Fiona: If any of your books was made into a film who would you like to play the lead

Ooh…that’s difficult! I really have no idea but I would very much like to have a say if the time comes!

 

 
Fiona: Do you have any advice for other writers?

Write whatever you’re thinking. If you dismiss a plot or even a single sentence, you’ll lose it but if you write it down and then decide it’s not appropriate, you can always remove it at a later date or use it elsewhere. And always keep a notepad or your phone close – there have been too many times that I’ve struggled with the next sentence or paragraph late at night, closed my computer down and then had the perfect idea!

 

 
Fiona: Do you have anything specific that you want to say to your readers?

I hope you enjoy A Proclivity To Prurience and I hope you love the characters as much as I do…no matter how despicable they might be! But, it is just a story.

 

 

Fiona: What book are you reading now?

I’ve just finished reading Bruce Springsteen’s autobiography.

 

 

 

Fiona: Do you remember the first book you read?

Probably a Peter & Jane story at primary school!

 

 

Fiona: What makes you laugh/cry?

Laugh – I love comedy and panel shows and of course, my husband, children and family keep me constantly amused; cry – anything that involves children; I hate to think of any child suffering in any way.

 

 

Fiona: Is there one person pass or present you would meet and why?

Bruce Springsteen – he’s a self-taught genius and not without his quirks, but that just makes him more human and fascinating.

 

 

Fiona: What do you want written on your head stone and why ?

Still dancing – I think that’s pretty self-explanatory.

 

 

Fiona: Other than writing do you have any hobbies ?

Music. I listen to music all day, every day and love to watch my children play their cellos. I cannot imagine my life without music and am immensely proud that my children have developed their own interest. Photography has been an on-going interest and there’s always socialising…

 

 

Fiona: What TV shows/films do you enjoy watching?

Currently I’m enjoying Lucky Man, Big Little Lies and Broadchurch but loved The Replacement. Films – I love anything with intrigue.

 

 

Fiona: Favorite foods / Colors/ Music

I adore Mexican food; green is my favourite colour and most of the rooms in my house are green; I love Blues and especially The John Doe Trio, but my favourite singer, without doubt, is Paolo Nutini – he’s in a class of his own.

 

 

Fiona: If you were not a writer what else would you like to have done?

Been involved in music somehow but it’s very difficult when you’re not at all musical!

 

 

Fiona: Do you have a blog/website? If so what is it?

Not yet but I’m working on it.

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Cheryl-Butler/e/B01NARMRQW/ref=sr_ntt_srch_lnk_1?qid=1490696735&sr=8-1

Here is my interview with Johanna Craven

Name:  Johanna Craven

Age: 35

Where are you from? Melbourne, Australia

A little about your self `ie your education Family life etc  

I spent the first 24 years of my life in Melbourne before moving to Los Angeles to study film and TV scoring. After my course, I returned to Australia for a few years before moving to the UK in 2011. I currently live in London with my partner, where I work as a musician and writer and run workshops for artists.

Fiona: Tell us your latest news?

My second novel, The Devil and the Deep Blue Sea was recently released by London-based Endeavour Press. This book took me years to research and write so it’s a great feeling to know people are finally reading it!


Fiona: When and why did you begin writing?

I’ve been writing stories ever since I could spell. It’s something I’ve been doing for so long I couldn’t tell you how I started- it was just a need that I had. I used to write purely for myself, but now I’m selling my books, I can see it’s so much more rewarding to be able to entertain other people with the characters and worlds I’ve created.


Fiona: When did you first consider yourself a writer?

Not really until I published my first novel. Even now I sometimes still feel like I’m faking it!


Fiona: What inspired you to write your first book?

I wrote my first book, Music From Standing Waves to combine my two loves, music and writing. There are parts that are quite autobiographical- like the protagonist, Abby, I studied at Melbourne Conservatorium and found it often very challenging. Writing about it helped me make sense of the experience in a way.


Fiona: Do you have a specific writing style?

I’ve been told my writing is quite lyrical- I pay close attention to the sound and rhythm of the prose, which I’m sure is a result of my musical background!


Fiona: Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?

That the line between ‘right’ and ‘wrong’ can sometimes be blurred. That people are too complex to be labelled as ‘goodies’ or ‘baddies’. I rarely write characters with the aim of making readers love or hate them. I just write them in all their complexity and leave it to the audience to determine where their sympathies lie. I know there are plenty of authors who disagree wholeheartedly with this approach, but I feel that human nature is too complex for a character to be labelled as good or bad.


Fiona: How much of the book is realistic and are experiences based on someone you know, or events in your own life?

The book is based largely on a true event: the earthquake and tsunami in 1692 that left the pirate haunt of Port Royal, Jamaica, at the bottom of the Caribbean Sea. The characters in the book are fictitious, but I have stuck as closely as possible to the events of that day, as preserved by eyewitness accounts.

While writing, there were some great coincidences, where I needed something in particular to happen in the story then discovered while researching that that exact thing had happened in real life. For example, I wanted the crew to be forced to row into Port Royal, as there was no wind. I discovered that at the exact time I wanted them to arrive- the morning of June 7th, 1692- a dead calm had fallen over that area of the Caribbean. I also needed the governor to be occupied when the pirates arrived. In my research, I discovered that on the morning of the earthquake, the governor of Jamaica had called an emergency council meeting as they suspected French spies in the colony.


Fiona: What books have most influenced your life most? a mentor?

As a kid, books by Judy Blume. As a writer, I’m influenced by authors like Hilary Mantel and Susan Fletcher. I was also really lucky to have author Rebecca Smith as an editor/mentor while writing The Devil and the Deep Blue Sea. Her advice and support was incredibly valuable, particularly as I was beginning to doubt if I would ever see it finished and published!

Fiona: Are there any new authors that have grasped your interest and who is your favorite author and what is it that really strikes you about their work?

I love the Sons of Odin series by Erin S. Riley. It’s set in the Viking era and has a fantastic cast of complex characters. Great writing and story telling.


Fiona: Name one entity that you feel supported you outside of family members.

Definitely the network of fellow authors I have built up since publishing my first book. Publishing is such a huge learning curve and it’s great to be able to bounce ideas off people and share our successes and failures.


Fiona: Do you see writing as a career?
Absolutely


Fiona: If you had to do it all over again, would you change anything in your latest book?

Haha I don’t want to think too hard about that one in case I come up with things I want to change! I don’t think so- I’m very happy with the final product!


Fiona: Do you recall how your interest in writing originated?

Not really- I’ve been doing it for as long as I can remember!

Fiona: Can you share a little of your current work with us?

My work in progress, Forgotten Places, is an historical novel set in colonial Australia. It’s based around the true story of a group of convicts who disappeared into the bush- one of whom was never accounted for.


Fiona: Is there anything you find particularly challenging in your writing?

The amount of research needed for historical fiction is definitely a challenge! In today’s digital age, there’s so much pressure to do everything quickly and there are many authors producing numerous books a year. With so much research needed for my books, I can’t imagine ever being able to match this pace!


Fiona: Do you have to travel much concerning your book(s)?

