Here is my interview with Christie Silvers

Name:  Christie Silvers

Age: 40

Where are you from: 

Christie: Born and raised in Chatsworth, Georgia, a small town in northwest Georgia.

A little about your self `ie your education Family life etc:

Christie: I’m a wife and mother first and foremost. I have three daughters ranging from 12 to 20 years old. It’s crazy to say that since they were just babies when I started writing professionally. My youngest was only 1. Eek! I live on several acres in north Georgia with dogs, cats, and chickens. We had pigs, but that was a hassle. Whew! Not only do I take care of my family, all the animals, and my writing, but we also have a rental house I manage. There is always an overabundance of projects going on or needing attention around here. It never ends, but I love it! Life would be boring without chaos.

 

 

Fiona: Tell us your latest news?

Christie: Oh boy, I’ve had a lot going on in the last year. My mother was diagnosed with lung cancer in September of 2015. We had several months of continuous treatments, transfusions, and hospital stays until she passed away in May of 2016. It took me a few months to get a handle on things again before I was finally able to get back into my writing. And here we are, the release date of my newest book, and the first in a new series, will be on March 7, 2017. Devastating Sorrow is a story about an immortal witch who’s simply tired of her long existence.

 
Fiona: When and why did you begin writing?

Christie: I started writing when I was a child. I had notebooks filled with stories, as well as all the school essays, stories, and written discussions. I was always top of my class in writing and even had classmates coming to me for help with their own projects. However, I didn’t start writing professionally until 2006. As for why, there never was a why. Writing is something I have to do. I have too many characters in my head vying for attention and the only way to quiet them is to write their stories. Yes, I know that sounds like I may need medical attention, but hey, I’m sure most writers do!

 
Fiona: When did you first consider yourself a writer?

Christie: When I received the very first paycheck for a piece of my writing I knew that was it. I was hooked! That was the day I considered myself a writer.

 

 


Fiona: What inspired you to write your first book?

Christie: I’ve always enjoyed fiction, but especially stories with vampires, werewolves, and witches. At the time I was writing online content articles, and making a good living from it, but it wasn’t my passion. I wanted to do fiction. I disliked articles, but they made the money. One day I was talking to my husband about it and telling him about the book idea I had and he said, “Do it.” It was that simple to him. Just write my story. I could still write articles if I wanted to, but if I wanted to do fiction then I needed to jump right in and do it. So I slowly retreated from articles and focused more and more on my fiction. After the first book was published and the royalties started coming in I gave up content articles for good.

 
Fiona: Do you have a specific writing style?

Christie: I really enjoy writing in first person. I know a lot of readers don’t like first person, but that’s my favorite. I like to read it and write it. I feel like you can really get into the character’s head if they are telling their own story. Also, that’s the way my character’s tell their stories to me, so I’m obliged to write it that way.

 
Fiona: How did you come up with the title?

Christie: Devastating Sorrow went through about a dozen title changes during conception. It started out as “Untitled,” but I can’t work like that. I need my project to have an actual name, even if I do change it later. So over the course of several months the book went through numerous title changes until I got far enough into the story to realize it’s true title. Readers of this book will understand the title right away once they get into the pain of loss our character is dealing with.

 
Fiona: Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?

Christie: I don’t really write my books with hidden messages. They’re pretty much come as you are stories. However, if I had to pick one thing it would have to be to love those you’re with when they’re with you. You never know when they’ll be lost to you forever.

 
Fiona: How much of the book is realistic and are experiences based on someone you know, or events in your own life?

Christie: Since I write fiction I don’t think anyone should go into one of my stories thinking I’ve lived forever or run with vampires and witches. Though I do think I’d like to meet a real vampire one of these days, I don’t actually hang with any at the moment. As for emotions, I do try to pull from things I’ve dealt with when writing about a character’s pain, happiness, or anger. We’ve all been in situations that bring out the emotions in us and my characters are no different. I also pull elements from locations I’ve been to, experiences I’ve had, and even people I’ve met. I think all writers do, but that doesn’t necessarily mean we’ve been through the same trials our characters have.  That’s the fun of fiction!

 
Fiona: What books have most influenced your life most? a mentor?

Christie: I surround myself with other writers, some older and some younger, because they all inspire me. The older ones give me their advice and the younger ones look to me for advice. I enjoy both worlds. A lot of books influenced me when I was younger. Anne Rice was the first author who made me think I’d like to write fiction. Her books were the first ones I’d read that recognized the passion I felt for the fantasy/gothic/monster stories. No one else wrote about vampires the way she did. I’d never read vampire stories that beautified creatures of the night the way she did, and still does.

 

 

Fiona: Are there any new authors that have grasped your interest and who  is your favorite author and what is it that really strikes you about their work?

Christie: Oh gosh, I have so many favorites aside from Anne Rice. I also enjoy MaryJanice Davidson, her Betsy series makes me laugh. I like Charlaine Harris. All of her books are great, but I started with the Sookie Stackhouse series. I also read all of Gerry Bartlett’s books.  You might see a particular sharp-toothed theme here. The odd man out would have to be Jasper Fforde and his Thursday Next series. There aren’t any vampires in that one, but I like his twist on nursery rhymes.  A few newer authors would be Robin Renee Ray, Cameron Jace, RaeAnne Hadley, Amanda Kimberly… gosh, there are so many.

 
Fiona: Name one entity that you feel supported you outside of family members.

Christie: Hm, besides family… Fellow writers have always been a big support. It’s such a large community that you can’t help but support each other. We’re all in this together! My very own fans would have to be the largest group of supporters I have. I get emails and messages all the time from my readers. They read my newsletters, Facebook posts, blog entries, and of course my books. I love hearing from them. There have been times when I didn’t feel like I was making it in this business, a moment when a nasty review really hit me hard, times when I considered giving it all up and getting an outside job, but then I’d find a message from someone who had just read one of my books and loved it. Those are the moments when I realize I really am doing what I’m supposed to be doing.

 
Fiona: Do you see writing as a career?

Christie: I see writing as my lifelong love. Yes, I try to treat it as a career, but even when I have family emergencies and can’t work for a few days my writing is always there waiting for me when I return. I don’t try to crank out a dozen books a year in order to make money hand over fist, but I do set my work hours each day and attempt to stick to a schedule in order to accomplish my goals. As my children have aged I’ve found more writing time and I anticipate even more once all my girls are grown. No more school drop-offs and pick-ups means more work time for me. And it really is something special when you actually look forward to more work time.

 
Fiona: If you had to do it all over again, would you change anything in your latest book?

Christie: Well, my current book is still in the editing stages so if anything needs to be changed it will be. For my books already on the market, no. The stories come about the way they want to come about, so once I proclaim it’s done and it’s on the market there’s nothing else to do. You could edit a book to death and then there’s nothing left of substance. You’ve cut out everything that makes it uniquely yours. At some point you have to just let it go and move on to the next project. Each book has to stand on its own, and you, as the author, have to let it do what it’s going to do. Kind of like watching your grown kids go out into the world (of which I’m also doing at the moment) and create their own adventures. Sometimes you want to yank them back into safety, but you have to take a deep breath and move on.

 
Fiona: Do you recall how your interest in writing originated?

Christie: I don’t remember, it’s just always been there. My mother told me I was writing/drawing stories at the age of five. A few years ago she gave me my first “book” made of construction paper, illustrated with crayons, and bound with yarn. I’m just going to go out on a limb here and say I’ve been obsessed with books and writing since I knew what they were.

 

 

Fiona: Can you share a little of your current work with us?

Christie: Here’s the description for Devastating Sorrow, book 1 in the Penny Montague series:

Witch and ex-military, Penny Montague is sick of her immortal life. Working as a phone sex operator to occupy her time and keep in touch with her humanity, she spends her days trying to find a way to end her long, lonely existence and her nights pretending to care about men with mommy issues, strange fantasies, and twisted imaginations.
Life wasn’t always this bad though. When Penny’s ninety-four year old son, Charlie, dies in her arms the crushing reality of her long life truly hits her. What else is there to live for without her son? She’s ready to give it all up, and has tried multiple times, when her brother, Byron, shows up on her doorstep, trouble on his tail as always. It wasn’t until armed guards burst into her home, drag her from her bed, and throw them both into the dungeons of Midnight Manor that Penny realizes this is much worse than Byron’s normal scheming.
Midnight Manor is the control center of all immortals, run by an elite group called The Council.  Nothing happens in the world without Midnight Manor having their fingers in the pot. They raise and educate immortal children from an early age and place them throughout the world in positions beneficial to their causes, both present and future. There isn’t anything that happens, be it war, arms trades, or scientific achievement, that Midnight Manor doesn’t influence.
Penny retired from the Midnight Manor military nearly a century before, but now, in order to save her brother from being tortured for the rest of his immortal life because he slept with the wrong man’s wife, The Council gives Penny the choice to hunt down and return a runaway scientist or risk a fate worse than death and join her brother in the torture chambers for eternity.
Penny, with the help of a few people from her past, decides to at least attempt the retrieval. After all, according to The Council, the scientist is a danger to all immortals and his research must be returned. Tracking was her specialty during her time in the service.    This should be an easy in and out kind of mission with only a couple of days of work involved. Right?

 
Fiona: Is there anything you find particularly challenging in your writing?

Christie: Writing! Haha! In this day of constant distractions if I don’t schedule my writing time I don’t get as much done each day as I’d like. My kids don’t seem to understand that when Mom is writing don’t interrupt. They will want to have a full on conversation about some of the craziest stuff right when I’m getting into a good part. Kind of like someone interrupting you as you’re reading a good part. You don’t want to pull away from the book, but they just. Won’t. Stop. Talking! My phone rings more when I’m working; there are more package deliveries while I’m working; and the dogs need to be walked more while I’m working. I’ve had to learn not to work when the kids are home, turn off my phone’s ringer when I’m working, and I’m even looking into installing a doggie door for my four-legged brats. Even moms and writers learn as we go along.

 
Fiona: Do you have to travel much concerning your book(s)?

Christie: I don’t have to travel much in regards to my books. I do love traveling though and will use places I’ve been in my books. Over the years I’ve traveled for conventions and book fairs, but those weren’t a “have to” case.

 
Fiona: Who designed the covers?

Christie: For my Liz Baker series I had a fabulous cover designer name Kelly Shorten. She’s amazing and I hope to use her for future Liz books. For this first book in the Penny Montague series I used a new (to me) cover designer by the name of Desiree DeOrto, and that girl has the talent! Both ladies are very easy to work with and have never disappointed me with how fast they can conceive my ideas.

 
Fiona: What was the hardest part of writing your book?

Christie: I think, for me, the hardest part of writing any of my books is starting it. I write a lot of notes, research items of interest, and brainstorm, but putting that first sentence on a blank page is like pulling teeth. And it will always be changed during editing, so I don’t know why it’s so hard. Maybe it’s the blank page aspect of it that throws me.

 
Fiona: Did you learn anything from writing your book and what was it?

Christie: I learned that I could take a year off and still pick up right where I left off. The stories don’t stop trying to get you to write them just because you don’t have the time to sit and do it. During my mom’s sickness, treatment, and passing I didn’t write. I had more important things to take care of than work. I’ll never regret choosing to spend those last months with my mother.

 

 

Fiona: If any of your books was made into a film who would you like to play the  lead

Christie: Depends on which character we’re talking about. I think Kat Dennings would be a great Liz Baker. She certainly has the sarcasm and cattiness down. But for Penny Montague maybe Scarlett Johannson.

 

 

Fiona: Do you have any advice for other writers?

Christie: Listen to your characters. They have a story to tell and they’ve chosen you to tell it. No one can tell your characters’ story better than you. Also, anything can be fixed in editing. Don’t worry about how bad the rough draft looks because that should never be your finished product.

 
Fiona: Do you have anything specific that you want to say to your readers?

Christie: I love you all! I have the best readers around. I have readers who make it a point to see me any time I’m in even remotely close to their town. I have readers who share my work with everyone they meet. I have readers who cared enough to send me love when I’m having a hard time. Some of my readers have been around so long they’re family now. I love each and every one of you.

 
Fiona: What book are you reading now?

Christie: I’m currently reading Night Life by Caitlin Kittredge

 
Fiona: Do you remember the first book you read?

Christie: Oh gosh, the first one I remember reading was one of those Dick & Jane books in like the first or second grade. I remember everyone having to read aloud to the whole class and I was a shy child. My face would turn beet red and the heat would crawl up my neck as I stumbled over just enough words for my turn to be over and the next kid could endure the torment. Those books certainly weren’t read for pleasure.

 
Fiona: What makes you laugh/cry?

Christie: There’s a lot that makes me laugh. I have a crass sense of humor though. Some people most definitely wouldn’t laugh at a lot I find funny. My husband makes me laugh regularly. Sometimes my kids will say something that hits my funny bone. When my sister or best friend are with me it’s nothing but a big laugh-fest. As for crying, sometimes my own stories make me cry. Sometimes I cry when my kids are hurting. My husband has also made me cry. You don’t get through 23 years together without a few tears here and there. Losing family members makes me cry, though not usually publicly. Sad movies, sad books, frustration, disappointment. I guess you could say all the normal stuff makes me cry.

 
Fiona: Is there one person past or present you would meet and why?

Christie: I’d like to meet a lot of people. I can’t really narrow it down. Any of the authors I mentioned above would make for a great time.

 

 

Fiona: What do you want written on your head stone and why ?

Christie: Wife, Mother, Author for obvious reasons.  Haha! Actually, I really don’t care what’s on it. I won’t be around to read it.

 
Fiona: Other than writing do you have any hobbies ?

Christie: Reading, cooking, DIYing, I’m really into my new planner. I never knew people put so much time into making their planners pretty until I got this one and saw all the groups of people doing it. I’m simplistic with my highlighter color coding compared to everyone else.

 
Fiona: What TV shows/films do you enjoy watching?

Christie:
TV: Timeless, The Travelers, OA, Crazy Ex-Girlfriend, Vampire Diaries, Supernatural, Beyond, and many more.
Movies: Marvel movies (who doesn’t like all the shirtless superheros?), Underworld, Resident Evil, and a lot of the upcoming releases.

 
Fiona: Favorite foods / Colors/ Music

Christie:
Foods: Pizza, Chinese, Seafood
Colors: Purple and Blue
Music: Pop, Rap, Hip-Hop. Some of the music I listen to is pretty raunchy. That stuff is for listening to without kids present.

 
Fiona: If you were not a writer what else would you like to have done?

Christie: I’m doing exactly what I always wanted to do. Anything else would have just been a job, not something I would have liked.

 

 

 

Fiona: Do you have a blog/website? If so what is it?

Christie:
Website: http://www.christiesilvers.com
Blog: http://christiesilvers.blogspot.com
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/authorchristiesilvers
Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/christiesilvers
Instagram: http://www.instagram.com/christiesilvers

GoodReads: https://www.goodreads.com/christiesilvers

Amazon: USA https://www.amazon.com/-/e/B002BLQJNS

UK  https://www.amazon.co.uk/Christie-Silvers/e/B002BLQJNS/ref=sr_tc_2_0?qid=1484696606&sr=1-2-ent

 

Here is my interview with Marjorie Simmons

Name:  Author Marjorie Simmons

Where are you from?

I am from a small town in Oklahoma.

I write a wide variety of genes, from children’s stories, romance, drama, humor, suspense, ect. I have around twenty-three books out right now. I enjoy writing , painting, gardening, and working on projects for my home decor business. Family is very important to me, and I try to live life with the best outlook, and takes nothing for granted. God comes first in my life and family is the glue that holds life together. I cherish every moment in life, you never know when the ones you love will be gone. “Live, Love and Laugh in life, time is short!”

