Here is my interview with John Hickman

298586_232065426852921_1244294012_n

 

Name:      John Hickman

 

Age:       69

Carole, my wife of forty-eight years says that should make me a mature writer.

 

Where are you from:

I was born March 1945 in the ‘little room’ upstairs at 8 Barlby Road, Kensington, London, England.

 

A little about your self `ie your education Family life etc

I was educated at private schools in London. I joined the Westminster Bank, and then became an hotelier. It was while I was working in the hotel business with my Dad that I met my wife Carole in 1965.

I joined the Pest Control industry based in the UK before migrating with my family in 1971 as ‘ten pound Poms.’ We became naturalised Australians in 1973.

I specialised in pest control, fumigation, and timber preservation throughout S.E. Queensland and the South Pacific Islands my entire working life. My family and I also farmed deer in the South Burnett region of Queensland.

Family was instilled into me by my mother and father. In my life nothing takes precedence over the welfare of my family. My wife Carole of 48 years and our two children are devoted to each other. Family was the reason I worked all of my life, and the opinion of my family of me, and my actions, is important. More important to me than what others may think of me.

 

 

Fiona: Tell us your latest news?

My latest news is the release of my third book; Sex, Lies & Crazy People and the subsequent book launch to be held in Eagleby on the 24 October.

 

 
Fiona: When and why did you begin writing?

After retirement in 2003 I started to ‘smell the flowers’ and realised how most of them smelled the same. Unable to play golf, I discovered a passion for writing.

 

 
Fiona: When did you first consider yourself a writer?

After I’d published Reluctant Hero and started getting favourable comments back from readers. That gave me a great lift and I thought, Wow! It’s not too bad, then. I started showing the comments around to family and friends and they became excited for me. I suppose you could say that in some small way I began to float on the wings of my success.
 

 

Fiona: What inspired you to write your first book?
After our retirement in 2003 we intended to travel. I wanted to play golf and go fishing. The travel and the fishing went well but the golf was a disaster. No matter how many lessons I took, nor how hard I tried I couldn’t get that little white ball to consistently go where I wanted it to. I found the frustration outweighed the pleasure. At one stage I enjoyed the walk without using a golf club at all. Frustration led to me being under Carole’s feet when she wanted her alone time. One day she said to me, “Look if you’re bored, and can’t think of something better to do. Go write a damn book!”

Besides being unable to play golf my relationship with my father had always been a very close one. Initially, he was reluctant to speak of his wartime experiences, but over time he talked with me at length. At dinner parties when other people told jokes, being a poor joke teller myself, I often told one of his more suitable wartime experiences. Usually something with a tad of humour. You could say I fed off the stories he’d told me. Reaction was always good. So good that I was often told, “John you should write a book.”

What with being under Carole’s feet, I thought Dad’s story would be worth telling, and WW2 was still topical. The war may be over but it’s not done with, is it? Then I realised that if his story was to be told I was the only one alive to tell it. Carole said, “So you’d better get on with it. I’m going shopping!”

Women are so often right, don’t you think?

 

 

Fiona: Do you have a specific writing style?

I don’t know? Do I? I’d like to think my style is easy to read, and being true stories I can’t forget what the story line or what I’m writing about. Some have said I’m a bit like Bill Bryson. I’ll take that as a compliment.

 

 

Fiona: How did you come up with the title?

I didn’t. It was my editor Tricia Eban’s choice. I wanted to call it Bill’s War. I canvassed about and because Foyle’s War was popular on TV at the time, the majority vote was in favour of Reluctant Hero.

With the sequel Tripping Over my working title was Falling Down but when it came to completion time that didn’t quite fit. It was while we were deciding which photos would be included that my distributor Dennis Jones & Associates helped choose the cover photograph. Skipping Through Life didn’t appeal but Tripping Over was a unanimous vote. It said it all.

Sex, Lies & Crazy People started out with a working title of the Harewood Hotel because that’s where the majority of the story takes place. Unfortunately, the Harewood Hotel hit troubled times. Conflict arose over the continuation of the full licence. Its reputation declined to little more than a doss house of ill repute until it closed permanently. Decades later it was remodelled to become the very grand Grantley Court. Initially I chose Sex, Knives & Crazy People. I liked knives because of the waiters fighting with knives. But again, Dennis Jones & Associates, came to my rescue and suggested I leave Knives out of the title as it could conjure up a false image in the minds of female readers as to what the book was about. My daughter Sara thought that Sex, Lies & Crazy People fitted my story perfectly! Women are so often right, don’t you think?

 

 

 

Fiona: Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?

I would be truly flattered to believe that Reluctant Hero is that rare creature, a book not afraid to be honest about war, but immensely readable and entertaining as well. Many readers have praised it as one of the best anti-war books they’ve read. I’m very happy with that. What a tribute that is to the air crews who never came home.

Tripping Over and Sex, Lies & Crazy People are intended to be entirely different to Reluctant Hero in that I attempted comedy. Messages are cryptic or masked except by Gramps, the straight shooter of the family. Both Tripping Over and Sex, Lies & Crazy People are so entirely politically incorrect throughout. So much so that readers are encouraged to read the PREFACE before the book. That’s to avoid accusations of me being in breach of the Racial Discrimination Act, which in my opinion by now should have been revamped to better suit Australians!

 

 
Fiona: How much of the book is realistic?

I’d like to think that all three books are realistic. They are after all – all true stories. I stand by what I write. Nothing is based on a true story. Classified as non-fiction can I be any more realistic? Or truthful?

 

 
Fiona: Are experiences based on someone you know, or events in your own life?

Yes, very much so. All three books are mixtures of the people I have known and myself. Outside of family names have been changed out of consideration for those I have been unable to contact, and for legal reasons. To avoid being sued!

 

 
Fiona: What books have most influenced your life most?

I don’t think any one book, or books have truly influenced my life, but I’ve always enjoyed reading.

 

 
Fiona: If you had to choose, which writer would you consider a mentor?

I’ve liked the work of James Herriot, real name Alf Wight. He wrote All Creatures Great and Small, and of course the venerable Bill Bryson.
 

 

Fiona: What book are you reading now?

This Is Not A Drill by Paul Carter.

 

 

 

Fiona: Are there any new authors that have grasped your interest?

Many, but I’d be reluctant to single any one individual out.

 

 
Fiona: What are your current projects?

I’m busy promoting Sex, Lies & Crazy People, and preparing material for my next book G’day Down Under the sequel to Sex, Lies & Crazy People.

 

Fiona: Name one entity that you feel supported you outside of family members.

There are many. I’m a member of the Queensland Writers Centre, FAWQ, and our local Writers Circle. They keep me on track. More recently my association with In House Publishing takes centre stage. My journey with publishing had been a steep learning curve with pitfalls and hidden surprises until I met Ocean Reeve. He’s the In House Manager and head consultant who took me under his wing when Sex, Lies & Crazy People was in final draft form. He made the management of my publishing processes enjoyable from our first meeting until the published book, and beyond. He has a natural flair, which comes from his love of what he does. He’s not a bad bloke for a Kiwi.

 

 

 

Fiona: Do you see writing as a career?

Most definitely but not necessarily a profitable one. The good thing is that being a self-funded retiree I can now afford to spend my time on pursuits I enjoy rather than labouring to pay the mortgage and support my family.

 

 
Fiona: If you had to do it all over again, would you change anything in your latest book?

Not a thing. But let’s hope the readers feel the same way.

 

 
Fiona: Do you recall how your interest in writing originated?

I was always interested in writing. As a teenager I was editor of the school magazine. I just couldn’t see an income from writing back then. Actually, I still can’t.

 

 
Fiona: Can you share a little of your current work with us?

Certainly. Sex, Lies & Crazy People is the bittersweet true story about my family’s involvement in the Harewood Hotel, Royal Tunbridge Wells, Kent in England during the 1960s.

Best described as a true life Fawlty Towers – but without Basil it is interspersed with self-deprecating reminisces. Dad assigned me to the kitchens because he was frightened shitless but,

will I be able to cook any better than my dysfunctional family? You’ll have to read the book to find out but I’m in good company with chefs who can’t cook and waiters who don’t speak English.

We had a multitude of international guests at the Harewood. They included a millionaire addicted to pornography; a con man and his beautiful ex-prostitute wife; a cash strapped film company; a strange little man who reads tea leaves and scientologists seeking spiritual fulfilment. To name a few!

After falling in love for all the wrong reasons in Tripping Over I meet Carole – but will our love last? Unfortunately, I’ve already given away the ending to that, haven’t I?

Sex, Lies & Crazy People follows on from Tripping Over. But that said they are all stand alone stories.

 

 

 

Fiona: Is there anything you find particularly challenging in your writing?

Yes. Finding the time. I know that sounds ridiculous for someone who’s retired but I often tell people I could never go back to work as, “I don’t have the time.”

 

 
Fiona: Who is your favourite author and what is it that really strikes you about their work?

I can’t honestly say that I have a favourite author, but I’ve enjoyed the Jack Reacher books by

Lee Childs. To relax I often read fiction. Gran used to say, “Fiction’s a waste of time unless you get a laugh out of it.”

 

 

Fiona: Do you have to travel much concerning your book(s)?

Not really although we enjoy travel. I went back to the Old Dart as part of my research for Reluctant Hero and while I was there I did a trip down memory lane, which also included some reminiscing over the Harewood Hotel in Royal Tunbridge Wells, Kent. I even visited the Sussex Pad Hotel in Hove.

 

 
Fiona: Who designed the covers?

Reluctant Hero was designed by the talented Andy McDermott at Publicious, Tripping Over was the inspiration of Luke Harris at Chameleon Print Design, and Sex, lies & Crazy People was the graphic design team at In House Publishing.

 

 
Fiona: What was the hardest part of writing your book?

With Reluctant Hero it was attention the to detail, with Tripping Over and Sex, Lies & Crazy People it’s been the focus on humour. I find it’s not easy to write comedy. And of course what appeals to one person as funny might not strike another as amusing at all. When I was a child I was in awe of comedians like Norman Wisdom and Jerry Lewis. A few years ago I watched an interview with Jerry Lewis when he was asked how funny was he at home? He said, “I’m not a funny man. Comedy is a very serious business.” That made sense to me and I decided to attempt it for myself.

 

 
Fiona: Did you learn anything from writing your book and what was it?

Reluctant Hero stands alone as a controversial book in that it ridicules war and highlights corruption and incompetence by those in privileged positions of power.

With Tripping Over and Sex, Lies & Crazy People I ask readers to apply a giggle stick scale:

By that I mean that “0” is unfunny up to “10” is hilarious. If you call me after you’ve read a book to ask where the funny bit was – then give it a “0” but if you call to say you couldn’t put it down because it was hilarious as some have, then I think it deserves a “10.” And please remember to be kind to the author!

 

 
Fiona: Do you have any advice for other writers?
Yes. Above all never give up. Perseverance. And to quote a line from Reluctant Hero – Nil bastardi carberandum! (Don’t let the bastards grind you down!)

 

 

Fiona: Do you have anything specific that you want to say to your readers?

Thank you. Thank you. Thank you. Thank you for liking my books, thank you for buying my books, thank you for enjoying the product of what I do. I’m obsessed with my writing but without you, you wonderful dear readers, I wouldn’t be an author.

 

 

Fiona: Do you remember the first book you read?

Goodness. That’s over 60 years ago. I was rapt in all of Enid Blyton’s work, I read comics when I was allowed and I do remember a book called Pete of the Wild Grass Country but I can’t remember who wrote it.

 

 

Fiona: What makes you laugh/cry?

I’m an emotional man but I prefer laughter to tears. I enjoy movies and I’ll go with anything provided it’s well done. Tom Selleck is a good mixture in his Jesse Stone series, Dexter, Deadwood, Billy Connolly makes me laugh as does Pam Ayres. And the hilarious and talented Robin Williams before his tragic death.

 

 

Fiona: Is there one person past or present you would want to meet and why?

Not one person, no. But if I could go back in time, knowing then what I know now, I’d love to sit down one last time with Dad. Oh, and to have met Robin Williams – what a talent.

 

 

Fiona: Other than writing do you have any hobbies ?

Does consuming alcohol most days from 4pm onwards with good friends or family count?

If not, no, but I keep meaning to play Croquet but haven’t got around to it. We’ve covered golf!

 

 

Fiona: What TV shows/films do you enjoy watching?

On TV I watch; The Good Wife, Silk, Foyle’s War, Dr Who, The Blacklist, Mrs Brown’s Boys, to name a few. I also enjoy the History Channel on Foxtel; who wouldn’t be inspired by Tony Robinson’s enthusiasm for finding an old rock? And the Crime Channel; it amazes me how bad bastards in the USA can get 999 years and here, for the same crime, they get 5 years and probation.