Yes, I love travelling to do research. Unfortunately, I didn’t get the chance to travel to Jamaica to research The Devil and the Deep Blue Sea, but I’ve had research trips in Tasmania and Cornwall for my works in progress. It’s such a great experience as it makes my writing so much more authentic. I’ve found locals and historians are always so willing to help out when they hear you’re researching a book.


Fiona: Who designed the covers?

My publisher.  


Fiona: What was the hardest part of writing your book?

Staying historically accurate. It puts me off if I’m reading a novel and I find an anachronism. Hopefully I haven’t let any creep in!


Fiona: Did you learn anything from writing your book and what was it?

I learned a ridiculous amount about pirates! I also learned that’s it’s okay to write a really terrible first draft. I still have early drafts of The Devil and the Deep Blue Sea and they are hilariously bad. It’s really inspiring to be able to look at the finished product and see how much it’s improved!

Fiona: If any of your books was made into a film who would you like to play the lead?

Anyone but Johnny Depp! I love Pirates of the Caribbean but this is a very different type of story.


Fiona: Do you have any advice for other writers?

Be patient. With self-publishing so easy to do, I think there’s a tendency for people to click ‘publish’ as soon as they’ve finished a draft or two. Take your time, have a break and come back to the manuscript with fresh eyes.


Fiona: Do you have anything specific that you want to say to your readers?

Thank you!

Fiona: What book are you reading now?

The Girl in the Red Coat, by Kate Hamer

Fiona: Do you remember the first book you read?

Spot Goes For a Walk?? No, I really don’t remember. I was a big Enid Blyton fan as a kid though, and after that, I loved the Babysitters Club.

Fiona: What makes you laugh/cry? Pretty much everything! I cry at the drop of a hat.

Fiona: Is there one person pass or present you would meet and why?

Henry VIII’s wife Katherine Howard. History makes her out to be such a ditz, but I don’t believe anyone that brainless could have risen to the heights of queen. I’d love to know what she was really like.

Fiona: What do you want written on your head stone and why?

No headstone for me- I’d rather be cremated and thrown over the sea! I have a severe case of wanderlust and this way I never need to stop travelling!

Fiona: Other than writing do you have any hobbies?

I love travel (see above…), cooking and I’m learning the Celtic fiddle!

Fiona: What TV shows/films do you enjoy watching?

I love horror films- anything with a good ghost story! I was a huge X-Files fan and I’m currently obsessed with Once Upon A Time.

Fiona: Favorite foods / Colors/ Music

Chocolate, red, 80s pop!

Fiona: If you were not a writer what else would you like to have done?

When I’m not writing, I’m teaching, playing and writing music. I’d keep doing all of these things.

Fiona: Do you have a blog/website? If so what is it? https://www.johannacraven.com

Amazon: https://www.amazon.com/Devil-Deep-Blue-Sea-ebook/dp/B01N95XMBJ/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1490685970&sr=8-1&keywords=johanna+craven

 

Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/33124738-the-devil-and-the-deep-blue-sea

 

Here is my interview with Rita Goldner

Name Rita Goldner

Age 73

Where are you from?

Scottsdale, Arizona, USA

Fiona: Tell a little about yourself, i.e. your education Family life etc.   

I have a degree in elementary school education, and have always loved children, teaching, and drawing. I’ve combined all three in becoming a picture book author/illustrator

 

 

Fiona: Tell us your latest news?

I just finished a picture book Making Marks on the World. I’ll be picking up my first printer run tomorrow.

 

 

Fiona: When and why did you begin writing?

I started in earnest ten years ago, writing picture books, to combine my two passions, story-telling and drawing.

 

 

Fiona: When did you first consider yourself a writer?

When my publisher submitted my first print book, Orangutan: A Day in the Rainforest Canopy to a prestigious contest for books about the natural world, and it won a silver medal. I was flabbergasted!

 

 

Fiona: What inspired you to write your first book?

I took a class on writing and illustrating children’s picture books taught by an author/illustrator who since became a Caldecott Honor recipient. She got me hooked; it was a lot of fun, so I signed up for the advanced class.

 

 

Fiona: Do you have a specific writing style?

My audience is young, so my style is simple and the pictures are colorful and whimsical.

 

 

Fiona: How did you come up with the title?

My publisher helped me come up with the Orangutan book title, and my critique group suggested the other title, Making Marks on the World.

 

 
Fiona: Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?

In Orangutan: A Day in the Rainforest Canopy I hope the readers fall in love with orangutans and maybe when they grow up they can do something to help endangered species. However I didn’t mention anything in the book about their critically endangered status, since it’s a problem kids can’t solve, and it would make the book sad. In Making Marks on the World my message is that kids can learn in non-traditional ways.

 

 
Fiona: How much of the book is realistic and are experiences based on someone you know, or events in your own life?

Making Marks is fantasy and time-travel, but the places the protagonist goes to are real. The orangutan book is scientifically accurate. I did a lot of research, and had it fact-checked by a primatologist who runs a foundation that rescues and re-habilitates orphaned and injured orangutans in Borneo.

 

 

Fiona: What books have most influenced your life most? a mentor?

My mentor is Molly Idle, the author who taught the first writing/illustrating class I attended. When my own kids were small, I liked reading Richard Scarry books, mainly because he drew busy, madcap, detailed drawings. I loved Maurice Sendak’s Where the Wild Things Are, again, because of the illustrations.

 

 

Fiona: Are there any new authors that have grasped your interest and who is your favorite author and what is it that really strikes you about their work?

My teacher Molly Idle’s work impresses me because she’s written several wordless picture books. This is especially challenging, since the story is conveyed through facial expressions.

 

 

Fiona: Name one entity that you feel supported you outside of family members.

While I was writing the orangutan book I corresponded with orangutan experts. They were an important part of my research. My critique group helps too, we meet monthly to bounce ideas off each other.

 

 

Fiona: Do you see writing as a career?

I am retired from another career, so I vowed I would only do what was fun, but so far, this is a blast! I work almost full time now writing and illustrating.

 

 
Fiona: If you had to do it all over again, would you change anything in your latest book?

It’s so new I haven’t had time to think of that yet. But I’m having it printed in small batches, so I can change something if I get negative feedback. The first book had a run of 1000 copies, so it had to be as perfect as I could get it. That book is almost sold out.

 

 

Fiona: Do you recall how your interest in writing originated?

I wrote poems and short stories as a kid, and a few articles and news releases as an adult, but never considered doing serious creative writing until I took that children’s book writing course. Since then, I’ve taken dozens of classes, seminars, and webinars on the craft of writing and illustrating.

 

 

Fiona: Can you share a little of your current work with us?

Making Marks on the World is about a boy who dislikes school but learns through drawing and painting. He’s assigned a history report, so decides to draw and paint it by time-travelling to places and years where people have used art to leave a mark on the world. (cave paintings, King Tut’s tomb, etc.) The reader can color the line drawing illustrations. I also put the coil binding across the top, for left or right-handed coloring. I’m a southpaw, so I was always annoyed by my hand resting on the binding when I colored.

 

 

Fiona: Is there anything you find particularly challenging in your writing?

Even though I enjoy it immensely, it’s challenging to budget time. I’m also doing marketing myself, which I enjoy, but it’s a steep learning curve.

 

 

Fiona: Do you have to travel much concerning your book(s)?