 

 

Fiona: Tell us your latest news?

I have recently wrote and published two new book.

“A Tortured Soul Voices in the dark.” A tale of a young man’s journey from a normal life of a young child, to a life of mental illness, drugs, witchcraft, and the struggles with trying to cope with the day to day task of survival. This book is true to the events that happen to the youth of our time. We can not begin to fathom the tortures of the mind, and the deep pain of the unending tortures these individuals live with in their day to day lives. The research I did for this book, was at times overwhelming to even grasp the nature of the mind, in such a tormented state. I feel very heartbroken for these individuals that live with this on a daily bases, and have no one to turn to for help.

 

“Love, Betrayal, And The Loss Of Innocence” It is a story of the injustice that can lie within the court systems, due to money, greed, and deceit. A family, and a young child’s life is destroyed, by the deceitful desires of some people, to win at all cost. Nothing is expendable in this life, when it comes to greed, money and pure evil.

 

 
Fiona: When and why did you begin writing?

I began writing at a young age, around twelve. It seemed to bring comfort to me to write down my thoughts, feelings, and dreams. As a young teen, the things that come our way, sometime can feel like the end of the world, but as an adult we see that things are so simple and not as bad as we think they are at the time. Writing always seemed to help me put into perspective the problem, and the way to, and not to handle it. I always felt a sense of safety and peace in putting my feelings down on paper.

 

 
Fiona: When did you first consider yourself a writer?

In my early twenties. I wrote my first full story, “The End Of The World as we know it.” Before then, I wrote poetry, and short stories.

 

 
Fiona: What inspired you to write your first book?

“The End Of The World as we know it.” It came to me one day while sitting at home, and thinking about the things I had been thought growing up. God had always been a big part of my life growing up, and I felt a need to put down in a story, the things that I seen, as the future of the world.

 

 
Fiona: Do you have a specific writing style?

No, not really. I write all kinds of stories. I do try to hold true to my morals and beliefs though.

 

 
Fiona: How did you come up with the title?

I come up with the titles of my books in different ways. Some come to me in a dream, like some of the children’s books I have written, and some are just an idea that pops into my head along with the story.

 

 
Fiona: Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?

I try to always put a message in all my stories. Some are life lessons, some are guides to life’s journeys, and some are to help you understand that there is always hope in this life, no matter how hard it may be.

 

 
Fiona: How much of the book is realistic and are experiences based on someone you know, or events in your own life?

Most of my stories have some sort of pieces to my life, or someone else life that I have come in contact with, at one time or another.

 

 
Fiona: What books have most influenced your life most? a mentor?

The Bible, and Alfred Hitchcock books.

My mother and grandmother was my most influential people in my life. I think of them as my mentors. My mother always taught me to go after my dreams, and my grandmother taught me the importance of always trusting in Jesus Christ.

 

 

Fiona: Are there any new authors that have grasped your interest and who is your favorite author and what is it that really strikes you about their work?

Author Kathy Goodhew, and Author Elaine Littau. I love the way they are so real and love the chance to make someone smile.

My favorite author would have to be, H. G. Wells in the book The Time Machine. I was so engrossed in the story. I loved the way he put so much detail into his writing that it drew me in, and made me not want to stop reading it.

 

 
Fiona: Name one entity that you feel supported you outside of family members.

I had a teacher in sixth grade that encouraged me in life.

 

 
Fiona: Do you see writing as a career?

Yes

 

 
Fiona: If you had to do it all over again, would you change anything in your latest book?

I think that most authors think that there is always some way or another that they could improve their work. It is just human nature to want to always be at your best, and do it better the next time.

 

 
Fiona: Do you recall how your interest in writing originated?

Yes, as a young child I always loved stories.

 

 

 

Fiona: Can you share a little of your current work with us?

At this time I am not currently working on a book.

 

 
Fiona: Is there anything you find particularly challenging in your writing?

Yes, time. There never seems to be enough time to just go into a quiet room and right without any  interruptions.

 

 
Fiona: Do you have to travel much concerning your book(s)?

Not a lot. Mainly to book signings or events. Usually they are not but a couple of hours away.

 

 
Fiona: Who designed the covers?

I designed most of the covers myself. Some were designed by the publisher.

 

 
Fiona: What was the hardest part of writing your book?

The hardest part of writing my books are finding time, and having them edited.

 

 
Fiona: Did you learn anything from writing your book and what was it?

Yes, people are sometimes very inspired or touched by our stories, and yet there is always going to be that few who are critical at every turn. I have learned to take things in stride, and always remember that you can never please everyone all the time. I fill that opinions can sometimes help in our lives. I also have learned that some people take what we as writers write, as true life and forget that this is only fiction, for the enjoyment of one’s imagination. You have to take life as it comes, and never give up. We all make mistakes in things we do, but if you give up, you will never have the opportunity to strive to be great.

 

 

 

Fiona: If any of your books was made into a film who would you like to play the lead?

I have always enjoyed Kevin Costner films, I like the way he stays true to the things he believes.

 

 
Fiona: Do you have any advice for other writers?

Yes, If you enjoy writing, and want to pursuer a career in writing, don’t ever give up over mistakes, or criticism, keep trying and you will get better. You can only succeed if you never give up trying. Take advice from the ones who you look up to, and over look the ones who are just out to be mean. There is always room to improve in all things, don’t be afraid to try try again. Life is only as much as you put into it.

 

 
Fiona: Do you have anything specific that you want to say to your readers?

I would like to think that my books would give them some sort of joy, laughter, peace, understanding and maybe even help when there seems to be no hope. Thank you all for your support and advice. I truly hope that you enjoy the gift of reading and hope that you will instill in your own children the joy in reading. Reading can take you to places you other wise would not have the opportunity to go.

 

 

Fiona: What book are you reading now?

I am currently not reading anything at this time.

 

 

Fiona: Do you remember the first book you read?

Yes, Dick and Jane. My dad got it for me at a time when I struggled to learn to read. He spend hours with me, teaching me how to read from that book. I will always remember that first time that I was able to read that book all by myself.

 

 

Fiona: What makes you laugh/cry?

The joy of family getting together telling old stories, or a good clean joke.

The hurting in the world, and not being able to help. Seeing someone sad and broken.

 

 

Fiona: Is there one person past or present you would meet and why?

Jesus Christ, he is my true hero is life. He is the one that I look to in every aspect of my life. Without him I would have no talent. I am truly grateful to him for everything.

 

 

Fiona: What do you want written on your head stone and why?

I really have not give it much thought.

 

 

Fiona: Other than writing do you have any hobbies ?

Yes, I paint, and do rustic decor and some small furniture.

 

 

Fiona: What TV shows/films do you enjoy watching?

The Curse of Oak Island, Lonesome Dove, Comedies, and UFC.

 

 

Fiona: Favorite foods / Colors/ Music?

My favorite foods are, home cooked meals, almonds and ice cream.

My favorite color is bluish s purple and pink.

My favorite Music is Christian and Country. I also love the sound of a beautiful violin.

 

 

Fiona: If you were not a writer what else would you like to have done?

Maybe a singer or a missionary.

 

 

Fiona: Do you have a blog/website? If so what is it? amazon.com/author/marjoriesimmons

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Here is my interview with N. Nieto

Name N. Nieto

Age 26

Where are you from One stop light town of Falkville Alabama

A little about your self `ie your education Family life etc  

I am a true southern belle. I like my sweet tea and I like blessing hearts. I was born and raised in a one stop light town in North Alabama. As a child I was a bit of a tomboy. I loved riding bikes and playing basketball and volley ball.
As a teen I loved to read. My favorite author was Lurlene McDaniel. I loved, and still love, all of her books. Although I have added several authors to my favorites list, I still enjoy her writing style.
These days I spend my time chasing kids and cleaning house. (oh the life of a wife and mother!) I somehow find time to read and write in the middle of all of that crazy. I always say as long as one person likes my stories I will continue to write.

 

 

Fiona: Tell us your latest news?

I have a short story in a New Years Anthology put together by Black Ribbon Press. If you have read my Unforeseen Secrets Series then you have met the infamous Timothy Green. Well the short story is all about him and what let him to LA in the first place. You can purchase the Anthology for only .99 Cents!

 

 
Fiona: When and why did you begin writing?

I had a dream one night about this woman who loses everything but learns to love again. Only the person she grows to love has secrets of his own. I remember waking up thinking ‘Damn I’d love to read a book like that!’ I pitched the idea to my cousin, who happens to also be an author, and tried to get her to write me the book so I could read it. She refused saying she couldn’t write someone else’s story. So, I decided to try my hand in writing. And with her encouragement and guidance along the way Resurrected Secrets was written and published. Since then my passion for writing has grown tremendously. I couldn’t imagine not writing and making my own worlds now.

 

 
Fiona: When did you first consider yourself a writer?

Not until recently actually. Lol Sometimes I still question it lmao

 

 
Fiona: What inspired you to write your first book?

A dream 🙂

 

 
Fiona: Do you have a specific writing style?

Not really.

 

 
Fiona: How did you come up with the title?

A lot of brain storming!

 

 
Fiona: Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?

In Resurrected Secrets it would be forgiveness. In Jeremy’s Lies it would be acceptance or yourself and to never settle for less than you deserve; don’t sell yourself short.

 

 
Fiona: How much of the book is realistic and are experiences based on someone you know, or events in your own life?

All of mine are completely fiction except for Jeremy’s Lies. That one is based on a past relationship of mine. My first love actually. I am proud to say I have come a long way since the ‘me’ in that book and I will never go back to that version of me.

 

 
Fiona: What books have most influenced your life most? a mentor?

I grew up reading Lurlene McDaniel books so I would have to say her and my cousin Salice Rodgers has influenced me the most. Salice is defiantly my mentor. I go to her with all my book questions lol.

 

 

Fiona: Are there any new authors that have grasped your interest and who is your favorite author and what is it that really strikes you about their work?

Aimee Noalane is the newest author to me and I love her No Regrets books. As for favorite authors, lol, that list would take all day to go through. I am a sucker for romance and paranormal books. Just a few of my favorite authors on the list would include, Salice Rodgers, T.R Cupak, Jillian Anselmi, Stephanie Hoffman Mcmanus, Joy Eileen, Mia Clark, Tali Alexander, Tillie Cole, Aimee Noalane, Bobbie Jo Benz, J.T. Lozano and many more. Like isaid I could go on for days lol

 

 
Fiona: Name one entity that you feel supported you outside of family members.

At the beginning of all of this it was defiantly my former best friend. She supported me more than my own family. Too bad things and people change. But everything happens for a reason 😀

 

 
Fiona: Do you see writing as a career?

Yes. I’d love to make this my full-time career.

 

 
Fiona: If you had to do it all over again, would you change anything in your latest book?

I am sure every writer would. If they tell you otherwise they are being dishonest.

 

 
Fiona: Do you recall how your interest in writing originated?

Yes, it kind of just happened but once I started I just couldn’t stop. There is something about getting to create your own world that is so exciting to me. I love it.

 

 

Fiona: Can you share a little of your current work with us?

Currently I am working on 7 different books lol but I wil share a small piece from one of them.

Untitled By. N. Nieto

This content is subject to change and under copyright by N. Nieto

**Intended for 18 years and older!**

“Lay down on your stomach with your legs apart.” He instructs me as soon as he walks into my room.

 “What, no hello or how are you doing first?” I joke.

 Kaeden Gives me a pointed look before he drags his T-Shirt over his head show casing his chiseled chest and rippling abs.

 When Kaeden first came to me for help I thought he had to be kidding. I mean with a body like that how could he possibly need my help in learning how to please a woman? Just looking at him is enough to please me.

 “McKenna, I’m not playing. On your stomach. Clothes off and legs spread. Now.”

 A shiver of excitement races up my spin as I think about all the naughty things to come. He claims he didn’t know how to sexually please a woman before me but the way he demands my body and takes control over my every orgasm, and trust me there are always plenty when I’m with him, hints that he is either lying or doesn’t know what he is really capable of.

 I raise my eyebrow up in question at him but quickly do as he asks. Once I’m face down on the bed and my legs spread wide, I turn my head to the side to look over my shoulder so I can see him.

“What’s this about Kaeden? We didn’t have an appointment today; it’s not until next week. You are supposed to be at football camp all week.”

 “I missed you. I missed this.” I suck in a breath as I feel his hand come down on my naked ass then he gently rubs the stinging skin with his soft touch. “I couldn’t stay away. It feels too good to be with you.”

 I hear the zipper of his jeans being yanked down and within seconds I feel his hot breath on the back of my neck.

 “Did you miss me like I missed you?” His hand moves down my shoulders to my back gliding in-between our bodies. Grabbing his cock, he rubs it along the crease of my ass. “He missed you too. Very, much. Did you miss him Kenna? Did you miss me?” He questions again.

 It’s hard to concentrate on his questions when his throbbing dick is so close to my entrance. I wiggle my ass raising it up as much as I can with him straddling me.

 “Nah, nah. Answer me and I will give you what you want.” He moves his dick away from where I want it.

 “Yes Kaeden. I missed him. Now please!” I wiggle my ass again. It still amazes me just how worked up he can get me without even really touching me.

 “I see, but did you miss me?” I can hear the smile in his voice. Besides the fact that he is by far the sexiest; he also takes the time to get to know me some to talk to me. That’s what makes Kaeden stand out from my other students. Yeah, most of the talking may be while we are having sex but hell, that’s what he pays me for.

 

 
Fiona: Is there anything you find particularly challenging in your writing?

I find it really heard to try and write a ‘clean’ book like YA. Jeremy’s Lies was intended to be a YA but I just couldn’t tell the story correctly without the ‘dirty’ parts.

 

 
Fiona: Do you have to travel much concerning your book(s)?

No not yet L I am hoping to change that this coming year!

 

 
Fiona: Who designed the covers?

Just Write Creations designed the cover for Jeremy’s Lies but I have done the rest of the covers.

 

 
Fiona: What was the hardest part of writing your book?

Editing! I hate it!

 

 
Fiona: Did you learn anything from writing your book and what was it?

Yes! I learned how long it takes a gunshot wound to heal.

 

 

Fiona: If any of your books was made into a film who would you like to play the lead.

Oh I would love for my Unforeseen Secrets Series to be a movie! I would want Sandra Bullock to play Mandy and Jase Dean to play Collin lol that’s really the only two characters I have thought about.

 

 
Fiona: Do you have any advice for other writers?

Never give up! There is a reader out there for everything!

 

 
Fiona: Do you have anything specific that you want to say to your readers?

I love you and thank you for your support!

 

 

Fiona: What book are you reading now?

I am beta reading for Joy Eileen’s upcoming release!

 

 

 

Fiona: Do you remember the first book you read?

Lol no I have read so many.

 

 

Fiona: What makes you laugh/cry?

My kids! And sometimes all at the same time lol

 

 

Fiona: Is there one person pass or present you would meet and why?

Yes! I’d love to meet Harriet Tubman! I’d just like to talk to her about how life was back then.

 

 

Fiona: What do you want written on your head stone and why?

I wish I had a glass of mountain dew. And just to be funny cause I always drink Mountain dew.

 

 

Fiona: Other than writing do you have any hobbies ?

Reading! I love to read!

 

 

Fiona: What TV shows/films do you enjoy watching?

Grey’s Anatomy, The Walking Dead, Vampire Diaries, The Originals, The Voice and Talking Dead.