Film wise I prefer modern stuff. Frankly, I think its so much better produced and acted than the oldies. Admittedly, there are a few classical exceptions; we always watch Dinner for one 1963 at Christmas.

I like blockbusters with special effects but I also like Aussie movies; The Castle, The Dish, Gettin’ Square, Kenny, Two Hands, Mr Reliable.

 

 

Fiona: Favourite foods / Colours/ Music:

Fresh seafood any which way, steak, and roasts. I don’t have a favourite colour but I like white.

I like ballads and anything that has a beat that I can hear the words to. Beach Boys, Elvis, The Beatles, ABBA, The Bachelors, Ken Dodd – you’re dating me now!

 

 

Fiona: If you were not a writer what else would you like to have done?

If computers had been around I would have liked to be a computer nerd. A life in movies might have been fun.

 

 

Fiona: Do you have a blog/website? If so what is it?

Yes. www.authorjohnhickman.com

FaceBook https://www.facebook.com/JohnHickmanAuthor?ref=hl

Twitter https://twitter.com/writerJohnH

Goodreads https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/4952360.John_Hickman)

 

ReluctantHero-e1408282463478TRIPPING-OVER-3D_849x1126-1-e1408282319882SEX-LIES-N-CRAY-PPLHomeThumb_NR2

 

 

Here us my interview with Luke Christodoulou

Me in Santorini (book 2 setting)

Name  Luke Christodoulou

Age 32

Where are you from I am from Cyprus, I have Greek, English and Spanish roots.

A little about your self `ie your education Family life etc

I am a happily married man with an amazingly talented and crazy daughter. I consider myself a movie-book-coffee lover. I studied education in Greece and Applied Linguistics in the UK and for the last 8 years I have been teaching English to the little ones in public primary schools in Limassol and Paphos.

 

 

Fiona: Tell us your latest news?

My book, The Olympus Killer, became an Amazon bestseller in various thriller categories. Not even in my wildest dreams could I have expected more. I have also passed the 40000 word mark on my second book from my Greek Island Mysteries series.

 

 
Fiona: When and why did you begin writing?

Natural need really. I had to get the thoughts out of my head and onto paper (well, screen). I started as a kid, writing mostly science fiction tales for my family, then poetry while at uni and now thrillers.

 

 
Fiona: When did you first consider yourself a writer?

When my first book, The Olympus Killer, was published and someone bought it. A great moment.

 

 
Fiona: What inspired you to write your first book?

I have always been drawn to thrillers, both books and movies. I wanted to do something different though, and I was inspired by the sun kissed Greek Isles and Greek mythology.

 

 

Fiona: How did you come up with the title?

Olympus the mountain where the ancients believed the Gods lived and ruled. As my killer, was murdering according to Greek myths, I named him THE OLYMPUS KILLER.

 

 
Fiona: Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?

That life is fragile. That tragedy can strike at any time, but as humans we stand strong. Also, to appreciate the people protecting us.

 

 
Fiona: How much of the book is realistic?

The plot and the characters are entirely fictional. However, the emotions and the settings are real. The murders are fictional, but we hear daily of gruesome crimes being committed around the globe.

 

 
Fiona: What books have most influenced your life most?

As a writer, Hercule Poirot books have been a major influence. As a person? Hmm… influence my life? Ok, don’t laugh, but the Gruffalo. Read it as a child and admired the little mouse for using his brain to survive.

 

 
Fiona: If you had to choose, which writer would you consider a mentor?

Agatha Christie or Stephen King. I would settle for James Patterson too!

 

 
Fiona: What book are you reading now?

I am currently reading a Greek book, called Five Keys by Lena Manta.

 

 
Fiona: What are your current projects?

Greek Island Mysteries #2 is coming along great. It nice to be living with my characters once again.

 

 
Fiona: Name one entity that you feel supported you outside of family members.

The book’s fans. The Olympus Killer was voted Book Of The Month in two Goodread’s groups and has thousands of followers on social media. Their feedback, love, support, judgement, reviews have been overwhelming.

 

 
Fiona: Do you see writing as a career?

Yes, but in all honesty, it does not pay enough for me to give up my day job and pursue a full time writing career. Besides, I love teaching.

 

 
Fiona: Can you share a little of your current work with us?

I’d rather not reveal the title. Let’s call it Greek Island Mysteries #2 for now. It follows the two protagonists from the first book, however, instead of being faced with one case (The Olympus Killer), they are now faced with various cases all strangely connected to the church. The first chapters are available at the end of The Olympus Killer.

 

 
Fiona: Who is your favorite author and what is it that really strikes you about their work?

Agatha Christie. She was unique and ahead of her time. It strikes me how she used the same character so successfully thoughout so many different cases.

 

 
Fiona: Do you have to travel much concerning your book(s)?

Yes. I visit annually the Greek Islands, each time discovering another hidden paradise.

 

 
Fiona: Who designed the covers?

An amazingly talented young lady, Maria Nicolaou. She grasped the main idea of a thriller being set in the Greek Islands and the cover is eye candy. I love it and look forward working with her for the next instalment.

(Mj.Vass http://99designs.com/users/1158351)

 

 
Fiona: What was the hardest part of writing your book?

The hardest part was I actually finished it. The editing took months, changes were hard to accept and I remember reading the same chapters again and again and finding it hard to let go. To accept it’s finished.

 

 
Fiona: Do you have any advice for other writers?

A few clichés. To write daily and to keep reading while writing. For newcomers, I would say, to set up a platform over social media before releasing their book. Marketing is harder than writing.

 

 
Fiona: Do you have anything specific that you want to say to your readers?

Just a huge THANK YOU for all their support.

 

 

Fiona: Do you remember the first book you read?

The very hungry caterpillar was a childhood favorite. My first novel, was The witch, the lion and the wardrobe.

 

 

Fiona: What makes you laugh/cry?

Life. My wife, daughter and crazy friends whom I travel to work with make laugh quite often. I don’t cry easily. I get emotional with a good movie, but tears rarely form.

 

 

Fiona: Is there one person pass or present you would

To meet and why?

Mother Teresa. I believe I live too selfishly. I would love to hear her advice. Get inspired by how she lived for others. Fought to make the world a better place.

 

 

 

Fiona: What TV shows/films do you enjoy watching?

Anything with good acting and a descent story. I am mostly drawn to thrillers and blockbusters, but me and the wife watch all Oscar winners/nominees. Comedies are my least favorite. Pixar movies are a guilty pleasure.

 

 

Fiona: Favorite foods / Colors/ Music

Octopus marinated in wine / Blue and black / All genres. If my ear likes it, it does. If it doesn’t, it doesn’t. I can’t explain it any better.

 

 

 

Fiona: Do you have a blog/website? If so what is it?

People can find me : http://greekislandmysteries.webs.com/

Or on fb: https://www.facebook.com/pages/Greek-Island-Mysteries/712190782134816

Twitter: @OlympusKiller

LINKS: Amazon: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00JMTRPTE

Amazon UK: http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B00JMTRPTE?*Version*=1&*entries*=0#13905910073971006

.

Thank you Fiona!

 

new cover

Here is my interview with Daithi Kavanagh

 

daithi kavanagh

Name:  Daithi Kavanagh

Age:    56

Where are you from – Ballyshelin, Trinity, Co. Wexford.

A little about your self `ie your education Family life etc:

I am married to Caroline and I have two teenage children Ella and Rory aged 17 and 14. I recently went back to adult education having sat my leaving certificate in 2014 and am now doing a third level course in Irish Culture and Heritage.

 

 

Fiona: Tell us your latest news?

My debut novel ‘The Gun’ has just been published by Tirgearr Publishing i.e 30th September 2014 as an eReader four weeks after I started my third level course.

 

 

Fiona: When and why did you begin writing?

I began writing approx two years ago when I started on an adult education course. My English teacher felt I had a talent for creative writing and encouraged  me to continue.

 

 
Fiona: When did you first consider yourself a writer?

When Tirgearr accepted my novel it struck home that maybe I actually can write.
 

 

Fiona: What inspired you to write your first book?

The anger that existed in Ireland after the economic collapse inspired me to write this book.
Fiona: Do you have a specific writing style?

I tend to read Nordic crime novels and am very much influenced by this type of writing.

 

 

Fiona: How did you come up with the title?

From the outset the gun itself took on a huge role in the book. This is the reason I named the book ‘The Gun’.

 

 

Fiona: Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?

Sometimes peoples personalities such as Sullivan’s mature better in less favourable circumstances and if people are pushed to far they will strike out.

 

 

Fiona: How much of the book is realistic?

I feel in general that the characters and the events come across as realistic and most of the places mentioned in it are places where I grew up and have lived in for most of my life.

 

 

Fiona: Are experiences based on someone you know, or events in your own life?

The recession to a large degree influenced my writing and some of the experiences of the characters are loosely based on my own.
 

 

Fiona: What books have most influenced your life most?

With regard to my own writing writers such as Stieg Larsson, Henning Mankel and Ian Rankin are a big influence.

 

 

Fiona: If you had to choose, which writer would you consider a mentor?

Henning Mankel.

 

 

Fiona: What book are you reading now?

Police by Jo Nesbo

 

 
Fiona: Are there any new authors that have grasped your interest?

I am enjoying Jo Nesbo at the moment.

 

 

Fiona: What are your current projects?

My current projects are my new book The Brotherhood and I am doing a third level course in Irish Culture and Heritage.

 

 

Fiona: Name one entity that you feel supported you outside of family members.

Kemberlee in Tirgearr Publishing, Troy my editor and my English teacher Jim Maguire.

 

 

Fiona: Do you see writing as a career?

I would love it to become my career.

 

 
Fiona: If you had to do it all over again, would you change anything in your latest book?

No I’m happy with the way my book has turned out.

 

 

Fiona: Do you recall how your interest in writing originated?

Through encouragement from my English teacher Jim Maguire.

 

 
Fiona: Can you share a little of your current work with us?

The Gun is an Irish crime novel involving a political serial killer (The Deerstalker) and a detective called Tadhg Sullivan who is trying to end his reign of terror.

 

 

Fiona: Is there anything you find particularly challenging in your writing?

Finding time to write whilst trying to maintain a balance between work and family life can be challenging.

 

 

Fiona: Who is your favorite author and what is it that really strikes you about their work?

Arnaldar Indroason who is an Icelandic crime writer. What strikes me is his empathy with his fellow human beings.

 

 

Fiona: Do you have to travel much concerning your book(s)?

No. My books so far are based in Ireland but there are aspects of the stories that are related to outside influences. In my second book in the series – The Brotherhood Sullivan and Horowitz an ex CIA agent have to travel to the Middle East.

 

 

Fiona: Who designed the covers?

Tirgearr Publishing with some ideas from my brother Sean.
 

 

Fiona: What was the hardest part of writing your book?

Having the time to dedicate to it. I enjoy the actual writing as I get to stay in bed to do it!

 

 

Fiona: Did you learn anything from writing your book and what was it?

That anything is possible.

 

 

Fiona: Do you have any advice for other writers?

Believe in yourself and do it. Don’t give up.

 

 
Fiona: Do you have anything specific that you want to say to your readers?

I hope my writing inspires people to be nicer to each other as it has done with me.

 

 

Fiona: Do you remember the first book you read?

Chopper ( book about Hells Angels). I was 12 years old when I read it. My second book was Wuthering Heights.

 

 

Fiona: What makes you laugh/cry?

My wife!

 

 

Fiona: Is there one person pass or present you would To meet and why?

Michael Davitt an Irish Patriot who was born in England and had more empathy with the common man than in my opinion anybody past or present.

 

 

Fiona: Other than writing do you have any hobbies ?

Music, singing, politics, history and Irish Culture.

 

 

Fiona: What TV shows/films do you enjoy watching?

Crime Dramas.

 

 

Fiona: Favorite foods / Colors/ Music:

I like simple plain food i.e. Bacon and Cabbage, steak and chips etc. Colours – green, blue and brown. Music – Irish traditional.

 

 

Fiona: If you were not a writer what else would you like to have done?

Historian or Archaeologist.

