Here is my interview with Shakuita Johnson

Name Shakuita Johnson
Age 29
Where are you from
Born in Mississippi, grew up in Missouri
A little about your self `ie your education Family life etc
I’m the oldest of 5 brothers/stepbrothers. I have a BA in Psychology and an AA in Logistics. I served 8 years in the United States Air Force. I like to read, watch TV series that are usually supernatural in origin. I’m a One Tree Hill fanatic. I used to read around 10-20 books a week before I started writing and publishing myself. I’m a constant day dreamer.

 

 

 

Fiona: Tell us your latest news?
My latest news is I’m preparing for my 3rd book in my Dark Indiscretions Series to be released Aug. 15th. I am also starting a spin off of that same series called Dark Indiscretions Chronicles with the first book hopefully coming out Oct 2014.

 

 

Fiona: When and why did you begin writing?
I’ve always written since I was in middle school. Mostly poems. There is no why I write I just do. I enjoy it and it makes me happy to get lost in the words and places writing takes me.

 

 

Fiona: When did you first consider yourself a writer?
From the moment I started writing poems in middle school.

 

 

Fiona: What inspired you to write your first book?
My best friend Gavin, I wrote Dark Indiscretions for him. He was the first to read it and the first to fall in love with it. Had he not loved it so much no one would have ever know it existed.

 

 

Fiona: Do you have a specific writing style?
No, not at all, I just write and take notes and reread what I’ve written before to make sure it matches up and nothing that won’t eventually make sense is there.

 

 

Fiona: How did you come up with the title?
My book is darker in nature and there are some questionable goings ons in them so Dark Indiscretions was perfect.

 

 

Fiona: Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?
Be who you are no matter who/what wants you to be someone else. You can’t please everyone but you can do the things that make you happy. No matter how they make others feel. Sometimes it’s okay to be selfish and at the end of the day the only person’s opinion of you that should matter is your own.

 

 

Fiona: How much of the book is realistic?
None it’s paranormal/urban fantasy with a dark edge.

 

 

Fiona: Are experiences based on someone you know, or events in your own life?
Not at the moment with this particular series. I have a contemporary romance that I keep going back and forth between if I’m going to write it. It will be loosely based on some of my feelings of relationships. It won’t be a happy/sappy story by any means but a real, raw, and gritty truth of heartbreak and trying to not let someone else crawl inside your heart so firmly that when they aren’t interested in the same outcomes as you, you aren’t completely devastated in their wake.

 

 

Fiona: What books have most influenced your life most?
I read A LOT. I love A Rip in Heaven by Jeanine Cummins, A Child Called It by Dave Pelzer, Queen of the Damned by Anne Rice, The Hollows Series by Kim Harrison, and many, many more.

 

 

Fiona: If you had to choose, which writer would you consider a mentor?
Anne Rice

 

 

Fiona: What book are you reading now?
I just finished Kalona’s Fall by PC Cast and Kristin Cast, Magic Breaks by Ilona Andrews, and I have Silver Shadows by Richelle Mead that I’m about to start. They all released on July 29th

 

 

Fiona: Are there any new authors that have grasped your interest?
Yes a few…Kimber S. Dawn, M. Robinson, Cristy Rey, and NL Hoffmann to name a few.

 

 

Fiona: What are your current projects?
Ha, well my Dark Indiscretions Series as I have 4 more books in that series. I have 4 planned in my Dark Indiscretions Chronicles Series that I will be working on as I’m working on Dark Indiscretions and I have a few more in the works that I will start working on in 2015 and more on those when I have firm guidelines for them.

 

 

Fiona: Name one entity that you feel supported you outside of family members.
Gavin…

 

 

Fiona: Do you see writing as a career?
Writing is fun and I enjoy it and I have no intention of not doing it. I also want to work with children once my Psychology knowledge is better. As long as I enjoy doing something I will do it so I don’t really think in terms of career… If I barely sold any books I would still write and publish because someone besides me wants to know how the story ends.

 

 

Fiona: If you had to do it all over again, would you change anything in your latest book?
Not in my latest release in April. I went exactly where I wanted to go… now my first book yes as it was my first book and I had no idea what I was doing. I just had an idea and I wrote it. I would have liked to add more details in certain places in the book to flesh it out a bit more for upcoming ones but at the time I had no intention of writing past it.

 

 

Fiona: Do you recall how your interest in writing originated?
No I just have always written.

 

 

Fiona: Can you share a little of your current work with us?
My currently work is Callisto Carvanis: And A Legacy Was Born. She appears briefly in Dark Indiscretions: A Prequel and I couldn’t let that be all of her story. I had to go back and show why she was who she was.

 

 

Fiona: Is there anything you find particularly challenging in your writing?
Keeping track of my every growing world.

 

 

Fiona: Who is your favorite author and what is it that really strikes you about their work?
I have many favorites but I one day hope to write a book as beautifully written as Queen of the Damned by Anne Rice. The storytelling in that novel was amazing and the legends were original and well thought out.

 

 

Fiona: Do you have to travel much concerning your book(s)?
Not at the moment.

 

 

Fiona: Who designed the covers?
Daria Brennan designed all of the Dark Indiscretions Covers besides Rumspringa. Willow Raven Illustration and Design did that one.

 

 

Fiona: What was the hardest part of writing your book?
Deciding what to reveal and what not to reveal yet. Dark Indiscretions has one story arc over 7 books. I might have had a character say he would explain something in one book but it might not get explained until a different book. I didn’t forget to explain it, it just isn’t time yet to reveal it.

 

 

Fiona: Did you learn anything from writing your book and what was it?
That I enjoy making up new words and species.

 

 

Fiona: Do you have any advice for other writers?
Research for yourself always.

 

 

Fiona: Do you have anything specific that you want to say to your readers?
Thank you

 

 

Fiona: Do you remember the first book you read?
Not really…probably something Dr. Seuss related or something like that in head start or elementary school. I just know I wanted that free pizza from Pizza Hut every month.

 

 

Fiona: Other than writing do you have any hobbies?
Watching TV shows, going to the movies, cruising book stores, reading, sometimes cooking.

 

 

Fiona: What TV shows/films do you enjoy watching?
Supernatural, One Tree Hill, Charmed, Vampire Diaries, The Originals, The Secret Circle, Hemlock Grove, all the Underworlds, Resident Evil, to name a few.

 

 

Fiona: Favorite foods / Colors/ Music
Red/All music except most rap/Chinese, pizza, tacos.

 

 

Fiona: If you were not a writer what else would you like to have done?
I want to be a Child Psychologist

 

 

Fiona: Do you have a blog/website? If so what is it?
Blog: http://www.dark-indiscretions.com
Website: http://www.authorshakuitajohnson.com

https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/7504850.Shakuita_Johnson

Reading order…

Dark Indiscretions: A Prequel (can be read before or after book one…I suggest after) coming Aug 15
Dark Indiscretions

Dark Indiscretions: Monster Unleashed
Dark Indiscretions: Seer Destined coming soon
Rumspringa coming soon

Purchase Links:

Dark Indiscretions (Book One)

Amazon – http://www.amazon.com/Dark-Indiscretions-Shakuita-Johnson-ebook/dp/B00H5DODE4/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1397586386&sr=8-1&keywords=dark+indiscretions

Barnes and Noble – http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/dark-indiscretions-a-novel-shakuita-johnson/1117612344?ean=2940148857266

Dark Indiscretions: Monster Unleashed (Book Two)

Amazon – http://www.amazon.com/DARK-INDISCRETIONS-UNLEASHED-Shakuita-Johnson-ebook/dp/B00JPHFT5U/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&qid=1397586386&sr=8-3&keywords=dark+indiscretions

Barnes and Noble – http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/dark-indiscretions-shakuita-johnson/1119231232?ean=2940149201037

Newsletter

http://eepurl.com/MubU9

 

 

 

Here is my interview with Brendan Gerad O`Brien

 

 

Name Brendan Gerad O’Brien
Age 67
Where are you from: .. Originally from Tralee, on the west coast of Ireland, and now live in Newport, South Wales.
A little about your self `ie your education Family life etc: Married with two daughters. I left school at fourteen and went to work in hotels in Killarney, then joined the Royal Navy at eighteen and went to the Far East. I spent the first two years between Singapore and Hong Kong and when I got home I met Jennifer, and we’ve been together since. My career took various roads and I ended up as a department manager with ASDA in Cardiff before retiring in 2006 because of a heart problem.

 
Fiona: Tell us your latest news?
I’m delighted to say my novel Dark September – an alternate history thriller set in Wales in 1940 – has been accepted for publication with Tirgearr Publications and should be out in October.

 

 

Fiona: When and why did you begin writing?
When I won my first writing competition I was so excited I ran all the way home. I was about eight years old. The Fun Fair was coming to Tralee – our little town on the West coast of Ireland – and apart from Duffy’s Circus which came in September, this was the highlight of our year. Our English teacher asked us to write an essay about it, and I won the only prize – a book of ten tickets for the fair. There were eight kids in our family so everyone got a ride on something. So writing was in my blood from a very young age. I’ve always loved essays and English literature.

 
Fiona: When did you first consider yourself a writer?
I think I always felt writing was a hobby rather than a career, and to a degree I still do.
Fiona: What inspired you to write your first book? My head has been full of stories for as long as I can remember and I always wrote them as short stories. I’ve written hundreds but only 24 were good enough to see the light of day. Those were printed in various mediums and also in a collection called Dreamin’ Dreams. Maybe it’s an impatient thing but I like short sharp stories, especially ones that make you sigh with satisfaction. Anyway, when I did decide to try a full novel it morphed into something totally different from what I started out to write. It eventually became Dark September, of which I’m very proud.

 

 

Fiona: Do you have a specific writing style?
I suppose I write in the kind of style that I like to read. I know I’ll never please everyone. Even in our family – all avid readers – there’s a healthy disagreement about what a good style is. My brother has every Clive Cussler book ever printed but I can’t get on with them. I have every Andy McNab book but my brother can’t stand them. So it’s best to write in the style you feel comfortable with.

 

 

Fiona: How did you come up with the title?
As it’s set in Sept 1940 I originally called it Once On A Cold And Grey September. Initially I had good feedback on that but when I put it on Autonomy.com a lot of established writers thought it was a bit of a mouthful. After a lot of jigging about I settled on Dark September.

 

 

Fiona: Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?
Not consciously, but probably the fact that we learn absolutely nothing from our mistakes down through history. Barely twenty years after the most horrific war in history – WW1 – here we were again doing the same thing and sleepwalking into WW2.

 

 

Fiona: How much of the book is realistic?
The fear and trepidation is something I gleamed from my parents who drove trams in Birmingham during the darkest days of the blitz, and from my father-in-law who went through the African campaigned and was lucky to escape the attack of Tobruk.

 

 

Fiona: Are experiences based on someone you know, or events in your own life?
My father-in-law told some horrific stories about his experiences during the war and I imagined how my characters would feel under the same circumstances. But, no, I’m glad to say that there was never anything like that in my life.

