Here is my interview with Selena Haskins

me in the fields

 
Name Selena Haskins
Age Sometimes I feel like I’m 26, other times I’m reminded that I’m not.
Where are you from- Washington, DC
A little about your self -ie your education Family life etc – I’m married with a beautiful son who impresses me more and more each day

 

 
Fiona: Tell us your latest news?
Riding the Waves-The Price of Fame and Fortune is my latest novel that was just released this summer. It’s a follow-up to my debut novel, but it can also be read independently.

 

 
Fiona: When and why did you begin writing?
It started with having a vivid imagination as a kid. I was a daydreamer, and one of my teachers told me to write about the things I think about. All these characters and stories came to my mind so I would write about them.

 

 

Fiona: When did you first consider yourself a writer?
By the time I reached school high and began writing for the school newspaper, I knew I was a writer.

 

 

Fiona: What inspired you to write your first book?
I wrote my first book when I was 16. My Uncle was an animation artist, and I would write the dialogue for his characters. He liked it so much that he told me to write a story about it. I did, but I never published it.

 

 

Fiona: Do you have a specific writing style?
My writing style is a combination of expository and narrative.

 

 

Fiona: How did you come up with the title?
I came up with the title of my first book, A River Moves Forward as a symbolic theme to show readers how you can still move forward despite trials in your life. Rivers always pass over the rocky things underneath, and in life we have some rocky situations too, but we have to keep pushed ahead and leave those things behind in order to have a successful future.

 

 

Fiona: Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?
The message is my story is about forgiveness. In fact books one and two will highlight the importance of forgiveness as a way to heal yourself and your relationships with others.

 

 

Fiona: How much of the book is realistic?
I would say half of it is realistic and the other half is fiction. Sometimes readers have said it almost feels too real, but by the same token that’s why they enjoy my books.

 

 

Fiona: Are experiences based on someone you know, or events in your own life?
I believe art imitates life, and it’s hard for me to write about something I don’t know about, haven’t experienced, or lived it vicariously through someone else. My stories are a combination of all of those things, and my imagination.

 

 

Fiona: What books have most influenced your life most?
The Bible. I know it’s a non-fiction book, but if you read the story of David, the book of Acts, Kings, and four gospels. It’s all filled with non-stop action and drama. I do take it seriously of course and I’m definitely uplifted by it, but it’s truly an inspiration because it helps me to write stories that will engage people and leave them walking about with something they can learn from.

 

 

Fiona: If you had to choose, which writer would you consider a mentor?
I wouldn’t want to choose because I’ve learned something from different writers. One writer may teach me about marketing, another may teach me about plot development, and another may teach me how to keep my voice with my stories. I learn from different writers.

 

 

Fiona: What book are you reading now?
When You’ve Been Blessed by Adrienne Thompson

 

 

Fiona: Are there any new authors that have grasped your interest?
Well, these authors are new to me, but they may not be new in terms of being published since I’m just reading their books. I’ve enjoyed reading books by Stacey Adams Hawkins, La’Tonya West, TM Brown, Adrienne Thompson, Janice G. Ross.

 

 

Fiona: What are your current projects?
I’m working on a short-story comedy.

 

 

Fiona: Name one entity that you feel supported you outside of family members.
My JBU sisters- Tina Brown, Janice G. Ross, Adrienne Thompson, CoCo Dunlap, Tamika Christy, and my two favorite authors supported me too- Margaret Johnson-Hodge and Omar Tyree.

 

 

Fiona: Do you see writing as a career?
I do. I enjoy it very much. I wish I could write full-time and live off my earnings.

 

 

Fiona: If you had to do it all over again, would you change anything in your latest book?
Being the perfectionist that I am, I would always change something about every story that I write, but I have to put a period at the end of my thought process and let it be. Otherwise the story would either go on forever or I may change something that the reader just may like.

 

 

Fiona: Do you recall how your interest in writing originated?
It started as a child. I think the creativity was innate. As I grew, I sort of developed intuitiveness about people that sometimes makes me a good judge of character. I feel it also helps me to develop authentic and believable characters.

 

 

Fiona: Can you share a little of your current work with us?
The project I’m currently working on is a short-story comedy about a woman who is a widow, and it’s just her and her son. He meets and falls in love with a woman he eventually wants to marry, but his mother is not happy about the idea, and plots a scheme to break up the relationship.