 

Fiona: Do you have a blog/website? If so what is it?

www.daithikavanagh.blogspot.com

http://www.tirgearrpublishing.com/authors/Kavanagh_Daithi/the-gun.htm

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00NU8MDTA

 

 

91aBiQJr-vL._SL1500_

Here is my interview with Andrea McKenzie Raine

author_photo

Name   Andrea McKenzie Raine

Age 39

Where are you from

Victoria, BC, Canada

A little about your self `ie your education Family life etc

I studied creative writing and English literature at the University of Victoria, and graduated in 2000 with a B.A. in English Literature. I continued to write poetry and fiction and became an active member of my writing community. Since my college days, I have been a regular attendee at a successful reading series called Planet Earth Poetry (formerly known as Mocambopo) where I have connected with many aspiring and established writers locally and nationally. My family has always been supportive of my writing aspirations – my parents encouraged me when I was younger (and still do), and more recently my husband has acknowledged the importance of writing in my life; before we became parents he would often tell me to ‘go and write’ while he made dinner, etc. My husband and I work full-time and are raising our two boys, aged 5 and 2, with the help of day-care and grandparents during the day. So, the days are a bit of a juggling act, and my writing time is limited and precious. My oldest son is now aware of my writing life and he has accompanied me at poetry readings and often asks me about my novel. I am very fortunate to have such an understanding, loving, creative and supportive network of people in my life as I embark on this journey.

 

 

Fiona: Tell us your latest news?

In December 2013, I published my debut novel Turnstiles through Inkwater Press. Now I am working on a prequel novella, A Crowded Heart. I have another local reading in November 17, 2014, at the Pen-In-Hand Reading Series at Serious Coffee. I am also thrilled to be receiving wonderful reviews of my book.

 

 
Fiona: When and why did you begin writing?

I have been writing since I could hold a pencil. It is something ingrained in me and I have always had the desire to express myself through journaling, poetry and creative stories. I was the kid who became excited in class whenever the teacher assigned creative writing, while most of the other kids groaned and whined. I started writing my first journal when I was six, and at age seven I would write little ‘ding-dong’ poems in homemade cards for family members. My third grade teacher told me that she expected to see a novel written by me one day, and my mom eventually started asking me to write poems in other people’s birthday cards. So, I had support from an early age from people close to me, which helped encourage me to continue writing and developing my craft.

 

 
Fiona: When did you first consider yourself a writer?

In the third grade, I knew writing was an important part of my life. I seriously began thinking about writing as a career and considered myself a writer, albeit very young and unpublished. I couldn’t really call myself an author, and expect others to see me in the same light, until my first book of poems A Mother’s String was published by Ekstasis Editions in 2005.

 

 
Fiona: What inspired you to write your first book?

I always knew I had a novel inside me, but I didn’t feel like I had much to say until I embarked on a two-month solo backpacking trip through Western Europe in the summer 1998.

 

 
Fiona: Do you have a specific writing style?

My writing tends to be more in the ‘literary fiction’ category; I have read a lot of classical literature and I prefer to paint pictures with words and go beneath the skin of my characters. I write more about my characters’ inner lives and struggles. I also incorporate poetic language into my fiction. My writing is accessible and entertaining, but I believe my work also has many layers and an underlying message for the reader to explore and ponder.

 

 
Fiona: How did you come up with the title?

The working title came to me in the early stages of writing my book, and it stuck. I was thinking of Turnstiles in a concrete way: train travel. Then Turnstiles became a metaphor for traversing through rites of passage, and crossing both geographical and personal landscapes to discover new places or perceptions.

 

 
Fiona: Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?

I believe there are many layers to explore in Turnstiles, but ultimately I hope readers will grasp the idea that everything can change in a heartbeat; the world is full of possibilities, and the key to accessing those possibilities could simply be an act of kindness or changing the course of your day. Also, things aren’t always what they seem – the person you dismiss as an out-of-work bum sitting on the sidewalk may have a great spark inside of them that hasn’t been able to shine yet, and the person who seems to ‘have it all’ may be battling with demons that you wouldn’t wish on anybody.

 

 
Fiona: How much of the book is realistic?

Writing Turnstiles was a cathartic journey for me, although most of it is fiction. I did explore some issues I was working through:  finding my way into steady, rewarding employment after university; muddling through my ‘single life’ and the disappointment of failed relationships; and trying to find my own place and purpose in the world.

 

 
Fiona: Are experiences based on someone you know, or events in your own life?

I have never been through anything as severe as my characters; however, I was able to impart empathy for their situations on some level. I’ve watched a lot of movies, read a lot of books, taken pieces from the lives of others and mine own – basically, I’ve lived on this planet for nearly 40 years and paid attention.

 

 
Fiona: What books have most influenced your life most?

Crime and Punishment by Dostoevsky;

 

 
Fiona: If you had to choose, which writer would you consider a mentor?

Patrick Lane

 

 
Fiona: What book are you reading now?

Break In Two by MJ Summers. I don’t usually read steamy romances, so this one is kind of new for me. I also simply need an escape at the moment. My husband and I work full-time and we have two rambunctious boys who are five and two; sometimes it’s nice to read some light fiction. I like to alternate between classic literature and contemporary fiction.

 

 
Fiona: Are there any new authors that have grasped your interest?

Arleen Pare and Pamela Porter

 

 
Fiona: What are your current projects?

As I mentioned, I am working on a prequel novella titled A Crowded Heart. I am also trying to find a home for my second poetry manuscript, Spectrums & Apertures and a chapbook of ghazals titled A Year of Mornings.

 

 
Fiona: Name one entity that you feel supported you outside of family members.

I have a wonderful writing group called the Waywords. Our focus is poetry, but the sole act of writing is at the core of the group. They have definitely been a large part of my support network, and cheering me in on all my writing endeavours.

 

 
Fiona: Do you see writing as a career?

Absolutely. I have so many ideas, and other novels that I have started and want to finish. My novel Turnstiles also has more legs: a spin-off and possible sequel.

 

 

Fiona: If you had to do it all over again, would you change anything in your latest book?

No. I have lived with these characters and their individual stories long enough that I feel every rock has been overturned.

 

 

 

Fiona: Do you recall how your interest in writing originated?

It was always there. I don’t know when or how the first impulse to write began. I do remember that my first grade teacher gave our class an assignment to keep a daily journal, and I took it very seriously and enjoyed the chance to write down all of my daily events. The record of those events also conjured up emotions about them. I also taught myself to read books before I started school, so I think my desire for books began at a very early age and I knew I wanted to be a part of that creative world.

 

 
Fiona: Can you share a little of your current work with us?

The prequel novella I am working on is centered on a main character in Turnstiles who the reader never gets to meet because he is deceased from the beginning of the novel. However, the choices he made in his life have a direct influence on the way the lives of the other characters unfold. He is painted in a bad light, and I felt that he needed an opportunity to tell his side of the story.

 

 

 

Fiona: Is there anything you find particularly challenging in your writing?

Finding the time to write; to get lost in that other world.

 

 
Fiona: Who is your favorite author and what is it that really strikes you about their work?

Diana Gabaldon is my favourite author because her writing is epic, adventurous, historical, interpersonal, human, vivid and poetic.

 

 
Fiona: Do you have to travel much concerning your book(s)?

My novel, Turnstiles, is largely set in London, Paris and Germany; when I returned from my backpacking trip, the landscapes and people of these countries were fresh in my mind.

 

 
Fiona: Who designed the covers?

Inkwater Press worked with me to find the perfect cover for my book.

 

 

 
Fiona: What was the hardest part of writing your book?

The hardest part was delving into those darker places.

 

 
Fiona: Did you learn anything from writing your book and what was it?

I think I learned that there is a light at the end of any dark tunnel.

 

 
Fiona: Do you have any advice for other writers?

Keep writing. Don’t lose the spark, or drop the thread no matter how little time you have to write, or how long it takes to complete a poem, short story, or novel. Take the time to get your thoughts down on paper – brain dump into a journal (you may find little gems later). Remember to let your characters take you wherever they want to go.

 

 
Fiona: Do you have anything specific that you want to say to your readers?

I am a new author, but I have a lot to say and I have been working on my craft for a long time. I am grateful to all of the readers who have taken a chance on reading my first book.  There will be more to come.

 

 

Fiona: Do you remember the first book you read?

Ramona, Age 8 by Beverly Cleary

 

 

Fiona: What makes you laugh/cry?

My children make me laugh and cry.

 

 

Fiona: Is there one person past or present you would want to meet and why?

Emile Zola. I don’t know how much we could say to each other since I don’t speak French, but I would like to meet him because he was prolific and brave; he wrote for the sake of humanity.

 

 

Fiona: Other than writing do you have any hobbies?

I enjoy scrapbooking my sons’ baby books and travel books.

 

 

Fiona: Favorite foods / Colors/ Music

Lasagne/red/classical and rock

 

 

Fiona: If you were not a writer what else would you like to have done?

I honestly don’t know. Writing is in my blood. Perhaps I would have continued studying ballet.

 

 

Fiona: Do you have a blog/website? If so what is it?

My author website is http://andreamckenzieraine.com

My author blog is http://arainewriter.blogspot.ca

 

8746_671477376217920_1873025128_n

Here is my interview with Tina Smith

Tinastwitterpicture

 

Name Tina Smith

Age 31

 

A little about your self `ie your education Family life etc?

I was born in the Bega Valley in New South Wales Australia. I have one younger brother. I’m the oldest.  I spent the first 7 years of my life in a tiny town in Victoria before moving back to the Valley where I attended Candelo primary and Bega High. I had a terrible reputation as a ‘bad girl’. My friends new the truth, it was a complete ruse.

 

 

Fiona: Tell us your latest news?

I am producing two anthology novels, Night Life and Lacing Shadows. I have plans to extend the short stories I have written about vampires and Aliens into novels. I am also aiming to complete the Wolf Sirens Series, releasing book #6 next year. It will be followed by The Shade Before us—a prequel to Wolf Sirens.

 

 
Fiona: When and why did you begin writing?

I was born a writer, I have a wild imagination and I’m very introverted. I stared writing as a child. I used to make up stories to tell my friends and my brother. I didn’t attempt anything serious until I started on Wolf Sirens, though I was a journal and poem writer since I was a kid. I suspect that I cultivated the idea of Wolf Sirens for some time in the back of my mind.
 

 

Fiona: When did you first consider yourself a writer?

When I published Wolf Sirens, my first book. It wasn’t until I had it in my hands that I realized I was a writer.
 

 

Fiona: What inspired you to write your first book?

Twilight, to be honest—that book has a lot to answer for! Wuthering heights was an influence as well as my life and personal heartbreak.

 

 
Fiona: Do you have a specific writing style?

I think I do have my own style. It’s detailed and I like to mislead the reader. I have a lot of conflicting reviews. But I feel if you want more from the genre of PNR, you’ll appreciate what I do.
 

 

Fiona: How did you come up with the title?

A lot of thinking and word combining. It’s original and it fitted so well.

 

 
Fiona: Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?

Probably, I think you can tell from reading it that I am a firm believer in true love. I don’t think books should reflect the author’s morals but funnily enough I think my dislike of high scruples and convention shines through. At the same time it’s chaste in style, I am quite liberal. I like strong female protagonists with heart and I’m somewhat of a feminist. I think girls should have good female role models. I believe in gender equality and I tried indirectly to paint that kind of world.

 

 
Fiona: How much of the book is realistic?

It’s a strange cataclysm of things, one of them being experiences I have had. The setting is based on Bega. Pieces of relationships and feelings I have felt. Art versus life. Lila is the tougher version of my younger self. I think I am a lone wolf at heart. It’s my totem animal. PN is a metaphor for life. It’s a heightened reality in a way, a tool I use to enhance and explore emotions.

 

 
Fiona: Are experiences based on someone you know, or events in your own life?

Cres is closely based on friends of mine from high school. I’m a pantser and I layer up my novels, by about the fifth going over I have developed my characters and the interesting detail. It happens as I go along. I just have to be in the Wolf Sirens zone. I channel parts of my life into it.
 

 

Fiona: What books have most influenced your life most?

Twilight, Call of the Wild, White Fang, Checkers, Shiver and Children of the Dust. Everything I read or see or hear about is fodder. But those are strong influences. As were Roald Dahl and Paul Jennings and Emily Rodda when I was a kid. John Marsden’s When the War Began and Lindsay Andersons Looking for Alibrandi, in high school. All of those stories and story tellers influenced me.

 

 

 
Fiona: What book are you reading now?

I am reading Thirst by Ava Delany. It’s about vampires.

 

 
Fiona: Are there any new authors that have grasped your interest?

I love Amanda Hocking actually. I also really love Colleen Hoover’s books.

 

 
Fiona: What are your current projects?

I am chipping away at Wolf Sirens #5, Dawn in Shade. We are almost done. Then I start work on Wolf Sirens #6, Storm in Shade. I am also going to extend the short stories that I have written for the anthologies. They have been well received and I would love to take them further, one is about vampirism and the other is about aliens—good looking aliens. The novellas all seem to have my trademark mystery and detail.

 

 
Fiona: Name one entity that you feel supported you outside of family members.

My mother’s best friend, Sally and her husband have encouraged me from the very start. They read over my work when no one else had seen it and it’s due to their enthusiasm that I took the plunge to show my secret to the world.