 

 

Fiona: What books have influenced your life most?
So many it would be hard to whittle it down to just a few. The Wind in the Willows had the most magical effect on me – I lived in that story and still get that feeling whenever I sit on a riverbank – but I can still remember running home from school to listen to Treasure Island and Robinson Crusoe being read on the radio. In my teens I got hooked on Mickey Spillane and Zane Gray, but now I have to say that Val McDermid is my all-time favourite. However Ann Cleeves would be a close second …

 

 

Fiona: If you had to choose, which writer would you consider a mentor?
Val McDermid.

 

 

Fiona: What book are you reading now?
Dead or Alive by Tom Clancy

 

 

Fiona: Are there any new authors that have grasped your interest?
Tirgearr Publishing has a nice selection of new writers and I’ll be looking at them as I get the opportunity.

 

 

Fiona: What are your current projects?
I’m about two chapters from finishing the first draft of my new book – then the long slog of editing and re-writes.

 

 

Fiona: Name one entity that you feel supported you outside of family members.
Two newspapers – the Kerryman and Kerry’s Eye – both did several pieces on my stories over the years. ASDA, when I was working there, did a whole page spread in their customer magazine on my stories, also ESSO in their in-house magazine. So I’d say local media was a great support.

 

 

Fiona: Do you see writing as a career?
Not a career, more a hobby because I love it. If I had to do it I might think differently.

 

 

Fiona: If you had to do it all over again, would you change anything in your latest book?
Nothing. I did millions of changes as I was refining and I’m really happy with it now.

 

 

Fiona: Do you recall how your interest in writing originated?
My grand-uncle Moss Scanlon was a Harness Maker and he had a small shop in Lower William Street, Listowel – a rural town in Kerry that was just a bus ride from Tralee. We spent some wonderful summer holidays there. The shop was a magnet for all sorts of colourful characters who’d wander in for a chat and a bit of jovial banter. One wonderful storyteller who often popped in was John B Keane, and it was a great thrill to actually meet him. I asked him once where he got his ideas from, and he told me that everyone has a story to tell, so be patient and just listen to them. And I was there, sitting on the counter in the shop, when John B’s very first story was read out live on Radio Eireann. I can still remember the buzz of excitement and the sheer pride of the people of Listowel. And the seeds of storytelling were sown in my soul.

 

 

Fiona: Can you share a little of your current work with us?
My current story is a murder thriller set in Ireland in 1942. A man is shot in a crowded pub, yet no one saw or heard anything. Danny O’Shea is a member of the Local Security Force, established by the Irish Government to assist the Garda in those troubled times. Then O’Shea’s sister is found dead in the town park, apparently after taking sleeping tablets and a bottle of whisky. When his ten year old son disappears the tension is cranked up to another level …

 

 

Fiona: Is there anything you find particularly challenging in your writing?
Actually getting down to doing it and not wandering over to Facebook or checking my e-mail and all the other distractions that always seem more attractive at the time.
.
Fiona: Who is your favorite author and what is it that really strikes you about their work?
Val McDermid – her writing is so smooth you don’t notice it. You fall into the story and flow along in it without the distractions of convoluted writing. To be honest Ann Cleeves would come a close second.

 

 

Fiona: Do you have to travel much concerning your book(s)?
Not yet …
Fiona: Who designed the covers?
I did, although Tirgearr had the right to change it if they want.

 

 

Fiona: What was the hardest part of writing your book?
I write the story in longhand then type it on my lap top, and I hate typing. My wife and daughter both said they’d help but neither of them can understand my writing.

 

 

Fiona: Did you learn anything from writing your book and what was it?
Don’t let writer’s block frustrate you – throwing the compute at the wall doesn’t do it, or you, any good. So relax, dose up with copious amounts of coffee and write something – anything – to get the imagination going.

 

 

Fiona: Do you have any advice for other writers?
Write the best book you can write, and enjoy doing it. Take feedback on board but don’t let it antagonize you. You won’t please everyone and the chances of becoming world famous are against you anyway, so just do your best and be proud of what you do.

 

 

Fiona: Do you have anything specific that you want to say to your readers?
Thanks for taking the time to read my work. I hope you enjoyed it as much as I enjoyed writing it. And I answer all correspondence personally.
Fiona: Do you remember the first book you read?
Probably The Wind in the Willows – it was the one that impressed me the most.
Fiona: Other than writing do you have any hobbies?
DIY – I’m always potching around the house doing magic stuff with a saw and a hammer.
Fiona: What TV shows/films do you enjoy watching?
Mostly detective shows like Lewis and Morse, but documentaries like Coast and History of our Streets too. I hate reality shows (X-factor and Strictly etc.) and soaps, so when my daughters stay over I’m dismissed to the dining room with a DVD on the laptop.
Fiona: Favorite foods / Colors /Music:
Food – Sunday Roast as cooked by Jennifer.
Colour – blue and yellow, sometimes purple.
Music – anything from the sixties, Barbara Streisand, Katie Melua and loads of other stuff.
Fiona: If you were not a writer what else would you like to have done?
Painting, though I’m useless at it.

 

Fiona: Do you have a blog/website? If so what is it?

http://bgobrien.com/

 

Here is my interview with Jen Cousineau

Name Jen Cousineau
Age 28
Where are you from Fond du Lac, WI
A little about your self `ie your education Family life etc I have been married for five years, but have been with my husband since 2003, and we have twin daughters who are 3.5 years old. I am the youngest of four, and lucky me – I was the only girl! Needless to say my dating life was non-existent in high school! Lol. I also have an Associate’s Degree in Business Management, which I have yet to even put to good use.

 

 

Fiona: Tell us your latest news?
Personal life latest news? My daughters are ALMOST potty trained! Slowly, but surely… lol. Writing wise…my TBW list (aka to be written list) is at a whopping 15 book ideas! Licentious will be out 8/27/14, and A Secret Gamble (for all you Trey lovers – Summer Series Book 2) will be out this winter in 2014!

 

 

Fiona: When and why did you begin writing?
I actually began writing when I was about thirteen, and it was mostly poetry and song lyrics. It was just a way to let some creativity out. It eventually became very therapeutic in those crazy teen years.

 

 

Fiona: When did you first consider yourself a writer?
When I hit publish on my debut novel this past April.

 

 

Fiona: What inspired you to write your first book?
My sista from another mista – Corinne. (Or I call her Tiger ‘cuz she’s feisty!) And I can’t forget the scrap piece of paper and a few bottles of wine ;)

 

 

Fiona: Do you have a specific writing style?
Not really. It all depends on the story that I’m focusing on in my head, and who and how those characters are. Just like my writing ‘genre’ is not set in stone to erotic romance, neither in my writing style. I like to keep my options open otherwise I feel like it can be a bit stifling.

 

 

Fiona: How did you come up with the title?
A bottle of wine Tiger :)

 

 

Fiona: Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?
For A Deadly Bet, it’s to trust your instinct. Love with everything you have. And never give up. For Licentious, which will be out at the end of August, the main message is that sometimes life sucks. Sometimes, life doesn’t turn out how we planned our lives to be. Sometimes, good people end up doing shitty things, and sometimes shitty things happen to good people. But there’s always a way to feel whole again. There’s always something that we can hang onto to get us through whatever it is we are facing – whether it be music, or a person, or whatever, there’s always something.

Fiona: How much of the book is realistic?

Both books are fictional stories ;)

 

 

Fiona: Are experiences based on someone you know, or events in your own life?
There are a FEW experiences between A Deadly Bet, Licentious, and A Secret Gamble, that has impacted either my life, or someone close to me.

 

 

Fiona: What books have most influenced your life most?
Erotic Romance is a huge one. It made me realize that it’s okay to act be more sexual. (It’s also great for my marriage!) As a mom of twin toddlers, who works full-time, writes at night, and has a life like everyone else, come 9 PM I’m dog-tired. Erotic Romance helped spark something inside of me to make the effort more frequently with my hubby.

 

 

Fiona: If you had to choose, which writer would you consider a mentor?
OMG. Really?! What kind of question is this?! This is like asking me to choose my favorite child! Lol. Oye… umm… I can’t answer this question. So I’m going to list the first bunch of author names that pop in my head that I one-click without reading the synopsis: Harper Sloan, Brooke Cumberland, Nicole Edwards, James Patterson, Ryan Michelle, Chelle Bliss, Belle Aurora, EL James, Lucian Bane, Kimber S. Dawn, Lily White, Erika Ashby, SD Hildreth, Mia Sheridan… this list can continue on forever…

 

 

Fiona: What book are you reading now?
I’m not. My TBR is super long. I have probably 300+ books one clicked and waiting for me to read but I banned myself from reading anything until the Licentious rewrites are done, and at least ten chapters of A Secret Gamble. Unless, it’s a beta read – then all bets are off!

 

 

Fiona: Are there any new authors that have grasped your interest?
Yes! Oh my word. I have beta read for a few recently published or up and coming, and let me tell you – prepare yourselves! Seasons by Katrina Alba, Picking Up the Pieces by Stephanie Gresham, Unexpected Chances and Second Chances by S.L. Scheifer, and Orphan Flowers by JC Rochford. I’m also a huge fan of Lucian Bane’s Dom Wars. I love how the main characters aren’t as… predictable in the bedroom as a D/s relationship. It seems more realistic and relatable for me personally than some of the other D/s books I have read.

 

 

Fiona: What are your current projects?
I’m currently working on a few rewrites of Licentious, which will be out on 8/27/14. I have about a third completed on Dominating Elijah which is book one of four in a series, and I have about three chapters completed in A Secret Gamble which will be released this winter 2014. Today actually, I just outlined two new standalone books.

 

 

Fiona: Name one entity that you feel supported you outside of family members.
I can’t do one. I have to do three. And those are my best girlfriends. Corinne (Tiger), Sara W and Amber P. These three girls are my sisters and my best friends and I can honestly say, that I probably would not have even started or hit publish on ADB if it weren’t for them.

 

 

Fiona: Do you see writing as a career?
Definitely! I’m a dreamer, and I truly believe that anything is possible. But even if the day never comes where I can tell my boss that I’m resigning to write full-time, I will never stop writing.

 

 

Fiona: If you had to do it all over again, would you change anything in your latest book?
Not a thing. I made the mistake of reading some not-so-great reviews, and I appreciated them. I saw where the reader was coming from, but it made me start to doubt myself, my story, and the way the characters shared it with me. A Deadly Bet may not have been perfect for some people, but it was perfect for me. Because I write for, well… me. Before I put ADB down a paper, I told myself that story a thousand times over. Even if I never publish another book again, I’ll never stop writing. Even if I don’t put the words down on paper, doesn’t mean I’m not writing in my head.

 

 

Fiona: Do you recall how your interest in writing originated?
I remember being down one day, and I could not tell you for the life of me what it was about, but I just picked up a pen and starting writing poetry. Then I started writing a few songs. Eventually small stories ran through my head that turned into full length novels.