 

 

Fiona: Is there anything you find particularly challenging in your writing?
The challenge I face when writing is trying not to edit anything. I learned it’s important to write the whole story first then go back and make changes.

 

 

Fiona: Who is your favorite author and what is it that really strikes you about their work?
I really enjoy the works of J. California Cooper and Margaret Johnson-Hodge. The reason I enjoy J. California Cooper is because of her unique writing style, storytelling, and there’s always a positive message at the end of her stories. I also enjoy Margaret Johnson-Hodge because of her choice of words when she’s describing her scenes. Her words paint an easy picture for readers to visualize, and her stories are really good.

 

 

Fiona: Do you have to travel much concerning your book(s)?
I do, because there aren’t a lot of local book events where I live.

 

 

Fiona: Who designed the covers?
My first book was designed by Quality Press, my second book was designed by Adrienne Thompson.

 

 

Fiona: What was the hardest part of writing your book?
Rewrites. I think almost every author hates rewriting, but in the end it’s worth it.

 

 

Fiona: Did you learn anything from writing your book and what was it?
I learn from each book I write, and I try to get better with every new book project. I would rather not mention the specifics of what I learned because pointing them out would make it noticeable to a reader who may not have necessarily picked up on it before.

 

 
Fiona: Do you have any advice for other writers?
Always remember that writing is a growing process whether you’re a best-selling author or new to the publishing industry. Stay humble. Humility will override stubborn tendencies that could stunt your growth process. Accept honest criticism as a way to grow as well.

 

 

Fiona: Do you have anything specific thing that you want to say to your readers?
I wrote as a hobby, and I decided to publish at least one book to see what would happen. Because of my readers’ support, I now want to keep writing and publishing stories that they can enjoy. So, thank you readers!

 

 
Fiona: Do you remember the first book you read?
Forever by Judy Blume

 

 
Fiona: Other than writing do you have any hobbies?
I love music, movies, and I’m a gamer. I like to play videogames and card games.

 

 
Fiona: What TV shows/films do you enjoy watching?
My taste is so eclectic where do I began? I love watching movies based on real-life events or someone’s real life story. For instance, the move Ray is a favorite, Malcolm X, and a Beautiful Mind just to name a few.

 

 
Fiona: Favorite foods / Colors/ Music :
My favorite color is purple

 

 
Fiona: If you were not a writer what else would you like to have done?
Visual Art or Acting.

 

 
Fiona: Do you have a blog/website? If so what is it? http://www.booksbyselena.com/

 
Amazon: http://www.amazon.com/Selena-Haskins/e/B00BHYA3ZA/ref=sr_tc_2_0?qid=1409240163&sr=1-2-ent

Barnes and Noble: http://www.barnesandnoble.com/s/selena-haskins?store=allproducts&keyword=selena+haskins

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Here is my interview with T.L. Gray

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Name T.L. Gray
Age 43
Where are you from – Atlanta, Georgia
A little about your self `ie your education Family life etc : Author of The Arcainian Series (The Blood of Cain & The Arcainians already released), Milledgeville Misfit, Keezy’s 10 Awesome Rules for Teenage Date, and several short stories in many online magazines, and a short story “The Kid” in the anthology “Triumph over Tragedy”. I’m the founder/agent at North Star Literary Agency, Founder of North Star Editing Services, and am a Contributing Writer for several print and online magazines.

 

 
Fiona: Tell us your latest news?
I’ve just signed my 5th author with North Star and I’m working on my 5th novel.

 

 

Fiona: When and why did you begin writing?
Since I could put pencil to paper, but professionally in 2009. I did the corporate career first.

 

 

Fiona: When did you first consider yourself a writer?
When I got accepted by my first literary agent in 2009.

 

 

Fiona: What inspired you to write your first book?
Telling stories to my children and finding it difficult to keep them from mixing together, so I started writing them down. Before I knew it, I had several manuscripts (rough drafts, mind you) but full manuscripts.

 

 

Fiona: Do you have a specific writing style?
No, I mix it up with every novel.

 

 

Fiona: How did you come up with the title?
Whatever fits in or about the time I’m writing.

 

 

Fiona: Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?
I want them to care about the characters and take an adventure, not just read a story.

 

 

Fiona: How much of the book is realistic?
I try to make it as realistic as possible. At least plausible.

 

 

Fiona: Are experiences based on someone you know, or events in your own life?
A mixture of both. It’s best to write what you know.