 

 

Fiona: Favorite foods / Colors/ Music  Food:

Mexican, Color: Pink and Music: Country, Pop, and 80s

 

 

Fiona: If you were not a writer what else would you like to have done?

Forensic Scientist

 

 

Fiona: Do you have a blog/website? If so what is it?

I have both. A book blog Bobbie’s Book Blog and Reviews and my Author Website is http://www.authornnieto.wordpress.com

Stalk Me!

Links

Email: nnieto2510@gmail.com

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/authornnieto
Twitter : https://twitter.com/Nnieto25
Goodreads:   https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/14232993.N_Nieto
Amazon: amazon.com/author/nnieto
Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/authornnieto/
Website: https://authornnieto.wordpress.com/

Newsletter: http://facebook.us1.list-manage.com/subscribe?u=ec7b040384f72a4253014f9f5&id=c17b550cf2

Here is my interview with Candace Calvert

Name Candace Calvert

Age Grandmotherly

Where are you from

I’m a native northern Californian, veteran ER nurse, grandmother to 8 (plus a first great grand!), a passionate cook, world traveler—and bird nerd.

Fiona: Tell us your latest news?

My 9th medical drama for Tyndale House publishers, Maybe It’s You, releases February 3rd.


Fiona: When and why did you begin writing?

I wrote stories as a child, then in diaries, journals . . . for as long as I can remember. Writing is a great outlet and (to quote Anais Nin), a way to “taste life twice.”


Fiona: When did you first consider yourself a writer?

I can’t remember a time when I didn’t.


Fiona: What inspired you to write your first book?

A “triple whammy” that left me divorced, temporarily homeless and physically and spiritually broken—my first published work appears in Chicken Soup for the Nurse’s Soul.


Fiona: Do you have a specific writing style?

I write inspirational contemporary romance, a medical subgenre that has been dubbed “hope opera.” Adrenaline-infused, warmly romantic, touches of humor.


Fiona: How did you come up with the title?

The title Maybe It’s You was actually my editor’s suggestion.


Fiona: Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?

The unifying message in Maybe It’s You is one of forgiveness and healing, brokenness and worth—that no matter our mistakes, we are loved by God.


Fiona: How much of the book is realistic and are experiences based on someone you know, or events in your own life?

I think most works of fiction contain a bit of author DNA and I try hard to make my characters feel real and relatable. No actual personal events in this story, but definitely an overall blend of experiences and relationships. I hope my readers see themselves or someone they know while reading it.


Fiona: What books have most influenced your life most? a mentor?

A literary work very close to my heart is The Diary of a Young Girl by Anne Frank. It touched me deeply when I first read it and again, quite recently, when I had the opportunity to tour the Anne Frank House in Amsterdam.

 

Fiona: Are there any new authors that have grasped your interest and who  is your favorite author and what is it that really strikes you about their work?

There are so many, and I have been privileged to meet more than few fellow Christian fiction authors. In the mainstream, I love work of Sara Gruen, Jodi Picoult, Anne Rivers Siddons, and Maeve Binchy—to name only a few.


Fiona: Name one entity that you feel supported you outside of family members.

My literary agent, Natasha Kern, my publishing team and my fellow authors—members of American Christian Fiction Writers.


Fiona: Do you see writing as a career?

Yes. My second career, following nursing. Writing for publication isn’t for the faint of heart; tenacity is a must.


Fiona: If you had to do it all over again, would you change anything in your latest book?

No. I’m happy with it—and eager to share with my readers.


Fiona: Do you recall how your interest in writing originated?

Reading as child, most likely. And my father was quite a storyteller.

Fiona: Can you share a little of your current work with us?

This is the back cover “teaser.”

ER nurse Sloane Ferrell escaped her risky past—new name, zip code, job, and a fresh start. She’s finally safe, if she avoids a paper trail and doesn’t let people get too close. Like the hospital’s too-smooth marketing man with his relentless campaign to plaster one “lucky” employee’s face on freeway billboards.

Micah Prescott’s goal is to improve the Hope hospital image, but his role as a volunteer crisis responder is closer to his heart. The selfless work helps fill a void in his life left by family tragedy. So does a tentative new relationship with the compassionate, beautiful, and elusive Sloane Ferrell.

Then a string of brutal crimes makes headlines, summons responders . . . and exposes disturbing details of Sloane’s past.

Can hope spring from crisis?

 

 


Fiona: Is there anything you find particularly challenging in your writing?

Since I write medical fiction, I’m careful not to use too much “jargon” or, on the other hand, talk down to my readers—people are more medically savvy today.


Fiona: Do you have to travel much concerning your book(s)?

I do some limited travel for book events—and research.


Fiona: Who designed the covers?

The talented art team of Tyndale House Publishers.


Fiona: What was the hardest part of writing your book?

(Always) Finding a balance between time spent writing and time spent living my life—the juggle of the fictional and real worlds.


Fiona: Did you learn anything from writing your book and what was it?

I had to research alcoholism, Russian organized crime, and human trafficking—all very interesting.

Fiona: If any of your books was made into a film who would you like to play the lead

I think my heroine, Sloane Ferrell, looks a lot like Alexis Bledel of Gilmore Girls—those compelling blue eyes.


Fiona: Do you have any advice for other writers?

Read widely, study craft, and attend conferences, network with writers ahead of you on the publishing path.


Fiona: Do you have anything specific that you want to say to your readers?

That I appreciate you very, very much.

Fiona: What book are you reading now?

I just finished Maeve Binchy’s Echoes.

 

Fiona: Do you remember the first book you read?

I remember crying in my spaghetti over Charlotte’s Web.

Fiona: What makes you laugh/cry?

Life.

Fiona: Is there one person pass or present you would meet and why?

Anne Frank, because of her amazing spirit of optimism—her open heart.

Fiona: What do you want written on your head stone and why ?

I don’t know. Something like “Funny, grateful, caring.”

Fiona: Other than writing do you have any hobbies ?

Cooking, travel, gardening, bird watching.

Fiona: What TV shows/films do you enjoy watching?

I enjoy “Madam Secretary” and “The Great British (and American) Baking Show.”

Fiona: Favorite foods / Colors/ Music

Appetizers, red, zydeco

Fiona: If you were not a writer what else would you like to have done?

I was a nurse; it was a wonderful career.

Fiona: Do you have a blog/website? If so what is it?

Website   http://candacecalvert.com/

Facebook Author Page  https://www.facebook.com/candacecalvertbooks/

Goodreads  https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/2870525.Candace_Calvert

 Amazon Author Page: https://www.amazon.com/Candace-Calvert/e/B0028ONKV2/ref=dp_byline_cont_book_1

 

Here is my interview with Clare Flynn

Name  Clare Flynn

Age  Yikes! It’s classified information – 62 (going on 16)

Where are you from?

I was born in Liverpool and have lived all over the place – numerous locations here in England plus Paris, Brussels, Milan and Sydney. After spending the last 18 years in London I moved last March to the south coast to Eastbourne where I have a view of the sea from my kitchen and living room.

A little about your self `ie your education Family life etc  

I have a degree in English Language and Literature from Manchester University. I’m the eldest of five children – but have none of my own. I was very much caught up in my career – I was a Marketing Director – hence the foreign living locations – and did a lot of travelling with my work. Twenty years ago I left corporate life and I set my own business. I worked with big companies as clients, helping them figure out their business strategy and improving their corporate culture to become more innovative. Since my move down here to the seaside I’m now 100% focused on my writing.

Fiona: Tell us your latest news?

I’m off on holiday next week – going on a rail trip to Switzerland up to the top of the Jungfrau – following in Sherlock Holmes footsteps to the Reichenbach Falls – but hopefully not over them!

I’m working hard to finish my next book, The Chalky Sea. It’s set in WW2 here in Eastbourne.


Fiona: When and why did you begin writing?

As soon as I could hold a pencil in my hand. I loved making up stories and writing poems and plays. It’s always been both a compulsion and an escape for me. I can’t imagine not writing. Even when I was in the corporate world I paid a lot of attention to crafting and “wordsmithing” every business document I had to write. I love words and putting them together and since I was able to read I’ve devoured books.


Fiona: When did you first consider yourself a writer?

Probably when I held the first paperback version of my first book in my hands, hot from the printers. There’s no feeling quite like it.


Fiona: What inspired you to write your first book?

My first book was never published and is locked away on an ancient floppy disk somewhere – if it exists at all any more. It was a thriller set in Istanbul and not at all the kind of book I would write now.

My first published novel was not inspired by anything particular except the desire to write a book. I had no idea what was going to happen in the story until I started to write it. My inspiration to finish it came from T.E. Lawrence – my first draft was stolen along with my laptops in a burglary. I was going to give up all my writing dreams but I read that Lawrence had left the manuscript for Seven Pillars of wisdom on a train and wrote it all again, so I decided to do the same.


Fiona: Do you have a specific writing style?

I find that hard to answer. That’s one to ask my readers! I guess I must do as, even though I don’t write series, people read one book and then go on to read the others. I suppose my style is built on a foundation of decades of reading widely.

If forced to think about elements that define my style, I’d say I write fast paced stories with strong and memorable characters. I try to avoid black and white characters and go for a full palette so even the baddies have some redeeming qualities and the goodies are all flawed.

I spend hours crafting the words on the page. Story alone is not enough. It has be told well. Lots of readers say my books make them forget they’re reading a book and feel as if they’re there witnessing what’s happening. One woman wrote to tell me she was unable to travel due to disability but she went to all kinds of places vicariously through my books. That was such a compliment.


Fiona: How did you come up with the title?

Titles are always hard. A Greater World is set in the Blue Mountains of Australia and the title comes from a couple of lines in a poem by Alfred Noyes “Beyond the Blue Mountains, We’ll find a greater world” and that’s what my main character Elizabeth has to do, rebuilding her life in Australia and overcoming so many obstacles.

Kurinji Flowers is named for a plant that grows in a small area of South India and nowhere else on the planet. It only blooms once every twelve years and was seen as a symbol of love in ancient Indian poetry. It is of great significance to my main character, Ginny.

Letters from a Patchwork Quilt was not my first title choice – mine was not well received by my editor and was perhaps a bit too esoteric – so I asked a few friends who’d read an early draft for help, and one of them came up with this title which I love and is a perfect fit for the story, some of which comes to light when a present day woman finds some old letters sewn inside a quilt.

The Green Ribbons was because a pair of green ribbons feature in the story and thread their way through the narrative.

My next book has a working title of The Chalky Sea. That’s because the sea here in Eastbourne is a wonderful grey-green colour and often has a cloudy opacity due to the chalk deposits washed from the cliffs into the water.
Fiona: Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?

I think all my books are to some extent about displacement. My main characters are taken out of what had been a comfortable and secure existence with everything going well and thrown into very difficult and challenging circumstances sometimes on the other side of the world. How they cope with this varies between the characters.  Elizabeth and Michael in A Greater World find themselves moving from England to Australia – Michael willingly to escape a tragedy, Elizabeth very reluctantly; Ginny in Kurinji Flowers is transposed from her debutante London society life to British India, where she feels unsettled and out of place; Jack and Eliza in Letters from a Patchwork Quilt are forcibly separated and she is trapped on a voyage to America without him, while he ends up in an unfamiliar, ugly, industrial town in the North of England. In The Green Ribbons Hephzibah loses her parents in a tragic accident and has to make a new life in a new place.


Fiona: How much of the book is realistic and are experiences based on someone you know, or events in your own life?

All my books are entirely fictitious and I never base any characters on real people. I stole some elements of my great-grandfather’s life for Letters from a Patchwork Quilt – just the places he had lived in and the two jobs he had  – as a schoolteacher and a publican. That was all I knew about him and I couldn’t imagine why a pub landlord would want to be a teacher and vice versa, so I decided to use that to make a story up. But none of the things that happened to him, or the women he was involved with have any connection at all to my own ancestor’s life. And as to using my own experiences – no way!

In my new book (out later this year) I have used real bombing incidents here in Eastbourne, sticking to the same locations and the same numbers of dead and injured – but all the characters are invented.

All my books are intensively researched to get the period detail right but I love writing because I love making stuff up!


Fiona: What books have most influenced your life most? a mentor?

So many books. I’d single out Thomas Hardy, the Brontes, Austen, Geroge Elliot, Henry James, but I also read lots of contemporary fiction. My favourite read last year was A God in Ruins by Kate Atkinson – I love everything she writes. I often revisit the classics, including American literature – particularly John Updike, John Irving, Fitzgerald, Edith Wharton – but I also love to read books by authors I know persoanlly. The thing that surprised me most on becoming an author is how supportive it is as a community and I have met some wonderful people who will now be lifelong friends. It means I have a very long To Be Read list! There are a couple of recent posts on my blog highlighting some of my top reads of last year.

As to a mentor – all of my great English teachers at school – Miss Neely, Miss Ledger, Mrs Tillyard, Miss Wilson. Although it’s so many years ago and they are probably dead now, I owe them a huge debt – along with my late mother who died a year ago this month.


Fiona: Name one entity that you feel supported you outside of family members.

School – as above! I was blessed with great teachers. Much more so than at university.

Nowadays it’s other authors. I’m in The Historical Novel Society, The Romantic Novelists Association, The Society of Authors and The Alliance of Independent Authors. All of these are sources of fantastic support, advice and friendship. I am also in a small critique group of 5 professional writers here in Eastbourne – we meet fortnightly to share extracts from our works in progress and offer each other constructive feedback. I recently wrote a piece for the ALLi blog about how this works and the benefits http://selfpublishingadvice.org/writing-partnerships-critique-groups/


Fiona: Do you see writing as a career?

Yes definitely.


Fiona: If you had to do it all over again, would you change anything in your latest book?

No. I spend a huge amount of time getting a book right, drafting, redrafting, making changes for my editor, getting feedback from a reader panel beforehand. I cut lots out. I fine-tune for ages. By the time the book is published I’m done and want to move on! If I didn’t believe it was good enough I wouldn’t put my name to it. No point in going back.


Fiona: Do you recall how your interest in writing originated?

Lying at night on the bedroom floor when I was a small child in Liverpool, trying to read by the landing light under the bedroom door. Reading fueled my thirst to write. I used to make up stories and worlds to inhabit for my brothers and friends in our games. I sometimes wrote little plays for us to act out.

Fiona: Can you share a little of your current work with us?

My next book is about Gwen, 36, married with a husband away indefinitely on a secret mission related to the war. When we meet her, she is rather repressed, unfulfilled in life and suffering from a bad case of British stiff upper lip. It’s also the story of Jim, 25, a Canadian farmer who joins up when his fiancée dumps him for his younger brother. Jim is disenchanted with life and, along with his fellow Canadians, fed up with being held in reserve, kicking their heels as the British and other commonwealth nations fight without them.

The book is about the way war changes people and impacts their lives. It’s set in what should be a sleepy seaside town but becomes a frontline in the battle with Hitler and subject to one of the heaviest and protracted bombardments outside of London.


Fiona: Is there anything you find particularly challenging in your writing?

I’m a perfectionist – so I have to resist the temptation to keep on editing and re-drafting when I should be getting the rest of the story down first. I’m also a procrastinator – I think most authors are! I was going to write another 1500 words this afternoon but instead I’m answering your questions!


Fiona: Do you have to travel much concerning your book(s)?