 

 

 

Fiona: Can you share a little of your current work with us?
Sure! Here’s the prologue from Licentious, releasing on 8/27/14.
Prologue

I never had a mother. Well, technically I do, but in reality she’s a total bitch who couldn’t remember to take a pill regularly, and…well, here I am. Surprise!
I love my Dad though. He tries his hardest to make up for my mother lacking on all levels. My brother, Aedan, is seven years older than my sister, Eve, and I, but he’s never treated us as ‘annoying little sisters’. In fact, if you take my Mom out of the equation, we’re a tight-knit family who truly are best friends. Cliché? Maybe. But fortunately for us, it’s pure truth.
I wish I could tell you my life is all rainbows and butterflies, but then I’d be giving you complete bullshit. One dream. My dream, broke everything. It destroyed my family, my best friends. It destroyed me. It tore me down, causing me to defend myself the only way I knew how. I just simply stopped caring. Until I met a man who tried to change everything I felt. Until he believed in me, to make me see how beautiful life can be if I just let it in. I started to believe. He helped me see what I was missing, that is, until I discovered who he really was. How dark and dangerous he truly was. How believing in him, means turning my back on everything I believed in.
I’m not promising you butterflies and rainbows. Shit, I’m not even promising you a happily ever after, simply because, I don’t even know how this is going to end.
I’m Joey. Welcome to my hell.

 

 

 

Fiona: Is there anything you find particularly challenging in your writing?
I swear like a trucker. Whether I’m talking, texting, or writing, the profanities just keep on coming. I personally don’t care, but I’m constantly reprimanded other people… including my daughters since they aren’t allowed to say ‘naughty words’. Sometimes the characters do call for more profanity than usual, but sometimes my brain just naturally adds those damn words in all on its’ own.

 

 

Fiona: Who is your favorite author and what is it that really strikes you about their work?
Same answer from the author mentor question. I wouldn’t consider someone a mentor if they weren’t one of my faves ;)

 

 

Fiona: Do you have to travel much concerning your book(s)?
Not yet! My first official signing as of now, will be in Biloxi, Mississippi on March 7, 2015. However, I may just be adding a few to that list ;)

 

 

Fiona: Who designed the covers?
Kari Ayasha from Cover to Cover Designs

 

 

Fiona: What was the hardest part of writing your book?
Being patient and waiting for edits and cover mockups. And then trying to hold off and not hit publish (even though I did hit it a week earlier than planned anyways lol)

 

 

Fiona: Did you learn anything from writing your book and what was it?
To not read the reviews. It’s fine to copy/paste a few for marketing purposes, but I refuse to read the majority, including the low rated ones because I don’t want to become enthralled with changing the stories, the characters, and me as a writer for someone else.
I’ve also learned that there is a lot of negativity in the indie community, as well as piracy. But I’ve come to realize that there’s even more positivity, and amazing authors, bloggers, and readers who genuinely CARE and WANT people to succeed. And they want to read their stories. They don’t charge you your next child’s college tuition to help. They offer amazing feedback. They help promote because they want to and they believe in the author’s work. I have friends in my ‘real’ life. But I’ve also made some amazing friends that I can’t wait for the day to meet them all. If I would’ve known how supportive so many of these amazing people truly are, I wouldn’t have waited so long to write my first novel.

 

 

Fiona: Do you have any advice for other writers?
DON’T read the reviews!! You want feedback, find yourself some amazing, helpful, damn good betas. They’ll be honest and it will change your world and make your story 100 times better than you originally thought. The reviews are for other readers, and even if your book is the best ever written, there will always be a select few who won’t connect, and they’ll let you and everyone else know in a not so nice fashion. It’s happened to me, and it’s happened to every. Single. Author. That’s published.

 

 

Fiona: Do you have anything specific that you want to say to your readers?
THANK YOU! Thank you for giving me a chance. Even if you hate my work – thank you for giving me a shot. Thank you for the reviews – reviews are HUGE for authors. We may not always like them, but they’re great for other readers to resort to. Thank you for being a part of the indie community and supporting us indie authors, because without you – the readers – we writers wouldn’t be publishing anything. We may not even put the words to paper, or even share the stories out loud with anyone else. Life would be boring without books and the creativity that books spark within us. So thank YOU!

 

 

Fiona: Do you remember the first book you read?
No. BUT, I remember my first favorite book! Go Dog Go! was not only my favorite by all of my brothers, too. I now buy each new nephew/niece born into that side of my family their own copy in hopes that they’ll love to read it as much as we did. I can’t even tell you why it was all of our favorites, but it was.

 

 

Fiona: Other than writing do you have any hobbies ?
I love to write and read (duh!). I also love to bake, go for walks with my girls, camping, hunting, fishing, kickboxing, shopping, and sleeping. I definitely love to sleep – but that’s probably because I only average 5-6 a night. I used to get 8+ before having kids lol.

 

 

Fiona: What TV shows/films do you enjoy watching?
Oh my word! Lol… hmmm. I love teen shows. I may be a bit old for them but I just can’t help myself! The Vampire Diaries and The Originals are my top faves! But I also love Chasing Life, Switched at Birth, and of course MTV’s The Challenge. If Dawson’s Creek and One Tree Hill were still airing I’d be watching those, too! (But I always watch the reruns) ;)

 

 

Fiona: Favorite foods / Colors/ Music
I’m a sucker for Italian food. If I’m given the option, I will always choose Italian! My favorite colors are green, orange, and grey. But I love yellow, too! To be honest, it really depends on what we are talking about to determine what my fave color will be. I love music. I seriously love all music except classical and heavy metal. I’m really into Of Monsters and Men, Florence and The Machines, Paramore, CCR, Mumford & Sons, Phillip Phillips, Rhianna, and pretty much anything that Pandora gives me when I’m on one of these artist channels. Lol.

 

 

Fiona: If you were not a writer what else would you like to have done?
Well, I still work full-time for a living :( BUT my dream job would be to open a book store/coffee shop, be or a criminal psychologist. I really would love to be a social worker or work in oncology at a children’s hospital – I just never thought my heart could actually handle the not so good stories of those jobs.

 

 

Fiona: Do you have a blog/website? If so what is it?
Yes! You can check out my website and blog at http://jencousineau.com
Social Media:

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/AuthorJenCousineau
Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/8021709.Jen_Cousineau
Amazon: http://www.amazon.com/Jen-Cousineau/e/B00JPFDWJC/ref=sr_ntt_srch_lnk_1?qid=1399335879&sr=8-1
Google+: https://plus.google.com/u/0/101921096166996171765/posts
Booktropolous: https://booktropoloussocial.com/index.php?do=/profile-3196/
Twitter: https://twitter.com/JenCAuthor (@JenCAuthor)
Pinterest: http://www.pinterest.com/authorjenc/
Instagram: http://instagram.com/jencousineau

A Deadly Bet Links:

Amazon US: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00JREOZA6
Amazon UK: http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B00JREOZA6?*Version*=1&*entries*=0
Amazon CA: http://www.amazon.ca/gp/product/B00JREOZA6?%2AVersion%2A=1&%2Aentries%2A=0

Amazon AU: https://www.amazon.com.au/dp/B00JREOZA6Amazon CA: http://www.amazon.ca/gp/product/B00JREOZA6?*Version*=1&*entries*=0
Amazon AU: https://www.amazon.com.au/dp/B00JREOZA6
B&N: http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/a-deadly-bet-jen-cousineau/1119222360?ean=9781497304802
Smashwords: https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/427890
SIGNED PAPERBACK: http://jencousineau.com/
Prices include signed book, signed bookmark, and shipping.
US $15
Canada $24
International $29

 

 

 

Here is my interview with Steven Bynum

 

Name: Steven Bynum
Age: 41
Where are you from?
I’m from a small town, Rocky Branch, Louisiana.
A little about your self `ie your education Family life etc
I have a Bachelor degree in Information Systems Security. It was a total waste of money. I never was able to land a job in the computer field, so, I wound up working as a security officer. Well, I got tired of that job for various reasons and decided to make a change in my life. I started writing. It was the best decision I ever made. I’m not making a lot of money at it right now, but I sure am enjoying life doing it.

 

 

Fiona: Tell us your latest news?
I just published my first short story, Ceremony for the Boy, on Amazon. My novel, Deaders, is coming along. It has reached the 40k words mark. I consider it to be 75% done.

 

 

Fiona: When and why did you begin writing?
I began writing in High School. Mostly, it was poems about this and that. Life, however, can take you in a totally different direction. Just two years ago, 2012, I started writing again. I wanted to do something in life that I enjoy.

 

 

Fiona: When did you first consider yourself a writer?
I finished and published my first novella January, 2013. When I finished and published the second novella March, 2013, I considered myself a writer. It’s proper, I think, for someone to consider themselves a writer if they write any kind of story whether they publish it or not. Mainly, I figured if I kept writing and publishing then I was a writer. Just a personal test I suppose.

 

 

Fiona: What inspired you to write your first book?
My first book, Becoming the Beast, is extremely personal. It deals with feelings and emotional stress I had with me for many years. It is not exactly what I would call based on a true story, but there are a few things in it that happened and are real in my life. For example, my brother does suffer from chronic mental illness and shadow people did torment him for a while until we managed to get him treatment. I suppose I wanted to show the horrors of mental illness thru the life of a werewolf. Since, I really love werewolves you see. It was a way to write about my favorite supernatural creature and make it personal.

 

 

Fiona: Do you have a specific writing style?
Not really. I feel like my writing style is still developing and evolving.

 

 

Fiona: How did you come up with the title?
If you mean the title of the novel I am working on, Deaders, then, it was just an idea of what someone might call a bunch of zombies.

 

 

Fiona: Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?
In, Becoming the Beast, I want people to understand how terrible chronic mental illness can be. I want them to understand how it can destroy not only someone’s life, but the life of their entire family
There’s really no message in Into Zombies Complete and Deaders. They are both just good zombie fun with a little extra thrown inside.

 

 

Fiona: How much of the book is realistic?
In, Deaders, apart from the zombies, just about everything is realistic. I did not do a major amount of research, but I tried to use real items and places that exist in the world today.

 

 

Fiona: Are experiences based on someone you know, or events in your own life?
No, Deaders, is just a story solely being written for entertainment.

 

 

Fiona: What books have most influenced your life most?
Dragonlance novels, especially the first six, Chronicles and Legends by Margaret Weis and Tracy Hickman, really got me into enjoying reading. Those books took me into fantasy lands of imagination.

 

 

Fiona: If you had to choose, which writer would you consider a mentor?
I’m sure you’ve heard these names before, but I’ll say them again. Mike Evans, Tony Baker, David Reuben Aslin, as well as all the other indie authors I have met on Facebook that inspire me every day.

 

 

Fiona: What book are you reading now?
I am in the process of reading, The Orphans, by Mike Evans.

 

 

Fiona: Are there any new authors that have grasped your interest?
Yes indeed. I pretty much only read indie authors now. The most recent I have read, Tony Baker, David Reuben Aslin, and Mike Evans. I fully intend to read books from Mike Clary, Ian McClellan, Ian Woodhead, Matthew Cox and more.

 

 

Fiona: What are your current projects?
I will continue writing Deaders. It’s around 75% done. After that, I plan to write more short stories.

 

 

Fiona: Name one entity that you feel supported you outside of family members.
All my friends on Facebook.

 

 

Fiona: Do you see writing as a career?
I very much hope it to come into being.

 

 

Fiona: If you had to do it all over again, would you change anything in your latest book?
Hmm, I’m sure I would. I have learned a lot since writing Becoming the Beast and Into Zombies Complete.

 

 

Fiona: Do you recall how your interest in writing originated?
I don’t like talking to people. My best mode of communication is through writing.