I do a lot of readings at elementary schools, but only in neighboring cities. I’ve driven to do weekend book fairs in Tucson, Payson, Prescott, and Sedona. Those cities are about 100 miles from me.

 

 

Fiona: Who designed the covers?

I did the illustrations and my editors cropped them and picked out the font.

 

 

Fiona: What was the hardest part of writing your book?

Finding a “voice” not too formal, that would appeal to a child.

 

 
Fiona: Did you learn anything from writing your book and what was it?

I learned how important it is to communicate with children and get them to love reading. Toward that end, I really like doing the school author visits.

 

 

Fiona: If any of your books was made into a film, who would you like to play the lead?

The Orangutan book would have to use a digitally created orangutan, because I wouldn’t allow a real animal to be exploited. In the Making Marks book, my protagonist boy has spikey red hair, which is my silent homage to Van Gogh. So any day-dreaming 3rd grade red-haired kid would do.

 

 

Fiona: Do you have any advice for other writers?

Join a writers association and meet other authors for networking in marketing and critiquing. Take classes and read how-to books on plot and character developing, and finding your “voice”. Hire a professional editor. Read voraciously.

 

 

Fiona: Do you have anything specific that you want to say to your readers?

Read with discernment, so you’ll learn to tell good books from not-so-good. Discussing them with your friends will help this.

 

 

Fiona: What book are you reading now?

The Longmire series of novels by Craig Johnson. The characters were in a Netflix series, but the books have different stories. (And last week I got to meet Craig Johnson and shake his hand at a book fair, where we both had booths!)

 

 

Fiona: Do you remember the first book you read?

I remember the first book I took out of a library. It was The differences Between Crocodiles and Alligators. Even as a young kid I was intrigued by science and animals.

 

 

Fiona: What makes you laugh/cry?

Human interest stories.

 

 

Fiona: Is there one person past or present you would meet and why?

I’d like to go to Borneo and meet the primatologist who fact-checked my book, and see his rescue center, and the wild orangutans in the rainforest.

 

 

Fiona: What do you want written on your head stone and why?

“She tried to make a positive difference in the world.” Because that would be the greatest compliment I could receive.

 

 

Fiona: Other than writing do you have any hobbies?

Sewing and painting landscape plein air (on location, outdoors).

 

 

Fiona: What TV shows/films do you enjoy watching?

I don’t watch much TV, but when I do, it’s cowboy movies.

 

 

Fiona: Favorite foods / Colors/ Music

Foods: Anything, as long as someone else is cooking. Colors: The cool colors of nature: greens, blues, violets. Music: Rock. (I take a Zumba class, and love dancing.)

 

 

Fiona: If you were not a writer what else would you like to have done?

I already had a 38 year career as a costume designer before I started writing. For something completely different, I guess I’d be a forest ranger.

 

 

 Fiona: Do you have a blog/website? If so what is it?

I have a website www.ritagoldnerillustrations.com

And a newsletter http://shoutout.wix.com/so/3LhQU9GZ#/main

https://www.amazon.com/Rita-Goldner/e/B00NOCPT9S/ref=dp_byline_cont_pop_ebooks_1

Here is my interview with Abdur Rehman Qadeer Chughtai

Name Abdur Rehman Qadeer Chughtai

Age 21

Where are you from Sialkot, Pakistan.

A little about your self `ie your education Family life etc :

I have graduated in commerce. I am a Muslim.  

Fiona: Tell us your latest news?

One of poems just got published in Nanotext anthology by Medusa’s Laugh Press. It’s titled “Bloody Feet”

Fiona: When and why did you begin writing?

I always saw the darkness overwhelming the world. I wanted to raise a voice but for a very long time, I could not. Then one day, I knew that there was a drone missile attack by Western forces in Wazirastan, and 18 kids died in that attack. And about that, I wrote my first poem. After that, I like to write about darkness and sometimes when “Nature” fascinates me into writing something. The thing I love most to write about is Nature.


Fiona: When did you first consider yourself a writer?

I think… When my poem ‘Song of Stable Boy’ got published by Quailbell Magazine.


Fiona: What inspired you to write your first book?

Well, I have none book written yet. But beauty of the Nature inspires me most.


Fiona: Do you have a specific writing style?

No, I don’t think so.


Fiona: What books have most influenced your life most? a mentor?

Al-Qur’aan… Especially the verse 27 of 3rd Surah.

“You cause the night to enter the day, and You cause the day to enter the night; and You bring the living out of the dead, and You bring the dead out of the living. And You give provision to whom You will without account.”

 

Fiona: Are there any new authors that have grasped your interest and who  is your favorite author and what is it that really strikes you about their work?

Allama Muhammad Iqbal, Hasrat Mohani, Robert Frost, John Keats, William Blake, William Wordsworth.


Fiona: Name one entity that you feel supported you outside of family members.

My Teachers, especially Sir Nusrat Ali.


Fiona: Do you see writing as a career?

Obviously… May be…


Fiona: Do you recall how your interest in writing originated?

I think the love for nature.

Fiona: Can you share a little of your current work with us?

Yes sure, this is my most recent published poem:

“You walked carelessly,

On the crumbs of hearts,

Now why so worried?

If you see,

Red footprints behind,

And the blood in your feet?”


Fiona: Is there anything you find particularly challenging in your writing?

Well… Writing about personal emotions I guess.

Fiona: If any of your books was made into a film who would you like to play the lead?

May be. By the way it seems impossible.


Fiona: Do you have any advice for other writers?

Write from heart. There is a lot more inspiration than books in the forest, deserts, seas, shores… The things around you. And perhaps in yourself.


Fiona: Do you have anything specific that you want to say to your readers?

Focus on the feeling.

 

Fiona: What book are you reading now?

Currently I am reading Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen.

 

Fiona: Do you remember the first book you read?

The Old Man and The Sea.

Fiona: Other than writing do you have any hobbies ?

Hiking

Fiona: What TV shows/films do you enjoy watching?

The Vampire Diaries, The Originals, Game of Thrones, The Musketeers, all Pakistani movies and all the Vampire movies.

Fiona: Favorite foods / Colors/ Music

Biryani is favorite food, and all music by Sami Yusuf and Zayn.

Fiona: If you were not a writer what else would you like to have done?

 I do a lot of things beside writing, and so would be in that situation.

Fiona: Do you have a blog/website? If so what is it?

http://ar-qadeer.blogspot.co.uk/

 

Here is my interview with Rob Kitchin

Name Rob Kitchin

Age 46

Where are you from Near Liverpool, but have lived in Ireland for 20 years

A little about your self `ie your education Family life etc I presently work as a professor of Geography, which keeps me pretty busy. At home, I mostly read and play with our three dogs. 

Fiona: Tell us your latest news?

I don’t have any fiction related news to be honest.  The last book was out three years ago.  My latest work has got stuck in the finding a publisher merry-go-round. In terms of non-fiction, the latest edited book was published last month and another will be published later in the year, and I’ve a steady stream of articles being published. I’ve spent most of the last few years concentrating on non-fiction writing.


Fiona: When and why did you begin writing?