It depends on the book. I went back to Australia to do some fact-checking and location-hunting as I was finishing off A Greater World. The idea for Kurinji Flowers came to me during a sleepless night in a hotel room in Kerala, India when I was on holiday. But I made another trip when I was doing the final edits of the book – so I could stay on a tea plantation and walk in the steps of my character Ginny. I always take lots of photographs – and in India I also painted – that’s what Ginny did and I like to paint too (but I’m not as good as her). For Letters from a Patchwork Quilt I had been to St Louis, Missouri before I started writing the book so I used my memory of my visit there, backed up by online research – and I drove up to Middlesbrough to do a recce as I’d never been there. To be honest, I got more out of book research, studying old maps and online research, as most of Victorian Middlesbrough was demolished by developers in the sixties. The setting for The Green Ribbons was a village in Berkshire where I used to own a cottage. And The Chalky Sea is on my doorstep. Maybe my next book needs another exotic location…?


Fiona: Who designed the covers?

Jane Dixon-Smith of JD Smith Designs. She is fabulous to work with. I wanted to ensure we created a family of books with consistent branding. It’s an evolutionary process and I love my covers.


Fiona: What was the hardest part of writing your book?

Writing is a joy. But there are still days when I get distracted by other things – especially social media.


Fiona: Did you learn anything from writing your book and what was it?

IN order to write The Chalky Sea I’ve had to learn so much about Eastbourne and its history. I lived here in my teenage years but knew nothing of the dramatic wartime events that took place here. I’ve also learned a lot about the terrible things people went through during the war, living constantly on the edge of death. My mother was evacuated as a child and liked talking about the war and her memories of the bombings in Liverpool – sadly we kids didn’t like listening… My Dad was a pilot in Coastal Command in the RAF and was trained in Canada – as all the British and commonwealth airmen were. I so wish I were able to ask them both questions now.

Fiona: If any of your books was made into a film who would you like to play the lead

I’ve cast all my books! The Green Ribbons is the most recent but the main characters are very young and I envisage unknowns playing the roles (and getting their big breakthoroughs!). So let’s go for Letters from a Patchwork Quilt – I would have James Norton as Jack, Carey Mulligan as Eliza, Ruth Wilson as Mary Ellen and Gabriel Byrne as Dr Feigenbaum. But then I’d be prepared to reshape any of my characters in order to have Ryan Gosling play one. His choice!


Fiona: Do you have any advice for other writers?

Read as much as you can and as widely as you can – not just within your chosen genre.


Fiona: Do you have anything specific that you want to say to your readers?

Thank you!

What I have to say, I say in my books and I hope you enjoy reading them. And if you do, please spare a minute to leave a review when you’ve finished. It really does make a difference to writers. I also love to hear from readers, so do get in touch. You can contact me on my website or by signing up to my list – and I’ll send you a short story as a thank you. You’ll only hear from me when I have special offers or a new book – unless you write to me – in which case I always reply personally. Readers are the most important people to me.

Fiona: What book are you reading now?

I’m reading four! East of Eden by John Steinbeck for book club; The Secret History of the Blitz and Bravely into Battle as background reading for my next book; and I have Sebastian Barry’s Days Without End as an audiobook to listen when I’m walking, doing the ironing or in the car for a long time.

Fiona: Do you remember the first book you read?

Janet and John. When I was very small my Dad was a teacher and he taught me to read before I started school. I’m pretty sure he used Janet and John.

Fiona: What makes you laugh/cry?

I laugh all the time. Anything can set me off. But OMG I don’t know whether it’s my age but lately I cry ALL THE TIME – watching the news, watching movies, anything sets me off – especially people doing things they have worked hard for – or where they show great attainment like playing an instrument or a sporting performance – I just start blubbing. Yesterday it was watching a video of a flash-mob performing Carmina Burana on a German station concourse. I don’t know what gets into me.

Fiona: Is there one person past or present you would meet and why?

Napoleon Bonaparte. I’ve always found him fascinating. I think he would be great company with loads of stories to tell. If it’s somebody living, probably Michelle Obama – well she can bring Barrack along as well. There’s so much I’d want to ask them both. Oh and David Bowie please.

Fiona: What do you want written on your head stone and why ?

I don’t want a headstone – even though I LOVE graveyards. I use headstones to find character names and I don’t want someone one day stealing mine for their novel!

Fiona: Other than writing do you have any hobbies ?

I paint – water-colours mostly but I’ve started on oils. I’ll be painting in the sunshine (I hope) in March in the Canaries. I also love to quilt – mostly by hand. But I never seem to have enough time for either hobby at the moment as I’m racing to get The Chalky Sea finished. In the evenings I relax with a glass of wine and a box-set or a movie.

Fiona: What TV shows/films do you enjoy watching?

Breaking Bad, Parks and Recreation, all the Scandi noirs, Happy Valley, documentaries. And most evenings I knock off writing at 7pm so I’m in time for Channel 4 News.

Fiona: Favorite foods / Colors/ Music

I’ll eat anything – I love food, but having lived for 3 years in Italy that’s my favourite cuisine. And I’m a cheese addict.

Colour – duck egg blue

Music – very catholic tastes. I grew up with all the influence of Motown and rock music and never ever missed Top of the Pops. I can still remember where I was and what I was wearing when I first heard certain records. I also love classical music and the odd bit of country. I’m still reeling from all the legends who died last year. I don’t often have music playing when I’m writing – particularly if there’s lyrics – too distracting. But it’s still a huge influence.

Fiona: If you were not a writer what else would you like to have done?

I’d like to have been a foreign correspondent (or a rock star)

Fiona: Do you have a blog/website? If so what is it?

http://www.clareflynn.co.uk

www.twitter.com/clarefly

www.facebook.com/authorclareflynn

Authors Amazon page UK https://www.amazon.co.uk/Clare-Flynn/e/B008O4T2LC/ref=dp_byline_cont_pop_ebooks_1

Authors Amazon page  USA  https://www.amazon.com/Clare-Flynn/e/B008O4T2LC/ref=sr_tc_2_0?qid=1484426219&sr=1-2-ent

 

A Greater World http://mybook.to/agreaterworl

Kurinji Flowers http://mybook.to/kurinjiflowers

Letters from a Patchwork Quilt http://mybook.to/patchwork

The Green Ribbons http://mybook.to/greenribbons

Clare

 

Here is my interview with Sarah Jane Butfield

Name Sarah Jane Butfield

Age 51

A little about yourself `ie your education Family life etc  

I am originally from rural Suffolk in East Anglia, UK. I was born in Ipswich, but we lived in small village called Stonham Aspal where I also attended primary school. We later moved back to Ipswich when I was in college studying my pre-nursing course. My nursing years were spent in Colchester, Essex and Liskeard in Cornwall. Later we lived in Australia and then France. I am a bit of a gypsy! After 28 years as a Registered General Nurse working in a variety of healthcare establishments, I am now a full time author and freelance writer which makes me very happy and pays the bills. I am also a mentor to debut and aspiring authors at Rukia Publishing where we provide a range of free services to help authors navigate the world of independent author book promotion and marketing. I am married, third time lucky! With 4 children and 3 step children, all grown up and spreading their wings into the big wide world, but always finding time to Skype or visit mum! I am also now a grandmother to two boys with a baby grand daughter expected in February, which is a wonderful feeling and I am truly blessed.

 

 

 

Fiona: Tell us your latest news?

I have a new book currently on pre-order called, ‘Bedpans to Boardrooms.’ It is Book 2 in The Nomadic Nurse Series which documents my 28 year nursing career in a variety of health care settings in both the UK and Australia. Book 2 is set in aged care where, as a newly qualified nurse and new mum, I struggle to keep my personal and professional life on track.

 

 
Fiona: When and why did you begin writing?

I truly was The Accidental Author even though I always harboured the idea of writing a romance novel. My debut memoir Glass Half Full was originally written from my journals after the Brisbane floods in 2011 as a cathartic exercise to try and come to terms with the loss of our home, belongings and the roots to our Australian dream life.

 

 
Fiona: When did you first consider yourself a writer?

I don’t think I really considered myself as a writer until I started to be invited to join writer and author groups and when I was invited to take part in my first book signing. to know that people are reading and have opinions on your writing is a humbling experience but to be able to meet them and talk about issues I have written about and how other people relate to them is quite a surreal experience.

 

 
Fiona: What inspired you to write your first book?

The first book in my travel memoirs series was inspired by my journals which I kept during our time in Australia and more importantly during the period of shock and adjustment after finding out that our newly renovated home had been totally submerged during the Brisbane floods.

 

 
Fiona: Do you have a specific writing style?

I don’t know that I have a specific style although my books have been compared to Driving Over Lemons by Chris Stewart, so if you like his style you may like mine!

 

 
Fiona: How did you come up with the title?

The title if my first book Glass Half Full totally depicts the approach myself and my family take towards life and the challenges that it throws at us.

 

 
Fiona: Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?

All of my travel memoirs have an inspirational them, to motivate reader to believe that whatever obstacles occur in life there is always a way through and there is always something better waiting ahead.

 

 
Fiona: How much of the book is realistic and are experiences based on someone you know, or events in your own life?

All of my books are true stories.

 

 
Fiona: What books have most influenced your life most? a mentor?

I have been an avid reader all of my adult life. I think I have been heavily influenced by my self published peers who have not only motivated me, but who have helped me to learn so much on my writing career to date.

 

 

Fiona: Are there any new authors that have grasped your interest and who  is your favorite author and what is it that really strikes you about their work?

There are a number of new authors coming through the free services that we provide at Rukia Publishing in a variety of genres and I feel privileged to have had the opportunity to read their books ahead of everyone else. Authors that come to mind are Randy Williams author of Sherlock Holmes And The Autumn Of Terror and Margaret Daly author of Dusgadh.

 

 
Fiona: Name one entity that you feel supported you outside of family members.

The Rukia Publishing social media team is a support that any author would be proud to work with and alongside.

 

 
Fiona: Do you see writing as a career?

I do now, but I think the word career is not really the best description for the work of a writer or author. It is and has to be a vocation as it is totally absorbing.

 

 
Fiona: If you had to do it all over again, would you change anything in your latest book?

I actually enjoy revisiting my books to improve and enhance them with images, quotes and more editing.

 

 

 

Fiona: Can you share a little of your current work with us?

Here is the background to Bedpans to Boardrooms

It’s the late 1980s and a newly qualified staff nurse is now taking on dual roles as she becomes a first-time mum. This additional role necessitated a rethink and some serious adjustments to her intended career pathway to enable her to juggle the roles of a nurse, wife and new mum. The mortgage rates were high so the option of being a full-time stay at home mum were out of the question and in all honesty, it was not what she really wanted.

The events that follow will see Sarah Jane unexpectedly enter the aged care sector starting as a staff nurse at a private nursing and residential care facility, funded by a charitable organisation, in Colchester, Essex. Sarah Jane had trained to become a Registered General Nurse in Colchester and was familiar with the nursing home and its reputation, yet despite this familiarity with the home and her local area, this new position immediately posed challenges as she moved from the relative safety of NHS hospital wards, supported by her peers and more experienced Staff Nurses, Ward Sisters and Matrons, to a role with greater professional independence and responsibility.

 

Here is an excerpt:

 

I awoke with a warm, damp sensation under my bottom and lower back. Thinking that I had wet the bed due my deep, drug induced sleep, I knew I needed to get up and deal with this situation. I looked at the white-faced clock on the wall in front of me and saw that it was only 2.20 am. As I moved, intending to head off to the bathroom to sort out my embarrassing accident, I suddenly felt a pressure on my inner thigh. I threw back the sheets, looked and screamed.

Carol, a buxom, African nurse ran in and also started screaming. Suddenly from behind her came a loud, assertive instruction. “Keep still Sarah! Carol, get the wheelchair; Donna call the labour suite and tell them we are on the way. Tell them to page the on-call anaesthetist and his team.”

Carol pulled the wheelchair close to edge of the bed. I was crying, fearing the worst for my baby, whose head I could now feel properly between my legs.

“Now let’s get you to the labour ward.” Carol spluttered, obviously still trying to regain her own composure after her initial outburst as she gently manoeuvred my legs to the side of the bed.

“Is the baby ok?”

“Everything is just swell, now come on with you.”

“I can’t sit in the chair!” I shouted.

“Yes, you can, I will position you, don’t worry.” Worry was not the word I would have used to describe my feelings at that moment. Hysteria would probably be more appropriate. As Carol and the ward sister pulled me to a standing position a student midwife, who had been watching this debacle from the doorway, suddenly lurched forwards. I don’t know exactly what happened in that split second, but I felt a tugging sensation as she grabbed the bed sheet and it disappeared from its role of covering my dignity. The next thing I knew she was sprawled beneath me. I felt as if my intestines had dropped from my body as a large squelch echoed and Carol screamed again.

The screaming was immediately replaced with a shout of, “I’ve got it!” From the student midwife.

“Bloody hell!” Donna shouted, as she rushed back from making the telephone calls, “You’ve had your baby, Sarah.”

I felt faint, my legs wobbled and a hot sweat came over me. They pushed me backwards onto the bed and I think I must have passed out for a minute or two because as my eyes opened, despite the room spinning I could hear Carol saying, “That’s it, placenta is out and intact.” I was shaking uncontrollably as they cut the cord and started rolling me from side to side to change the blood and amniotic fluid soaked bedding.

The next half an hour found me in the undignified position which involved me laying with my legs up in stirrups whilst the ward sister and the student midwife inspected and sutured various parts of my perineum which had been torn in the process of my baby making its unannounced, sudden, premature entry into the world with no labour pains or preparation.

Turning towards Carol I hardly dared to ask, “Is it alive?” No answer.

 

 
Fiona: Do you have to travel much concerning your book(s)?

I do not travel specifically to write, but my travel memoir series does document our experiences as an expat family in Australia and France.

 

 
Fiona: Who designed the covers?

Since my debut offering with a cover I created in Picasa using a photograph from our time in Australia with overlaid text, I have updated and improved my covers with the help of Amalgada Design, Tabatha Stirling and The Black Rose, photographer.

 

 

 

Fiona: What was the hardest part of writing your book?

Knowing how much to keep in without offending family and friends, but without cheating the readers out of the whole, true story.

 

 

 

Fiona: If any of your books were made into a film who would you like to play the lead

If my books were made into a film or television series I would love to be played by

Helen Baxendale

 

 
Fiona: Do you have any advice for other writers?

The best advice I have for debut authors is – ‘get your author platform in position before you publish. If I had known this I could have saved myself over 6 months of hard work. For more on this feel free to download a free copy of The Accidental Author available at all good online bookstores books2read.com/AccidentalAuthor

 

 
Fiona: Do you have anything specific that you want to say to your readers?

Read everyday and thank the authors of the books you enjoy with a review.

 

 

 

Fiona: What book are you reading now?

I am reading the paperback, ‘The Darzoids’ Stone’ by Richard Smith, which is awesome and is a highly recommended young adult fiction book.

 

 

 

Fiona: Do you remember the first book you read?

The first books I remember reading my childhood were the Peter and Jane Ladybird series, that went up in numerical order.  However, as a child choosing my own reading books it has to be Enid Blyton Famous Five series of adventures.

 

 

Fiona: What makes you laugh/cry?

I love watching romantic comedy movies for a good light hearted laugh, but in our family life my children and my oldest grandson make me smile everyday. Our two dogs also make me smile with their unconditional love and antics.

 

 

Fiona: Is there one person past or present you would meet and why?

I would love to meet Robert De Niro, who is my absolute favourite movie star hero. He must have so many fascinating stories to tell from his movie making career that I am sure I could listen and talk to him for hours.

 

 

 

Fiona: What do you want written on your head stone and why ?

“She said she would and she did!” Because you have to have goals and dreams and you owe it to yourself to chase and achieve them, after all you live once!

 

 

 

Fiona: Other than writing do you have any hobbies ?