 

 

Fiona: Can you share a little of your current work with us?
Excerpt from Deaders:
One
Clump…clump…clump…clump…the zombie slowly walked across the floor. Jacob, Mary, and their teenage daughter, Sheila, were huddled in the cellar below. They were terrified. It had been a few days since the Emergency Broadcast System blared on the television, telling everyone to remain calm and stay in their homes. Like good citizens, they listened, and did what the message had said. Two days ago they had seen the first zombies strolling by their home. It was all so surreal and unimaginable. None had ever tried to get inside until now. This one was different somehow. As if it had a slight intelligence, it had smashed through a window and was now searching their home for something to eat. They wondered if it knew they were there, hiding.
Clump…clump…with every step, Sheila became more and more frightened. She had begun to whimper, and Mary was doing everything possible to keep her quiet. Jacob was searching for a weapon. If it came down to it, he would defend his family with his life. He was becoming a bit frustrated. He had not found anything yet that he considered suitable for a weapon. Certainly there must be something down here. The darkness made the search even more difficult. At long last, his hand scraped across a claw hammer. It would have to do. Taking it, he moved to the bottom of the stairs, waiting.
Mary caressed her daughter’s hair and kissed her on the forehead.
“Everything will be okay, sweetie; daddy will take care of us,” she whispered. “It can’t get down here. You’ll see. We’re safe.”
Clump…clump…the zombie stopped just on the other side of the cellar door. A long scraping sound echoed down the stairs as it slid its fingernails across the wooden surface. It scratched at the door, moaning. Jacob and Mary were becoming nervous, and Sheila started trembling in her mother’s arms. She began whimpering again, and Mary placed her hand over her daughter’s mouth.
“Shhh,” Mary whispered. “If you don’t be quiet, it will hear us. You need to control yourself, sweeheart.”
The scratching stopped abruptly, causing a heavy silence to wash over them. Their minds raced, wondering what was going on. What’s it doing? Did it leave? There they waited, frozen in place, not wanting to make a sound. Their hearts pounded. The beating seemed so loud, they wondered if it could hear the thumping in their chests. They took shallow breaths as they watched the cellar door with wide eyes. Jacob’s muscles tensed as he gripped the claw hammer tightly. He held it up at the ready.
Rap…the zombie hit the door with a fist, causing Sheila to scream aloud. The zombie snarled at the sound, and began pounding on the door. It knew there was food on the other side of the door and it would not stop until it got in. Mary could not muffle Sheila’s screams. She had become hysterical with fear. Jacob took a quick look in their direction, and moved slightly closer to the door. He prepared to defend his family with all his might.
“I’m not sure the door will hold,” Jacob shouted. “Get back as far as you can. We can’t get trapped in here. If it gets through, I’ll make an opening and the two of you run for it!”
“We will not leave you behind,” Mary sobbed. Sheila was crying as well, as she held on to her mother’s hand.
Pounding…the zombie was trying to punch its way through the door. Jacob knew it wouldn’t be long before the latch gave way. What am I going to do? He placed his back to the door in an attempt to brace it from opening. The punches from the zombie were strong and jarring. Even if he was able to keep the door shut, the wood was beginning to weaken. One way or another, the zombie would get through and devour their flesh while they are still alive.

 

 

 

Fiona: Is there anything you find particularly challenging in your writing?
I freaking hate dialogue. It always gives me trouble. Probably because I don’t talk a whole lot. Never have.

 

 

Fiona: Who is your favorite author and what is it that really strikes you about their work?
I’m finding that to be a difficult question for some reason. I want to say all indie authors, because they put so much heart and soul into their writing.

 

 

Fiona: Do you have to travel much concerning your book(s)?
I have not done any traveling as of yet.

 

 

Fiona: Who designed the covers?
Until I start making good money, I do my own covers.

 

 

Fiona: What was the hardest part of writing your book?
I tend to have trouble putting what I have in my mind down on paper. It gets easier with practice.

 

 

Fiona: Did you learn anything from writing your book and what was it?
Never give up.

 

 

Fiona: Do you have any advice for other writers?
Keep writing. Do not let a bad review get you down. You will never be able to please everyone.

 

 

Fiona: Do you have anything specific that you want to say to your readers?
I can not express how much I appreciate their support. Writing is a lot of work and if they can take the time to write a review, it helps. Bless you all.

 

 

Fiona: Do you remember the first book you read?
I do not, but Lord of the Flies and Catcher in the Rye comes to mind. Those were probably two of my earliest books to read. I’m sure I read something when I was younger, I just can’t remember it.

 

 

Fiona: Other than writing do you have any hobbies ?
I love to play video games, watch movies, and read.

 

 

Fiona: What TV shows/films do you enjoy watching?
I will pretty much watch anything if it is good. Star Wars and Star Trek are two of my loves. I’m hooked on The Walking Dead and Supernatural at the moment.

 

 

Fiona: Favorite foods / Colors/ Music
I’m not much of a food person. I eat what I can decide on at the time. If I had to pick one food, I would say fish.
Colors, hmm, black, blue, and gray.
I listen to different music, but I have to say heavy metal is my favorite.

 

 

Fiona: If you were not a writer what else would you like to have done?
I would have loved to designed video games.

 

 

Fiona: Do you have a blog/website? If so what is it?
My blog, if you can call it that I suppose. I Write Stuff
Facebook author page: https://www.facebook.com/sbynumauthor
Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/sgbynum
Amazon author page: http://amazon.com/author/sgbynum

 

Here is my interview with Benjamin Card

 

 

Name: Benjamin Card
Age: 25
Where are you from: Miami, FL
A little about your self `ie your education Family life etc:
My family is huge and awesome. A bunch of crazy Cubans. My dad is Colombian. All my cousins are my best friends. I started college but stopped for now.

 

 

Fiona: Tell us your latest news?
I have a new collection being published with Villipede Publications titled “The Courting”. The release date is still TBA but I’ll be announcing an exact date soon. I’m also working on a new science fiction novella called “Love, American Style” and a horror YA series called “Survive The Night”. I have several more novels in my head and plan on releasing at least one a year.

 

 

Fiona: When and why did you begin writing?
It must have been during elementary school. It started with writing crappy comic books with my older brother and eventually I was starting different stories and never finishing them. Usually love stories because I was influenced early on by Nicholas Sparks.

 

 

Fiona: When did you first consider yourself a writer?
I guess I always enjoyed writing as a hobby but it was about 3 years ago after reading Richard Matheson’s work that I decided to pursue writing as a career.

 

 

Fiona: What inspired you to write your first book?
My first completed novel was Survive the Night, and it first started in my head as a short story about a kid who is asked to house-sit for a family and starts encountering a lot of demonic things in the house and he’s unable to escape for the entire night. Then the story evolved and eventually became a YA haunted house series. The story was inspired by Shirley Jackson’s “The Haunting of Hill House” and Matheson’s “Hell House”.

 

 

Fiona: Do you have a specific writing style?
Well, I’d say my style mimics Richard Matheson and Ernest Hemingway the most. Unlike Hemingway, though, I love to describe feelings in detail and use a lot of imagery for fear and different emotional reactions.

 

 

Fiona: How did you come up with the title?
My titles always come differently. Not sure how to answer that question. I just think about what sounds cool and might sound good as a movie. Aside from the stories I already mentioned, I plan on writing these titles: The Orbs, 2 Saviors, The House Always Wins, On the Rim of the Visible World, and The Comatose Country. I might possibly write a sequel to The Courting sometime in the future.

 

 

Fiona: Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?
Sure. It all varies and sometimes comes without me even noticing. My short stories Wake Up!” and “The Glitch” deal with poverty in the world. “I’ll Spend it With You,” “Blind Date,” and “All Is Fair In Love” deal with themes of love and romance. There’s nothing too specific and it’s never preachy or even optimistic usually, but I put enough heart to let the reader take it any way they want.

 

 

Fiona: How much of the book is realistic?
Well, The Courting is realistic if you can believe in a drug that can target a demographic and make them act differently. Some stuff is fake, but I try to make it believable, even the fake stuff.

 

 

Fiona: Are experiences based on someone you know, or events in your own life?
Sometimes. The Courting came to me in a nightmare. The other stuff depends. The scary stuff is usually stuff that scares me.

 

 

Fiona: What books have most influenced your life?

Everything by Richard Matheson.

 

 

Fiona: If you had to choose, which writer would you consider a mentor?
Matheson, Hemingway, Bradbury, and Stephen King.

 

 

Fiona: What book are you reading now?
Psycho 2 by Robert Bloch and A Farewell To Arms by Hemingway.

 

 

Fiona: Are there any new authors that have grasped your interest?
I usually read older books. But Mitch Albom is a fantastic new author. I hope he goes down in history as one of the greats.

 

 

Fiona: What are your current projects?
The ones I mentioned above.

 

 

Fiona: Name one entity that you feel supported you outside of family members.
God if we’re going to get weird and spiritual. And my close small circle of friends.

 

 

Fiona: Do you see writing as a career?
Sure. It is a career.

 

 

Fiona: If you had to do it all over again, would you change anything in your latest book?
Nope, I did my best. I’ll drive myself crazy if I think that way.

 

 

Fiona: Do you recall how your interest in writing originated?
Reading Nicholas Sparks and then Matheson. And I just liked the idea that I could create my own world and invite readers into it.

 

 

Fiona: Can you share a little of your current work with us?
I’m writing a new novella called “Love, American Style”, which takes place in future America, where a new technology let’s people simulate any experience they want, even if it’s illegal, immoral, or just plain evil. It’s legal because it hurts no one, but one young man sees what the rest of the country doesn’t and tries to stop these criminal acts by shutting down the system and letting America reveal its true colors.

 

 

Fiona: Is there anything you find particularly challenging in your writing?
Sure. I think researching is difficult and just plain boring. I try to avoid it if I can. Dialogue comes pretty naturally to me (I hope).

 

 

Fiona: Who is your favorite author and what is it that really strikes you about their work?
Richard Matheson. And it’s because he writes so honestly and so realistically that I feel like his characters are in my own head.

 

 

Fiona: Do you have to travel much concerning your book(s)?
Nope I don’t think so.

 

 

Fiona: Who designed the covers?
I design all of my covers initially, and the publisher polishes it up and makes it look way better.

 

 

Fiona: What was the hardest part of writing your book?
Starting it and then finishing it. But when I look back it wasn’t hard at all. Just takes discipline.

 

 

Fiona: Did you learn anything from writing your book and what was it?
I learned that a little bit of writing a day can eventually make a novel.

 

 

Fiona: Do you have any advice for other writers?
Write. Read. Get weird with it, and have fun.

 

 

Fiona: Do you have anything specific that you want to say to your readers?
If you check out my book, I hope you enjoy the stories. I had fun writing them and reading them after. I think they’re quite good. And there’s more to come. Thanks for reading.

 

 

Fiona: Do you remember the first book you read?
Nope. I remember the first book that awakened me to love reading. “Message in a Bottle” by Nicholas Sparks.

 

 

Fiona: Other than writing do you have any hobbies?
I have a rock band called My Flesh Heart. Check me out on iTunes and Spotify. I also enjoy drinking often with friends.