 

 
Fiona: Do you see writing as a career?

I do now, though at the same time I know more than ever that that is a hard thing to achieve. I hope to be able to financially support myself on my novels and spend every day doing nothing but writing.

 

 
Fiona: If you had to do it all over again, would you change anything in your latest book?

No, I work over them as hard and as much as I can and when they are done, they are done. I cannot go back and read them over once they are out. I am evolving as a writer and I am usually in a different zone once a work is done. I would hate to think that I could make it better, it is what it is. I hope that it is well received; I might rethink my current opinion if it was not. However I plan the plots in my head long before the words hit the page and long before the public read the pages. So I stand by all twists and turns. They aren’t up to me, the story writes itself.

 

 
Fiona: Do you recall how your interest in writing originated?

I like tales. I loved the story of Puss in Boots and other fairytales as a small child. I used to beg my parents to read to me. They were so sick of it they bought me books on tape. There is something innate in me. When I was inline in heaven God handed me a love of words. No one else in my family shares my passion, but my mother’s side are all very creative. Writing is my outlet, my art. Plus I like being alone for extended periods so it’s all fallen into place.

 

 
Fiona: Is there anything you find particularly challenging in your writing?

I used to think I hated writing high action but strangely I do like writing action books, I just don’t like writing the intensive parts like battles. I do it well, apparently, but it is my least favourite part of the job of telling a story. That’s why I like Fever so much (book #2 Wolf Sirens series), it’s a slower pace, a slow burner. All my books have a pace all their own. I feel like every with novel in the series the pace increases. It all heats up and by book #6 it’s on fire.

 

 
Fiona: Who is your favorite author and what is it that really strikes you about their work?

I love Colleen Hoover, I love the twist, she excels at good surprises in her stories. The nice ‘slap in the face’ surprises make her stories great. Amanda Hocking’s style is very different and I have strived to emulate her zombie novels, I love her pace and Hollow men and Hollow Land inspired me hugely. I hadn’t read much action and the style rubbed off. I also adore An Rice’s Vampires. Their personality is so well depicted. I also like to take my love of contemporary fiction and inject it into my Paranormal. Books like Atonement and The Book Thief. I hadn’t read Hunger Games until after I had written and published WS1 and I think my style was comparable. Katniss and Lila have similarities— attitude and a bow.

 

 
Fiona: Do you have to travel much concerning your book(s)?

No, but here’s hoping that I might get that opportunity in the near future.

 

 
Fiona: Who designed the covers?

I did, necessity is the mother of invention. I have a limited budget and I am a perfectionist, so I worked hard and taught myself how to use photo shop. I am happy with the results.

 

 
Fiona: What was the hardest part of writing your book?

Editing, first and second rounds before I give it to my editor and proof reader. That is work! The story still has some very rough edges and you have to squeeze and push until it pops out the other side as a fully formed baby/book.

 

 
Fiona: Did you learn anything from writing your book and what was it?

What didn’t I learn! I learnt so much about editing. I was a newb before I started writing the series. I have learnt about formatting, cover design, computers, facebook, promo, touring and bloggers. The one thing I employ a lot in my writing is “Show Don’t tell.” The reader doesn’t want to be told what you said, they want to hear it. They don’t want to be told the Bar was grimy, they should be shown.

 

 
Fiona: Do you have any advice for other writers?

I like that saying. “Write like no one will read it and edit like everyone will.” I also abide by the idea that, apart from spilling your heart and soul on the page and working really hard at it, that you must write what you would never tell your mother. That’s what people want to read.

 

 
Fiona: Do you have anything specific that you want to say to your readers?

Tell your friends how great the book was. The hardest part about being Indie is that I have a small advertising budget. Word of mouth is the best thing you can do for a book and a writer you love. It keeps me in business.

 

 

Fiona: Do you remember the first book you read?

It was probably Roald Dahl’s Rotten Nursery Rhymes—and I loved it. I starred in the primary school play based on it and I knew everyone’s lines. However, a case of stage fright meant I didn’t face the audience on opening night. I had my back to the audience most of the time because I was so shy!

 

 

Fiona: What makes you laugh/cry?

What doesn’t! I am an emotional creature, I’ve had to toughen up a lot. It’s a cruel world and the strong prey on the weak. As far as laughter goes I am amused by fairly immature humour and embarrassing tales (who isn’t?). Certain people think I am hilarious and others don’t get it at all. I am the queen of the dead pan, so if you aren’t on the wave length you can think I am serious, at times I am being serious (I’m very melodramatic) but I do see the funny side. My daughter thinks I am a bag of laughs and my mother just thinks I am complaining, she frequently scolds me.

 

 

Fiona: Other than writing do you have any hobbies ?

Yes, beading, walking the dog, soaping and I can cook. Most of my spare time is spent watching movies for inspiration, reading for inspiration and eavesdropping for ideas. I try to soak up art like a sponge. But writing my series is my life, when I am not at work in customer service and more often than not nowadays I am marketing or promoting the series and the anthologies—so I have to squash in spare time.

 

 

Fiona: What TV shows/films do you enjoy watching?

I watched Divergent recently and loved it! They did a good job of keeping it close to the book. It was a thrill.

I love reality talent shows at the moment. I like So You Think You Can Dance and any one of the Singing shows like Idol. I get a kick out of seeing people pursue their passion. The dancers remind me of the wolves in wolf sirens. They are agile and strong and super fit.

 

 

Fiona: Favorite foods / Colors/ Music?

Aqua, chocolate, and my favourite song is ‘My Immortal’ by Evanescence. Last night I had ‘All about that Base’ by Meghan Trainor spinning on replay in my head. I was up at 2.30a.m in the morning singing it. I had had no coffee (I can’t handle the stuff), so it remains a mystery…perhaps it’s a full moon?

 

 

Fiona: If you were not a writer what else would you like to have done?

I’m able to adapt and pick up most things, I work in customer service and I find it so draining and not something that I naturally excel at. My mother runs a store so that’s where I started out. I imagine that I could have been a baker of fantastical cakes, in reality I would probably practise as a naturopath but my heart isn’t in it. I have spent the last seven years completing the over 30 subjects required for the advanced diploma whilst working in a health food store. Unlike with writing there were many road blocks and it was a long road but I always finish what I start.

Writing comes naturally to me. I dislike reality; I am only truly at peace when I am creating an alternate world, even one filled with sadness, death and violence. I am the first to admit I am an oddity. But don’t oddballs make the best authors?

 

Fiona: Do you have a blog/website? If so what is it?

 

Goodreads; http://www.goodreads.com/TinaSmith

 

Kindle: Forbidden; http://www.amazon.com/dp/B009GG06AS Wolf Sirens Fever; http://www.amazon.com/Wolf-Sirens-Fev… Night Fall: http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00D6BUDH0

Dusk in Shade: http://www.amazon.com/Wolf-Sirens-Shade-Wolves-Sunset-ebook/dp/B00HKQLLBY

 

Smashwords: Forbidden; https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/210115 Fever: https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/248222 Night Fall: https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/321480 Dusk in Shade: https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/388578

 

Twitter: https://twitter.com/tinawolfsirens Pinterest: http://www.pinterest.com/wolfsirens/boards/ Facebook; http://www.facebook.com/wolfsirens

 

Amazon Author Page: http://www.amazon.com/Tina-Smith/e/B008V3H97A

Website: wolfsirens.com

 

 

Fiona: Can you  share a little of your current work with us? Sure. (I’ll attach it). Wolf Sirens #5 Dawn in Shade. It is due for release in October.

 

 

Wolf Sirens #5 Teaser:

Due for release October 2014

 

We all relaxed a little as we hit the open countryside but the sky was still buzzing with electrical threads that seemed to culminate around a white sun in a frosty blue sky.

Dillon reached across behind Marcus, and handed me something. Bullets. I found the pistol and loaded the magazine as I nodded my thanks.

“Crain, remember that I’m the only one who knows where your friends are.” He reminded me. As we neared the other boundary of Shade the sky was the same; it cut off our way out of the Valley. Mason got out and tried throwing a rock that dissolved into it. He paced the glowing perimeter.

“What is this?” he asked, I realized he actually expected an answer from me. The wounded guy who was already starting to sweat looked at me sullenly like he too might expect me to answer them. “You said it would be the same, how did you know?”

“Ha, now you think that I have the answers?” It was ironic. “You are on your own.” I jumped down and tucked the gun in my belt, casting a worried look at Fre before addressing them. “Oh, and just a heads up; that guy is infected, he’ll be one of them in about an hour.” I looked away from him and started walking.

“Wait, wait!” Dom called, clambering out of the vehicle “Please, is there any cure?” Marcus followed him, equally anxious to hear what I said as he clutched his bandaged arm.

I strode back over to him and shoved the army issue rifle slung on his shoulder into his arms, pointing the muzzle at his chin.

His face was pained and he looked dirty and damp with sweat.

“Do it now,” I urged through clamped teeth, “and it will be quick or you will cause these men a lot of pain.” My heart was beating fast as I held his horrified stare.

“If you had any guts, any mercy, you would do it and if it was you, you’d want him to do it for you.” I swallowed. That was the cold truth.

Dom had his hand on my shoulder. “Let him go,” he cautioned. But there was no need.

“Have it your way. But maybe you should know something before I leave you for dead.” All attention was on me. “Shoot them in the head or with a direct shot to the heart, otherwise they heal.” I stepped back and turned. “Take care of the kid,” I said over my shoulder as I strode away, I avoided her innocent face. Neither did I look back as I strode down the road. Night would be falling, soon. I needed to find a hiding spot on high ground. I watched the weaving white blue wavy lines in the sky above the mountains with interest.

I was about to head off-road when I heard the familiar whir of the Hummer. I stepped further aside. But they slowed and pulled up.

The sick guy, Marcus, was still with them. “I told you to kill him,” I snarled.

“Get us out of here alive Crain and I’ll make sure you get to see your friends.” I stopped and looked at Dillon. I glanced at Dom.

He could do better than that. “You’ll let them go.”

“They’ll be released,” he assured me. I hid my relief behind a scowl.

I nodded.

“What should we do?” Dom asked.

They were lost without me and they knew it. Things had swung in my favour, only my instincts told me I was better off alone and Dillon might not even have the kind of authority to return my friends, if they were alive.

“Kill him,” I advised ignoring Marcus.

Dom stated his case. “Look, we are soldiers; killing is what we do. But we don’t kill our own.” His voice deepened. They all stared hopefully at me, even the driver, O’Donnell, as his arm rested over the top of the steering wheel.

“Maybe that’s been your biggest mistake.” I looked at Marcus Green. He was already turned. I knew what I had to do for Fre. “He isn’t a soldier anymore,” I warned. His face was clearer. I lifted my gun to pull the trigger but Mason dived on me and I fell back under the force as the infected soldier leapt, transformed, at Dom. I was winded and I struggled to get up, but all I could see was Lab Coat struggling. Fre. I thought with despair as I wriggled under Mason’s weight.

Mason grabbed my arm. He let me up but held me back, firmly. Thankfully, I saw a hypodermic needle protruding from a wolf’s eye, then Marcus reformed into a dead naked human. Dom panicked, pushing the body back. Mason let go of me. I struggled for breath as I walked over and shot Marcus in the head point blank. The bullet blew out the back of his skull, the splatter flicked over my face. We were all in a state of shock, breathing heavily, still tense for action as the echo of the shot died down and I dropped the hand that held the pistol.

 

promo promo image goodWolf Sirens Thumbnail COVER

Here is my interview with Bellann Summer

Name  Bellann Summer

Age  Between 21 and 65

Where are you from: I’m from the midwest of the United States of America

A little about your self `ie your education Family life etc   – I’m an ex-accountant, office manager. I’m married with three children, two boys and a girl. We also have two miniature black and tan dachshunds. We live in the middle of the woods on a lake which suits my nature.

 

 

Fiona: Tell us your latest news?

The big news is that I have been asked by Siren Publishing to become an exclusive author. And I have accepted.

 
Fiona: When and why did you begin writing?

I actually became unemployed last year and thought what the heck. I sat down and wrote a story. I then followed the directions for submitting to Siren Publishing. And the rest is history.

 
Fiona: When did you first consider yourself a writer?

I think I started to believe it was real around book 10.

 

Fiona: What inspired you to write your first book?

I was watching the news and saw a house being swept away by a flooding river. I thought about what would happen if there was a group of experts that could come in and help. Rescue for Hire was born.

 

 

Fiona: Do you have a specific writing style?

I don’t know. I write the way I think and make sure it isn’t boring.

 

 

Fiona: How did you come up with the title?

Out of thin air.

 

 

Fiona: Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?