 

 

Fiona: What books have most influenced your life most?
Nancy Drew, Harry Potter, Ursula K. Leguin, Christopher Paolini, Mark Lawrence, Michael J. Sullivan, Anthony Ryan, Jeff Suwak, Patrick Rothfuss, R.M. James, Teri Cross Chetwood, Marti Weaver.

 

 

Fiona: If you had to choose, which writer would you consider a mentor?
Jeff Suwak

 

 

Fiona: What book are you reading now?
The Prince of Fools by Mark Lawrence

 

 

Fiona: Are there any new authors that have grasped your interest?
Will White,

 

 

Fiona: What are your current projects?
I have several novels in the works – a fantasy called “Hunter and Chase” and another called, “Ink”. I’m currently working on a novel called “Star Dust” that I’ve already received an offer for a film adaptation.

 

 

Fiona: Name one entity that you feel supported you outside of family members.
My writing friends, fellow authors I’ve met at signings, conferences and conventions.

 

 

Fiona: Do you see writing as a career?
Yes, but I know it’s not like that for everyone.

 

 

Fiona: If you had to do it all over again, would you change anything in your latest book?
No, it is as it’s supposed to be. I don’t feel those are MY stories. I’ve just been blessed with the opportunity to be the Scribe of my Imagination.

 

 

Fiona: Do you recall how your interest in writing originated?
I had to entertain five brothers growing up and telling stories was the best way to do that.

 

 

Fiona: Can you share a little of your current work with us?
What do you mean? Like an excerpt? I’ll post one at the end of this interview.

 

 

Fiona: Is there anything you find particularly challenging in your writing?
The research. I do extensive research.

 

 

Fiona: Who is your favorite author and what is it that really strikes you about their work?
Jeff Suwak – he moves my soul by the way he sees the world and is able to convey that beauty within it. Also, Mark Lawrence. I consider him a modern-day philosopher of our generation. He’s brilliant.

 

 

 

Fiona: Do you have to travel much concerning your book(s)?
Not really, but sometimes I have.

 

 

Fiona: Who designed the covers?
Actually, I have. I never liked anything my publishers came up with – so I designed my own.

 

 

Fiona: What was the hardest part of writing your book?
The research and finding the time to get it done, then the editing and knowing when to stop editing.

 

 

Fiona: Did you learn anything from writing your book and what was it?
I learn more and more about me in every story, every blog post, and every novel I write.

 

 

Fiona: Do you have any advice for other writers?
Do what you love and don’t let anyone else stop you. This is your dream.

 

 

Fiona: Do you have anything specific that you want to say to your readers?
Thank you for reading my stories.

 

 
Fiona: Do you remember the first book you read?
Nancy Drew and The Old Clock.

 

 
Fiona: Other than writing do you have any hobbies ?
Boy, do I… first off… writing isn’t my hobby. My hobbies are hiking, white water rafting, sky diving, exercise, gourmet cooking, being outdoors, hanging out with friends, blogging, etc.

 

 
Fiona: What TV shows/films do you enjoy watching?
Anything with a good storyline. I like cooking shows.

 

 
Fiona: Favorite foods / Colors/ Music
ah, there’s too many to name.

 

 
Fiona: If you were not a writer what else would you like to have done?
Be an explorer or Scientist.

 
Fiona: Do you have a blog/website? If so what is it? I have a few blogs: http://www.tlgray.blogspot.com and http://www.authortlgray.wordpress.com – also my agency has one at http://www.northstarliterary.com Here is the link to my published books: http://www.tlgray.blogspot.com/p/tls.html

 

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This is the Akuma symbol. It means… heaven, angel, star dust, 10. It is the symbol I’m using for my character, the Archangel Mikhael, in my new WIP currently called Star Dust. Michael is also the patron saint of the Airborne Infantry, which fits perfectly.