 

 

Fiona: What TV shows/films do you enjoy watching?
Steven Spielberg, Sam Raimi, Edgar Wright, George Romero, Joss Whedon, gosh there’s too many… For shows: South Park, It’s Always Sunny in Philadelphia, Breaking Bad, Twin Peaks, Six Feet Under, Eastbound and Down, The Twilight Zone, too many too mention…

 

 

Fiona: Favorite foods / Colors/ Music.
Italian, Mexican, Greek. Every color is cool I guess. I’m color blind so there are some shades I can’t see. Music: Jars of Clay, Switchfoot, Family Force 5, Needtobreathe, Passion Pit, House of Heroes, Mahler, The Beatles, Chet Baker, Kendrick Lamar, Eminem, Tchaikovsky, Johnny Cash, so many more…

 

 

Fiona: If you were not a writer what else would you like to have done?
Music.

 

 

Fiona: Do you have a blog/website? If so what is it? Nope, but look me up on social media by searching Benjamin Card. I’m on Instagram, Twitter and vine.

 

 

Here is my interview with Elle Boon

 

 

Name: Elle Boon
Age: EEEEEKKKK 41
Where are you from: Missouri, like smack dab in the middle of Merica hehehehe.
A little about your self `ie your education Family life etc: I have a degree in Accounting, but am a stay at home mom. My youngest is 14 and my oldest is 20. My husband and children are my world, so when my youngest started school, I was left with a gaping hole that I filled with books for the 7 hours while he was away. I’d always worked until I’d had my youngest that was born with underdeveloped bronchial tubes. From the moment we realized he was sick, I became a “helicopter” mom lol. So when he went to school, it was really hard to let go. Thank the lord for Romance novels 

 

 

Fiona: Tell us your latest news?
I just hit send on Final Edits of Jaklyn’s Saviors book 3 in The Ravens of War and am working on book 4 Kira’s Warriors. I think y’all will love where I took Jaklyn and her men (fingers crossed) and with book 4 it’s going to be even more different. My goal is to make each book a stand alone, but you will see characters from previous books in each story. I also plan to make them so different from each other that the reader won’t go “same story different hero and heroine”. In books 1&2 you had the same bad guy, but that was really the only similarities, however in books 3&4 there are no similarities.

 

 

Fiona: When and why did you begin writing?
I’d always kept a journal and had stories in my head, but after my son started school I was diagnosed with Uterine Cancer. I realized life really could change in the blink of an eye, and there was soo much that I hadn’t done. So I made a bucket list. I became a beta/crit partner for several authors and from there I started writing the stories in my head down on paper. My bucket list started getting things checked off and becoming a published author was on that list. I’m happy to say I was finally able to put a check mark after that one too. Of course it took a few rejections which sucked major monkey balls to get them, but they made me a better writer in the long run. I learned a lot from the rejections and met some great ladies along the way who helped me. One of those women just so happened to be Desiree Holt. She actually critiques Selena’s Men and helped me clean it up and get it ready to submit to Siren.

 

 

Fiona: When did you first consider yourself a writer?
When I had a reader ask me for my autograph at Lori Fosters Reader Author Get Together in 2014. That was awesome! My hand was shaking and I truly have the most god-awful handwriting ever! She even posed for a pic with me so I could have it for my own scrapbook.

 

 

Fiona: What inspired you to write your first book?
The story kept playing in my head. I could see Selena’s life soo clearly like it was real lol. Until I finally sat down and started typing, the same scene kept playing every time I stopped to think. Once I got it down, then I was able to move on  To the next scene lol.

 

 

Fiona: Do you have a specific writing style?
I’ve found out that I am a “pantster”. I write scene by scene. I start out by getting my characters lined out. I know their names and descriptions from top to bottom. I know what the overall storyline is going to be, like who the good guys are and who the bad guy or guys are going to be. I know there is going to be an HEA and I’ll know what the major conflict is going to be. But everything in between is a mystery to me. I keep it in a notebook beside me and as I’m writing I add to the notebook. If a character pops up I add him or her to the storybook. If someone says something all the time I add it to their description, that way I don’t have another character saying or doing the same thing.

 

 

Fiona: How did you come up with the title?
I knew I was doing a series, so I wanted something that I could somehow use or play off of for the next and the next. And then I realized that was even harder than I thought lol. So I decided to use the ladies names to start each book, that way they all were cohesive in a way.

 

 

Fiona: Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?
For me my books are a way to escape from reality, that’s what I did when I was going through chemo. I read romance of all genres to escape from reality. But I hope that readers will read my stories and walk away happy. In all my books I write heroines that are no weaklings. They are all different in looks and sizes, but all have inner cores of steal. They all have overcome some sort of adversity or loss and were still fighters. So maybe that is a message and I didn’t realize it until now OY. 

 

 

Fiona: How much of the book is realistic?
I put a lot of characteristics from friends into the characters of my stories. I even name or use parts of names of my real life friends in the stories. Also the setting for Selena’s Club is based off of a real life place near where I am from, only the bar is fictional sort of. There are certain phrases that are used that I am known to say or someone I know say in each book. I have yet to base a bad guy off of someone I know, but I never say never hehehehe.

 

 

Fiona: Are experiences based on someone you know, or events in your own life?
Since the stories are paranormal and completely out of this world, the answer is not completely, but I do use some real life issues. I just tweak them…A lot  for instance in Selena’s Men there is a scene where Selena gets on the bar and dances to a Sugarland song. I have actually done this with my friends at a bar. In Selena’s Men she does Krav Maga and so do I. In Two For Tamara she is the snarky best friend with a penchant for saying the “F” word, that is so me, and so many other things in each of my heroines. So there are many things from my life that I put into each story, not only of me but of my friends that I inject into my characters.

 

 

Fiona: What books have most influenced your life most?
This is where I’m supposed to say Jane Eyre or some other great book, and while yes I’ve read the greats, they are not what I love or would consider influential. Books or authors that I consider inspiring are Sherrilyn Kenyon, Carrie Ann Ryan, Laurann Dohner, Kate Douglas, Shelly Laurenston, Dana Marie Bell and Diana Palmer and so many others lol. I read to escape and for fun, so anything with an HEA and that is 3rd person. I know the trend is serials and 1st person, but I am not a fan of those.

 

 

Fiona: If you had to choose, which writer would you consider a mentor?
Desiree Holt. Hands down that woman is by far the greatest, most giving woman ever. She has helped me soo much and I credit her for helping me get my first contract with Siren.

 

 

Fiona: What book are you reading now?
Diana Palmer Invincible. I just finished reading Mandy Roth’s latest I’Ops.

 

 

Fiona: Are there any new authors that have grasped your interest?
I’ve been writing so I haven’t been reading as much. I have my autobuys and my favorites that I read, but I have read a few new Siren authors like Jordan Ashley, Michelle Roth, and Heather Fortman to name a few. They are all amazing and I highly recommend them all. 

 

 

Fiona: What are your current projects?
I’m working on book 4 in my Ravens Of War Kira’s Warriors. IMO this book is going to be awesome. A little darker than the last three, but soo good.

 

 

Fiona: Name one entity that you feel supported you outside of family members.
I can’t name just one person, so I’ll say my “Friends” and the list is not long. I have several girlfriends who I truly would be lost without. Debbie Ramos, who has been my friend, and beta reader from the beginning. Margie Hager, who has been a wonderful friend and cheerleader. Valerie Tibbs who has done so much for me, from creating my website, to making me ads for my books, to being one of my best friends. Not to mention all the new supporters that have been awesome. That list is getting long!

 

 

Fiona: Do you see writing as a career?
Right now I see writing as the best thing that’s happened to me since my husband and kids. I don’t know if I would classify it as a career. More like my passion, or my third love. <3

 

 

Fiona: If you had to do it all over again, would you change anything in your latest book?
No! I truly love my stories and how I wrote them. I’ve re-read them and I still love them. Heck I just re-read book 3 Jaklyn’s story and I fell in love with the characters all over again.  When I was reading it for editing purposes I found myself laughing at the antics of these characters that I created. When I was reading the editors comments, and how much she enjoyed them too, I was excited to hear the readers take on them.

 

 

Fiona: Do you recall how your interest in writing originated?
Honestly I’ve always kept a journal and made stories up in my head. I just never thought about doing it until one of the authors I was beta/reading for said I should become a writer that I really became serious. I was helping her through a “block” and we were on the phone while I was driving (I was on my wireless headset) and she stopped in the middle and said I was wasting my talent. We chatted and I told her about my recurrent story and she told me to get it on paper or computer…NOW. So I did and the rest as they say is history. Now, let me back up and say I do have a story I wrote prior to Selena’s Men, that will probably never see the light of day. It is a contemporary romance that needs A LOT of work.

 

 

Fiona: Can you share a little of your current work with us?
I am writing the 4th book in the Ravens of War series. This book takes us to Japan with Thane and Garrick and Kira. You meet these three in Jaklyn’s story and get to see that there’s more to the petite young woman than meets the eye. The Ravens had been hired to protect her by her father, but all is not as it seems. She helps to save a very important person in book 3 (don’t want to give any spoilers) but her life is in danger, which is why she has Ravens as bodyguards. I’m only in the beginning, but I think it’s fabulous.

 

 

Fiona: Is there anything you find particularly challenging in your writing?
I love writing, it’s the promo that I find hard. I love chatting with readers, and going on blogs, and the parties are awesome. But I don’t think I’m good at promo 

 

 

Fiona: Who is your favorite author and what is it that really strikes you about their work?
OY, I have so many favorite authors. My favorite genre is paranormal though. I have a tattoo of books on my right shoulder and down my back of books. On the books I have different symbols, from a wolf paw to a star and I had the double bow and arrow from Sherrilyn Kenyon’s Dark Hunters. So I guess you can say she is one of my favorites. But I still love Diana Palmer too even though she’s as far from paranormal and erotic as you can get.

 

 

Fiona: Do you have to travel much concerning your book(s)?
Not yet and thanks to the internet I can find just about anything I need concerning the places I do use. Also since I write paranormal and some of the places I use are fictional, I can make them look the way I want with my own creative mind. In Two For Tamara the crew travels to the fifth level of Hell. I was very creative in what I though each level would look like and feel like.

 

 

Fiona: Who designed the covers?
Harris Channing has made all the covers so far. I described what my characters looked like, what I didn’t want and have loved what she’s come up with. I can’t wait for the print versions.

 

 

Fiona: What was the hardest part of writing your book?
Submitting them for the first time. That was truly scary  and then came the wait “insert nail biting”!

 

 

Fiona: Did you learn anything from writing your book and what was it?
I learned I suck at proper comma usage *weg*, but that wasn’t really a shock.

 

 

Fiona: Do you have any advice for other writers?
To not give up. If they really want to be a writer, then they need to keep trying, even if they get rejected. This is not an easy business, but it is soo much fun to create worlds. I was told that a writer had to have a thick skin, and that is the absolute truth. I luckily only got rejected 3 times, but I have friends who had been rejected dozens of times.

 

 

Fiona: Do you have anything specific that you want to say to your readers?
Thank you…Thank you from the bottom of my heart for taking a chance and reading my stories, when there are so many others to choose from. Thank you for leaving a review on all the different platforms, and for friending me on Facebook and liking my posts. I truly appreciate each and everyone of you. Big Huge Hugs. And as I’m fond of saying, but is so true. Love y’all soo hard

 

 

Fiona: Do you remember the first book you read?
I remember the first book I read when my son started kindergarten. It was Diana Palmer’s Carrera’s Bride. I think I have read that book a dozen times and it’s still one of my favorites. When I was younger I read all the time, but since I went through chemo I have what is affectionately called “chemobrain”. I just always loved to read and had tons of books even as a child.