I read quite a lot when I was a teenager and always had a desire to write. I wrote my first novels in my early 20s, but none were published.  I had my first non-fiction piece published in 1993 and have published fairly consistently since then.  So far, I’m just over the 30 books mark, plus a large encyclopedia, 200 or so articles/book chapters, a couple of thousand blog posts, and editing over 130 volumes of academic journals.


Fiona: When did you first consider yourself a writer?

In terms of academic stuff, early 1990s.  In terms of fiction, I still don’t really think of myself as a fiction writer; more a hobbyist.  I think the difference is probably success.  I’m well established as a non-fiction writer and have won a few prizes, etc., but I’m still finding my way with fiction.


Fiona: What inspired you to write your first book?

It was just something that I always wanted to do.


Fiona: Do you have a specific writing style?

No, not really.  I’ve written for a number of formats and audiences – academic, newspapers, blogs, TV documentary, fiction, etc.  I’m used to shifting registers and styles depending on what’s required.


Fiona: How did you come up with the title?

For Stumped – it was suggested by a friend.  The book was originally titled ‘Saving Siobhan’ but the publisher thought that non-Irish audiences might struggle with ‘Siobhan’.  Stumped works on a number of levels – the lead characters quickly get stumped in their deductions, the novel is set during an election when one of the characters is working the stump, and the lead character is a double amputee.  It also chimed well with the previous book that was titled ‘Stiffed’.


Fiona: Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?

No, not really.  The story is a comic crime caper and is meant to be a bit of fun.


Fiona: How much of the book is realistic?

In parts it’s reasonably realistic, but some of it stretches the imagination a little.


Fiona: Are experiences based on someone you know, or events in your own life?

No, it’s entirely made-up.


Fiona: What books have most influenced your life most? a mentor?

I read pretty widely.  Generally, I read a couple of novels a week, plus a lot of non-fiction.  I’m not drawn to any one book or writer.


Fiona: What book are you reading now?

Adrian McKinty, ‘Police at the Station and They Don’t Look Friendly’


Fiona: Are there any new authors that have grasped your interest?

Loads – I review a couple of books a week on my blog – The View from the Blue House.  New authors to me I’ve liked recently include Caimh McDonnell, Jock Serong, John Hart, and Harry Bingham.


Fiona: What are your current projects?

 

At some point during the year I’ll have a go at re-editing my latest work-in-progress.  Otherwise, it’s non-fiction writing related to large funded projects concerning the relationship between digital technologies and cities.


Fiona: Do you see writing as a career?

It kind of is on the non-fiction side.  My work involves a lot of writing, I make a bit of money from it, and do a lot of related travel (I get 80+ invites a year to give talks).


Fiona: If you had to do it all over again, would you change anything in your latest book?

In terms of the one I’ve been working on recently, not really, other than how readers react to it.  They generally think it’s a book aimed at 10 year old kids, whereas I think the target audience is adults!


Fiona: Do you have to travel much concerning your book(s)?

No, not really.  They are mostly based in Ireland.


Fiona: Who designed the covers?

The publisher looked after that, except for a couple of short story collections, which were done by JT Lindroos


Fiona: Do you have any advice for other writers?

A book doesn’t write itself; the only way it gets written is to sit and write it.  And write the book that you’d like to read, rather than trying to second guess agents, editors and publishers.

Fiona: Do you have a blog/website? If so what is it?

My fiction blog is The View from the Blue House (https://theviewfromthebluehouse.blogspot.ie /).  Generally, I review crime fiction novels and post short stories.  I have a bunch of other websites but they are all day-job related.  My Twitter handle is @robkitchin

 

http://www.kitchin.org/

 

Amazon Authors Page UK

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Rob-Kitchin/e/B001IR1IE6/ref=sr_tc_2_0?qid=1490639730&sr=1-2-ent

Here is my interview with Wren Michaels

Name – Wren Michaels

Age – 42

Where are you from – Born in Wisconsin, but currently living in Houston, Texas

A little about your self `ie your education Family life etc  

Wren hails from the frozen tundra of Wisconsin where beer and cheese are their own food groups. But a cowboy swept her off her feet and carried her below the Mason-Dixon line to Texas, where she promptly lost all tolerance for cold and snow. Together they have one amazing princess who rules their world. Fueled by coffee, dreams, and men in kilts, Wren promises to bring you laughter, sexy fun time, and action that keeps you on the edge of your seat. The easiest way to her heart is anything to do with the Green Bay Packers, Doctor Who, or Joss Whedon.

 

 

Fiona: Tell us your latest news?

I have several news tidbits.  First is I released my first contemporary romance called FRIEND ZONED. It’s about two college students using each other for sociology papers, but end up falling in love and have to cross some tough cultural divides to be together, as one of them’s stuck to be wed in an arranged marriage.

The second is my new release KISSES FROM THE KREMLIN, which is book 2 in my BREAKING THE SEAL series. It’s a novella written in Susan Stoker’s Special Forces: Operation Alpha kindle world, and it is the follow up to THE FOX AND THE HOUND which released in November.

 

 
Fiona: When and why did you begin writing?

I started around 2008 or so. I was going through a tough time in my personal life and it was a creative and therapeutic outlet for me. I just never stopped and have a very supportive husband who has been a champion of my writing since the very beginning.

 

 
Fiona: When did you first consider yourself a writer?

Probably when my first book got published, UNBEARABLE. Up until then, it was still a pipedream, never really thought anything would come of it. But Evernight Publishing took a chance on me, and I’ve never looked back.

 

 
Fiona: What inspired you to write your first book?

Honestly, it was the Twilight books. Some may not like them, but I was never a big reader until a friend convinced me to try reading them. And I fell in love with the world and didn’t want it to end. So I decided to write my own world where I didn’t have to leave the characters I created.

 

 
Fiona: Do you have a specific writing style?

Yes. I love writing strong heroines. I don’t write damsels in distress. I write damsels that cause distress. I also try to put humor into every book. I like to runt he gamut of emotions from laughter to tender moments, to hair raising suspense and action. I want to give all the feels.

 

 
Fiona: How did you come up with the title?

Some titles pop up immediately as the idea for a book takes shape. Others, like with my book VEXED, it doesn’t come until the book is done and I see the full story take shape. I’m a pantser, so sometimes I don’t know exactly how a book will turn out. I write from the hip, and let the characters take me where they want to go as they tell me their story.

 

 
Fiona: Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?

Each book is different. But in all my books so far, love conquers all. Some characters are more stubborn to see  it, but in the end, what they think will destroy them ends up saving them.

 

 
Fiona: How much of the book is realistic and are experiences based on someone you know, or events in your own life?

Each one is different, especially writing paranormal. LOL It’s more like, I wish I could have these kinds of abilities. And if I did, this is what would probably happen. For my contemporaries, a little of me is in each heroine. Things they say and do, mostly the humor, is a lot of me.

 

 
Fiona: What books have most influenced your life most? a mentor?

Well, Twilight for sure, since it’s what started me writing. But also Diana Gabaldon and Charlaine Harris. I love both of their work, such completely different styles, but wonderful storytelling. I wanted to be able to tell sweeping stories that give you all the feels.

 

 

Fiona: Are there any new authors that have grasped your interest and who  is your favorite author and what is it that really strikes you about their work?