Excerpt from Star Dust by T.L. Gray

Mikhael took his seat. Kenya sat beside me. Kal and Emma took the two seats on the opposite side of the table, Kal across from Kenya and Emma across from Mikhael. Something inside Mikhael felt satisfied that she had chosen to sit next to him and not Kal. He couldn’t stop the small smile that tugged on his lips.
Sitting in front of Mikhael was a chilled plate filled with romaine lettuce, tomatoes, black olives, drunken goat cheese, crumbled feta, sliced roasted almonds, dried pomegranates and small wedges of tangerine, all drizzled with olive oil, garlic and rosemary. On a tray in the center of the table sat a plate of sliced strawberries, red and green grapes and wedges of various hard cheeses. “Wow, this looks amazing.” He looked to Kenya and smiled, “I see you’re serving delicious red apples.”
She laughed. “Yes. Just for you,” Kenya answered and then motioned toward the other two. “Kal and Emma helped me prepare everything. We have some roasted Rosemary chicken for an entrée later and a delicious chocolate cake for dessert.”
Kaemon gazed up and down the table. “I don’t see any apples.”
Mikhael smiled at Kenya, knowing that it was their little inside joke where they called red grapes delicious red apples. “Of course you wouldn’t.” He leaned back and rubbed his stomach. “I have a feeling PT is going to be quite difficult in the morning.”
“PT?” Kal asked and then shoved a large fork full of salad into his mouth, still scanning the table, most likely still looking for apples.
“Physical Training. Our soldiers are required a basic session of PT every morning.”
Kal groaned and then swallowed his bite of food. “I’d hate to have to be forced to exercise every morning whether I felt like it or not.”
“Without regular physical training the temple would not have the stamina or endurance to complete its mission.” Mikhael felt an agitation from the young man, though he didn’t understand why.
“I suppose that makes sense. I’d still hate it though. It’s my body and I would want to be the one to decide if I forced it into an exercise routine or not.” Kal took a large sip of his wine.
“A soldier’s fitness isn’t for himself. It’s for when he has to push harder and faster than the enemy, or carry that weak soldier in the team that just became a liability.” Mikhael moved some of the salad around on his plate but he didn’t take a bite. His mouth felt dry, his throat parched, and he wanted to take a drink of the water sitting in front of him, but his stomach felt in a knot. His mind raced through his thoughts wondering at the reason these human feelings were coursing through him so strongly. “Besides, your body is no longer your own but property of the United States Army until you retire.”
Kenya nodded. “That’s a great point, Mikhael. I’ve never looked at it that way. I was somewhat of the same mind as Kal, thinking it arcane how a soldier is constantly pushed to physical limits almost on a daily basis.”
“Why do you consider it arcane?” Mikhael turned his head to look at Kenya. He almost lost his thought when he looked into her hazel eyes and noticed the shimmer of her glossy lips, coated now with a thin layer of olive oil from her salad. She opened her mouth to speak.
“Because of tradition, of course,” Kal interjected. He waved the end of his fork in the air as he spoke as if the action emphasized his point.
Mikhael kept his gaze on Kenya, ignoring Kal’s interruption, as she closed her mouth and nodded her agreement to Kal’s interruption.
Kal rattled on, unaware of his intrusion. “Traditions often enslave and entrap a man into a system of beliefs and practices that prevents their ability to think for themselves or outside the lines of conformity.” He stabbed his fork into his salad. “This leads to blind obedience. A man who does not think for himself will find himself a slave to a man who does.”
“Alexander the Great once said, ‘Without knowledge, skill cannot be focused. Without skill, strength cannot be brought to bear, and without strength, knowledge may not be applied.’” Mikhael turned his gaze toward Kal. “It is in my experience that when a body is conditioned in routine, able to respond with a subconscious automatic reflex, it frees the mind for greater thinking, quicker responses, and deeper understanding.” He then turned his gaze back to Kenya.
She smiled and answered, “Very well said, Mikhael. Is that something they teach you when you become a Drill Sergeant?”
“Contrary to popular belief I’m not a drone. I am also not a mouthpiece for what I’ve been told or taught. I think for myself and regularly conduct my own study of human nature.” He didn’t understand what possessed him to say what he said next or do what he did. All he knew was that in that moment, gazing into her hazel eyes the two of them connected on an intellectual and physical level. He reached up with his right hand and gently rubbed the outer shell of her ear and said, “Like I just learned something very interesting about the earlobe.” He leaned over and whispered, “The ears can be very sensual. Not only because they receive whispered secrets …” He pursed his lips and lightly blew on her ear. “…but the bundles of nerve endings can lead to arousal.”
Kenya shivered.
Mikhael shivered in return.
“Da-a-yum,” answered Emma. “That was smooth, Drill Sergeant.”

Here is my intervie with Joy M Byrd

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My name is Joy M Byrd
Age 47 years old
Where are you from
I grew up in a little town about twenty miles west of Cooperstown NY in a little hamlet called Burlington Flats
A little about your self `ie your education Family life etc
I have been married to my husband for almost 28 years and we have 4 kids and live on a farm in the country..