 

 

Fiona: Other than writing do you have any hobbies ?
Reading lol. I also love to sew. Anytime, anyone in my family has an article of clothing that needs to be fixed or made, I’m the one they bring it to. I love to make things 

 

 

Fiona: What TV shows/films do you enjoy watching?
I love Game Of Thrones, True Blood, Teen Wolf, and recently my daughter who is 20 has gotten me hooked on series through NetFlix. She has been getting series that I have fallen in love with even though I don’t watch much television, like Prison Break (Love them brothers) and Breaking Bad, Friday Night Lights, and now Greys Anatomy. Lord Save me lol.

 

 

Fiona: Favorite foods / Colors/ Music:
I love Italian food, my favorite is chicken con broccoli over angel hair pasta with a creamy garlic sauce yummmm. My favorite color is purple, add sparkles and I’m in love. My taste in music is very eclectic. I love country, rock, and some pop. As long as you can dance to it I love it. With that being said my all-time favorite group Metallica, their re-make of Bob Seger’s Turn The Page is something I never get tired of hearing, and then I can switch to country and boot scoot with the best of them. I love the hair bands of the 80’s, but I also love heavy metal too. Very eclectic lol.

 

 

Fiona: If you were not a writer what else would you like to have done?
Exactly what I was doing. Being a wife and mother. I love my life with my husband and kids, I’m just grateful that I am doing what I always wanted to do now and that is writing. I’m glad that people are getting to read my stories and seem to like them.

 

 

Fiona: Do you have a blog/website? If so what is it?

Yes mam. It’s http://www.elleboon.com, but I am on Facebook all the time. Here are a few of the places you can find me 

https://www.facebook.com/elle.boon

https://www.facebook.com/pages/Elle-Boon-Author/1429718517289545

https://twitter.com/ElleBoon1

Places to find my books 

http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/selenas-men-ravens-of-war-elle-boon/1119372514?ean=9781627415378

http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/two-for-tamara-ravens-of-war-2-elle-boon/1119782921?ean=9781627417785

http://www.bookstrand.com/jaklyns-saviors

 

eb-row-selenasmen-full  eb-row-twofortamara-full eb-row-jaklynssaviors-full

 

 

Here is my interview with Heath D. Alberts

 

Name: Heath D. Alberts
Age: 39
Where are you from: Rockford, Illinois

 

 

Fiona: Tell us your latest news?
Heath: Currently, I’ve just released my first mystery novel, “Photographic Memory”. It’s my third novel, and I really wanted to give the genre a try. More so because the heavily-dystopian work that came before it, “Last Rights”, was so dark.

 

 

Fiona: When and why did you begin writing?
Heath: Most kids ask for fun stuff for Christmas – I asked for a typewriter. I had made use of them wherever I found them in people’s homes we might be visiting, but I wanted my own. I would write little stories, mostly to entertain myself. I think I did so because my childhood tended to be a somewhat bleak one. It was an escape from the negative reality often happening around me.

 

 

Fiona: When did you first consider yourself a writer?
Heath: This might sound trite, but I still don’t consider myself a writer. I am a person who writes. A writer, in my mind, tends be trained in the editing arts, and the art of storytelling. Even so, I’ve been writing for as long as I can recall.

 

 

Fiona: What inspired you to write your first book?
Heath: I had been playing with a few short-stories and essays that developed out of dreams that I had had, of all things. M first book, “Terminal Beginning” developed over a decade from a short-story that I wrote down one morning after having a dream worth remembering. I tend to dream Hollywood-blockbuster style – I always have. Some mornings I wake up, feeling as though I’ve lived an eight-hour movie, with a cast of thousands and never-ending landscapes. It’s kind of a cool thing, now that I think about it more.

 

 

Fiona: Do you have a specific writing style?
Heath: I tend to be a bit wordy. I’m trying to get away from that. I always infuse every work with some semblance humor. I grew up as the fat kid who needed humor as a shield. That still permeates who I am, to this day. I’ve toyed with first-person, but I seem to work better in third-person omniscient.

 

 

Fiona: How did you come up with the title?
Heath: My titles, typically, are meant to be clever, tongue-in-cheek references to what’s happening in the story. I still have to explain to some people that Last Rights is a play on words, and not an errant misspelling of the service offered when you’re dying.

 

 

Fiona: Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?
Heath: I usually want them to take an introspective look at themselves. If I can get them to do that, then I’ve succeeded. We live in a time where apathy seems to be more and more the norm. I want people to consider the power and privilege that they possess – whether they know it or not. I also want them to be introspective about what they’re doing in their daily life, and how it affects not only themselves, but others. So far? I’ve gotten a lot of the reactions that I wished for. Those moments are exceptionally special.

 

 

Fiona: How much of the book is realistic?
Heath: With most of my works (the current one in progress being the exception) I try to be as accurate as possible. I take into account time period, and also make heavy use of history, geography, and experts in an effort to avoid a serious faux pas.

 

 

Fiona: Are experiences based on someone you know, or events in your own life?
Heath: It’s funny. My brother recently commented that he sees a lot of me in my characters – some more than others. Which was odd, because I have never written ‘myself’ into a book – in character form, or otherwise. In hindsight, I guess I do inject a bit of myself into them, disparate though they may be.

 

 

Fiona: What books have most influenced your life most?
Heath: ‘Atlas Shrugged’ tops that list. It gave me a whole new perspective on perseverance, and making your own luck. I tend to turn a blind eye to the hedonism and adultery found therein, however. Thomas Stanley’s ‘The Millionaire Next Door’ is another work that I think everyone with more than $2 should read. Tolkien, Adams, Stephenson, Gibson, Kress, Murakami, Patchett, Hiaasen, and Dorsey are all favorites as well.

 

 

Fiona: If you had to choose, which writer would you consider a mentor?
Heath: That’s hard. Tim Dorsey has, graciously, over the years interacted with me. He didn’t have anything to gain, but he did it anyway. I think that those acts of kindness to a nobody via e-mail really helped me take the leap of faith to keep publishing.

 

 

Fiona: What book are you reading now?
Heath: Joe Abercrombie’s latest, ‘Half A King’. Abercrombie is the modern day Tolkien. If anyone wants to argue that, I’m easy enough to find. The man is a genius.

 

 

Fiona: Are there any new authors that have grasped your interest?
Heath: It’s been a while since I have read a book by an author, only to have to read their entire body of work – immediately – because they were so amazing. David Mitchell was the last one. The guy can write about a can of soup, and I’d read it. I’m eagerly awaiting his new novel, ‘The Bone Clocks’.

 

 

Fiona: What are your current projects?
Heath: Currently, I’m working on something that also spawned from a dream about twenty years ago. The working title is ‘Not On The List’. It centers around an entire society of beings living among us, but who we cannot see. If I had to compare it to something, it’s a little Discworld-ish, in that it offers up endless possibilities, and allows my humor to come through full-on for the first time. It was something that, as a novice author, I don’t think I was prepared for the first time around. A bit of it was snatched from what was to be my second novel. It failed – miserably – and I shelved the whole work, and thought I’d never look at it again. This was more than five years ago. Now, I’m finding that I have the intuition to make not only a good story out of something that I considered junk, but I also see a potential for a serial set of works if it does well.

 

 

Fiona: Name one entity that you feel supported you outside of family members.
Heath: Unfortunately, I can’t. Finding support has been an uphill battle.

 

 

Fiona: Do you see writing as a career?
Heath: Unfortunately, no. I’ve been blessed with a job where I make more money than I probably should. That being said, as I get older, I’d like to become ‘known’ enough to write into early retirement. That would be nice.

 

 

Fiona: If you had to do it all over again, would you change anything in your latest book?
Heath: Nope. Not a thing. I’m fortunate to have a great group of readers. There are only four of them, but each brings something unique to the table. With their input, and numerous edits, I feel like it’s a solid product.

 

 

Fiona: Do you recall how your interest in writing originated?
Heath: I think it spawned from an interest in reading.

 

 

Fiona: Can you share a little of your current work with us?
Heath: Sure. Here’s a raw, unedited, segment:

 

“An Omen Cometh, A Harbinger Goeth

As the Harbinger reluctantly followed the Omen, he considered the fortuitousness of Omens being impossible for humankind to see in their true form. Instead, humanity received only the visible, mental, or audible indicator of their presence.
If it were the other way around, he considered, they would be too busy laughing themselves stupid at the sight of the things.
From lamppost, to rooftop, to tree, to tower the Omen bounded, headed for one of the older parts of the industrial section of town. As the buildings got older, the Omen picked up its pace. It then disappeared into a ninety-degree joint, where pavement met brick wall on a careworn building. It did so at a very steep angle. This led the Harbinger to conclude – correctly – that their quarry was both somewhere near, and below ground.
As an unwritten rule, Harbingers detested moving through solid objects. Where Omens gladly went anywhere, carefree as pixies on cocaine, Harbingers preferred the out-of-doors to communicate their particular portents. Even so, the Harbinger possessed the capability of solid-object traversal and so, true to its orders, it plummeted in the wake of the Omen.
By the time it reached the brick-lined tunnel beneath the building, the Omen was already divulging its foreshadowing of things to come.
“…is seeking you out, even as I speak. This will not bode well for you. No, indeed.”
“Two questions,” a semi-disheveled individual in the company of the garbage troll was asking, “how did you find us, and what in the hell are you?”
“That’s an Omen,” Willy snapped at Jules. “And damn clever of him to send you, blast it,” he scolded the Omen.
“Did it just say Santa was after us?” Jules asked. “I couldn’t have heard that right.” His head was full to bursting with follow-up questions as well, begging to be answered.
“Oh, yes,” Willy sniped. “Best damn bounty hunter around, these days.” Then Willy spied the Harbinger, floating up in a corner, merely observing the goings-on. “And he’s sent a Harbinger too, I see.”
Jules looked up to where Willy’s eyes were locked. “That thing up in the corner that looks like Orko, from the Masters of the Universe cartoon?”
Willy nodded. Clearly, he was sizing the situation up.
“Oh, this whole ordeal just keeps getting better and better,” Jules flustered.
“Let me guess,” Willy spoke anew, apparently having had his required epiphany, “you’re here to find me, in the guise of a warning,” he said to the Omen. “And you’re tagging along, so that you can return to Santa, and let him know where the Omen deceased.”
“Look at the brain on you,” the Harbinger said, nonchalantly as it looked around taking in its surroundings.
“Oh, hey! I know! Does anyone like…” the Omen began.