I enjoy family time with my children and grandchildren. We enjoy camping, walking and travel. In my own quiet time I enjoy cross-stitch and knitting.

 

 

 

Fiona: What TV shows/films do you enjoy watching?

I enjoy watching psychological thrillers or dramas as I like to try and work out what has happened before it plays out

 

 

 

Fiona: Favorite foods / Colors/ Music

My favourite food is anything spicy. I love Indian, Thai and Chinese food especially when eaten from street food vendors in the native countries.

My favorite colour is purple and I enjoy indie and pop music. i am a huge Maroon 5 and Robbie Williams fan.

 

 

Fiona: If you were not a writer what else would you like to have done?

As I have been a nurse for 28 years before becoming a writer I think if I now had to choose something else to pursue it would be furniture upcycling and restoration.

 

 

 

Fiona: Do you have a blog/website? If so what is it?

You can find detail on all of my books and the work I do for other authors on my websites below.

Author websites

www.sarahjanebutfield.com

http://sarahjanebutfield.wix.com/sarahjanebutfield

Blogshttp://sarahjanebutfield.wix.com/sarahjanebutfield

http://sarahjanebutfield-glass-half-full.blogspot.co.uk/

http://www.rukiapublishing.com/sarah-janes-bloghttp://sarahjanebutfield-glass-half-full.blogspot.co.uk/

 

Twitter @SarahJanewrites

Facebook:

www.facebook.com/AuthorSarahJaneButfield

www.facebook.com/Twodogsandasuitcase

www.facebook.com/OurFrugalSummerinCharente

www.facebook.com/Ooh-Matron-1646665865549530/timeline/

 

Support and networking for authors provided by Sarah Jane & the #RPBP Social Media Team:

http://www.rukiapublishing.com/

https://www.facebook.com/RukiaPublishing

https://www.facebook.com/promotingauthors

 

Sarah Jane, the roving Florence Nightingale, has had a successful career as a nurse and used her nursing and later teaching qualifications to take her around the world. She is now the successful author of a travel memoir series set in Australia and France. In addition, she recently released the first two books in a series of self-help literature for aspiring and debut self-published authors: The Accidental Author, The Amateur Authorpreneur and The Intermediate Authorpreneur.  Ooh Matron! Which was release on 14th September 2015 is the multi-award-winning book one in The Nomadic Nurse Series and is a highly popular read at all good bookstores.

Glass Half Full: Our Australian Adventure, her debut travel memoir, and the award-winning sequel Two Dogs and a Suitcase: Clueless in Charente, are regularly found high in the Amazon rankings in categories including; Parenting, Grief, Christian faith, Step-parenting, Travel and France. Her culinary memoir, Our Frugal Summer in Charente was recently voted as one of the ‘Top 50 self-published books worth reading in 2015’.

 

Author Sarah Jane Butfield was born in Ipswich and raised in rural Suffolk, UK. Sarah Jane is a wife, mother, ex-qualified nurse and now an international best-selling author. Married three times with four children, three stepchildren and two playful Australian Cattle dogs she an experienced modern day mum to her ‘Brady bunch’, but she loves every minute of their convoluted lives.

 

Here is my interview with P.I. Barrington

Name:  P.I. Barrington

Age: 59

Where are you from: Southern California

A little about your self `ie your education Family life etc:

Growing up in LA you are pretty much required to work in the entertainment industry, lol! That’s everything from performing to holding the lights in place. So, of course I did too. My goal was to meet Paul McCartney and I did that so there wasn’t much left to accomplish. I worked in radio, music industry, film and TV and a tiny bit of journalism. But I think I should have been writing all along.

 

 

Fiona: Tell us your latest news?

I recently moved across the country to the South, specifically Tennessee! It’s been really an upheaval since we’ve never lived anywhere else but California and in fact, we lived in our last house 42 years! It gets swampy here in the summer. The worst thing here is trying to get used to the time difference. I never have any idea what time it is so I sleep and wake up at strange times, lol!

 

 

Fiona: When and why did you begin writing?

I’ve always written I just never took it seriously. Finally, for some strange reason I decided to see if I could actually write fiction since all of my writing was news. I lurked on some writing groups online and one day I saw a submission call for a new publisher and submitted. One thing led to another and I ended up with a three-book contract. That’s when I started to take it seriously as an actual career. Plus, as I said, I worked in entertainment, so when I’m writing, I’m seeing that movie playing in my head.  Why I began writing is simply that I want to entertain people. Take them on a ride to somewhere they’ve never been or never really thought about going.  I’m not trying to change the world; I’m just trying to make it a little bit more bearable, a lot more fun…for a while anyway.

 

 
Fiona: When did you first consider yourself a writer?

You know, I think I secretly always was a writer deep down. I wouldn’t admit it and that twisted things around and wasted a lot of time and effort on my part. If I hadn’t been so stubborn, I’d have already been doing it.

 

 
Fiona: What inspired you to write your first book?

The Editor/Publisher wanted me to write a sort of dystopian futuristic romance which ended up being a futuristic crime thriller/romance set in Las Vegas (my “second” home). It was a trilogy. It was my first ever attempt at writing an entire book, let alone a trilogy. I think I managed it well…I hope.

 

 
Fiona: Do you have a specific writing style?

I do I think. It’s a bit gritty and edgy with a lot of swearing but not very erotic usually. It’s what I call “dark”. Which doesn’t mean it’s horror or gore or too graphic. It means that the stories and/or characters’ back stories aren’t always happy or don’t have an HEA (Happily Ever After) ending. It’s also very concise. I don’t waste words if I can write tight and fast; that’s a leftover from my journalism days. If I can use one word that gets an emotion across I don’t need to use 12 words. I only write two points of view: Third Person Omniscient (i.e. “He/She/they ran down the hall” (Third Person) and First Person (“I ran down the hall”) It’s easier to write FP but I think that TPO is faster and bigger since you see all the characters’ points of view, motivations, reactions, plans/plots and you can control the speed with which things happen.

 

 
Fiona: How did you come up with the title?

For my first trilogy, the Editor suggested “Future Imperfect” which I thought was great, but for each individual book, I pulled out each major plot point from the book (Crucifying Angel, Miraculous Deception, Final Deceit). For The Brede Chronicles, I knew I had the title once I had the character name. This is Book One and I’m working on Book Two even as I answer this! Also Brede is with another publisher so I was kind of alone on the title which is good in some ways and not so good in other ways. I have to tell you this; it’s one of my favorite lines from some fiction book that I don’t even remember: one character asks another if something is a good or bad thing. The other characters says “It’s like being ten feet tall—good for some things, bad for others” That line just cracks me up because it’s right on the mark without being insulting! That’s exactly what I mean about Brede’s title, lol.

 

 
Fiona: Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?

No. Seriously, no. I’m not trying to change the world or standing on some soapbox with my writing. I’m just trying to show my readers a good time. If there was any message, it would be that good always wins out but that doesn’t mean it will always be perfect afterward. It just means that the ending is an ending but not a final end. There’s always a story to follow after the end. Kind of like life itself, you know, “it ain’t over ‘til it’s over” if you’ve ever heard that phrase. (It probably originated in Hollywood.)

 

 
Fiona: How much of the book is realistic and are experiences based on someone you know, or events in your own life?

Well…since I write what I call “Near Future” books (NEVER more than 100 years in the future) the technology changes & we have contact with aliens who are close to us in physiology, few real events in mine or others’ experiences are common. However, my brother in law is the Chief of Police in the next town over, and a lot of the new police technology I ask him about and am always amazed at some of the necessary advancements there are plus any I can think up myself. For example, I can’t fly an interstellar ship but my characters can. We do have a space station and can change crews or take up supplies when needed, but I can’t since I’m not trained for that and only a few actually are. But there’s no alien tentacle sex—that’s too far out for even me to relate to and my readers as well. I try to think how I would act in those situations and give them to my characters. I always tell people that my characters are much braver than me and that they do things I’d never do.

 

 
Fiona: What books have most influenced your life most? Any mentor?

As a little kid, somehow I got hold of a book of Shakespeare for children and I read MacBeth which set the stage for my entire writing phenomena and themes.  That guilt, that greed and trying to twist something right into something wrong and being destroyed by it is always a major theme for me.  All of it gives my characters motives, actions, emotions—everything humans deal with everyday. After that, Mary Stewart’s Merlin series was a huge influence, Ray Bradbury, and Colleen McCullough who I adored with her Masters of Rome series and…finally…the king of them all…Stephen King. I read Carrie when it first released and that was it. I was hooked on him for life!

 

 

Fiona: Are there any new authors that have grasped your interest and who is your favorite author and what is it that really strikes you about their work?

I usually don’t review books  because I’m always in the process of writing but there is an author out there named Shauna Roberts who writes ancient historical romance and who I requested to be sent her book to review.  Unfortunately I suffered a cardiac arrest in early 2015, was in a coma 12 days and then in rehab. She probably thinks I didn’t like her book Claimed by the Enemy but it’s right up my alley of reading genre. She has a great feel to her books and I love anyone who can correctly use the name Sargon correctly and in a story! So, here’s a shout out to Shauna Roberts!!

 

 
Fiona: Name one entity that you feel supported you outside of family members. Several I think: two in music and at least one in journalism. One was a friend of my mother; one was a neighbor, and a college professor in journalism. They believed in me ferociously.

 

 
Fiona: Do you see writing as a career?

I do now. I used to think, “Oh, it’s stupid. It’s silly. Besides what chance do I have with any of the big 5 publishers?” Since publishing has become accessible to everyone via Amazon and others such as B&N, there are a lot more opportunities out there for writers and more choices as well.

 

 
Fiona: If you had to do it all over again, would you change anything in your latest book?

No, not really. There’s a lot of back story between Alekzander Brede and Elektra Tate so hopefully a reader will be captivated with them and their story. It was a labor of love for me, so I put a lot into it before I submitted it. Luckily, First Realm (Publishing) liked it and contracted it.

 

 
Fiona: Do you recall how your interest in writing originated?

It was truly just reading so much that I just sort of absorbed styles, themes, how scenes are constructed, how pacing should work or could work stuff like that. Oh, and then (like very many authors) there was that district wide story contest as a little third grader that…yes, you guessed it—I won. I think that was when I knew consciously that I could write but would definitely do it sometime in the distant future—which is now.

 

 

Fiona: Can you share a little of your current work with us?

He had every right to kill her if he needed or wanted. Once more he pounded and kicked her door and when she did not respond he shot the keypad making the door slide open as far as its now bent frame allowed it. She stood waiting for him. Elektra pointed a gun at him, arms straight forward in shooting position.

“Why can’t you leave us alone Alekzander?” she asked, voice shaky. “All I want is to raise my boy and make him feel safe and happy.”

“He’s my son too Elektra. I want him.”

“I can’t do that Alekzander.”

“I want him.”

“Please Alekzander I don’t want to do this. Please just leave us alone,”

“I want my son.”

“Don’t make me do this please.”

“You think you can?”

“Alekzander please.”

“Do you think you can—what—wound me and run away again Elektra—?”

“Alekzander,” she broke into his sentence. “I can’t wound you and leave it at that. You once told me that you learned to kill at ten and then learned not to regret it the next year. But I never told you, I’ve been a crack shot since I was three. I won’t miss.” She openly cried now but never lowered the weapon.

Brede looked at the floor and snorted out a small sarcastic laugh. He shook his head.

“So none of those shots were lucky?”

He didn’t give her a chance to answer but moved forward and twisted back her real hand, the right one until she dropped the weapon with a cry.

Brede laughed.

“Did you really think you could take me down Elektra?”

“Stop hurting my Mommy!”

Brede looked down at himself in shock. The blast went through his back and exited through his chest, tearing a large hole. He staggered back a little and looked at the boy and then at Elektra who backed away from him just in time to miss being hit herself. Her face, spattered with his blood, paled beneath it.

“You taught him to shoot his father?” He asked astonished.

“No! No I didn’t Alekzander! I taught him to shoot in self-defense if I couldn’t be there to protect him, that’s all! I never thought he might—” She turned to the child. “Give me the gun Zander,” She held out a palm.

“But he was hurting you Mommy. He always hurts you. He always makes you cry.”

“I know honey and you were very brave to try to help me but you made a mistake.”

“But—”

“I know baby. Give me the gun and you go back upstairs. Mommy will come up after a while.”

“But—”

“Zander! Do what your mother says!”

Both of them stared at Brede. Whether it was the tone, a deep growl, or that the boy somehow recognized the voice of his father, he ran up the stairs, two at a time, the gun on the floor where he laid it.

“Do you see now Elektra? He needs a disciplinarian, not a coddler.” He grimaced at her from the floor and wall that he now slumped against. “Now, you’re going to fix me up.”

“I don’t know how.”

“Doesn’t matter, you’re going to do exactly as I tell you. And don’t think you can kill me through this. You won’t.”

“Alekzander, I didn’t want to hurt you I told you that. I never thought he’d think to use it on you—”

“Yeah, that’s great. Now shut the fuck up and listen to me. Do you have a cauterizing tool?”

“Yes but that’s only for—”

“Go and get it.”

She started to respond but then thought better. She stood up and ransacked the shelves on her walls seeking the little torch. She tossed whatever she found over her shoulder and behind her and when she found it Elektra spun around and held it out to him. He grunted and slid almost flat on the floor.

“I’m not going to use it you are.”

“But Alekzander—”

“Listen to me.” He grasped the collar of his shirt and ripped it in half, exposing the deep wound. “You are going to power up that thing. Then you are going to reach into this hole, grab the edges of my torn rear aorta and then squeeze them together. When they touch you are going to run that tool along the edges and cauterize them shut—seal them. Do you understand Elektra?”

She nodded once again unable to speak. He could see the white around her irises. She was afraid again, a good thing for once. He grunted.

“Do it now.”

“But—”

“Do it now.”

She reached inside him with shaking hands and he watched her breath unevenly as she followed his instructions. Amazingly he did not scream.

“Is it done?”

“Ye—yes,”

“Alright, I’ll live. Now do the same thing with the frontal aorta and until the skin is the last thing you solder together, got it?”

She pressed her lips to squelch another sob and nodded.

“Do it.” He inhaled with pain and then looked at her. “Now,”

To Elektra’s credit she managed to do it competently and with little unnecessary pain to him.

“Leave me,” he said. “Go check on the boy.”

She nodded again and entered the lift after wiping his dark indigo blood from her hands on her skirt. He watched her thinking the small apartment primitive and probably all she could afford though it was relatively safe and hidden from most of Amphidia and somehow she’d managed to keep them both alive in the planet’s violent existence. At last she’d done something right. By the time she returned Brede stood at the half-open door, its power source constantly buzzing in frustration unable to open or close completely. Already his body was healing; his alien half took care of that. Zander’s shot nicked the rear heart but tore through the frontal one. Luckily the rear cardiac system was the crucial one. He looked at her.

“He’s sleeping as if nothing happened.” She shrugged, surprised. “I’ve never seen him do that before. He gets upset so easily,”

“I told you he needs discipline Elektra.”

“He’s only a little boy—” She stopped and shook her head. “I’m tired Alekzander. I don’t want to fight now. I’m just so tired…”

“I’m going. But know that I will be back, Elektra.” He turned toward the door.

“Alekzander.”

He turned only his head looking over his shoulder but not at her.

“Look, I know you still hurt and well, as always this is my fault, but if you want, you know, you can sleep here on the sofa tonight,” she waved a hand at what looked more like a bed than a couch. “You know…if you want. I mean, if you think it will help with…the pain and everything.”

He turned fully around.

“You won’t let my son kill me this time?”