 

 
Fiona: Tell us your latest news?
I am working on a new book and have one ready to go.

 

 

Fiona: When and why did you begin writing?
I started writing when I was ten and have been doing it ever since

 

Fiona: When did you first consider yourself a writer?
I guess I considered myself a writer from the start.

 

 

Fiona: What inspired you to write your first book?
I wrote my first book because it was something I wanted to do. It was inspired a little from some things that happened in college and just kind of snowballed from there.

 

 

Fiona: Do you have a specific writing style?
Not really, I just write what I would like to read

 

 

Fiona: How did you come up with the title?
Passionate Choices came from the story line because the heroine had to make some difficult choices in her life.

 

 

Fiona: Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?
Not really, just to enjoy it.

 

 

Fiona: How much of the book is realistic?
I think it believable that it could happen.

 

 

Fiona: Are experiences based on someone you know, or events in your own life?
Very little, just a couple of events I elaborated on with dramatic license.

 
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Fiona: What books have most influenced your life most?
The Bible has been the most influence in my life. But I also read many novel by Lindsay Mckenna, BJ Daniels & Delores Fossen, HelenKay Dimon.

 

 

Fiona: If you had to choose, which writer would you consider a mentor?
Lindsay Mckenna

 

 
Fiona: What book are you reading now?
Traceless by HelenKay Dimon..

 

 
Fiona: Are there any new authors that have grasped your interest?
Shirley Mccoy

 

 

Fiona: What are your current projects?
Song of Love that is based in the country music industry and it is all done and ready to be sent.

 

 

Fiona: Name one entity that you feel supported you outside of family members.
My best friend.

 

 

Fiona: Do you see writing as a career?
Yes I do,

 

 

Fiona: If you had to do it all over again, would you change anything in your latest book?
No.

 

 

Fiona: Do you recall how your interest in writing originated?
It has just been something that I have always loved to do.

 

 

Fiona: Can you share a little of your current work with us?
I am working on “Michael’s Heart” about a father of six who is diagnosed with testicular cancer and the woman who is standing by his side as he fights for his life even though her husband died from the same disease. It’s a tough one to write.

 

 

Fiona: Is there anything you find particularly challenging in your writing?
When I get writer’s block that is a huge challenge and not always easy to get through.

 

 

Fiona: Who is your favorite author and what is it that really strikes you about their work?
Lindsay Mckenna and I love how she is so in depth with all her characters and their history.

 

 

Fiona: Do you have to travel much concerning your book(s)?
No, but I would love to get the chance to someday.

 

 

Fiona: Who designed the covers?
PublishAmerica sent me two designs and I chose which one I wanted to use.

 

 

Fiona: What was the hardest part of writing your book?
Getting the time to do it because my kids were little.

 

 

Fiona: Did you learn anything from writing your book and what was it?
Yeah, do not edit it yourself as a final draft.

 

 

Fiona: Do you have any advice for other writers?
Don’t give up.

 

 

Fiona: Do you have anything specific that you want to say to your readers?
Thank you for buying my book and I hope to have more to come for you soon..

 

 
Fiona: Do you remember the first book you read?
Charlotte’s Web.

 

 
Fiona: Other than writing do you have any hobbies ?
Reading, quilting, baking, sewing, and gardening when I can.

 

 
Fiona: What TV shows/films do you enjoy watching?
I love Castle, Hawaii Five-0, (the new one with Alex O’laughlin), Rizzoli & Isles, and Major Crimes, I like romance movies and liked Nicholas Sparks’ The Lucky One and Dear John. I sometimes like to watch the SciFi movies and do enjoy Scifi shows like The Outer Limits and The Twilight Zone, and Star Trek movies.

 

 
Fiona: Favorite foods / Colors/ Music
I love Italian food especially Pizza. Love pinks & mauves and blues and Contemporary Christian music and Country music.

 

 
Fiona: If you were not a writer what else would you like to have done?
I have no idea really. Maybe an actress or singer.

 

 
Fiona: Do you have a blog/website? If so what is it?
http://www.facebook.com/pages/Passionate-Choices and you can find my book on PublishAmerica at http://www.americastarbooks.net/sc/productsearch.cgi?storeid=*1a5ce440a0a34abc0842724ed84a15&search_field=Joy+M+Byrd.