POP!It was gone in a weak flash of blue. “Surprised he wasn’t more chatty,” Willy said, to the Harbinger. “Surprised, hell – you should have heard him before we arrived. My God, the damn thing wouldn’t shut up. And then it sang the whole way here.” “So, I suppose this means that you’ll be heading back, and divulging my whereabouts,” Willy asked, as much as stated. “Oh, yes. In fact, I had best be off.” And then, as an afterthought, the Harbinger added, “I’ll tell you this, though: I hope you that get well away with Father Time, here, before Santa arrives, because he had me created for a reason that just pisses me off. I feel like a whore. And, if I weren’t about to cease to exist, I would probably give him what-for, right after a series of hot showers to scrub off the taint of existential unpleasantness.” “Those are the breaks,” Willy consoled. The Harbinger nodded, and disappeared through the wall. “What in the hell just happened?” Jules demanded, as much as he dared, under the current circumstances. “What just happened was that Santa somehow got me on his radar, and found a clever work-around to my secrecy totem, is what happened. And the Harbinger just let slip the reason why we were paid this uninvited and unannounced visit.” “It did?” Jules asked, confused, and wondering if he had just engaged in the same conversation as Willy had. “Those men who gave you that drink?” “Yeah? What about them?” “Were there twelve of them?” “Possibly. I can’t say that I counted, but that seems about right. Why?” “Because those weren’t men,” Willy began, “those were the twelve Hours, meeting, and waiting for you. And, apparently, you’re the new Father Time.” “I’m the what, now?” “Son of a bitch,” Willy sighed.”

 

 

Fiona: Is there anything you find particularly challenging in your writing?

Heath: I find myself using too many adverbs. I also find believable dialogue to be something I need to continue to work on. I tend to slip into a mode where the individual ceases talking, and appears to be reading from a book. Which makes for great information, but a lousy conversation.

 

 

Fiona: Who is your favorite author and what is it that really strikes you about their work?

Heath: Ayn Rand is probably my favorite. After that, there are a lot of others. Rand’s work really hits home on a lot of fronts for me. It’s powerful, it’s poignant, and it’s relevant to me.

 

 

Fiona: Do you have to travel much concerning your book(s)?

Heath: I’d love to say yes but, sadly no – not yet.

 

 

Fiona: Who designed the covers? Heath: I do all of my own layout, cover design, and editing (with the help of my four proofers.) I learned graphic design out of necessity. I wanted great covers, but couldn’t afford to have them done. I’m the kind of person who doesn’t mind a new challenge, so I just bought the software, learned how to use it, and began making my own. I’m actually rather proud of them, all in all.

 

 

Fiona: What was the hardest part of writing your book?

Heath: The first one? Fear. I was afraid it wasn’t good enough for publication (it wasn’t.) Even so, I found a piece of advice somewhere that said (and I’m paraphrasing, here): “Publish your first work. It will probably fail. It will probably be the worst thing you ever put out there. Then, begin your next one. Learn from your mistakes, and with each successive work, it will get better.” This turned out to be simplistic, but nonetheless true. I have since given the first work a heavy facelift.

 

 

Fiona: Did you learn anything from writing your book and what was it?

Heath: I’ve learned all sorts of interesting things. Half of the things I Google are, I’m sure, landing me on a CIA watch list. Especially with my last two books: poisons, murder, air speed and payloads of stealth planes, white slavery. I often joke about it but – still – they could be reading this right now.

 

 

Fiona: Do you have any advice for other writers?

Heath: Keep writing. Writing is work. Editing thrice so. Do it anyway. I follow a great guideline that Neil Gaiman mentions often: “When someone tells you something doesn’t feel right, then it probably isn’t. When they tell you exactly how to fix it, then leave it alone.” Also, I would strongly encourage you to re-read the entire work about four time through, minimum. I allow my group of four to do so, incorporate their advice, and then re-edit form there. Then, I do a second pass through. Finally, they re-read it, and I incorporate their – and my own – changes. I have three who are great at editing, one who explains emotional states when reading the work, and one of the editors is also a genius at catching discrepancies in timeframes and facts. My wife (one of the editing crew) is also great at catching repetition of statements and phrases.

 

 

Fiona: Do you have anything specific that you want to say to your readers?

Heath: I can only say thank you. I wish there were more of them but – those I have interacted with – have made me feel amazing.

 

 

Fiona: Do you remember the first book you read?

Heath: Oh, I’m sure it was a Golden book or Dr. Seuss. I am told, by my Mother, that ‘Are You My Mother?’ was a favorite as a child. To the point where she probably considered burning the damn thing.

 

 

Fiona: Other than writing do you have any hobbies ?

Heath: I actually collect rare, signed, first-edition books. I read a great deal. I am also a rabid audiophile. It’s still writing, but I am a co-administrator of The Rockford Blog. It’s a non-profit that looks to shed positive light on my hometown which, sadly, has been at the top of just about every negative list that you could imagine, of late. I also try to assist my wife with her not-for-profit venture, Tailored To Hire. I don’t do much, but I like to toss in my 1% when I can. It’s been a phenomenal success, and she has helped a lot of individuals by empowering them to help themselves. I’m very, very proud of her.

 

 

 

Fiona: What TV shows/films do you enjoy watching?

Heath: I pretty much avoid movies. There are so few worth watching, and I’ve seen so many in my youth (long story, there) that I seldom watch one. Television, for me, usually needs to teach me something, or I’m just not interested. That being said, I do enjoy shows that are well-written (Aaron Sorkin and J.J. Abrams can pretty much take my money if they’re involved.)

 

 

Fiona: Favorite foods / Colors/ Music

Heath: I’ll eat just about anything. Green. And my iPod makes no sense to anyone but me, given the eclectic nature of the music that I listen to. From classical to power pop, it’s in there.

 

 

Fiona: If you were not a writer what else would you like to have done?

Heath: I’m actually an Operations Manager at a mid-size manufacturing firm. I sort of groomed myself in school to be in that position, so I ended up right where I thought I would. If I had had the money, I would probably have pursued a degree in residential or commercial architecture. There’s an old joke about being a writer that, sadly, rings true: “So, what do you do?” … “I’m a writer.” … “Yeah, but – what do you do for a living?”

 

 

Fiona: Do you have a blog/website? If so what is it?

Heath: I stopped blogging a little over a year ago. My wife, a second partner, and I own a mixed media company (Digital Ninjas Media, Inc.). Not surprisingly, MY website is a pile of suck. It’s all written in raw HTML (I used to do this to keep my HTML skills sharp. I’ve been writing websites since the mid-nineties.) I need to update it, but I can’t seem to find the time. http://www.heathnwanda.com It’s like the old adage: If you want your home to have perfect plumbing, then don’t marry a plumber.

 

My Amazon page http://www.amazon.com/Heath-D-Alberts/e/B00J4VI9QS/ref=dp_byline_cont_book_1

MY Authors page on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/HeathDAlberts

 

 

Heath: I’d also like to say thank you for the opportunity to be here. It’s folks like you who help us – the authors – gain traction in our mad dash to become ‘someone’ in the literary world. Every time I’m afforded an opportunity like this, I feel grateful that someone actually wants to hear what I might have to say. I truly appreciate it.

Here is my interview with WJ Lundy

Name WJ Lundy
Age: Younger than I look.
Where are you from?
Central Michigan, but have lived all over the globe.
A little about yourself ie your education Family life etc
I was an Army Brat before I moved back to my family’s hometown when he left the service. I graduated from HS and joined up as soon as I could. Traveled the globe and got out after 8 years, earned a bachelor’s degree in Computer Science on the GI Bill, started a family then joined the Reserve Force. I work for a top company M-F and play Ninja on the weekends. Occasionally I get to do an overseas deployment.

 

 
Fiona: When and why did you begin writing?
Wrote my first short story in grade school, didn’t do much after the need for income kicked in.

 

 
Fiona: When did you first consider yourself a writer?
Not sure that I still feel legit about it.

 

 
Fiona: What inspired you to write your first book?
I just had enough free time that I gave it a shot, I really never thought anything would come of it, or that anyone would take it seriously. I hate when the military is portrayed as the bad guys, or as video game type characters. I just wanted to try and put my own spin on things. To me there is nothing worse than military done poorly. I’m sure the 99% of people that have never served find nothing wrong with it, but I wanted to write something for vets. There is nothing I enjoy more than getting an email from a Vet thanking me for my work. I know I still make mistakes, especially when I step out of my lane, but I give it my best shot to get the answers.

 

 

 

Fiona: Do you have a specific writing style?
Hmm not sure, I think it’s pretty straightforward. I am not into artsy confusing text. I write in the voice that I want to listen to. I keep things moving, I really could care less how the paint looks or feels as it dries. I’m not into writing a story then going back and injecting fat into it, just so I can meet a word count goal. The original “I am Legend” by Richard Matheson was 25,000 words. Your goal should be to tell a good story, not meet some arbitrary number.

 

 
Fiona: How did you come up with the title?
Just an inside joke, one of those things you pick up along the way. The subtitles just kinda come to me as I write the volume.

 

 
Fiona: Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?
I write Post-Apocalyptic fiction. My biggest message is that people got along and worked together long before technology, and they would do the same things again without it. For some odd reason the common theme these days is that without gasoline and light bulbs everyone will starve and kill each other.

 

 

 
Fiona: How much of the book is realistic?
None of it.

 

 

 
Fiona: Are experiences based on someone you know, or events in your own life?
Very loosely, only the accuracy of things in the way the work or units function. None of the characters except in the most general sense.

 

 

 
Fiona: What books have most influenced your life most?
Louis L’Amour, Dale Brown, Tom Clancy, and recently JL Bourne has inspired me to share my stories.

 

 

 
Fiona: If you had to choose, which writer would you consider a mentor?
I share a lot with Darren Wearmouth, I think we have a great deal in common as far as strategies and motivation. JL Bourn was kind enough to share his experiences with me when I was juggling publishing offers.

 

 

 
Fiona: What book are you reading now?
The Rising, by Brian Keene.

 

 

 
Fiona: Are there any new authors that have grasped your interest?
I have been doing some Beta reading for HJ Harry and Allen Gamboa, they both have some great stories to tell.

 

 

 
Fiona: What are your current projects?
Most are tied up in the WTF world. But I have been dabbling in a Sci-Fi piece I hope to finish one day. I have a few short stories that I still don’t know what to do with. Plenty of open notebooks…

 

 

 
Fiona: Name one entity that you feel supported you outside of family members.
The military and experiences, nothing in a particular focus, mainly because I usually write in secret.

 

 

 
Fiona: Do you see writing as a career?
No. How can I write based on experiences if all I do is write. I guess I could write about a writer.

 

 

 
Fiona: If you had to do it all over again, would you change anything in your latest book? Good question. No. The last one I did my way.

 

 

 
Fiona: Do you recall how your interest in writing originated?
Out of necessity for entertainment, and to get past the comic bookish portrayal of soldiers.

 

 
Fiona: Can you share a little of your current work with us?
It will be bigger and better than the others. I try to drop snippets on my facebook page as I make progress.

 

 

 
Fiona: Is there anything you find particularly challenging in your writing?
I think the challenge is the scope of reality. I want to tell a story from a single soldier’s viewpoint. But the reader wants to know everything that is going on. I don’t think I can have it both ways. If I show you the big picture, the suspense and the viewpoint of the individual is gone. It ruins that element. I just think it’s a tough balance. I want to say,”hey this is what’s going on, and this is why this happened”. But that wouldn’t be real, and would make other things not line up or make sense.

 

 

 
Fiona: Who is your favorite author and what is it that really strikes you about their work?
Louis L’Amour, because he was real and didn’t try to get you with gimmicks and fluff filled paragraphs.