“Don’t be funny. I’m trying to be nice—I just want a—a truce for tonight, okay?”

She turned toward the kitchen space, letting him make his own decision. She bent to pick up some toy of Zander’s and her hair fell half way out of the clip she’d swept it up with. Ignoring it she tossed the toy over the Permaglass partition, their son’s obvious play corner and he stood behind her, brushing a stray strand from her neck. Elektra stopped moving and he watched a shiver run down her back. Brede ran a finger along her shoulder.

“You know, the last time we actually spoke civilly to one another, you confessed that you only stowed on the Scythe was to ‘get close enough to have an outside chance with me,'” He said quietly.

“That was a long time ago Alekzander.”

“Not that long.”

“You didn’t want me you wanted Narita. I was just a convenient substitute.”

“Not this time. You’d have more than an outside chance.”

“Look what happened last time Alekzander. He’s sleeping upstairs.”

He kissed her neck and she shivered again but still did not move.

“If—if I do this, will you leave us alone?”

He twisted her head around to face him.

“This is not about custody.”

He twisted her face farther and kissed her. She responded greedily, surprising him and they tumbled down on the couch. Brede’s eyes were closed when the secreting began. As he licked her body, anywhere his tongue touched her the sweet, granular gel called Sugar by humans and Amphidians alike, spread over her making her moan and arch toward him. In Amphidians it was a sign of great emotion; an automatic response uncontrolled and unbidden and once begun unable to stop until their bodies pulled apart in satiation. Sugar served other purposes as well; to enhance the human pleasure and to prime her body for pregnancy. It happened once before when she’d stowed away on the Scythe. After they were through Brede laid on his back thinking. At the time he didn’t realize it was happening or didn’t want to realize it. It never occurred with Narita, not once, even during the most intense sex. The Sugar caused Elektra to conceive Zander but Brede put it down to his general fury at her, especially when she’d hitched a ride with the express intention of sleeping with him. The anger was the reason it happened at all. He’d never been that angry with Narita until he killed her and then it was cold anger, no real emotion at all. The Sugar was also responsible that the sex with Elektra burned into his brain and body never wiped away or forgotten.

This time it wasn’t for quick intense release and when they finally finished with each other, Elektra lay in deep sleep with her back to him, hair askew and soaked with sweat. He watched her, moving her hair from her eyes and then put an arm around her, against her breasts, and his leg over a thigh enjoying the feel of her flesh. Her hair, grown out and long, was no longer cut short and childish and her face less thin and angular; living off the streets made her healthier. Her body was not long and thin and boyish now, but softly rounded no doubt from giving birth to their son.

“Mommy?” Zander stood at the open lift door, eyes wide with fear. “Mommy!” He rushed toward them and stuck his face into Elektra’s. When he was sure she was breathing he stared hard at Brede. “Did you hurt my mommy again?”

Brede shook his head in the negative and held a finger against his lips. “She’s sleeping,” he mouthed at the boy. Zander promptly climbed on the ‘bed’ and sat at their feet.

“Who are you and why do you make my mommy cry?” the boy asked in a mix of curiosity and hostility.

“I am your father Zander.”

“But why do you make her cry if you’re my father?”

Brede thought for a moment.

“Because I am a man…and something else,” he said finally. “As you will be a man.”

“When I am a man I won’t make my mommy cry.”

“You will Zander.”

“I won’t ever! I’m not like you! I’m not mean.”

“You are like me regardless you like it or not. And one day you will find that you have another side, like me, that is different from a man. A side that likes to hurt just because he can do it.” Brede stared into the boy’s eyes, identical to his own, until recognition dawned in them and the child looked away.

“But you still need to learn to be a man Zander.”

A small tapping sounded on the frame of the twisted, half-open door and Zander leapt off the bed and ran to it. Two children, Amphidian, asked the boy if he could play with them. Zander spun and ran back to Elektra’s face.

“Mommy, can I go outside and play?” He worked a finger between her eyelids. “Mommy is it alright?”

Elektra grunted, pulled his finger out of her eye and then opened them both. She sat up a little.

“No Zander. I’ve told you before that it’s not sa—”

“Let him play Elektra.”

“No! It isn’t safe. He’s only four—”

“And he needs to learn how to deal with things—with people.”

“But—”

“No. He needs to learn to be a man. There isn’t any better place to learn it. Let him go.” He looked at his son. “Go on Zander.”

The child spun and ran outside, laughing and talking non-stop in Amphidian with his newly allowed friends.

“Besides, I don’t believe that we are quite through here,” Brede grasped a handful of her pale hair. She struggled against his hold.

“Are you trying to condition me that every time I let you countermand me I get some sexual thrill from it?” Elektra snapped.

“Hm, hadn’t thought of that but it’s damned a good idea.” He snickered and pulled her face toward him again. “And where the hell did you learn the word ‘countermand’?”

“Shut—”

“Up.” He finished for her.

****

“Alekzander, I can’t do this. I can’t be the other woman.” Elektra shifted on the bed and lay on her back. She stared at the ceiling and Brede readjusted his arm to continue pressing it against her breasts.

“You won’t.”

“Yes. Look I’ve tried to be—mature about everything but…I tried to get you out of the pyramid when they activated the tracking device in my palm. It started blinking off and on red and I knew they were trying to find you again. I couldn’t let that happen. I tried to cut it out of me, to dislodge it but I couldn’t. That was when I got back into the pyramid and told you to leave with Narita. I told you I’m a crack shot. When they came in after you, I had an old ball detonator full of processed napalm. I tossed it to them and out of reflex one caught it but as he did I shot the ball in the direct

center. The firestorm rolled over them and exploded detonating away from me. It did throw me out of the pyramid and how I landed without losing Zander I don’t know. I didn’t even know I was pregnant, that’s probably why.”

“I saw the firestorm from the ozone,” Brede told her. “I figured nothing was left of the building or half the city.”

“Why did you come back to look for me if you thought I was dead?”

“I had a…revelation of sorts.”

She gave him a curious frown.

“I heard something that changed my plans.”

“What about Narita? Does she know you’re here with me—or looking for me?”

“Narita doesn’t matter anymore.”

“Don’t lie to me Alekzander.”

“I’m not lying.”

“I have a right to know if she’s going to come after me with murder in mind,” Elektra said.

“It’s not something you have to worry about anymore.”

Elektra sat up completely.

“Where is she?”

“I took care of it.”

“Took care of what?” Elektra stared at him eyes wide.

“Took care of it—of her.”

Her eyes widened.

“You killed her?”

“Yes.”

“Why?”

“Because she needed it, that’s why.”

“Alekzander, you were her sworn consort! Why would you possibly do that?”

“I told you. I learned something that changed my mind.”

Elektra looked away.

“Will you kill me too if I don’t give you what you want?”

“I doubt it.”

“But you might. I know you Alekzander. If you want something badly enough, killing someone to get it isn’t beyond you.”

Brede laughed.

“I could have killed you at any time Elektra. I haven’t so far.”

“Only because you don’t want Zander to see you do it,” she looked away again.

“He’d get over it.”

Her head whipped back around.

“You’re hateful. I don’t know why—”

“He’s more like me than you know Elektra. He has more sides than one—and one that you don’t and shouldn’t know about.”

“I’d never let him grow up like you—”

“You have no choice in the matter. And neither does he,” Brede sat up and grabbed her shoulders. He twisted her to face him. “I want him. He needs me more than he needs you.”

“No he doesn’t—”

“Elektra,” it was a statement. “This isn’t open for discussion.”

“I—”

Don’t—“ He licked his lips. “Make things harder than they need to be, Elektra. Especially for yourself.”

She glared at him.

“You really will kill me won’t you, you bastard!”

Brede said nothing. There was nothing he could say. He merely stared back at her.

“Oh! I don’t know how I could ever think that you were someone or something I wanted! I hate you! You hold all the fucking cards here Alekzander and you think that makes everything you do all right. If you take him Alekzander I swear that I will hunt you down until my last breath. I will destroy you.”

“No you won’t.”

“Oh!” Elektra slapped him. He caught her arm and held it.

“Don’t ever raise your hand to me again woman.”

She grasped his hand with her mechanical left one and tried furiously to twist herself out of his grip. Although surprised by the power of her left arm, Brede simply held her until she exhausted herself.

“I mean it Elektra. Don’t ever do that again.”

She made one last weak attempt to wrest her arm out of his hand.

“You are not my master Alekzander. No matter who I am I still have rights.”

“I care nothing for rights Elektra—yours or anyone else’s. Not even Narita’s,” He smiled at the memory of her body floating aimlessly in space. “The only rights I care about are mine. And I have the right to my son.”

Elektra began to weep, hands covering her face.

“I can’t fight you Alekzander,” she told him between sobs. “I have nothing—no right to him whatsoever. Why do you have to take him? Why are you being so cruel?”

“Because I can.”

She wept harder for a long moment and then wiped the tear streaks from her face.

“If you take him, I’ll never see him again.”

Brede paused. Her response crept up his neck like a dark prophecy and he secretly shrugged it off.

“He’ll get over that too.”

If she wanted to strike him again she managed to control the urge. He watched her face tighten and her jaw set. His Elektra Tate was gone; the little girl pestering him for attention, taking all the cruelty for just a moment of his time had disappeared for the time being; perhaps for all time and Brede wondered for a moment if she could ever come back. He also found himself wondering why he wondered at all.

 

 
Fiona: Is there anything you find particularly challenging in your writing?

I think maybe the most challenging thing is the amount of time it takes writing and marketing a book. Marketing, whether you have a publisher or self-publish, is probably the bane of the writer.  Writing can take a while, depending on your story and how you express it, but marketing is a killer.

 

 
Fiona: Do you have to travel much concerning your book(s)?

I travel in any case, but a lot of the time for my first novel, Crucifying Angel, had already been spent in Las Vegas. I could write about Vegas in my sleep!  I have another book that I wrote after I’d first visited Britain.  I returned to Britain in 2102 and found Salisbury Cathedral and its center area the quad was almost identical to what I’d written!

 

 
Fiona: Who designed the covers?

First Realm Publishing used a cover artist named Jared from Off The Wall Productions. I adore the cover art for Brede.  It’s like he got inside my head and pulled my ideas out.

 

 
Fiona: What was the hardest part of writing your book?

Knowing when to stop putting in back story. There was a huge amount in the first book because I was trying to establish characters and their relationships within the text/setting of dystopian Egypt. I’d get lost in it a lot of times.

 

 
Fiona: Did you learn anything from writing your book and what was it?

Yes! Relating to the answer above, I found out that using a lot of back story can actually work well and be enjoyable to write! Like I said, I would get lost in writing it, lol!

 

 

 

Fiona: If any of your books was made into a film who would you like to play the lead:

I gotta tell ya here that I always cast my characters as soon as I have a name for them. It’s funny but this book’s characters came about after I’d finally watched the film Pitch Black. I was watching Radha Mitchell and I kept thinking “who is this character (of mine) that I’m seeing?” I thought about it after watching it again and suddenly the light came on in my head: Elektra Tate!! Vin Diesel would be great for Alekzander Brede, but I worry that Brede is too much of an anti-anti-hero for him. I loved their combination and chemistry in PB though the characters’ personalities are different than the movie. But as I said, my characters are cast almost immediately.

 

 

 

Fiona: Do you have any advice for other writers?

I always tell them this: Be your own harshest critic, that way someone else won’t have to be. Be hard on yourself, make sure you’re not being indulgent with your writing or thinking that whatever you write is perfect simply because you wrote it. Writers—good writers can always learn something about writing even when they think they can’t.

 

 
Fiona: Do you have anything specific that you want to say to your readers?

I love you and I want to take you on an adventure! I want you to go somewhere you’ve never been before and I want you to love the characters that take you and guide you on that adventure! I love them and I hope you will too!

 

 

Fiona: What book are you reading now?

Nothing! I’m trying to make a deadline for Book Two for my publisher so I can’t really read anything!

 

 

Fiona: Do you remember the first book you read?

Well, it was one of these three: Black Beauty by Anna Sewell, Misty of Chincoteague by Marguerite Henry or Shakespeare for children (Scholastic Books I think) “MacBeth”.  I have this feeling that it was Black Beauty.

 

 

 

Fiona: What makes you laugh/cry?

Most of the time what I laugh at is well written sitcoms or movies. Some lines from Seinfeld still make me scream with laughter. I also LOVE comedy films. Scary Movie 1-4 cracks me up still, the Naked Gun series (“It’s the bomb!”) and some of the old black and white films like “Coconuts” by the Marx Brothers or “Murder He Said”  Comedy is the best thing ever we’ve accomplished as human beings!   What makes me cry?  Abuse of animals has to be the worst. It gets me every time. Any animals—snakes, lions, dogs, cats, all of them. It’s in their eyes.

 

 

 

Fiona: Is there one person pass or present you would meet and why?

Anybody from Ancient Egypt—peasant, scribe or Pharaoh, I don’t care—I just want to meet someone from that time (AND be able to talk to them)

 

 

 

Fiona: What do you want written on your head stone and why?

She made us laugh!

 

 

Fiona: Other than writing do you have any hobbies?

Gardening, creating art, travel is a biggie, though I am terrified of flying. It got so bad my doctor finally gave me a prescription and said “take it before you take off,” So now I have to take it or I literally can’t fly.

 

 

Fiona: What TV shows/films do you enjoy watching?

I am not, not have I ever been a big TV fan. Over the years, only a handful of shows made me loyal to them. Unless it’s such campy show that I can make fun of it (Love Boat, Fantasy Island) or it’s spectacularly hilarious (FawltyTowers/Monty Python), I rarely watch TV. Movies? I love big, spectacle films like Gone With the Wind and the Ten Commandments. They were just big events—you’d have to go and see them in the theatre—and they kept their promise to you, to entertain you on a massive scale. Even though we have excellent film technology these days and I love it, I am sorry we’ve left behind that old way of making those big movies & musicals.

 

 

Fiona: Favorite foods / Colors/ Music

Foods? Thai and Mexican. Colors? Three of them: Green, yellow and orange, alone or together.  Music? ALL music from classical to rap, that’s why I worked in that industry. There is only one type of music I really don’t like and that’s jazz.

 

 

 

Fiona: If you were not a writer what else would you like to have done?

Well, I did do what wanted; to work in music. But I look back and think “Oh, I should have majored in ancient history and/or archaeology, or do stand-up comedy. There were so many avenues I could have or maybe should have gone into, but you only get one lifetime and all of those would take a lifetime to perfect. I chose what I loved most for good or bad. I don’t regret that choice at all, ever.

 

 

 

Fiona: Do you have a blog/website? If so what is it?

I only have a blog these days:

http://www.pibarrington.wordpress.com  and Twitter: www.Twitter.pibarrington.com

Facebook:

https://www.facebook.com/PI-Barrington-172789972781654/

 

https://www.facebook.com/PIBarrington

And last but not least:

https://www.amazon.com/Brede-Chronicles-Book-1-ebook/dp/B00L8FM978

Here is my interview with JJ Melvin

Name: JJ Melvin

Age: 38

Where are you from: California

A little about your self `ie your education Family life etc

I am married to a wonderful man who works in the entertainment industry and I have two beautiful children.

Fiona: Tell us your latest news?

I recently released, Dec. 12, 2016 Chapters 1-10 to raving reviews. My full book release is in 6 days, January 17, 2017.

 

 
Fiona: When and why did you begin writing?

I’ve always written short stories, winning the coveted “Future Author” award in the 1st grade. I am pleased to announce the prediction came true. The first time I actually sat down to write seriously was in 2014 when I wrote the first draft of The Four Points.