 

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Blurb

Jennifer Covvington has a gorgeous boyfriend who is, unfortunately, engaged to another woman. When Jennifer breaks up with Jared Philips, his volatile temper is revealed. Porter Brayden, the tall, dark-haired, handsome doctor she met when she was injured playing volleyball, persuades Jennifer to let him hire a bodyguard to protect her after he becomes concerned about her safety.

Porter calls Tyler Robinson to protect Jennifer. Immediately, she is attracted to this muscular, quiet man. As time goes by, she becomes drawn to Tyler more and more, especially after she spends a night sheltered in his strong arms. But she is also attracted to Porter and is not quite sure what she should do or where her feelings are taking her.

Amazon buying link http://www.amazon.com/Passionate-Choices-Joy-M-Byrd/dp/1424165237/ref=sr_1_fkmr0_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1409183318&sr=1-1-fkmr0&keywords=Passionate+Choices+by+joy+m+bird

 

Here is my interview with Rayme Sciaroni

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Name: Rayme Sciaroni
Age: 54
Where are you from: Born & raised in Sonora, California
A little about your self `ie your education Family life etc: Growing up in a small town had limited resources for the kind of creativity that I possessed. I loved music and began playing piano by ear and teaching myself songs. My mother quickly enrolled me into piano lessons to learn how to read music.
I was the middle child of five kids, 2 older and 2 younger. Both sets were closer to each other in age and had more in common with each other. Thus, I stayed at the piano and played and played and played.
High School introduced me to performing arts in which I excelled at, then moved to San Jose, California, where I continued music theory as well as musical theatre. I became musical director for a barn dinner theatre group in Santa Cruz. From there, a quick stint as pianist for a ballet company in Columbus, Ohio, then on to New York City where I continued playing piano for ballet classes as well as hiring myself out as pianist for some of the finer restaurants through out the city.
I was admitted into the BMI Music Theatre Workshop as composer/lyricist upon arriving in the Big Apple and teamed up with a lyricist to write a musical revue, “The Gym”. Immediately securing a place into the ASCAP Music Theatre Workshop with “The Gym”, mentors such as Broadway composers/lyricists Stephen Sondheim and Martin Charnin, the work was presented into the prestigious New Dramatists Guild and had various workshops throughout the country. Interestingly enough, “The Gym” is now being resurrected for another joyful run!

 

 
Fiona: Tell us your latest news?
RAYME: I am so proud of my first attempt at writing “Dinner for God”, a non-religious story of fiction that garnered 5 book awards: Winner-Indie Excellence Book Awards and Finalist: Next Generation Indie Book Awards, Beverly Hills Book Awards, International Book Awards and 2013 USA Best Book Awards.

 

 

Fiona: When and why did you begin writing?
RAYME: I used to write stories all the time beginning in high school. I always loved my creative writing classes and always had good starts for stories, but never took myself too seriously as a writer. I’ve always started all of my creative quests with questions that would pop into my head that would begin with, “What would happen if…” or, “What would I do if…” And by writing these different questions down, it would begin my exploring different ways to approach a particular piece of information.

 

 

Fiona: When did you first consider yourself a writer?
RAYME: I honestly think I first considered myself an actual writer when I finished and had published “Dinner for God”.

 

 

Fiona: What inspired you to write your first book?
RAYME: There it was. One of my questions! I was having lunch by myself at home one day when suddenly I asked myself, “If God were coming to my house for dinner, what would I serve?” I dropped my fork and asked myself again seriously, “If God were coming to my house for dinner, what would I serve? And what would I wear? And who would I invite? And what would we talk about?” Thus started my journey on what that would be like.

 

 

Fiona: Do you have a specific writing style?
RAYME: I think I might. I will always go for humor wherever I can find it. I’m anxious to start my next book to see what sort of devices I want to try for it.

 

 

Fiona: How did you come up with the title?
RAYME: After I started thinking about my initial story, the title fell naturally into place. I’m also thrilled that the title of “Dinner for God” instantly catches people’s imaginations when they see it and almost always ask, “Dinner for God…what’s that?”

 

 

Fiona: Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?
RAYME: Absolutely! My story is not a religious one, though many people can shy away from the title with the word ‘God’ in it. For me, using the word and the idea of ‘God’ was a fun way of exploring the possibility that if whatever one considers their ‘Divine Energy’ to be, imagine putting that source in a human form and coming to your table for dinner. Suddenly this particular dinner becomes more important somehow. More thought is given to the entire presentation. A certain way to behave, a certain way to dress, an extra amount of attention is given to the preparation of the food being served.
And my question is, “Why would we take all that trouble to make such a dinner for God and not for everyone in our lives?”