 

 

 
Fiona: Do you have to travel much concerning your book(s)?
Yes.

 

 

 
Fiona: Who designed the covers?
Andre Vasquez is my current cover guy.

 

 
Fiona: What was the hardest part of writing your book?
Getting the image on the page.

 

 
Fiona: Did you learn anything from writing your book and what was it?
Go with my first instinct. I let people talk me into changing some things, so that they would be more easily understood, and give Hollywood value. Those words now jump out at me as if they are bold and highlighted. I have actually gone back and removed many of those things from later issues of the books. I think as I have gotten some confidence, and I know my readers expect accuracy, I stay away from the “keep your head on a swivel, watch my six, throw me a clip” type stuff. Believe it or not, soldiers don’t talk the way they do on Call of Duty and GI Joe movies. Well some do, but we make fun of them.

 

 
Fiona: Do you have any advice for other writers?
Just go for it, it may suck, it probably will. Do it for the love and pleasure of writing and don’t put a price tag on it. Be cool to others and help out other authors. You probably won’t get rich, but you will have a lot of fun and make some great friends.

 

 
Fiona: Do you have anything specific that you want to say to your readers?
Thank you for sticking with me. It has been a blast!

 

 
Fiona: Do you remember the first book you read?
First novel I read of free will was Charlie Mike by Leonard B. Scott. Still one of my favorites.

 

 
Fiona: Other than writing do you have any hobbies?
Anything outdoors.

 

 
Fiona: What TV shows/films do you enjoy watching?
I’m watching The Last Ship, it’s great. Walking Dead is fun, and the Sons of Anarchy is a guilty pleasure.

 

 
Fiona: Favorite foods / Colors/ Music:
Meat, potatoes, blue, Country and anything that sounds good loud.

 

 
Fiona: If you were not a writer what else would you like to have done?
I am doing it.

Fiona: Do you have a blog/website? If so what is it? Wjlundy.com facebook.com\waronprimals

 

Here is my interview with Tiffany Flowers

 

Name : Tiffany Flowers
Age: 26
Where are you from: born, raised and still live in Clarke county Alabama
A little about your self `ie your education Family life etc
I live in a small town where everybody knows more about you than you know about yourself with my husband and kids. I have been with my husband for 9 years. I have three beautiful kids, one girl and two boys. I also have 3 dogs too. My oldest is the girl and she is 7, middle is 5 and my youngest is 10 months old. I am a stay at home mom and wouldn’t change a thing.

 
Fiona: Tell us your latest news?
My second book, Broken Pieces, should be out in December.

 

 

Fiona: When and why did you begin writing?
I began this year in January. I had always wanted to write just never had the guts until now!

 

 

Fiona: When did you first consider yourself a writer?
I’m not sure I consider myself a writer yet!

 

 

Fiona: What inspired you to write your first book?
I had a very vivid dream!

 

 

Fiona: Do you have a specific writing style?
No not really just whatever the character tells me to write I write.

 

 

Fiona: How did you come up with the title?
Lots and Lots of thinking. It was easier to write the book.

 

 
Fiona: Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?
Love is not always beautiful. Sometimes it’s ugly and hard but it is worth it!

 

 

 
Fiona: How much of the book is realistic?

It is a PNR. So not much!

 

 
Fiona: Are experiences based on someone you know, or events in your own life?
NO

 

 

Fiona: If you had to choose, which writer would you consider a mentor?

I can only choose 1. That would be the author who has helped me most and was my critique partner for my first book, Ella Medler.

 

 

Fiona: What book are you reading now?

None I am too busy writing my book. But the last book I read was by Kendall Grey. It was called Hot Blooded. And it was a 5 star read.

 

 

Fiona: Are there any new authors that have grasped your interest?

I haven’t had much time for reading!

 

 

Fiona: What are your current projects?

Broken Pieces book 2 in The Pieces Series and a couple other ones that have not title yet.

 

 

 

Fiona: Name one entity that you feel supported you outside of family members.
My critique partner. She never let me quit and talk me through any issues I had.

 
Fiona: Do you see writing as a career?

No, I will probably never make enough to call it a career, but I love writing so I will continue until I can’t!

 

 

Fiona: If you had to do it all over again, would you change anything in your latest book?
No.

 

 
Fiona: Do you recall how your interest in writing originated?
I always loved to make up story and imagine myself in adventures

 

 
Fiona: Can you share a little of your current work with us?

Here it is…. It is unedited and subject to change!
Derrick walks in dressed and ready to go round up more demons. One of them has to know something or be willing to help me get into hell. I stand and head to my closet. I reach for my weapons and hear a female voice, Willow. I run into my room and find her and Damon talking to Derrick. I see red. Next thing I know Willow is prying my hands from Damon’s neck.
“How could you let your daughter be taken to Hell?” I scream and glare at him.

 

 

Fiona: Is there anything you find particularly challenging in your writing?
Yes, Editing is the worse!

 

 
Fiona: Who is your favorite author and what is it that really strikes you about their work?
I can’t just name one!

 

 
Fiona: Do you have to travel much concerning your book(s)?
No.

 

 
Fiona: Who designed the covers?
Shamrock Designs

 

 
Fiona: What was the hardest part of writing your book?

Writing the blurb.

 

 

Fiona: Did you learn anything from writing your book and what was it?
If you want something bad enough all you have to do is work your butt off.

 

 
Fiona: Do you have any advice for other writers?
Things will be hard. Only write if you love it never for the money!

 

 
Fiona: Do you have anything specific that you want to say to your readers?Thank you for the support. Without you I would not be able to write a second book.

 

 
Fiona: Do you remember the first book you read?

No that was so long ago.

 

 
Fiona: Other than writing do you have any hobbies?

Not really. I don’t have time.

 

 
Fiona: What TV shows/films do you enjoy watching?

True Blood, Night Shift and my all time favorite movie is Twister.

 

 

 
Fiona: Favorite foods / Colors/ Music?
Foods- Pizza(cheese, pineapple, and ham) cheesecake
Color- is purple
Music: I listen to all kinds. It just depends on mood.

 

 

 
Fiona: If you were not a writer what else would you like to have done?
I would just be a stay at home mom

 

 

 
Fiona: Do you have a blog/website? If so what is it?

http://authortflowers.wix.com/authortflowers

Amazon page: http://www.amazon.com/Tiffany-Flowers/e/B00LFYR922/ref=ntt_athr_dp_pel_pop_1
Goodreads page: https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/7881911.Tiffany_Flowers
Facebook page: http://www.facebook.com/authortiffanyflowers

Here is my interview with Editor Monique Happy

 

 

Name: Monique Happy

Age: 49

Where are you from: Southern California

A little about your self `ie your education Family life etc

I’m a single mom with a 23-year-old daughter and a 9-year-old son. We have a large menagerie including cats, dogs, and a rabbit. The family has put an injunction on me not to rescue any more animals for a while. *grin*

I was a legal secretary for almost thirty years. When I was laid off in 2008, I was unable to find a full-time job right away, so I found a part-time job and went back to college. I intended to obtain my paralegal certificate, but along the way I realized I no longer wanted to work for attorneys. I took a handful of English courses and rediscovered my love of writing. I even had some of my short stories published on a well-known writer’s website (which since, sadly, has been disbanded). I also started editing for an indie author or two, and have built up my own business to where I am today.

 

 

Fiona: Tell us your latest news?

I’ll be publishing a horror anthology called Happy Little Horrors: Freak Show in September in collaboration with my partner, horror author David Reuben. It will contain stories and poems from a dozen of my author clients, as well as one of my own. We’re very excited about the anthology!

 

 

Fiona: When and why did you begin writing?
I started writing as a kid. I always loved the escape.

 

 

Fiona: When did you first consider yourself an editor?

When Mark Tufo listed my name as his editor on the inside of his book. I was thrilled. He sent me a copy and I showed my whole family.

 

 

Fiona: What books have most influenced your life most?

I don’t know if they’ve influenced my life but they’ve certainly enhanced it. Anything by Stephen King and Dean Koontz. I also love Mercedes Lackey, Anne McCaffrey, and Andre Norton, just to name a few. I’ve loved to read horror, fantasy and science fiction from the time I was 5. My first series was J.R.R. Tolkien’s The Trilogy. At age 5

 

 

Fiona: What book are you reading now?

Adrian’s Undead Diary by Chris Philbrook. It’s fantastic.

 

 

Fiona: Are there any new authors that have grasped your interest?

Yes. Tons. Just read Jenny Pox by JL Bryan. Loved it. Colin F. Barnes’s SALT. Colin Barnes & Darren Wearmouth’s Critical Dawn. Cedric Nye’s Zombiefighter Jango series. Really too many to mention. I’m constantly reading.

 

 

Fiona: What are your current projects?

I’m currently editing books for Owen Baillie, Thomas A. Watson, and Tristan Vick. Owen’s book Afterdeath: Survival is a continuation of the first book. It’s a zombpocalyptic story set in Australia. Thomas A. Watson’s book is a secret ;) It’s different from his popular Blue Plague series. All I can say is his fans are going to love it. As for Tristan Vick, I’m working on his post-apocalyptic story. I’m really digging it. Did I mention how much I love my job?

 

 

Fiona: Name one entity that you feel supported you outside of family members.

My authors. For entrusting their books to me.

 

 

Fiona: Do you see editing as a career?

Yes. I love it. Happiest I’ve been in years.

 

 

Fiona: Do you have any advice for other editors?

Never stop learning. I’m constantly reading articles and blogs about grammar, editing, and writing.

I’m also trying to learn everything I can about self-publishing in general. Self-publishing is not going away, and more and more talented authors are coming from their ranks. You’ll be reading books by these talented people for years to come. And many of them will be the authors I have the privilege of editing for!

 

 

 

Fiona: Do you have anything specific that you want to say to the readers of your authors?
Stay tuned. You know me – I’m constantly promoting my authors’ works. Follow me on Facebook and check my website frequently for the latest and greatest from authors such as Shawn Chesser, David Reuben, David Lund, W.J. Lundy, Derrick LaCombe, Joshua Dalzelle, Tania Cooper, etc.

 

 

 

Fiona: Do you remember the first book you read? The Hobbit.

Fiona: Other than editing, do you have any hobbies? Yes. Rescuing animals, reading, arts and crafts.

 

 

 

Fiona: What TV shows/films do you enjoy watching?

The Last Ship, CSI, True Blood, The Walking Dead, cooking shows.

 

 

 

Fiona: Favorite foods / Colors/ Music
Steak and potatoes, Caesar salad. Pink. Anything from the Grateful Dead to the Who to Ozzy Osbourne to Imagine Dragons.

 

 

 

Fiona: If you were not an editor what else would you like to have done?

I love being an editor. If I could have figured out my career path when I was 18, I would have chosen editing. But it took a lifetime of working in close, minute detail on legal documents to become the obsessive proofreader and editor that I am today. So it all worked out in the end.

 

 

Fiona: Do you have a blog/website? If so what is it?

Yes. I’m quite proud of it. http://www.indiebookauthors.com. All of my authors are listed; they each have their own page with their books linked to Amazon. We’re also going to be sharing blog articles helping writers with all different aspects of the writing process, from grammar to editing tips.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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