One character was kidnapped and abused. He vowed to never be a victim again, no matter what. Even though he was kidnapped again and abused, he wouldn’t succumb to being a victim. He fought against his attacker the whole way. I hope someone reading it in whatever situation they are in, can realize they can fight and not be a victim.

 
Fiona: How much of the book is realistic?

Other than the paranormal series, I try to keep it pretty real.

 

 

Fiona: Are experiences based on someone you know, or events in your own life?

Some, all, none and a few.

 

 

Fiona: What book are you reading now?

I’m reading one by Skye Michaels, Sean Michaels and Helen Bruch Pearson

 

 

Fiona: What are your current projects?

I am working on Lubirea Mia 3. This is about a bigoted lion shifter and a very stubborn human.  The readers will get an inside look at the big cat council in this one.

 

 

Fiona: Do you see writing as a career?

I hope so. I’m going to give it my best shot.

 

 

Fiona: If you had to do it all over again, would you change anything in your latest book?

 

My latest book is Rescue for Hire 6 – Gabriel’s Pretty turned out pretty good. Maybe I would explain the epilogue happened 6 months after the original story. Although in the next story it is explained.

 

 

 

Fiona: Can you share a little of your current work with us?

Here is a snippet :

Prologue

One year earlier during a mate sealing ritual between Samuel, Simon’s brother, and Riley.

Taking Riley’s hand, Samuel went over and stood on the soft white rug. Riley positioned himself in front of him and Samuel put his arms around his lubirea mai, pulling his back solidly against Samuel’s front. Samuel braced himself as Simon came toward them, his green eyes glowing.

Simon reached out his hands, ready to place them on lubirea mai symbols on their chests. The tips of his fingers were mere millimeters from their skin, when Riley spoke.

“Simon Craydon, I wish with all my heart that when you meet your mate, he or she will refuse to bow down to you until you’ve bowed to them first.”

Simon’s fingers froze for just a moment and white light burst in his blazing green eyes. The next moment the palms of his hands connected with the blurry scarred lubirea mai symbols on their chests. “Lion cat to human, human to lion cat. You are now united, becoming one in heart, soul and body. It is what is and what will be. For eternity and a day.” Simon’s deep voice echoed in the vast still room.

Fiona: Is there anything you find particularly challenging in your writing?

Just when I conquer on habit a new one develops. Sighs.

 

 

Fiona: Who designed the covers?

The awesome Harris Channing

 

 

Fiona: Do you have any advice for other writers?

Learn the game of promotion. Don’t assume because you have a book published you are going to sell a million copies. It takes putting in the time to promote your book and yourself.

 
Fiona: Do you have anything specific that you want to say to your readers?

Thank you with all my heart.

 

 

Fiona: Do you remember the first book you read?

See Dick and Jane

 

 

Fiona: Is there one person pass or present you would

To meet and why? I would love to meet my grandfather who died when my mother was 2 years old. I feel a connection with him when hearing all the stories about him. I would love to see and hear how he thinks. He was quite a successful man, but died on July 4th when he was only 52.

 

 

Fiona: Other than writing do you have any hobbies ?

Reading, camping, fishing, knitting, crocheting and reading.

 

 

Fiona: What TV shows/films do you enjoy watching?

I like reality TV, The Big Bang Theory and Criminal Minds.

 

 

Fiona: Favorite foods / Colors/ Music

Mint M&M’s, popcorn. Green is my favorite color and I like pop music.

 

 

Fiona: Do you have a blog/website? If so what is it? http://authorbellann.blogspot.com/

 

Tell us where we can find you on the internet. http://authorbellann.blogspot.com, http://www.bookstrand.com/bellann-summer,
http://www.amazon.com/Bellann-Summer/e/B00J2GL7YG/ref=ntt_athr_dp_pel_pop_1, http://www.barnesandnoble.com/s/bellann-summer?keyword=bellann+summer&store=ebook,

 

http://www.bookstrand.com/bellann-summer

http://www.amazon.com/Bellann-Summer/e/B00J2GL7YG/ref=sr_tc_2_0?qid=1412027749&sr=1-2-ent

Check Out These SeriesComing Soon – Presale Monday, September 29thLubirea Mai AdCrazy Angle Ranch ad

Here is my interview with Charlotte Blackwell

386548_330363303657954_1238412657_n

Name  Charlotte Blackwell

Age 37

Where are you from Alberta, Canada

A little about your self `ie your education Family life etc  I’m a stay at home mom of three amazing kids. Ages 15, 11 and 8. I retired as a nurse when my youngest was born.  My husband works away from home. I’m also very involved in music. I love discovering new bands.

 

 

Fiona: Tell us your latest news?

I’m almost finished an adult romance and hope to get back to the Embrace Series soon. Book 5 here we come.

 

 
Fiona: When and why did you begin writing?

Professionally I started writing about four years ago, but have always found myself writing my feelings and thoughts down.

 

 
Fiona: When did you first consider yourself a writer?

When it was all I could focus on. I had a story I wanted to tell and it had to come out. That’s when I knew.

 

 
Fiona: What inspired you to write your first book?

After reading some other YA books, I thought I can do this…so I did.

 

 
Fiona: Do you have a specific writing style?

I prefer to write in first person, present tense. I like to insert myself into the character. I guess I feel it’s easier to understand them.

 

 
Fiona: How did you come up with the title?

I knew I wanted Embrace in the title, that is what I call it when a human is turned to a vampire. From there I just wrote out lots of combinations and picked what fit. Immortal Embrace seemed perfect for the first book.

 

 
Fiona: Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?

There’s a few messages throughout the series. I would say the main one is being true to yourself.

 

 
Fiona: How much of the book is realistic?

It’s a series about vampires and witches and such, so obviously that part isn’t realistic. Although the relationships, personalities and bonds are all realistic. Many are actually taken from my own experiences.

 

 
Fiona: Are experiences based on someone you know, or events in your own life?

As I mentioned before, lots of the book is taken from my own experiences. Mostly in the form of personalities and relationships.

 

 
Fiona: What books have most influenced your life most?

Every book I read affects me in one way or another. I think as a reader we all take a piece of what we read and keep it inside of us.

 

 
Fiona: If you had to choose, which writer would you consider a mentor?

My good friend Kathi S. Barton, she is amazing and blows me away with her creativity.

 

 
Fiona: What book are you reading now?

The Bondage Club by Alexandrea Weis.

 

 
Fiona: Are there any new authors that have grasped your interest?

Pretty much every book I read. I don’t read a lot of mainstream authors. I prefer up and coming, self published, unknown.

 

 
Fiona: What are your current projects?

The Climb, it’s a romance with a spicy side and lots of ups and downs. I am in love with this story and it’s taken me over two years to finish it. Now I’m just in the rewrite and cleaning stage.

 

 
Fiona: Name one entity that you feel supported you outside of family members.

My readers, without them I wouldn’t have any reason to write. Doing it for myself is calming, but doing it for others is exhilarating.

 

 
Fiona: Do you see writing as a career?

Yes and no. You have to put the time and effort into your writing for it to be a career.

 

 
Fiona: If you had to do it all over again, would you change anything in your latest book?

No, because I did the best I could when I wrote each book. Each one made me a better writer and taught me more. Every good or bad review pushed me further and will continue to do so with my future works.

 

 
Fiona: Do you recall how your interest in writing originated?

I was always better at expressing my emotions on paper than to someone’s face.

 

 
Fiona: Can you share a little of your current work with us?

You can read the first chapter here at SYTYCW  http://www.soyouthinkyoucanwrite.com/manuscripts-sytycw-2014/the-climb/

 

 

 

Fiona: Is there anything you find particularly challenging in your writing?

Mostly just writing through blocks and busy times in life. I tend to take too much on.

 

 
Fiona: Who is your favorite author and what is it that really strikes you about their work?

Hmmm, I actually have so many. Kathi S. Barton, Joanne Buchanan, Mary Ting, Lindsay Anne Kendal. They all have different styles and such amazing stories.

 

 
Fiona: Do you have to travel much concerning your book(s)?

I have a little, I’ve been to Edmonton, Alberta; Vancouver BC; and a few places in Texas. I’m hoping to go to Vegas in April.

 

 
Fiona: Who designed the covers?

My publisher and I work together on an idea, but she does all the work.

 

 
Fiona: What was the hardest part of writing your book?

Putting it out there for others to read, to judge, to let them inside of a small part of me.

 

 
Fiona: Did you learn anything from writing your book and what was it?

To always believe in your dreams and not let what others think tear you away from who you truly are.

 

 
Fiona: Do you have any advice for other writers?

Just the basics. Write, write some more, read, and be kind to others. Most of all though, believe in yourself.

 

 
Fiona: Do you have anything specific that you want to say to your readers?

Thank you so much for believing in me, my little stories and encouraging and supporting me. It means more than you could ever know. Most of all thank you for being patient in waiting for my next books.

 

 

Fiona: Do you remember the first book you read?

I believe it was Heidi

 

 

Fiona: Other than writing do you have any hobbies ?

My kids, I take them to activities and such. Also I’m huge into music and love going to live shows.

 

 

Fiona: What TV shows/films do you enjoy watching?

It depends on my mood. Right now I’m watching the Pretty Little Liars series on Netflix.

 

 

Fiona: Favorite foods / Colors/ Music

I love Italian food, blue and Marianas Trench….but in all honesty I could write a novel about music I like and why.

 

 

 

Fiona: If you were not a writer what else would you like to have done?

Something in the music industry. Maybe promotions or booking.

 

Fiona: Do you have a blog/website? If so what is it? http://charlotteblackwell.blogspot.ca/ I haven’t been very active on it lately but hope to start posting weekly again.

 

Amazon page http://www.amazon.com/Charlotte-Blackwell/e/B005FD1QB4/ref=sr_tc_2_0?qid=1412024541&sr=1-2-ent

ImmortalEmbrace_432x648[1]ForbiddenEmbrace_432x648[1]Mysticembrace_423x648[1]Everlasting Embrace 453x680

Here is my interview with S. Briones Lim

1063839_335006153299146_506142979_o

 

 

Name S. Briones Lim

Age 31

Where are you from: Originally from San Diego, California but now live in Virginia

A little about yourself `ie your education Family life etc

I am an Honors graduate (Summa Cum Laude) from Old Dominion University with a degree in psychology. I am happily married and a proud rescue mom of my Doxi mix, Roscoe and proud “sister” of our family pug, Tobi.

 

 

Fiona: Tell us your latest news?

I am now a proud author with Limitless Publishing and have just recently released my Contemporary Romance/New Adult novel, Palace Hills, which is now available on Amazon, B&N, KOBO and iBooks. Aside from this release, I have just completed a Chick-Lit novel and another New Adult novel. Given that I entered the market initially as a Paranormal Romance author, I have been itching to write another book in this genre. Thus, I have also officially started writing my newest novel, which I must say is creepily romantic ;)

 

 
Fiona: When and why did you begin writing?

I’ve been writing ever since I was a child. I loved writing poetry and short stories and actually still have most of them filed away at my parents’ house. I “seriously” began writing in 2013 and actually published my first book that year.

 

 
Fiona: When did you first consider yourself a writer?

Honestly, I think when I finally saw my book available on Amazon. It was so surreal and yes, I had to take a screenshot of that moment!

 

 
Fiona: What inspired you to write your first book?

The very first book I wrote was Green: A Life Force Novel. It was actually inspired by a dream that I had on January 29, 2013. I only know the precise date because I had written the entry down in my dream journal.

Palace Hills is my first book released through Limitless Publishing. I actually came up with the premise of the story back in 2006 and was inspired by different things going on in my life during that time – crushes, music I listened to, etc. etc.

 

 
Fiona: Do you have a specific writing style?

I tend to write in first person narrative. Though I do have a novel written in third person narrative, I find that I prefer first person both as a reader and a writer. There’s something about getting into the characters’ minds that is utterly fascinating.

 

 
Fiona: How did you come up with the title?

Since Palace Hills is my newest novel, let’s focus on that one J My newest novel centers on the fictional town of Palace Hills and it seemed fitting to name the novel after it.

 

 
Fiona: Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?

Self-forgiveness is the main theme of my novel. We all have regrets, but what’s important is forgiving ourselves and learning from our mistakes.

 

 
Fiona: How much of the book is realistic?

It’s realistic in the sense that certain events could happen. However, Palace Hills is completely fictional.

 

 
Fiona: Are experiences based on someone you know, or events in your own life?

No, they’re completely fictional.

 

 
Fiona: What books have most influenced your life most?

There are so many! Where do I even begin? From childhood books like the Berenstain Bears and I’ll Love You Forever, all the way to recent reads like Twilight, The Lux series and Hunger Games. All the books I’ve read have influenced me in some regard. That being said, go Babysitters’’ Club!