LeTeisha Newton is an amazing author. She writes darker romance, but it punches you in the feels. Anne Conley is awesome. She has great voice and her characters are so easy to root for. Great sense of humor as well, she sucks you right in.

 

 
Fiona: Name one entity that you feel supported you outside of family members.

My agent, Margaret Bail. She’s been my champion and constant supporter when I feel like throwing in the towel.

 

 


Fiona: Do you see writing as a career?

Currently it is my career. My husband has been a huge supporter of my writing and has allowed me to take the necessary steps to make it my career and focus. I’m very blessed.

 

 
Fiona: If you had to do it all over again, would you change anything in your latest book?

There’s ALWAYS something you wish you could change in a book after it gets published. But as an author, you read over your work so many times that your brain starts filling in blanks, starts skipping parts as you read because it knows the story backwards and forwards. We know how the characters talk and what they mean when they say something, but sometimes that doesn’t always translate to the page as well as we think. Time and distance are powerful editing tools. So of course after it’s published and out of your mind for a time, do we go back and have those moments where we wish we would have done it differently or tweaked a bit here or there.

 

 

 

Fiona: Can you share a little of your current work with us?

Sure this is from the first chapter of FRIEND ZONED.

Beer dribbled down my chin as a breath hitched in my throat mid-drink. A line of suds trailed from my neck into the vast crevice of my breasts, never to be seen again. I muffled a cough as my eyes followed God’s gift to lady bits toward the bar. Sleeves rolled to the elbows, his white button-down shirt contrasted his olive skin. From the mess of tousled dark-brown hair, I figured he’d probably come to quench his thirst after a nooner. Lucky bitch.

The Longhorn game ruined my view, as a sea of students swarmed a giant flat-screen on the wall and swallowed his body. Normally, I’d be up there cheering right along with them, but Angie hated football. So like a good BFF, I hung at the booth with her.

“It’s so loud in here I can’t hear myself think. You’re lucky.” Angie quirked a brow and handed me a napkin. “You okay, Cat?”

Yup, lucky me. I gave her a nod. “Fine.”

I let my gaze fall away from reading her lips down to my hand patting its way into my bra as discreetly as possible.

“Uh huh. Which one is he?” she asked, not trying very hard to hide her sly grin.

As my roommate for the last several years, it was hard to hide anything from her. I leaned in. “The one in the white oxford.”

She jerked back. “The Bollywood model?”

“Shh,” I hissed through clenched teeth, shooting her a wide-eyed glare.

“Oh yeah, he’s yum. Seen him a few times on campus. No idea what his name is though. You want me to find out?” She inched her way to the edge of the booth.

“No!” I clasped a hand on her arm. “Chill, Ang.”

Dipping her chin, she locked eyes with me. “Chicken-shit.”

I gave her my finest death stare. “I’ve got a plan. I can kill two birds with one stone.”

“I like plans. Are we gonna tag team? From the looks of those muscles, he could probably bench press both of us.”

I inched my way across the table, closing the distance between us. “Back off, sister. I saw him first.”

“You’re lucky I love you like a sister.” She sat back in the booth. “Lay your plan on me.”

“I think I just found the first target for my sociology term paper.” I glanced over my shoulder to the bar. Mr. Bollywood fist pumped a Longhorn tackle and took a chug of dark beer.

“Okay, deets.” She sipped her white wine and bounced a leg under the table.

I spun back around and sifted through the noise around me for discernible words. “Huh?”

“Details. Spill it.” Angie set her glass back down, flagging the waitress for another.

“Oh, I’m dissecting the laws of attraction. In today’s social media age full of chatrooms, dating sites, and selfies, I thought it would be interesting to compare the old-fashioned way of meeting a guy in person versus getting to know someone online.”

“Interesting, go on,” Angie said.

“I’ll pick two targets. One guy I’m going to throw myself at in person, really working up the tangible side of things from simple physical attraction to touch and feel. The other I’m going to approach online, using words, wit, and charm.” I slipped a notepad from my book bag and jotted down some notes before I forgot anything. “I’ll see which one tries to get me in bed first.”

“Smooth. Get laid and a term paper done. Well played, Catherine Marek. Well played.” Her blue eyes twinkled in the beam of sunlight filtering between the slats of the blinds. “I totally should’ve come up with that one myself.”

“I’m not doing it to get laid.” I shook my head. “I’m trying to prove a point. If you flash tits, they’ll drop ‘trou’. I don’t expect it to last more than a couple of hours before I’m calling a cab.” I sat back and folded my arms. “Online, you get to know a person. Inside-out first.”

She arched a brow. “Mm-hmm, well, just make sure the objects of your mission aren’t in Sociology with you.”

“Well, Mr. Bollywood over there isn’t. I sure as hell would’ve noticed him. We’ve been in class for a month, and I’ve never seen him.” I took a swig of my beer, managing to keep it in my mouth this time.

Angie picked at her damp napkin as she glanced around the dimly lit bar. “So, he’s gonna be your in-person target?”

I traced the outline of a condensation droplet streaking my pint glass. “So far, he’s looking like a good pick. He’s brawny, into sports, and likes beer. Almost stereotypical college guy. I’m thinking he’ll probably respond if I target him with outright flirting. Can’t set myself up for failure, ya know?” Switching into stealth mode, I did my best to toss a side glance in his direction. He caught me as he turned from the bar and made his way to a nearby table, sitting across from a sandy-blond guy that may have been in my Economics class.

Rich, espresso-colored eyes locked onto mine for a brief second and a flutter ransacked my heart, sending it dive-bombing straight to my stomach. He glanced away as quick as I did.

“I think he just looked at you,” Angie said.

I stared into the amber liquid in front of me, studying the tiny carbonated bubbles zipping to the top. With each breath I sucked into my lungs, my heart hammered a little faster.

 

 
Fiona: Is there anything you find particularly challenging in your writing?

There’s always a challenge to find the right balance of how deep to take the characters, what kinds of tough topics can be introduced and not turn off a reader, what will keep readers connected to my characters, etc. Each book has it’s own set of challenges based on subject matter, what’s going on in today’s world, and just connecting to the audience.

 

 
Fiona: Do you have to travel much concerning your book(s)?

Some. I do a lot of local book signings, but this year I’m doing one in Wisconsin October. But I’ve been to New Orleans and Vegas for signings. It’s been exciting.

 

 
Fiona: Who designed the covers?

For my books with Evernight Publishing, Jay Aheer is my outstanding cover artist. For my book FRIEND ZONED and my Kindle World books, my cover artist is LeTeisha Newton with Boundless Tales Designs. She’s amazeballs.

 

 
Fiona: What was the hardest part of writing your book?

Just pushing through the self-doubt that all writers face. We go through a roller coaster with each book we write, where the idea takes hold and we’re all gung-ho to write this fabulous new story. But words get harder as the story progresses and what was once beautiful, we feel turns to crap mid-way and it’s a battle to continue on even when we’re at our lowest.

 

 
Fiona: Did you learn anything from writing your book and what was it?