 

 
Fiona: When did you first consider yourself a writer?

December 12, 2016. The date I published my first ten chapters.

 

 
Fiona: What inspired you to write your first book?

The characters. The story lived in my mind hounding— begging to be free.

 

 
Fiona: Do you have a specific writing style?

First person narrative for my first book, it may change in the future.

 

 
Fiona: How did you come up with the title?

The characters in my books are The Four Points. Four people chosen, destined to protect the world.

 

 
Fiona: Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?

I think the running theme through The Four Points is trust. It is a journey of believing in one’s self and trusting others. So the message I would like to give my readers is to trust and love yourself and have the courage to trust others and let them love you.

 

 
Fiona: How much of the book is realistic and are experiences based on someone you know, or events in your own life?

I think as writers we all draw from personal experiences. This book, though fiction, feels real because I have used so many experiences, events in my own life to give life to these characters.

 

 
Fiona: What books have most influenced your life most? a mentor?

Where The Red Fern Grows, Angela’s Ashes and the Harry Potter books by JK Rowling. JK Rowling is an inspiration. I also fell in love with The Twilight books by Stephanie Meyer.

 

 

Fiona: Are there any new authors that have grasped your interest and who  is your favorite author and what is it that really strikes you about their work?

One author did grab my attention. I loved her debut novel and was so excited for the follow up. I must admit though that when her second book was released, I was a little disappointed. The book was not part of the series and it felt as if it were not even written by the same writer. It differed in flow; this follow up book was so over written that I found myself skimming it rather than reading.

 

 
Fiona: Name one entity that you feel supported you outside of family members.

Ellie Kay-Bockert Augsburger. I hired her to create my cover. She has been amazing in all facets of truly leading a new author. She has done my formatting, set-up my website, social media sites, teasers, and her husband was my line-editor.

 

 
Fiona: Do you see writing as a career?

Yes! I am so inspired as I write my second book. The story, to me is exciting and if I must say, I feel my writing in Book 2 is stronger.

 

 
Fiona: If you had to do it all over again, would you change anything in your latest book?

No. My characters have flaws just as real people have flaws. My writing may not be loved by all but I am proud to call The Four Points my debut novel.

 

 
Fiona: Do you recall how your interest in writing originated?

I think writing is a creative outlet and I have always been creative.

 

 

Fiona: Can you share a little of your current work with us?

THE FOUR POINTS is a young adult fiction novel that extrapolates existing diamond myths (the belief that diamonds are associated with sacred moonlight, worn in battle as a symbol of courage and virtue protecting the wearer against serpents, fire, poison, sickness, thieves, floods and evil spirits) to tell a unique, authentic coming of age story. The Four Points is part Davinci Code and part Twilight (with all its romance and angst) and makes a fun nod to movies like The Mummy, by blending ancient and contemporary characters.

 

 
Fiona: Is there anything you find particularly challenging in your writing?

Not the writing, I hate the editing.

 

 
Fiona: Do you have to travel much concerning your book(s)?

Being a bit of an introvert, shy and private, I’m hesitant to travel for book signings and conferences. We’ll have to see what the future holds and if this changes.

 

 
Fiona: Who designed the covers?

Ellie Kay Bockert-Augsburger

 

 
Fiona: What was the hardest part of writing your book?

The editing.

 

 
Fiona: Did you learn anything from writing your book and what was it?

After writing my book I had to market it and through this I learned to trust my gut instincts. I came in contact with some not so nice people, but have met so many more wonderful ones. I learned to align myself with like-minded individuals who are positive, supportive and kind. Fortunately, the Indie World is filled with these types of people.

 

 

Fiona: If any of your books was made into a film who would you like to play the lead.

I would love to give this chance to an up and coming new actress, someone of mixed ethnicities, someone genuine.

 

 
Fiona: Do you have any advice for other writers?

Write, Write and Write. Do not let anyone discourage you. You are the master of your own fate. Jeez, I sound cheesy, but it’s true.

 

 
Fiona: Do you have anything specific that you want to say to your readers?

Thank you to everyone that read this book. Your support has meant everything for a debut author. I, in general, can be a bit self-deprecating. I am not someone who says my story is great, you have to read it. I understand that taste vary, nonetheless I am blown away by the outpouring of positive reviews for this debut novel. It is truly exciting that the characters I love so much are loved by others. They have life now, and continue to live every time a new person reads their story. That sentiment brings me to tears—so appreciative.

 

 

Fiona: What book are you reading now?

I just finished reading a book last night. I’m not too sure what I will read next. Do you have suggestions?

 

 

 

Fiona: Do you remember the first book you read?

This may not have been the first book I read, but it was definitely the first book that stuck with me: Where The Red Fern Grows.

 

 

Fiona: What makes you laugh/cry?

Laugh: Family Cry: Family

 

 

Fiona: Is there one person past or present you would meet and why?

Walt Disney. What an amazing visionary. Truly a genius and inspiration. I love reading quotes by him.

 

 

Fiona: What do you want written on your head stone and why ?

Loving mother, friend, wife. I want to have been known as a kind person with integrity. These two things are very important to me.

 

 

Fiona: Other than writing do you have any hobbies ?

Reading

 

 

Fiona: What TV shows/films do you enjoy watching?

Mostly reality shows: The Voice, Iron Chef Jr, Chopped, Chopped Jr., America’s Got Talent

 

 

Fiona: Favorite foods / Colors/ Music:

Food: I love a mix of ethnic foods: American, Japanese/Sushi, Thai, Vietnamese, Korean, Mexican – everything.

Color: I don’t really have a favorite, but for some reason I say pink—I think I only own one piece of pink clothing, so I’m not too sure why I say it.

 

 

Fiona: If you were not a writer what else would you like to have done?

This is the first time, literally I have ever said or written this out loud, but here goes—A Singer. I am probably an awful singer and I have never sang in public nor do I think I would have the nerve to. I have never even sang Karaoke, but I do love to see. So since this is a hypothetical type of question—a dream type of job, a singer. Singing makes me happy as does writing.

 

 

 

Fiona: Do you have a blog/website? If so what is it? www.jjmelvin .com

 

https://www.amazon.com/J.J.-Melvin/e/B01MRRIE2I/ref=dp_byline_cont_pop_ebooks_1

Here is my interview with Rose Gordon

Name  Rose Gordon

Age  30!!! Yikes

Where are you from

The Sticks!

 

A little about your self `ie your education Family life etc.

USA Today Bestselling and Award Winning Author of more than a dozen unusually unusual historical romances that have been known to include scarred heroes, feisty heroines, marriage-producing scandals, far too much scheming, naughty literature and always a sweet happily-ever-after.

 

When not escaping to another world via reading or writing a book, she spends her time chasing two young boys around the house, being hunted by wild animals, or sitting on the swing in the backyard where she has to use her arms as shields to deflect projectiles AKA: balls, water balloons, sticks, pinecones, and anything else one of them picks up to hurl at his brother who just happens to be hiding behind her.

 

 

 

Fiona: Tell us your latest news?

Hmmm. Well, I had my 17th full-length novel—Passions of a Gentleman—come out in August and a re-release of a novella—The Wooing Game—that was formerly part of an anthology come out in November. I have one of my books—Her Sudden Groom—currently in a 12-book collection titled, It Started with a Kiss. And finally, my first novella, The Perfect Lady Worthe, will be included in a charity collection with proceeds going to help Wounded Warriors (US Veterans).

 

 
Fiona: When and why did you begin writing?

It seems like ages ago, but I began writing seven years ago because I was overwhelmed with the world around me. It was my escape.

 

 
Fiona: When did you first consider yourself a writer?

After I’d completed my fifth book and was starting on my sixth. That was around the time that my first three books had been released to the wilds of Amazon and had done amazingly well. I took that as a clue I had gone from being a wife and mom who tapped away on the keyboard to an actual writer.

 

 
Fiona: What inspired you to write your first book?

Boredom. I hate to say that, but it did. As I mentioned before, writing gave me an escape. However, reading did, too. Until I felt like every book I read was the same. So one day I decided to try something different—a plot I hadn’t seen. I thought perhaps it would allow me a few days of escape vs. a few hours of escape that reading provided.

 

 
Fiona: Do you have a specific writing style?

Not sure what you might want specifically so here goes, I’m a pantser. I prefer to have a character and dialogue driven book rather than a lot of details about the surroundings. I like humor and lighter material. Life is heavy enough.

 

 
Fiona: How did you come up with the title?

Of my first book? That took a long time. In fact, I had written—and titled—the two follow up books before coming up with the title Intentions of the Earl. Quite simply, the title points straight to the plot which is all about his intentions—good and bad.

 

 
Fiona: Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?

Not in most of them. Most of them are just for fun and to be a break from their own craziness. If they can laugh or finish it feeling amused I feel like I’ve done my work. At the same time, I have a soft spot for characters with flaws. I have flaws. My kids have flaws. Part of why I started writing was because I was having a hard time coming to terms with some of those flaws and wishing that I had all the answers. So, I have characters with characteristics that not everyone has or can relate to. Such as dyslexia or social disorders. I have a heroine in a wheelchair because you know what, at the end of the day, they’re all people too, and deserve to be respected and understood. If a reader doesn’t have a person in their life with something that makes them different by society’s standards, maybe they’ll grow to like a character with such a trait and will be able to better understand how to talk to and relate to someone they might meet who is in a chair or has autism or struggles to read or do math.

 

 
Fiona: How much of the book is realistic?

Well, it is fiction.  As such, I do bend the rules a little when it comes to the time period to make it fit the story for our modern readers.

 

 

Fiona: Are experiences based on someone you know, or events in your own life?

Oh, each of the 20-ish stories I’ve written has a little truth mixed it. Whether it be someone I know or something I’ve done. You can’t write about things you don’t know.

 

 
Fiona: What books have most influenced your life most? a mentor?

If I were to pick a mentor it would be Ruth Ann Nordin. She’s been writing a lot longer than me and she’s such an inspiration. She also is always so willing to help me figure out a plot or talk through a business related matter. She’s a jewel.

 

 
Fiona: What book are you reading now?

Now that you ask, I have to ashamedly admit I haven’t picked up a book yet this year!

 

 
Fiona: Are there any new authors that have grasped your interest?

Again, see above. I think we all had a crazy ride in 2016 and sadly I don’t think I’ve read for fun since the close of 2013. Isn’t that crazy?!

 

 
Fiona: What are your current projects?

I guess that goes back up to my news. I have briefly started on a book titled His Penniless Bride which is a book that will go into the Banks Brother’s Bries series, but I don’t know when I’ll be done.

 

 
Fiona: Name one entity that you feel supported you outside of family members.

That’d be Ruth again. Outside of her though, early on in my career, I was taken in by a little group of writers—Ava Stone, Jerrica Knight-Catania and Jane Charles—who have always been so sweet and supportive. I love getting to see them from time to time at conventions and doing projects with them.

 

 
Fiona: Do you see writing as a career?

When I started no, just a hobby, but seven years later and still pecking away, I think I’d consider it a career.

 

 
Fiona: If you had to do it all over again, would you change anything in your latest book?

No. I’ve been down that road before and it gets ugly. Best to let each book be a stepping stone and grow from the experience.

 

 
Fiona: Do you recall how your interest in writing originated?

From reading.

 

 

 

Fiona: Can you share a little of your current work with us?

His Penniless Bride follows the story of two secondary characters who were introduced in His Yankee Bride. They grew up together and the Revolutionary War tore them apart. It took her from being the daughter of the wealthiest man in the county to practically a beggar When the couple is reunited past the time they’d originally agreed for her to wait for him, her wealth, or lack thereof, matters naught to him, however, her recent agreement to marry another based on his ability to provide for her family drives him away. It’s a tangle of miscommunication and misunderstanding. Insecurities and bruised feelings. In short, it’s a romance novel! (And that means there will always be a happily-ever-after.)

 

 
Fiona: Is there anything you find particularly challenging in your writing?

Description of exterior forces. As I mentioned, I prefer to focus on the character’s feelings and thoughts and dialogue. So sometimes I forget to describe the weather or what a room looks like each time they go into it or the world events at the time. (I also hate editing. I’m the sort who will read it over 100 times to change a few words or commas.)

 

 
Fiona: Who is your favorite author and what is it that really strikes you about their work?

Oh no, no, no. I learned long ago not to play favorites. 😉

 

 
Fiona: Do you have to travel much concerning your book(s)?

Of course. I loved to go meet my readers!

 

 
Fiona: Who designed the covers?

Yikes, every series has been designed by a different cover artist. I made my Scandalous Sisters Series covers—they did get a minor facelift a few years later by Liberty Photography. Dara England made my Groom Series covers. Lily Smith made my Banks Brothers Brides Series covers. I had a local friend draw (with chalk) my Fort Gibson Officers Series covers. Aileen Fish made my Gentleman of Honor covers and either I made or had Lily Smith make my stand alone covers. I like going with different cover artists with each series because it helps brand that series in a different way. Sometimes books that are all done by the same cover artist look like all twenty of their books are from the same series unless you look for the fine “XXXXX series, book XXXX”. So I like mine to be distinctive at first glance. I’m weird.

 

 
Fiona: What was the hardest part of writing your book?

Editing it.

 

 
Fiona: Did you learn anything from writing your book and what was it?

I’ve learned TONS of things from writing books. Research is extremely important and I feel like I’ve done enough to get another college degree. I’ve also learned a lot about myself. I can write 100,000 words. I can meet daily word counts. I make everything work out in the end and the characters fall madly in love.

 

 
Fiona: Do you have any advice for other writers?

Keep writing. Yeah, there’ll be dips in sales and yeah, there’ll be people who hate your book, but you know what, if it makes YOU happy, keep at it. Don’t let those exterior factors steal your joy.

 

 
Fiona: Do you have anything specific that you want to say to your readers?

Thank you to everyone who has supported me with buying my books, reviewing my stories, lending my books and even recommending me to a friend. If not for all of you, I’d have to be committed for having dozens of voices inside my head talking to each other!

 

 

Fiona: Do you remember the first book you read?

No.

 

 

Fiona: What makes you laugh/cry?

I laugh at funny situations or when someone uses a play on words.

 

 

Fiona: Is there one person past or present you would meet and why?

Beverly Cleary. I don’t remember the first book I ever read, but I do remember reading all of the Ramona books when I was a kid! She was hilarious.

 

 

Fiona: What do you want written on your head stone and why ?

….wife, mother, writer and above all, a child of God…

 

 

Fiona: Other than writing do you have any hobbies ?

Crafting. I’m terrible at it, but that doesn’t stop me from loving it.

 

 

Fiona: What TV shows/films do you enjoy watching?

Flea Market Flip and old family sitcom re-runs.

 

 

Fiona: Favorite foods / Colors/ Music

Food: pizza, color: green, music: country (hey, I told you I was from the sticks)

 

 

Fiona: If you were not a writer what else would you like to have done?

Like to have done? Been the next Martha Steward. Likely would have done: been an accountant.

 

 

Fiona: Do you have a blog/website? If so what is it?

Absolutely: www.rosegordon.net

 

Fiona, thank you so much girl for having me on. Answering your questions has been a real blast!

https://www.amazon.com/Rose-Gordon/e/B004QXMVHW/ref=dp_byline_cont_pop_ebooks_1

Here is my interview with Jane Davis

Name Jane Davis

Age 49 (and a quarter).

A little about yourself `i.e. your education Family life etc.

I am the middle child of five children, which certainly hones your observational skills. Dismissed as ‘the quiet one’ (have you tried to get a word in edgeways in a household of seven?) I always had a lot more going on inside my head, then ever came out of my mouth.