 

 
Fiona: If you had to choose, which writer would you consider a mentor?

What’s awesome about being part of the Limitless Publishing team is that we are very supportive of one another. We are a close-knit network who is there for one another in all aspects of the literary industry. Thus, I consider all my Limitless Publishing teammates as my mentors.

 

 
Fiona: What book are you reading now?

I am finishing up the newest installment of the Lorien Legacies, The Revenge of Seven. I have been following this series from the start!

 

 
Fiona: Are there any new authors that have grasped your interest?

I am a one-click addict! There are so many new authors that I discover all the time. The list is just insane!

 

 
Fiona: What are your current projects?

I am currently in the process of writing my newest Paranormal Romance; however I am also revising my New Adult book, which I actually had written while in recovery from surgery this past summer. Let’s just say the revisions are hefty as I wrote a majority of the novel while on pain meds.

 

 
Fiona: Name one entity that you feel supported you outside of family members.

My friends have supported me throughout this whole venture. My best friend was actually the person who pushed me to finally write Palace Hills as I kept procrastinating on it. Thanks Stephanie!  Also, my friend Jayne Thurber-Smith is a genius when it comes to editing!

 

 
Fiona: Do you see writing as a career?

At the moment I have a full-time job and moonlight as a writer at night. I do hope that one day I can make this a full-time career.

 

 
Fiona: If you had to do it all over again, would you change anything in your latest book?

It took me eight years to finally write Palace Hills and I’m more than happy with it J

 

 
Fiona: Do you recall how your interest in writing originated?

I was always a bookworm so I think my interest in writing was inevitable. I remember thinking, “Why can’t I make up my own stories?”

 

 
Fiona: Can you share a little of your current work with us?

The sharp bite of the cold car window did little to snap me out of my melancholic daze. I pressed my forehead against the glass, ignoring the stray strands of hair that matted against my skin. I gazed out the window and quickly became lost in the scenery around me. The rush of buildings soon turned to trees and subsequently to bland colored houses and power lines. It was like the beginning of a bad fairy tale, yet somehow I knew there would be no happily ever after to my story.

Too fast.

It was all happening too fast. Why couldn’t we just stop the car and slow everything down? Why couldn’t things go back to normal?

I shut my eyes as if to wish everything away. In just two weeks, my life as I knew it changed completely. There had to be a way to get it all back…but how?

My eyelids were shut so tightly, it began to induce a tiny headache. I didn’t care; I needed to pray, dream and wish all I could. Yet, I knew no matter how hard I prayed, dreamt, or wished, none of them would ever come true. I also knew that when I opened my eyes we’d be in our new home, Palace Hills.

Palace Hills.

I always scoffed at the name. The never ending streets of torn up houses and rusted chain link fences looked anything but a palace. I guess the city contractor had a sense of humor, and it was probably needed considering the pathetic state of the neighborhood. At least someone could find the humor in the situation. I know I found none.

 

 
Fiona: Is there anything you find particularly challenging in your writing?

I tend to get very emotional when I write. I guess you can call it “method-writing.” Often when I’m writing a very passionate scene I can get very depressed. I really need to work on it, but at the same time it helps make the scenes more real.

 

 
Fiona: Who is your favorite author and what is it that really strikes you about their work?

I love, love, love Jennifer L. Armentrout. I love how her books leave you hanging off the edge of your seats and I love all the new book boyfriends I get every time I read her stories!
 

 

Fiona: Do you have to travel much concerning your book(s)?

At the moment no, but we’ll see in the future J I’m always up for traveling!

 

 
Fiona: Who designed the covers?

I designed the covers for my self-published books (Green, Red, Silver, Parricide and Plan A: Lycaon’s Kiss). I went to art school for Graphic Design so that really helped out a lot.

Palace Hills was designed by the talented people at Redbird Designs and I think they did an excellent job.

 

 
Fiona: What was the hardest part of writing your book?

Nina, the main character in Palace Hills, made some pretty difficult choices in the wake of her situation. I want my readers to empathize with her, yet it was hard to portray her in such a way that my readers wouldn’t hate or become angry with her. It was such a fine line between understanding and anger and I think I succeeded in not crossing it.

 

 
Fiona: Did you learn anything from writing your book and what was it?

I know it sounds silly, but I learned that as a writer I have the ability to touch my readers emotionally. Sure, I’ve read books that touched me but to think that I wrote something that affected my readers? Amazing! It was very enlightening, humbling and I am awestruck by it. I feel so blessed to have such awesome readers.

 

 
Fiona: Do you have any advice for other writers?

Just write. Don’t let self-negating thoughts stop you from doing it. Write your little hearts out!

 

 
Fiona: Do you have anything specific that you want to say to your readers?

Thank you for all your support. Writing has always been a dream of mine and I couldn’t have accomplished it without all of you.

 

 

Fiona: Do you remember the first book you read?

Oh gosh, no I don’t. However, I can tell you I was obsessed with The Sweet Valley Twins and Babysitter’s Club.

 

 

Fiona: What makes you laugh/cry?

Wow, that’s a loaded question. I tend to wear my heart on my sleeves and am a very emotional person. There’s a lot that can make me laugh and cry, haha.

 

 

Fiona: Is there one person past or present you would to meet and why?

I know people are expecting some deep answer to this, but to be honest I would love to meet a certain group of people. Specifically, I’d LOVE to meet the Backstreet Boys. I’ve loved them since I was 13 years old. Their music speaks to me and has gotten me through many difficult times. I have always wanted to meet them, but alas never could. I’ve tried following their buses and even reaching out to different contacts, but still nada. So if anyone knows them please send them my way!

 

 

Fiona: Other than writing do you have any hobbies?

I love sketching, painting and graphic design. And of course I really love reading, but I think writing and reading always go hand in hand J

 

 

Fiona: What TV shows/films do you enjoy watching?

I have so many TV shows I love! Just to name a few: Law & Order: SVU, 19 Kids and Counting, Face Off, Teen Wolf, Sons of Anarchy, Ghost Hunters and Ghost Adventures.

Film-wise I love: Insidious, Conjuring, Divergent, Paranormal Activity, Hunger Games Series, Divergent, Twilight Saga and did I mention Divergent? ;)

 

 

Fiona: Favorite foods / Colors/ Music

Sushi/Green/ Top 40

 

 

Fiona: If you were not a writer what else would you like to have done?

As I currently have a full-time job in media, hobby-wise I’d probably be focused on my art – specifically sketches in charcoal.

 

 

Fiona: Do you have a blog/website? If so what is it?

My blog is: sbrioneslimauthor.wordpress.com. Stop by and leave a comment! I love chatting with new people.

 

10620709_507744166025343_7394349951030604607_n

Amazonhttp://amzn.to/1q6W53G

Kobohttp://store.kobobooks.com/en-US/ebook/palace-hill

Goodreadshttps://www.goodreads.com/book/show/22913745-palace-hills

Facebookfacebook.com/authorsbrioneslim

 

Twitter: @sbrioneslim

Instagram:  @sbrioneslim

Pinterest: @sbrioneslim

 

1814470121375_331827023617059_454845988_n

Here is my interview with Christoph Fischer

922159_10151345337037132_1303709604_o

 

Name Christoph Fischer

Age Mid-forties – i.e. ‘my prime’

Where are you from: Born in Southern Germany, now living in rural Britain

A little about your self `ie your education Family life etc

I did my A-levels at an old-fashioned grammar school in Bavaria, moved to Hamburg to become a librarian and ended up in London working for the British Film Institute and British Airways.
I come from a large family and now have three labradoodles as child substitutes with my partner.

 

 

Fiona: Tell us your latest news?

My new book “Conditions” will be out on October 16th. It is a contemporary novel about friends, family, mental health and a funeral. I published three historical novels but after my last novel, “Time To Let Go” (a book about Alzheimer’s), was surprisingly popular I decided to follow with another contemporary book.

 

 
Fiona: When and why did you begin writing?
Five years ago I tried to write a handbook for a workshop and whilst I sat at the computer, I wrote down a short story, just to see if I could write fiction. To my surprise the short story turned into a novel and suddenly I had ideas for another. I wrote a few before I decided to publish one of them, “The Luck of the Weissensteiners” in late 2012.
My new book, “Conditions” will be my fifth published book but it originated from the very first ‘short story’ I wrote and is my ‘original’ first book.

 

Fiona: What inspired you to write your first book?
A key scene in “Conditions” is a funeral, which is based on one I personally attended. The family division at a moment of grief shocked me and I always wanted to know more about it, although I never found out. It inspired the central conflict in the book.
On a wider scale, I grew up in an environment where I felt I didn’t fit in and consequently, I always ended up being friends with other misfits; that has influenced the people that populate “Conditions”.

 

 
Fiona: Do you have a specific writing style?
I tend to write the first draft with a plotline in mind but characters and events take on their own life, so I also become part spectator as the story unfolds.

 

 
Fiona: How did you come up with the title?
Intuitively. I kept thinking of names but none of them fitted. Then “Conditions” popped into my mind and I liked it. I gradually realized how well it worked.

 

 
Fiona: Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?
Yes. I do, but I don’t want to spoil the experience by spelling it out and hitting you over the head with it. Something along the lines of “You’re not alone”

 

Fiona: What books have most influenced your life most?

“Crime and Punsihment” by Dostoyevsky, “Shantaram” by Gregory David Roberts, “We Need to Talk about Kevin” by Lionel Shriver and “The Slap” by Christos Tsiolkas
 

 

Fiona: If you had to choose, which writer would you consider a mentor?
My beta readers Paulette Mahurin, Melodie Ramone, Fran Lewis and my editors (both writers) David Lawlor and Wanda Hartzenberg
 

 

Fiona: What book are you reading now?
“Americanah” by Chimaamanda Ngozi Adichie and “His Name was Ben” by Paulette Mahurin

 

 
Fiona: Are there any new authors that have grasped your interest?
Far too many, Murielle Cyr, S. Rose,, Nichols Sansbury Smith, PC.Zick, Judith Barrow, Travis Luedke, Dianne Harman, Dab10…

 

Fiona: What are your current projects?
“In Search of a Revolution”, a historical novel set in Scandinavia between 1918 and 1850. It is about two Danish men whose friendship is tested by war, politics and love.
 

 

Fiona: Name one entity that you feel supported you outside of family members.
My partner Ryan whose patience and kindness puts most of us to shame.
 

 

Fiona: Do you see writing as a career?
I am starting to see it a bit like that but I am enjoying the experience so much that I know I will always write, even if I ever grow tired of publishing and marketing.
 

 

Fiona: If you had to do it all over again, would you change anything in your latest book?
I learned a lot from feedback, critical reviews and from continuously writing, so part of me is always tempted to go back over old material with an editing pen. However, I am not sure I would change more than minor details. I know if someone edited one of my favorite books I might be quite upset about it.
 

 

Fiona: Can you share a little of your current work with us?

Martha Introduction 

Martha was petit and fragile looking with bleach blonde hair, very light skin and lots of freckles. She seemed lost in her overly large black dress.  When she saw it was a stranger answering the door she trembled, mumbling a barely audible greeting. Charles quickly stuck his head out of the kitchen and shouted:

“Martha, this is my friend Simon.”

She looked puzzled.

“Remember, I said there’d be someone from Torquay. The orchid guy?”

She nodded slightly, hesitantly stepped into the hallway and looked searchingly around.

“Talk to each other while I’m making dinner,” Charles ordered them. “I’ll be out soon. Go, sit in the living room!”

Martha shrugged and gave a little grin, then stood there waiting for Simon to do something.

“You have been here before, haven’t you?” he asked surprised at her lack of initiative.

“Yes, of course,” she said, continuing to stand until he started to walk. Only then did she move towards the living room, following his lead. She sat down on the sofa, put her handbag on the floor and folded her hands over her knees. She remained that way, without saying a further word, her gaze averted towards the floor. Simon sat down on the other sofa and tried to think of the right thing to say, but was stumped. Although she was as shy as Charles had predicted, there was something quite forceful underneath that exterior that didn’t sit comfortable with him. An unspoken pressure surrounded that woman and tensed up the atmosphere. She, too, had very attractive features, he thought. A hint of Meg Ryan maybe, if only her face was more relaxed.

“Can I get you a drink?” he eventually asked, grateful that something had finally sprung to mind.

“No thank you,” she said, her voice cracking halfway through the first syllable. He noticed that her eyes were melancholic and seemed to be continually searching for something. She smiled and shrugged as if to apologise for it. Only then did Simon remember being told about her drinking problem and felt the sting of embarrassment. To add to his discomfort Martha now seemed to have lost some of her initial shyness and looked expectantly at him. The mounting pressure began to feel very uncomfortable.