I always learn something when writing a new book because I do a lot of research on subjects I’m not familiar with. For my Kindle World books I had to do a lot of research on the military and Navy SEALs and the CIA. With FRIEND ZONED, I had to do a lot of cultural research for Jai’s character to make sure I represented the Indian cultural correctly, and captured who he was as a person stuck between two worlds. And the fact that my heroine, Cat is deaf, I also had to do a lot of research on that and had a friend who is hearing impaired help me with that part.

 

 

Fiona: If any of your books was made into a film who would you like to play the lead.

LOL Depends on the book again, because I use Pinterest to storyboard each of my books. So I cast them with people before I ever write. With FRIEND ZONED, Cat I see as Jenna Coleman and Jaidev as Ruslaan Mumtaz. With my FOX AND HOUND series, Jayla is Ksenia Solo and Noah is Steven R. McQueen.

 

 
Fiona: Do you have any advice for other writers?

Never give up. Perseverance is the key. Also, find critique partners. Beta readers are great, but you need Crit Partners, other authors who will read your work and shred it to make it better. Every writer has a strong point, find one who will help you with your weak points.

 

 
Fiona: Do you have anything specific that you want to say to your readers?

THANK YOU! I cannot say thank you enough to everyone who has taken a chance on my books, who has read my words and left such lovely messages for me in reviews. You are the reason I keep writing.

 

 

Fiona: What book are you reading now?

I just finished a couple of books by Skye Warren. I recently did a book signing with her and realized I’d never read her! She’s amazing. I just read Rough and Hard. Great books!

 

 

Fiona: Do you remember the first book you read?

I can’t remember as a child which book I read first, but as an adult, it was probably Outlander by Diana Gabaldon.

 

 

Fiona: What makes you laugh/cry?

I laugh a lot. I love people with dry wit. And I’m a very empathic person, so I cry at a lot of things, too. I can be in a room with people and it’s like I tap their emotions. So I cry at Kleenex commercials. It just depends on the day. LOL

 

 

Fiona: Is there one person pass or present you would meet and why?

That’s tough, because there’s lots of people I wish I could have met or meet today. I don’t know if I can narrow it down. From the past it would be anyone from Jesus to Princess Diana. Present, Ellen to Aaron Rodgers to Michelle Obama. LOL It just depends on the day.

 

 

Fiona: What do you want written on your head stone and why ?

She made the world laugh. Because I want to leave this world putting a smile on someone’s face.

 

 

Fiona: Other than writing do you have any hobbies ?

My family is active in the Renaissance Faire scene. We love camping and going to festivals.

 

 

Fiona: What TV shows/films do you enjoy watching?

I don’t watch a lot of TV. I’m always writing. But once in a while I binge watch shows like Vampire Diaries and Lost Girl.

 

 

Fiona: Favorite foods / Colors/ Music

Patty Melts/Blue/Depends on my mood. I love a lot of music and have a very eclectic taste, everything from Katy Perry to Within Temptation to Lady Antebellum.

 

 

Fiona: If you were not a writer what else would you like to have done?

I always wanted to be a marine biologist growing up. I love dolphins.

 

 

Fiona: Do you have a blog/website? If so what is it?

http://wrenmichaels.com/

https://twitter.com/AuthorWren

https://www.facebook.com/authorwrenmichaels

https://www.amazon.com/Wren-Michaels/e/B00TJFP5QG/

 

Here is my interview with Lissa Pelzer

Name Lissa Pelzer

Age  A lady never tells

Where are you from

The UK originally, but I’ve lived in the US, France, Japan and Denmark. I’m currently living in Germany

 

 
Fiona: When and why did you begin writing?

I first thought seriously about a career in writing during university. I was mesmerized by Patricia Highsmith novels and idolized her work and her lifestyle.

 

 
Fiona: When did you first consider yourself a writer?

I go in and out of phases of considering myself a writer. Once I had a job as a content writer, churning out 3000 words a day for a salary, then I felt like a writer!

 

 
Fiona: What inspired you to write your first book?

Patricia Highsmith’s Talented Mr Ripley. I desperately wanted to create a character than aspirational.

 

 
Fiona: Do you have a specific writing style?

I try for an economic, plot driven style, but know that sometimes readers like a little waffle too.

 

 
Fiona: How did you come up with the title?

My first book in the Carol Ann Baker series is called No More Birthdays. This title was designed as a hint towards the twist in the story. The detective trying to help Carol Ann after she’s killed a man in self-defense wrongly thinks she is a minor who will be eligible for leniency. It’s also meant to suggest danger, once someone dies, they don’t have any more birthdays.

 

 
Fiona: If you had to do it all over again, would you change anything in your latest book?

No. Because you can do that forever. You have to know when to stop.

 

 

Fiona: Can you share a little of your current work with us?

I’m currently working on a synopsis for a Virago competition. The brief is “suspenseful and original”, but otherwise it’s up to you. It’s hard to always be original. Too original and no publisher will go near it. A publisher’s dream book is always a little like another book which came before.

 

 
Fiona: Is there anything you find particularly challenging in your writing?

Editing after the first draft and remembering what has changed is a challenge. Sometimes, you read the first draft through and realize some tiny thing you wrote on page 52 doesn’t connect to something you wrote on page 99, so you change it. But then after the change, you remember there was something relevant on page 5, that now you’ve made the change, needs to be changed too. And on and on it goes a thousand times. I find that maddening.

 

 

Fiona: Do you remember the first book you read?

Princess and the Pea! I remember using it as a gauge to see how much I could read.  Once I could read the whole book alone, I was very proud of myself.

 

 

Fiona: Do you have a blog/website? If so what is it?

www.lissapelzer.com

 

Here is my interview with Rob Osborne

Name:  Rob Osborne

Age: 47 in June, 2017

Where are you from?

I live in Walderslade, a village outside Chatham in Kent.  I have been married for 23 years and have two sons of 18 and 15. I was born in Chelmsford, Essex and at the age of 6 months the family moved to Loose in Kent.  I attended the local schools and attained 5 O’levels and many CSE’s. From school I went into Further Education and studied Business and Finance and attained the BTEC Diploma. Whilst studying I had a Saturday job in Woolworths which is where I met my wife.  My first full time job was at Nationwide Building Society as a cashier and I worked my way up to Mortgage Advisor but couldn’t seem to advance any further (I found out later that the manager didn’t want to lose me although he encouraged me to apply for other jobs within the company. He actually quashed a promotion by telling a fellow manager I wasn’t ready.  When I told him I was leaving he offered me a £1000 pay rise) so after 6 years I moved on to the Alliance & Leicester.  My career progressed rapidly during my time there and I became a Financial Advisor before getting the chance to manage a couple of branches. I found the Branch Management fairly stressful and asked to return to Financial Advising 18 months later.  I was starting to become disillusioned with the whole industry and target based income but didn’t know anything else so I decided to try moving to another bank to see if it would reignite my enthusiasm, and after 6 years I moved to Lloyds TSB.  Unfortunately, this destroyed my love for the Financial Sector, the people were lovely but I was working between 11-13 hours a day, making very little money and not seeing my children so I realised that I needed a change.  Thankfully my brother-in-law was able to get me a job maintaining escalators on the London Underground and I have been there ever since working permanent nights.

Fiona: Tell us your latest news?