We lived close to Wimbledon, best known for its association with lawn tennis. These days, Wimbledon is in one of London’s most expensive post codes, but back in those pre-DIY days, it wasn’t nearly so affluent. Apart from the fact that I can longer afford to live in Wimbledon, I haven’t moved far and the changes I’ve seen, both demographically and architecturally, interest me. (More on that later.)

My paternal grandfather was a commercial artist and my maternal grandfather was a musician and composer, whose children all found work in the profession. My uncles, both flautists, played on The Beatles track, Fool on the Hill, while my mother’s various claims to fame include being an expert on Tudor music and performing on the infamous Finger of Fudge advert. As children, we were all encouraged to attend music and ballet lessons, pushed onto the stage and into compulsive exam-taking. My experiences left me with a hatred of classical music, terrible stage fright and panic on entering exam rooms.

In terms of qualifications, I learned early on that I am not an exam person. I left school at the age of 16 with an RE O Level and a life-saving certificate (slight exaggeration) I think it’s important to admit to this, as there are many routes to writing. I’d also like to reassure anyone who doesn’t do very well in exams that this is not the disaster you think it is. Exams are not a measure of intelligence, but of exam technique. I’ve found that hard work and getting on with people are far more important. These days, I have a few boast-worthy credentials. Before I began to write, I was the deputy managing director of a medium sized business. I have since won three awards for my writing: The Daily Mail First Novel Award. Best First Chapter Award and, most recently, Writing Magazine’s Self Published Book of the Year Award 2016.

 

 

 

Fiona: When and why did you begin writing?

Something happened in my life when I was in my mid-thirties that I needed to make sense of. I used writing to explore how I felt about it. I think that most writers are trying to create order in a confused world.

I had never attended a creative writing class. (I embarked on a Creative Writing MA in 2012 but quickly abandoned it because it wasn’t right for me and I wasn’t right for it.) I just had a laptop and a little spare time. Guided by instinct, my aim was to write the type of book I liked to read.

 

 

Fiona: When did you first consider yourself a writer?

There’s an enormous leap from writing your first novel and having the confidence to call yourself a writer. I think that’s best left to others. The agent who first signed me up said to me, ‘Jane, you are a writer.’ For four years, my 90,000 word manuscript had obsessed me, eating up all of my spare time (it remains unpublished). Finally, I was getting somewhere. And being a writer sounded so much more glamorous than being an insurance broker! Then, after I won The Daily Mail First Novel Award, Joanne Harris called me a writer as did one or two very nice newspaper reviewers. As someone who left school at with a handful of O’ Levels, I always had a nagging fear that I’m going to be found out at any moment. I don’t think the fear ever goes away, but you find a way of channelling it. Rather like making use of nerves when you speak in public.

 

 
Fiona: What inspired you to write your first book?

Like many first novels, mine was semi-autobiographical. Which is why it is a good thing it wasn’t published! The difficulty with baring your own soul is that none of us live in isolation. Other people feature in our stories. Recently, an author called Maria Bento Fernandes was sued for libel by her husband’s family and ordered to pay 53,000 EUR after she revealed intimate details of their family life in a novel. When she appealed against the original charge, the European Court of Human Rights didn’t uphold the original decision, but ruled that the award should stand as the author had ‘failed to respect her in-laws’ ‘right to a private life.’ Christmas at the Fernandes will never be the same again!

 

 
Fiona: Do you have a specific writing style?

I love this question. It gives the impression that the writing arrives fully formed, when in fact the version the reader sees is an illusion.

I went to hear Pulitzer prize-winning author Elizabeth Strout speak recently. Someone made the comment that she had a very economical style, and she said, ‘You should see the bits I cut’. I think it’s true that style owes much to the bits the reader never gets to see.

The hallmarks of a book written by Jane Davis are multiple points of view and non-linear timelines. I’m excited by cause and effect and unconventionality in all its forms. I like to write about big subjects and give my characters almost impossible moral dilemmas.

Overriding everything else, I have three rules when writing. Whatever my subject-matter, the end-product must be honest, credible and authentic.

 

 

 

Fiona: Tell us your latest news?

I released my seventh novel, My Counterfeit Self, in October. It tells the story of a radical poet and political activist called Lucy Forrester, who’s a cross between Edith Sitwell and Vivienne Westwood. Having been anti-establishment all of her life, she’s horrified to find that she’s been featured on the Queen’s New Year’s Honours list.

 

 
Fiona: How did you come up with the title?

Lucy’s parents behave so appallingly that she is freed from any feeling of obligation to live up to their expectations. She moves out of the family home and decamps to bohemian Soho. In distancing herself from her parents she adopts a new personality that she hides behind, her counterfeit self. Although she insists that she lays herself bare in her poetry, it’s keeping secrets from those who love her most that is her undoing.

 

 
Fiona: How much of the book is realistic and are experiences based on someone you know, or events in your own life?

I hope it’s realistic. I want readers to believe that Lucy Forrester exists! At the same time, I didn’t expect a reader to contact me and tell me that I’d written her biography. How could this have happened?

When I was writing I Stopped Time, a novel that spanned an entire century, I set up timelines, adding everything from news stories to the books people were reading to the weather. Now, whenever I write a book, I grab the data from the decades it covers and slot my tailored research into place. For My Counterfeit Self, that included details from biographies of poets, literary critics, and a dress designer who had connections with the music world.

I knew that Lucy was going to have suffered a severe childhood illness. When I laid my story over the timeline, there was only one real choice. During the 1940s and 1950s, polio was the world’s most feared disease, paralysing or killing half a million people a year.

Lucy was also going to be my rebel with a cause, but what cause should I give her? Again, there was only one logical choice. Fear of the Nuclear Bomb was a hangover from her wartime childhood. Talk of a third world war – the war to end all wars – permeated her adolescence. Watching black and white footage of Rod Stewart taking part in the first of the CND march from Trafalgar Square to Aldermaston, I had no trouble imagining Lucy Forrester at the centre of it all. And, of course, if you’ve campaigned for CND your entire adult life, it seems natural that you would take up the cause of the atomic veterans when their plight was highlighted.

When her parents behaved appallingly (and, here, I borrowed an episode from a biography, because you can’t make this stuff up), freed from the expectations of her family, Lucy decamps to bohemian Soho. And this is where my beta readers gave invaluable encouragement and insight. Several had lived the life I was describing. Marrying your gay best friend certainly wasn’t unusual in the 50s and 60s.

Put like that and it makes sense. Perhaps if you’ve done your research correctly, the life that you create may already have been taken.

 

 

 

Fiona: What was the hardest part of writing your book?

The poetry! The idea of writing about the life of a poet came from readers. So many reviews had commented that my prose was like poetry, it gave me confidence that I could convince readers I could see the world the way a poet does. As for the poetry, I decided that the worst possible thing I could do for the book would be to write it myself. Instead, I commissioned a poet to write several pieces. Unfortunately, that arrangement fell through at the eleventh hour. By that time, my copy editor had done his worst and encouraged me to have a stab at it. After all, I knew how Lucy thought. This was hugely daunting. The novel refers to Lucy as Britain’s greatest living poet, for goodness sake! I thought, I’ll only be able to get away with this if I limit myself to writing Lucy’s childhood poems. So that’s what I did. I think they’re just about passable as the work of a ten-year-old.

 

 

 

Fiona: Did you learn anything from writing your book and what was it?

Aside to adding to my knowledge of recent history, writing is a journey inwards and so you always learn more about myself. I think you always have to make it personal. I drew on my experience as a writer, my insecurities, the constant fear of being ‘found out’ as a fake, the small triumphs, the disappointments.

 

 
Fiona: Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?

I think that it’s up to readers what they take from any novel. Each reader brings his or own experience to the table and it helps them navigate and translate what they see on the page. Some readers have called Lucy ‘fiercely moral’ which I rather like. (My mother thoroughly disapproves of her.) Though Lucy is firmly anti-nuclear, she champions the cause of the British Nuclear Veterans, whose members are not – or not necessarily. Whatever their view on the matter, I would like readers to be aware that Britain is out of step with other nations who have compensated their nuclear veterans.

 

 
Fiona: What books have most influenced your life most?

I am hugely interested in cause and effect. One of my favourite authors is John Irving and the first novel of his that I read was A Prayer for Owen Meany. Irving overlays the story of Owen Meany, (a boy brought up to believe that he was the product of a virgin birth), with the somewhat dull present-day life of his best friend, John. Talk about cause and effect!

 

 

Fiona: Are there any new authors that have grasped your interest and who is your favorite author and what is it that really strikes you about their work?

I expect fiction to challenge me and the novels that I find the most satisfying deviate from strict chronological order – and here I’m thinking of A Visit From the Goon Squad by Jennifer Egan, Station Eleven by Emily St. John Mantel and The Coincidence Authority by John Ironmonger.

What I love about all of these books is that when you reach the end, you can head straight back to the beginning and start again without feeling that you’ve left the book. Because there is no beginning, middle and end in the traditional sense, the story is both cyclical and enduring, like one of Escher’s optical illusions. And you might think that the running order is random, but it takes enormous skill to pull off a work like Goon Squad whose chapters can be read in any order you damn well please, because each has to be perfect and complete. In Station Eleven, the flow is cyclical and the reader remains in the present while the book travels between the near past and the near future in which all technology has been wiped away. And then there is The Coincidence Authority, where you have the feeling of perfect order, that this is the precise order in which the story must be told, because in fiction the big reveal must come near the end but in life it may show up early.

 

 

Fiona: Can you share a little of your current work with us?
Fiona: Is there anything you find particularly challenging in your writing?

The worst thing about being in any creative profession is the constant cycle of self-doubt. Joanna Penn has written an excellent post about this received a huge number of comments. http://www.thecreativepenn.com/2015/02/17/roller-coaster/

 

 

 

Fiona: Name one entity that you feel supported you outside of family members.

I’m a member of the Alliance of Independent Authors. It’s far more relevant to me than the Society of Authors because it’s aimed specifically at author/publishers and the challenges that they face. There is a fantastic Facebook forum which is my go to place to ask for help or advice. Whatever problem I may have run into, I can be guaranteed that other members have run into it to.

 

 
Fiona: Do you have to travel much concerning your book(s)?

You won’t find any research trips in my business expenses. My novels are set in my personal geography, and so it already has many strata. I’ll let Ron explain. (Taken from An Unknown Woman)

There was something transportative about living in the same city all of your life; walking around familiar geography, knee-deep in the history of the place. And superimposed over a street map carried both inside and outside his head (the then and the now), were the milestones of his own life.’

When you write characters into what is already your personal backdrop, you create yet another layer. Recently, I found myself in St Mary’s Church in Beddington lighting a candle for my mother-in-law’s anniversary, but I also felt the presence of Jim and Aimee, two on my characters from A Funeral for an Owl.

 

 
Fiona: Who designed the covers?

My design process is a collaboration. I usually come up with the concept and source the photographs, then I commission Andrew Candy execute the design. Having said that, the cover he produces is often a surprise because he brings his professional vision to the table!

Rather than start from scratch, I chose to use elements from the cover of Half-truths and White Lies as building blocks: the font and the strong photographic image, repeated on the spine. The brief I gave Andrew Candy was that my books should look like a set you’d want to collect. I was thinking of my own bookshelves: the novels of John Irving; Frank Herbert’s Dune series; classic Penguin paperbacks. I wanted that certain something that would make people say, ‘Oh, another Jane Davis.’

This year Andrew’s design for my 2015 novel An Unknown Woman won two separate awards.

The exception is the cover for I Stopped Time. I decided to give the book a makeover in 2015 and commissioned Jessica Bell to design the cover for me. I was interested to see how different the end result would be. She was extremely easy to work with and really understands branding. I would recommend her without reservation.

 

 

Fiona: Do you have anything specific that you want to say to your readers?

If you enjoy a book, please do leave a review. Authors need a minimum number of reviews before they can advertise. Now that Amazon has removed its rule about minimum number of words, this is easier than ever and will only take a moment of your time.

 

 

 

Fiona: What book are you reading now?

I’ve just finished reading a book by one of my favourite authors, Maggie O’Farrell. It is her latest, This Must Be The Place, and it didn’t disappoint. I have just read the first chapter of The Essex Serpent by Sarah Perry. I actually struggled with her first novel, but this one is already nominate for so many awards that I felt I must give it a go. So far so good. It’s very different in terms of subject-matter. It’s a historical novel that blurs the boundaries between mythology and facts. It’s great to see an author flexing her wings without the constraints of pigeon-holing.

 

 

 

Fiona: Do you remember the first book you read?

Honestly, no. I have very few memories before the age of five and I know that I was reading well before then.

 

 

 

Fiona: Other than writing do you have any hobbies?

Reading, obviously. Aside from that, I’m a keen walker and photographer, hobbies I can combine. I like to contemplate life from the top of a mountain, but if I can’t get away then I head for the Surrey Hills, close to where I live.

 

 

 

Fiona: If you were not a writer what else would you like to have done?

Knowing what I know now, if I had been an exam person, I would love to have been an archeologist.

 

 

 

Fiona: What TV shows/films do you enjoy watching?

The West Wing, House, The Good Wife, BBC4 documentaries, especially anything about archeology.

 

 

 

Fiona: Favorite foods / Colors/ Music

Food: Thai curries, smoked salmon, dark chocolate, a good carrot cake.

Colors: Blues, turquoise, right through to lime green.

Music: Tom Waits, Elbow, Placebo, Bowie, Peter Gabriel, Kate Bush.

 

 

 

Fiona: Do you have a blog/website? If so what is it?

My website is www.jane-davis.co.uk. Readers who visit and sign up my newsletter will receive a free copy of her novel, I Stopped Time. http://eepurl.com/bugqnr I promise not to bombard subscribers with junk.

 

 

Biography

 

Jane Davis is the author of seven novels. Her debut, Half-truths and White Lies, won the Daily Mail First Novel Award and was described by Joanne Harris as ‘A story of secrets, lies, grief and, ultimately, redemption, charmingly handled by this very promising new writer.’ The Bookseller featured her in their ‘One to Watch’ section. Six further novels have earned her a loyal fan base and wide-spread praise, as well as comparisons to Kate Atkinson, Margaret Atwood and Maggie O’Farrell. Her favourite description of fiction is ‘made-up truth’.

Jane lives in Carshalton, Surrey, with her Formula 1 obsessed, beer-brewing partner, surrounded by growing piles of paperbacks, CDs and general chaos. When she is not writing, you may spot Jane disappearing up the side of a mountain with a camera in hand.

 

Social Media Links

 

My website: www.jane-davis.co.uk

(Anyone who signs up to www.jane-davis.co.uk/newsletter receives a free copy of my novel, I Stopped Time.)

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/JaneDavisAuthorPage/?fref=ts

Twitter: https://twitter.com/janedavisauthor

Google Plus: https://plus.google.com/+JaneDavisAuthor/posts

Pinterest: https://uk.pinterest.com/janeeleanordavi/boards/

Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/6869939.Jane_Davis

Amazon Author Page: https://www.amazon.com/Jane-Davis/e/B0034P156Q

 

Universal Book Links

I Stopped Time                                   https://books2read.com/u/3JK0BA

These Fragile Things               https://books2read.com/u/mdKNaO

A Funeral for an Owl              https://books2read.com/u/3neOPR

An Unchoroegraphed Life      https://books2read.com/u/4jKw7X

An Unknown Woman             https://books2read.com/u/mgKr6q

My Counterfeit Self                https://books2read.com/u/3kZveg