He remembered her story vaguely from one of Charles’s long monologues. Martha and Charles had met in hospital after his accident at the estate while she was being treated for nasty bruises and fractures – souvenirs from a recent fight with her latest abusive husband. The memory made him even more self-conscious as to what to speak to her about.

“How was the journey?” Simon had finally thought to ask.

“Alright,” she said, repeating her grin and shrug routine.

“Are you still living in…” Simon paused, realising that he couldn’t remember the name of the town.

“I’m still in the same place that I lived in with my ex-husband Clive,” she said eagerly. She had moved to the front of the seat and was leaning towards him. “It has to be sold to complete the divorce settlement and the sale is taking its time,” she added.

“Sorry to hear that,” he said, surprised by her sudden change of attitude.

“Like our marriage, the sale has turned into a tedious and painful affair,” she said, giggling slightly.

“I see,” Simon said, feeling embarrassed by the sudden intimacy. “I hadn’t meant to ask that, of course.”

“I don’t mind talking about it,” she said. “I’m in AA and there we share everything. Clive and I worked at the same firm and nothing about the split has ever been secret. Everyone knows my story and in parts I find that quite liberating. Charles probably mentioned the saga to you. At least he probably told you why I don’t drink,” she added.

Simon was stunned into silence by her forwardness.

“You don’t have to get embarrassed,” she assured him.

“I am embarrassed,” he said, to which she just shrugged her shoulders.

**********************************************************

Martha on the Bus

On the bus she couldn’t resist her curiosity and opened the text from Clive, bracing herself for another huge blow. Had he taken the house off the market yet again or was it going to be some regular abuse he often sent her when he was out drunk with his mates?

“I miss you!”

Martha head was throbbing. Was this a hoax… a sick joke? What on earth was he playing at?

She wanted to reply “I miss you, too” which would have been wrong … probably.  And what if it was his girlfriend playing a prank?

She shouldn’t reply at all. Ignore it. Leave him be. She opened her book and tried to focus on it. She couldn’t retain a single word she was reading. “I miss you!” “I miss you!” echoed over and over in her head.

When was she ever going to beat her addiction to him? It was ridiculous to think that only half an hour ago a semi-naked hunk had woken her up and it had not stirred her sexual appetite, yet a text from her abusive ex-husband did. When was the whole nightmare ever going to end – one way or another? What did he want now? She had to know, so she put the book down, got her phone out and started to compose a text. “Dear Clive…” She deleted the ‘dear’ in case it would make the text sound too familiar or make her sound too soft. “What do you want?” she tried, then she deleted that as well. She didn’t want to appear too aggressive in case it would trigger a nasty reply.

“Why do you…”, no she had to delete that also. He would say that was passive aggressive again. God, she had no chance with that man. She typed: “????”

That was good. He could make of that what he wanted. After all, his text had not only come like a bolt from the blue, it had been inconclusive… a testing of the waters, without giving anything away himself. She would, as usual, come running and open her heart to him, and he could then decide if he wanted her or not without having made one single promise.

Could he really be thinking about her? Did he want her back? Had his little child girlfriend become too boring or bored herself? Was it like Elaine had foretold?

Clive had volatile moods and could easily change his mind again and make her look like a fool if her reply was too positive. Her “????” was good, it did not give anything away and, maybe this once, she could have the upper hand in this relationship. She pressed send and immediately regretted it, tormented by worry and fear. She stared at her phone waiting for an instant reply – despite her better knowledge of Clive’s elusive phone manners.

She got to the end of her journey and changed onto another bus. Still no reply. She worried now that she’d made a fool of herself. If he had texted her last night while being drunk, he probably didn’t even remember sending the message. She should have ignored it after all. What an idiot she was when it came to dealing with this man.

By the time Martha got home she was in a hysterics over it. Of course there were no more texts from Clive. Instead there was a message on her home answer machine from the estate agent saying that there was going to be an extra viewing later that day and could she make sure the place was as presentable as possible. She had left the place in as good a state as she could, all she could do now was to take her bag and hide it under the bed. Probably best to leave the flat for the afternoon. A hysterical owner was not going to help sell the place – if it ever came to that. Then again, she’d only just arrived and it would be great to be at home at least for a little while. She would be careful not to make a mess and just have a quick coffee in the kitchen.

Her mobile phone bleeped twice, telling her she had a text message. Her heart started to race.

“Having lots of fun in the woods. No need to worry. Sorry for not txtg earlier. Love Emma and Jo.”
At last, word from her daughters. If this constant waiting for a message from Clive was going to continue Martha might well have a heart attack by the end of the day. She scolded herself for not really caring much about the message from the girls. She usually would have been worried about them the whole morning. Today, all she could think of was Clive. What a bad mother she had become.

*****************************************

Ruth and Sarah

“Don’t you think it’s comforting that Henry died a happy and loved man?” Sarah asked.

“I find Charles too annoying to think he made Henry happy. His tendency to talk and talk… mainly about himself – I question whether he has the ability to love anybody but himself; at least not the way I wanted Henry to be loved,” Ruth said, turning back to the window. “You think too much of him.”

“I’m not idealising Charles,” Sarah said. “I just didn’t find him as difficult as you obviously did. I considered him more of an eccentric than a nuisance. I don’t want everybody on this planet to be the same and predictable. He had a lot of character. If the price for that is a little madness as you call it, then that is a good bargain in my books!” Sarah said. “How did it happen anyway? His mother I mean, how did she die?”

“No idea,” Ruth answered. “It said in the newspaper that she died after a long illness, so I guess it was either her blood disease or maybe cancer? I can ask around if you want to know. I really don’t think you should take too much interest in it, you’ll get carried away. Are you not angry at Charles at all?” asked Ruth.

“I never really was that angry with him. Everything that happened must have been a tremendous shock for Charles. He’s such a sensitive soul. First Henry dying so sudden and then he got burnt and needed to go into hospital,” Sarah had to fight back tears which she didn’t want Ruth to see. She stood up and walked towards the bookshelves until she realised that she was in front of her secret chocolate stash and, feeling self-conscious, she quickly returned to her seat.

“We’ve been through this before,” Ruth said with surprising warmth and implied understanding but still standing with her back to her mother.

She was staring over the estate… the estate that would be hers one day.
“You lost a son,” she said, “I lost my brother and David lost a brother-in-law. We all knew Henry forever, Charles knew him for a year at the most. I thought it was disgraceful the way he played the widower and tried to get all the sympathy for himself. That was not gentlemanly, it was self-centred and annoying.”

“Yes, I know he can be self-centred, but I believe that he truly loved Henry, regardless of how long they’d been a couple. I found at least a dozen framed snap shots of Charles in Henry’s desk after he’d died. He wasn’t good at expressing his feelings but those pictures told their own story. Henry loved doing everything the right way and to manage the estate well. I am sure he loved ‘managing’ Charles and, like myself, he must have loved the life force of that man brought to our home. All grief is self-pity. You can’t tell Charles how much he’s entitled to, especially when their affection was so obviously genuine. Don’t you remember that night when they danced cheek to cheek in the party room? Wasn’t that so romantic?”

“Oh mother you can be so incredibly naïve,” she said laughing gently. “They were drunk, that’s all it was. I thought it was rather common, if I’m honest with you. The way Henry threw half of his tuxedo on the floor. They were drunk and full of lust, not love. Gay men have such an incredible sexual appetite, and your son was no exception, I’m sure. That’s why they bear the brunt of HIV and other sexually transmitted diseases. Don’t get me wrong, I’ve got a very good gay friend at my stables and have nothing against them as a group. You still have to be honest and call a spade a spade,” Ruth said with conviction.

“You can be so mean and cynical!” countered her mother.

“And you can be so naïve it hurts to watch.” Ruth turned slowly towards Sarah and put her hand on her arm.
“If you send word to Charles then you need to be sure of the consequences, because he’ll come here running and stick his feet under our table as he did before. If you are fine with that, please go ahead. I want nothing to do with it. I’m still upset with him about the legal matters.” She gave her mother an imploring look.  “Forgive my honesty. I mean to protect you, too.”

**************************************************

Fiona: Is there anything you find particularly challenging in your writing?
Continuity, not the big things like the time line and general events, but the tiny little details you make up while focusing on a different matter. Hair color of a secondary character, car type, etc.
 

 

Fiona: Who is your favorite author and what is it that really strikes you about their work?
Lionel Shriver and Christos Tsiolkas, both for their raw honesty and uncompromising writing.
 

 

Fiona: Do you have to travel much concerning your book(s)?
Not yet, but I did go to the London Book Fair this year and am planning to attend a few more in the future, now that I know how it all works.
 

 

Fiona: Who designed the covers?
All my covers were designed by Daz Smith of nethed.com and I must say he is a wizard.
 

 

Fiona: What was the hardest part of writing your book?
“Conditions” was my first book and had all the usual ‘first book’ errors, such as repetition and over-emphasizing my points, or including viewpoints that have nothing to do with the story.
 

 

Fiona: Did you learn anything from writing your book and what was it?
I found myself in almost all the characters I wrote, in one way or another. In that respect writing is a sometimes uncomfortable look in the mirror but it can also be liberating and very cathartic. I learned a lot of personal lessons.

 

 
Fiona: Do you have any advice for other writers?
Yes. Write as much as you can because only practice makes perfect. And don’t get knocked down by criticism. Take from it what helps and keep going.
 

 

Fiona: Do you have anything specific that you want to say to your readers?
Reviews are important to writers. If you have taken the time to read a book, consider leaving a comment on the website where you bought it. Independent writers in particular live from word of mouth and benefit from any fuss made about them. Remember that we do not have a big PR machine behind us, so if you liked a book you can make a big difference by just writing a few lines about it.
 

 

Fiona: Do you remember the first book you read?
It was called Konrad and was about a boy who came out of a tin. Apart from that, I grew up with Enid Blyton, Astrid Lindgren and Ottfried Preussler.
Grown up books: “The Idiot” by Dostoyevsky and “Heimatmuseum” by Siegfried Lenz.
 

 

Fiona: What makes you laugh/cry?
Comedy TV, such as: Scrubs, Friends and Six Feet Under.
My friends. Writers: Ian Hutson, Duncan Whitehead and Aaron David.

 

Fiona: Is there one person past or present you would like to meet and why?

Swedish author Henning Mankell seems a fascinating character with all the theatre and charity work he is doing aside his writing.
Dead: My grandfather on my father’s side, who lived on the other side of the iron curtain and whom I never got to meet.

 

 

Fiona: Other than writing do you have any hobbies ?
Walking my dogs, cycling, running, travelling and films.

 

 

Fiona: What TV shows/films do you enjoy watching?
Dexter, Modern Family, Big Bang Theory
 

 

Fiona: Favorite foods / Colors/ Music
Macrobiotic Vegan Tofu Salads (or Haribo and Pizza on naughty days) / Blue and Red / Cheesy Pop or atmospheric chill out music

 

 

Fiona: If you were not a writer what else would you like to have done?
Sports professional, location scout, dog whisperer

 

 

Fiona: Do you have a blog/website?

Website: http://www.christophfischerbooks.com/

Blog: http://writerchristophfischer.wordpress.com/

 

Book Marketing1-lrg Book_marketing2-lrg

 

 

The Luck of the Weissensteiners (Three Nations Trilogy Book 1)

In the sleepy town of Bratislava in 1933 a romantic girl falls for a bookseller from Berlin. Greta Weissensteiner, daughter of a Jewish weaver, slowly settles in with the Winkelmeier clan just as the developments in Germany start to make waves in Europe and re-draws the visible and invisible borders. The political climate in the multifaceted cultural jigsaw puzzle of disintegrating Czechoslovakia becomes more complex and affects relations between the couple and the families. The story follows them through the war with its predictable and also its unexpected turns and events and the equally hard times after.
But this is no ordinary romance; in fact it is not a romance at all, but a powerful, often sad, Holocaust story. What makes The Luck of the Weissensteiners so extraordinary is the chance to consider the many different people who were never in concentration camps, never in the military, yet who nonetheless had their own indelible Holocaust experiences. This is a wide-ranging, historically accurate exploration of the connections between social location, personal integrity and, as the title says, luck.