My first novel, Anything is Possible, comes out on 28th June, 2017.  It is a contemporary romantic drama with a smidgen of comedy. I am ¾ of the way through a second book and am completing another outline for a 4th book (I already have a 3rd book outline). None of these are sequels so I have a fair body of work to be getting on with.

Fiona: When and why did you begin writing?

I began writing in 2001 as a result of a dream.  I woke up before a satisfactory conclusion and couldn’t get back into it.  I spent the following days wondering what would have been the outcome and how the situation came about.  I thought that I would try and write about it and the rest is history!

 

 

 

Fiona: When did you first consider yourself a writer?

At the moment I don’t! This is purely and simply because it is my first book and it’s not been released yet.  I find it very surreal.  I took my mum out for dinner on Saturday and she wanted to order a copy of the book so she went into her local Waterstones. I wouldn’t go in with her because I thought it would be weird.  Also the book has taken years to reach the publishing stage (I tried to get an agent years ago without success).  The book survived being temporarily being lost and after rejection I lost confidence and planned to write as a hobby when I’d retired and self publish.  That all changed when my good friend Cheryl Butler told me that her book was being published.  She gave me the confidence to try The Book Guild.

Fiona: What inspired you to write your first book?

As I mentioned earlier it was as a result of a dream and I wanted to know what happened to the story after I woke up.

Fiona: Do you have a specific writing style?

I don’t think so!  I try to concentrate with the characters emotions.

Fiona: How did you come up with the title?

I thought that it could have two outcomes with the addition of punctuation. It could be a statement or question that is why I picked it.

Fiona: Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?

If you work hard at things you may have obstacles along the way but keep going then it may happen.  If you don’t try then you will never know. Oh, and make sure you have the full facts before acting on something.  Well at least I hope that comes out in the book.


Fiona: How much of the book is realistic and are experiences based on someone you know, or events in your own life?

It varies.  The first book has a fair chunk of personal experience in it. The main character works in a bank and I had the same operation that he has to cure a congenital defect.  My mood at the time was reflected in the book. Stuck in a job neither of us wanted.

Fiona: What books have most influenced your life most? A mentor?

Nothing has really influenced my life.

 

Fiona: Are there any new authors that have grasped your interest and who is your favorite author and what is it that really strikes you about their work?

I haven’t really been on the look out for new authors except my friend Cheryl Butler. I have read a sample of her book and my blood pressure shot up.

Fiona: Name one entity that you feel supported you outside of family members

Friends Cheryl and David Butler, Neil Stevenson, Rob Childs and finally Alexia Lewis.  It was Alexia who was the first unrelated person who read it.  She also did the vast majority of the proof reading originally.  When she first replied to me I scanned letter instead of thoroughly ready and saw the words needs totally rewriting.  I thought that meant the story was no good.  Thankfully after a short time of sulking I read the letter fully and it was only a paragraph she was referring to, not the whole book.  Never scan letters, always fully read. If I hadn’t I may have quit!!!

Fiona: Do you see writing as a career?

That depends on how the book is received.  I will continue on regardless and as long as people and publishers like my work I’ll be happy.  In an ideal world I would love to write full time.

Fiona: If you had to do it all over again, would you change anything in your latest book?

No but that could change with peoples reviews.

Fiona: Do you recall how your interest in writing originated?

The dream

Fiona: Can you share a little of your current work with us?

At the moment the book is in the process of being edited so it wouldn’t be the finished article.  I do have an unedited chapter on my Facebook page.

Fiona: Is there anything you find particularly challenging in your writing?

Time, all day long! I stopped working in finance because I was neglecting my family and working night’s means I have to split time.  My wife is a great support and doesn’t nag me a great deal.  She is probably the only one who could put up with me.

Fiona: Do you have to travel much concerning your book(s)?

None at all so far!

Fiona: Who designed the covers?

The Production Team at The Book Guild designed them.

 

 

 

Fiona: What was the hardest part of writing your book?

Not skipping chapters and writing the end first.


Fiona: Did you learn anything from writing your book and what was it?

Yes a great deal! I learnt that I could have the discipline to finish the job and keep going back until I was happy with it.  Before my dream I’d never considered writing so to finish something that people liked (I gave my book to a select few before attempting to publish) fills me with immense pride.

Fiona: If any of your books were made into a film, who would you like to play the lead?

I haven’t really thought about it?  If it was an American film maybe Anna Kendrick for the female and Patrick. J. Adams for the male.  That was off the cuff without much thought. If it was a British film I really have no idea.

Fiona: Do you have any advice for other writers?

For new readers? If you have an idea go for it.  If you are passionate about something you will overcome the obstacles facing you and you will put your heart and soul into the project.

Fiona: Do you have anything specific that you want to say to your readers?

Please give my book a chance! So far no one has disliked it.

Fiona: What book are you reading now?

I am not reading anything at the moment but I shall be reading David P Perlmutter’s Wrong Place Wrong Time, Cheryl Butler’s A Proclivity to Purience, Jim Proctor’s Veronica Phoenix: Phoenix Series Book 1 and Niki Livingstone’s Eyes Wide Shut.

Fiona: Do you remember the first book you read?

Three Bill Goats Gruff is the first one I remember.

Fiona: What makes you laugh/cry?

Anything makes me laugh. American Comedy. As regards to crying rom coms and sad events.

Fiona: Is there one person past or present you would meet and why?

Kenny Dalglish was my idol growing up.  Daryl Hall…The list is endless

 

Fiona: What do you want written on your head stone and why?

Writer, father, husband all round good guy, sorely missed!  Not necessarily in that order.

Fiona: Other than writing do you have any hobbies?

I enjoy playing football and cricket.  I also love watching films and TV Shows (mainly American ones)

Fiona: What TV shows/films do you enjoy watching?

Suits, Scandal, Once Upon a Time, Grimm…The list is endless.  I have over 30 TV shows in my DVD collection.  As for films I like every genre. Star Wars, Matrix, Rocky, Serendipity, I Love Trouble, My Best Friends Girl, Paycheck.  I could go on all day…

Fiona: Favorite foods / Colors/ Music

Steak and Chips, Spag Bol, Roast dinners etc.  My favourite colour is Green, why? I don’t know! I absolutely love Hall & Oates but I like all kinds of music.

Fiona: If you were not a writer what else would you like to have done?

Movie, TV critic. I could watch them all day and be paid for it.

Fiona: Do you have a blog/website? If so, what is it?

I have a  Facebook Page https://www.facebook.com/robossieauthor and https://twitter.com/RobossieAuthor for Twitter

Amazon authors page UK https://www.amazon.co.uk/Rob-Osborne/e/B01N5XKZAP/ref=dp_byline_cont_book_1

 

Buying link

UK https://www.amazon.co.uk/Anything-Possible-Rob-Osborne/dp/1911320688/ref=la_B01N5XKZAP_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1490635936&sr=1-1

 USA https://www.amazon.com/Anything-Possible-Rob-Osborne/dp/1911320688/ref=asap_bc?ie=UTF8

 

Here is my interview with Maya Starling

Name: Maya Starling

Age: 33

Where are you from: Zagreb, Croatia

 

A little about yourself (ie. your education, family life, etc):

Maya: I was born and raised in Zagreb, Croatia. Even though I have an MBA in Business, I ended up in the publishing industry; writing books and creating covers. That’s where my true passion lies. Now, I am a published author, and a cover designer with Panoptic Books Services. Married, and with a toddler, life keeps me plenty busy.

 

Fiona: Tell us your latest news?

Maya: On March 21st I published my second fantasy novel, Book Two in Dragons Awaken Trilogy; Dragon’s Prize. Most recently, the team I’m part of with Panoptic Book Services, contracted with Kace Tripp Publishing, along with the independent services we offer.

 

Fiona: When and why did you begin writing?

Maya: I’m a late bloomer when it comes to reading, and then writing. It wasn’t something I wanted to do since I was a kid because my family was never big on reading, but the passion grew inside me, and my wife was the one that introduced me to the world of reading. Fast forward a decade later. I was fresh out of university, unable to get a job because of the recession. Depression set in and I just lost myself in reading, mostly on Wattpad, which soon turned to editing for one of the authors there. Then, prompted by that author, I started writing.

 

Fiona: When did you first consider yourself a writer?

Maya: About six years ago when I first wrote something with a beginning and an end, in my own setting, with my own characters.

 

Fiona: What inspired you to write your first book?

Maya: I felt bad for the dragons. Why do they almost always have to be the bad guys? Why does the prince have to win the maiden? I wanted to read about the what if, so I wrote it. And also, a little secret: the maiden gets to save herself in the sequel. I wanted to give the dragon a chance at love and the maiden a chance to save herself.

 

Fiona: Do you have a specific writing style?

Maya: I’m not sure. Not too simplistic, not too purple prose. I am still experimenting with styles on my short stories. But one this is sure, I’m a pantser.

 

Fiona: How did you come up with the title?

Maya: It has a double meaning, and it just kind of came to me right from the start.

 

Fiona: Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?

Maya: I didn’t think about a message when writing it, but I guess you could say the message would be not to judge people, to be brave, to take destiny into your own hands.

 

Fiona: How much of the book is realistic and are experiences based on someone you know, or events in your own life?

Maya: Since the book is a fantasy novel, there is little that is realistic. The setting was inspired by low magic fantasy worlds. Also, I think that some of the characters share some traits with some of my friends.

 

Fiona: What books have most influenced your life most? A mentor?

Maya: There hasn’t really been a book that has really impacted my life, but there are a few that influenced my writing, and that I love to read:

Sharing Knife Trilogy by L.M.Bujold

Moirin Trilogy by Jacqueling Carey

Shadows of the Apt series by Adrian Tchaikovsky

After the Golden Age and Discord’s Apple by Carrie Vaughn

Lud-in-the-Mist byHope Mirrless

Chronicles of Amber by Roger Zelazny

 

Fiona: Are there any new authors that have grasped your interest and who is your favorite author and what is it that really strikes you about their work?

Maya: I love discovering new talent! Especially among the indie authors like

Emerald Delmara, Kim Fry, Poppy Reid and most recently M.A.Ray (totally hooked).

 

Fiona: Name one entity that you feel supported you outside of family members.

Maya: There is not only one, but a group of fellow authors from PSG community and among them, my biggest cheerleaders have been Emerald Delmara and Kim Fry.

 

Fiona: Do you see writing as a career?

Maya: Yes! Would love to have that dream come true.

 

Fiona: If you had to do it all over again, would you change anything in your latest book?

Maya: Maybe just some more polishing, but other than that, it’s one of my book babies and I love it just the way it is, flaws and all. I don’t think a book could ever be perfect and able to satisfy the needs of every reader.

 

Fiona: Do you recall how your interest in writing originated?

Maya: It originated with writing fanfiction.

 

Fiona: Can you share a little of your current work with us?

Maya: I have two WIPs, the third book to my trilogy, Dragons’ Queen, and a dark fantasy novel Vengeance Upturned.

 

Fiona: Is there anything you find particularly challenging in your writing?

Maya: At the moment, it’s finding the time to write with an occasional bout of self-doubt.

 

Fiona: Do you have to travel much concerning your book(s)?

Maya: Not too far, only in my imagination.

 

Fiona: Who designed the covers?

Maya: I made the covers myself and now I make them for Panoptic Book Services as well.

 

 

Fiona: What was the hardest part of writing your book?

Maya: Editing! Editing is a part of the writing process and I find that to be the hardest part. And not editing as I write.

 

Fiona: Did you learn anything from writing your book and what was it?

Maya: I learned to take critique, and learned that I have to trust my instincts.

 

Fiona: If any of your books was made into a film who would you like to play the lead?

Maya: Aidan Turner, and someone younger but similar to Rose Byrne.

 

Fiona: Do you have any advice for other writers?

Maya: Just keep writing, no matter how bad you think it is. There will be good days, there will be bad days, but you will only get better the more words you put out. And read! Read your genre, learn from the masters, read with the intent of editing someone else’s work, because that is how you will learn what works and what doesn’t, but don’t be afraid to develop your own style.

 

Fiona: Do you have anything specific that you want to say to your readers?

Maya: Thank you for your loyalty and support. Thank you for believing me and giving the wind to my writing sail. And reviews please: 😉

 

Fiona: What book are you reading now?

Maya: I have a couple lined up in my reader: Scream for me by Kim Fry, Hard Luck by M.A. Ray and The Ocean at the End of the Lane by Neil Gaiman.

 

Fiona: Do you remember the first book you read?

Maya: The first book I remember reading and that I liked reading it was The Jupiter Project.

 

Fiona: What makes you laugh/cry?

Maya: Lately, my son. Toddlers are funny, and also exasperating, and when you combine it with lack of sleep … you get crying.

 

Fiona: Is there one person past or present you would meet and why?

Maya: There is actually quite a few people I would love to meet, mostly from the publishing or entertainment industry.

 

Fiona: What do you want written on your head stone and why?

Maya: Here slumbers Maya, the great dragon shaman now turned to stone.

P.S. she was awesome!

 

Fiona: Other than writing do you have any hobbies ?

Maya: At the moment, only reading.

 

Fiona: What TV shows/films do you enjoy watching?

Maya: Mostly geeky stuff. Fantasy and sci-fi.

 

Fiona: Favorite foods/colors/music:

Maya: I really don’t have favorites when it comes to foods and music. But I do prefer deep purple or blue, but I mostly wear black.

 

Fiona: If you were not a writer what else would you like to have done?

Maya: Drawing!

 

Fiona: Do you have a blog/website? If so what is it?

Maya: You can find me many places! If you like to read blogs, book reviews, free short stories and be up to date with new releases, follow me on www.mayastarling.com If you prefer the social media:

https://www.facebook.com/StarlingMaya/

https://twitter.com/MayaStarling

 

Links to my books can be found here:

https://books.pronoun.com/dragons-treasure/

https://books.pronoun.com/dragons-prize/

Amazon Authors Pages

https://www.amazon.com/Maya-Starling/e/B01N9DYXHU/ref=dp_byline_cont_ebooks_1

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Maya-Starling/e/B01N9DYXHU/ref=sr_tc_2_0?qid=1490555368&sr=1-2-ent

 

And, of course, you can check out the Panoptic Book Services site at https://www.panoptic-books.com/ as well.