On Amazon:  http://smarturl.it/Weissensteiners
On Goodreads: http://bit.ly/12Rnup8

On Facebook: http://on.fb.me/1bua395

Trailer: http://studio.stupeflix.com/v/OtmyZh4Dmc/?autoplay=1

B&N  http://ow.ly/Btvas

 

Sebastian (Three Nations Trilogy Book 2)

Sebastian is the story of a young man who has his leg amputated before World War I. When his father is drafted to the war it falls on to him to run the family grocery store in Vienna, to grow into his responsibilities, bear loss and uncertainty and hopefully find love.
Sebastian Schreiber, his extended family, their friends and the store employees experience the ‘golden days’ of pre-war Vienna and the timed of the war and the end of the Monarchy while trying to make a living and to preserve what they hold dear.
Fischer convincingly describes life in Vienna during the war, how it affected the people in an otherwise safe and prosperous location, the beginning of the end for the Monarchy, the arrival of modern thoughts and trends, the Viennese class system and the end of an era.
As in the first part of the trilogy, “The Luck of The Weissensteiners” we are confronted again with themes of identity, Nationality and borders. The step back in time made from Book 1 and the change of location from Slovakia to Austria enables the reader to see the parallels and the differences deliberately out of the sequential order. This helps to see one not as the consequence of the other, but to experience them as the momentary reality as it must have felt for the people at the time.

On Amazon: http://smarturl.it/TNTSeb
On Goodreads: http://ow.ly/pthHZ

On Facebook: http://ow.ly/pthNy

Trailer: http://studio.stupeflix.com/v/95jvSpHf5a/

B&N http://ow.ly/Btvbw

The Black Eagle Inn (Three Nations Trilogy Book 3)

The Black Eagle Inn is an old established Restaurant and Farm business in the sleepy Bavarian countryside outside of Heimkirchen.  Childless Anna Hinterberger has fought hard to make it her own and keep it running through WWII. Religion and rivalry divide her family as one of her nephews, Markus has got her heart and another nephew, Lukas got her ear. Her husband Herbert is still missing and for the wider family life in post-war Germany also has some unexpected challenges in store.

Once again Fischer tells a family saga with war in the far background and weaves the political and religious into the personal. Being the third in the Three Nations Trilogy this book offers another perspective on war, its impact on people and the themes of nations and identity.

On Facebook: http://ow.ly/pAX3y

On Goodreads: http://ow.ly/pAX8G

On Amazon: http://smarturl.it/TBEI
Trailer: http://studio.stupeflix.com/v/mB2JZUuBaI/

Time To Let Go:

Time to Let Go is a contemporary family drama set in Britain.
Following a traumatic incident at work Stewardess Hanna Korhonen decides to take time off work and leaves her home in London to spend quality time with her elderly parents in rural England. There she finds that neither can she run away from her problems, nor does her family provide the easy getaway place that she has hoped for. Her mother suffers from Alzheimer’s disease and, while being confronted with the consequences of her issues at work, she and her entire family are forced to reassess their lives.
The book takes a close look at family dynamics and at human nature in a time of a crisis. Their challenges, individual and shared, take the Korhonens on a journey of self-discovery and redemption.

On Facebook: http://ow.ly/BtKtQ

On Goodreads:  http://ow.ly/BtKs7

On Amazon: http://smarturl.it/TTLG

Conditions

When Charles and Tony’s mother dies the estranged brothers must struggle to pick up the pieces, particularly so given that one of them is mentally challenged and the other bitter about his place within the family.
The conflict is drawn out over materialistic issues, but there are other underlying problems which go to the heart of what it means to be part of a family which, in one way or another. has cast one aside.
Prejudice, misconceptions and the human condition in all forms feature in this contemporary drama revolving around a group of people who attend the subsequent funeral at the British South Coast.
Meet flamboyant gardener Charles, loner Simon, selfless psychic Elaine, narcissistic body-builder Edgar, Martha and her version of unconditional love and many others as they try to deal with the event and its aftermath.

On Facebook: http://ow.ly/C0ZqX

On Amazon: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00NZ1VTBU

On Goodreads: http://ow.ly/C0Ziw

Short Biography:

Christoph Fischer was born in Germany, near the Austrian border, as the son of a Sudeten-German father and a Bavarian mother. Not a full local in the eyes and ears of his peers he developed an ambiguous sense of belonging and home in Bavaria. He moved to Hamburg in pursuit of his studies and to lead a life of literary indulgence. After a few years he moved on to the UK where he now lives in a small hamlet, not far from Bath.  He and his partner have three Labradoodles to complete their family.

Christoph worked for the British Film Institute, in Libraries, Museums and for an airline. ‘The Luck of The Weissensteiners’ was published in November 2012; ‘Sebastian’ in May 2013 and The Black Eagle Inn in October 2013. In May 2014 he published his first contemporary novel “Time To Let Go” in May. He has written several other novels which are in the later stages of editing and finalisation.

Website: http://www.christophfischerbooks.com/

Blog: http://writerchristophfischer.wordpress.com/

Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/6590171.Christoph_Fischer

Amazon: http://ow.ly/BtveY

Twitter: https://twitter.com/CFFBooks

Pinterest: http://www.pinterest.com/christophffisch/

Google +: https://plus.google.com/u/0/106213860775307052243

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/profile/view?id=241333846

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/WriterChristophFischer?ref=hl

All Facebook links:

http://www.facebook.com/WriterChristophFischer?ref=hl

http://www.facebook.com/TheLuckOfTheWeissensteiners?ref=hl

http://www.facebook.com/pages/Sebastian/489427467776001?ref=hl

http://www.facebook.com/TheBlackEagleInn?ref=hl

https://www.facebook.com/pages/Time-To-Let-Go/257989361049799?ref=hl

 

Here is my interview with Gracie Wilson

10590560_1461369284117435_877946349925134140_n

 

Name Gracie Wilson

Age 25

Where are you from Ontario Canada

A little about your self `ie your education Family life etc   I have a large extended family. Blood doesn’t make a family in my world. I have a medical education background and have taken classes in psychology.  I am a huge animal and nature lover! <3

 

 

Fiona: Tell us your latest news?

I’m currently working on The Missing Girl and Storm Corp book Two. I also have a secret in the works.

 

 
Fiona: When and why did you begin writing?

I began writing November 20ish 2013 on a dare from a friend. She told me to enroll in the November Novel month and I did completing my book in five days.

 

 
Fiona: When did you first consider yourself a writer?

Sometimes I still don’t.

 

 
Fiona: What inspired you to write your first book?

Loss. All the guilt and other issues that come with moving on.

 

 
Fiona: Do you have a specific writing style?

First person New Adult.

 

 
Fiona: How did you come up with the title?

I like to think of myself as the original Lonely Girl.

 

 
Fiona: Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?

Loss can be overwhelming, take it a day at a time. The world can become bright again, maybe never as bright but not pitch black anymore.

 

 
Fiona: How much of the book is realistic?

A far amount is taken from life experience.

 

 
Fiona: Are experiences based on someone you know, or events in your own life?

My own life. Some is dramatic flare of course.

 

 
Fiona: What books have most influenced your life most?

Anne Frank as a youth/child. Now pretty much anything by Rachel Van Dyken, Jamie McGuire, Abbi Glines and Jennifer Armentrout.

 

 
Fiona: If you had to choose, which writer would you consider a mentor?

Jae Hall and Sable Hunter

 

 
Fiona: What book are you reading now?

I’m working currently on my next book but I’m waiting for Shame by Rachel Van Dyken, like I needed it yesterday.

 

 
Fiona: Are there any new authors that have grasped your interest?

I read so many indie authors and newbies. This is always a hard question because what is new, new to me? New to the writing world?

 

 
Fiona: What are your current projects?

The Missing Girl and Storm Corp Two… and my WIP Finding  Darby.

 

 
Fiona: Name one entity that you feel supported you outside of family members.

Jae Hall. Amazing friend and always there when I need to talk.

 

 
Fiona: Do you see writing as a career?

I try to, I understand its something that takes years to build on. When people ask what I do, I say I write.

 

 
Fiona: If you had to do it all over again, would you change anything in your latest book?

Not one thing.

 

 
Fiona: Do you recall how your interest in writing originated?

I read…. A lot. Friends were always saying I should write a story about my past… I took pieces of it and made the Lonely Girl.

 

 

 
Fiona: Can you share a little of your current work with us? Finding Darby – unedited –  “Being without you is like days without the sun, nothing to chase away the shadows, nothing to keep away my demons. Don’t you see Darby, without you I’ve been wandering around in my own personal dark hell. With no end in sight, until you. Once I saw you the light began to flicker through, the more I’m with you, the brighter my world becomes. Don’t ask me to go back to that darkness, I’d rather die than not have my light. My everything and that all starts with you.”

Ethan – Finding Darby

 

 
Fiona: Is there anything you find particularly challenging in your writing?

The emotions can be overwhelming and draining. The nerves… that never changes.

 

 
Fiona: Who is your favorite author and what is it that really strikes you about their work?

Rachel Van Dyken…. Nixon… can I say more? Yummy :P

 

 

Fiona: Do you have to travel much concerning your book(s)?

I haven’t yet but I will be traveling for signings next year.

 

 

Fiona: Who designed the covers?

For the Lonely Girl Series I take the pictures and my publisher puts it together for the cover.

 

 
Fiona: What was the hardest part of writing your book?

The Lonely Girl Series is hard because I based the main character off of me and my loss. So it’s hard to write at times. Sometimes I have to get out of my own head and jump into another project and come back to it.

 

 

Fiona: Did you learn anything from writing your book and what was it?

Ryan O’leary (Editor and Co-owner of my publisher) He has taught me so much. He helped me bring The Lonely Girl to where I really wanted it. He is a constant help when it comes to me overthinking something. He taught me to trust my gut and go with it. Nerves get in the way a lot when you write.

 

 
Fiona: Do you have any advice for other writers?

Write for you, at the end of the day you alone must live with your story.

 

 

Fiona: Do you have anything specific that you want to say to your readers?

I wanted my story to become your story. When you read The Lonely Girl I hope you can see that.

 

 

Fiona: Do you remember the first book you read?

A book about catching a fish alive and counting to 10. The first WHOLE none school book I read was Angela’s Ashes… I was very young when I read this and my parents didn’t know… I was so happy to have read it though I wouldn’t let my kid read it at the age I was. So I’ve hidden my copy. Hehe.

 

 

Fiona: What makes you laugh/cry?

Memories and Love… and BOOKS ugh like Maybe Someday by Colleen Hoover and The Fault In Our Stars by John Green

 

 

Fiona: Is there one person pass or present you would To meet and why?

Corey Aka Michael (in the Lonely Girl), It has been ten years since I could pick up a phone and call him. I’d give anything to see him again.

 

 

Fiona: Other than writing do you have any hobbies ? I read… does that count. I also play soft ball.

 

 

Fiona: What TV shows/films do you enjoy watching?

I don’t really watch much tv, I’m a reader. I go through binges though where I will watch a whole series… I LOVE BONES :D I did like SOA until Gemma went all crazy and killed my favourite character.

 

 

Fiona: Favorite foods / Colors/ Music

Food, anything healthy or unprocessed. Other things hurt my tummy.
Colour Green! LIKE BRIGHT GREEN

 

Music, Anything really. I like Country, rock, top 40’s it all depends.

 

 

Fiona: If you were not a writer what else would you like to have done?

I wanted to be a vet.

 

 

Fiona: Do you have a blog/website? If so what is it? I only use my facebook page. http://www.facebook.com/graciewilsonauthor

Amazon Page http://www.amazon.com/Gracie-Wilson/e/B00IIDMDNS/ref=ntt_athr_dp_pel_pop_1

Lonelygirljakelove Prologueteaser ~*~ FREE ~*~ September 26, 27 and 28th the heartbreaking novel and emotional roller coaster The Lonely Girl is #free on Amazom  http://www.amazon.com/Lonely-Girl-1-Gracie-Wilson/dp/1500924008/ref=la_B00IIDMDNS_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1411855702&sr=1-1

The Lonely Girl What if one day you woke up and found your heart had been shattered? You lost the one person you loved more than anything. What happens when you learn to move on even though you thought you’d never be able to again? Is it worth the risk to try and let someone in? Is it better to be left alone then take the chance of more heartache? This time will be different. Becca slowly starts to put the shattered pieces of her heart back together only to have it broken again by someone she trusted. Can her heart that was barely healed in the first place be fixed, again? Becca falls for someone new, but will her heart be safe. Will she survive the secrets that come out from the past? Love is worth the risk. Can she really believe that? The question is: is he worth the risk?

 

BrokenGirlBrokengirlcover

Amazon  http://www.amazon.com/Broken-Girl-Lonely-Book-ebook/dp/B00MTBGQ8I/ref=la_B00IIDMDNS_1_2?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1411855702&sr=1-2

All Becca Potts seems to know is darkness, pain and loss.
Every time she gets ahead another secret or event sends her spiraling back.
Dillon’s attack has left her fighting for all she holds dear.
Now she has to be brave and pick up the pieces. Hearts will be shattered and love will be rewritten. Becca has to navigate through the chaos that is plaguing her life and figure out what she wants.
Nothing is going as planned but it never has.
Gracie
Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 283 other followers