 

 

Fiona: How much of the book is realistic?
RAYME: The story is a fictional one, but the characters are based on many encounters with wonderful Beings that I have had the honor of having contact with in many different shapes and forms. Many of the singular characters are a conglomeration of a few people that I have come across in my own life. Others are made up completely by myself but were given real life circumstances that I either have been touched by or have been aware of.

 

 

Fiona: Are experiences based on someone you know, or events in your own life?
RAYME: There are many experiences in the book that are based on events in my own life. Mostly the wonderful little jewels of sentences that I have had the pleasure of hearing and recognizing the beauty and humor of them.

 

 

Fiona: What books have most influenced your life most?
RAYME: Too many to count. I love good writing. “Pillars of the Earth” and “World Without End” by Ken Follet. The Earth’s Children series, by Jean M. Auel starting with “The Clan of the Cave Bear”. The humorous observations of David Sedaris in “Dress Your Family in Corduroy and Denim”. The fantasy world of J.K. Rowling – The Harry Potter series. The obscure short stories in “The Roald Dahl Omnibus”. The classics of Charles Dickens with “A Christmas Carol” and “Great Expectations”. And what I consider to be the most beautiful and succinct style of writing I can only dream of is that of any Jane Austen novel. “Pride and Prejudice”, “Emma”, “Sense and Sensibility”, to name but a few.

 

Fiona: If you had to choose, which writer would you consider a mentor?
RAYME: I take pleasure in being inspired by many different authors for many different reasons. The list above may be my first go-to place.

 

 

Fiona: What book are you reading now?
RAYME: “Miss Pettigrew Lives For A Day” by Winifred Watson.

 

 

Fiona: Are there any new authors that have grasped your interest?
RAYME: There are many and I am constantly on the look out for good writing, past or new authors. Have any suggestions?

 

 

Fiona: What are your current projects?
RAYME: I recently completed a companion book for “Dinner for God” entitled, “The Dinner for God Planner”. This gives the reader an opportunity to hold their own unique dinner for ‘God’ and guides them from planning and executing a menu, guest list, topics to discuss, theme suggestions, grace possibilities, everything one would want to know to make this particular dinner a memorable one. There are also many pages in between each section for journaling the experience along the way.

 

 

Fiona: Name one entity that you feel supported you outside of family members.
RAYME: ALL of my friends, ALL of the time! There has never been a more faithful and supportive group in the history of the world! I feel uber-blessed for them!

 

 

Fiona: Do you see writing as a career?
RAYME: It is! But in many different kinds of writing for me – story telling, music writing, lyric writing, stage writing, musical theatre writing and children’s stories.

 

 

Fiona: If you had to do it all over again, would you change anything in your latest book?
RAYME: I had the opportunity to live with my story for quite a while before offering it out into the world. I must honestly say there is nothing I would change in “Dinner for God”.

 

 

Fiona: Do you recall how your interest in writing originated?
RAYME: I was always fascinated with a good story. Whether it came from a television show, a movie or a good book, I could never get enough of this kind of entertainment that took me beyond the story and into the wonderings of it’s workings. How it began, where did the idea come from, etc.

 

 

Fiona: Can you share a little of your current work with us?
RAYME: Am completing a children’s story that I am very excited about as well as a sequel to “Dinner for God” that will be entitled “Dessert for God”. This new story will have some of the characters in it from the first story but mainly takes place in a children’s theatre space.

 

 

Fiona: Is there anything you find particularly challenging in your writing?
RAYME: I think finding my own unique twist in telling a story that will not only be interesting to readers but will captivate them as well. I’ve taken the risk with “Dinner for God” by adding another one of my gifts as a song writer and have written 5 original songs that are integrated into the story. The song lyrics are in the book in the place that they would be and a CD of the 5 songs are also available.

 

 

Fiona: Who is your favorite author and what is it that really strikes you about their work?
RAYME: Currently it is Ken Follet. His diligence in studying the time frame he chooses to write about in his historic novels are not only fascinating, but I learn bits of history from them as well. The same goes for Jean M. Auel. Had I been given “The Clan of the Cave Bear” in school, I would have ACED the Ice Age quiz!

 

 

Fiona: Do you have to travel much concerning your book(s)?
RAYME: For “Dinner for God”, no. I set it in a similar setting to where I live. Research however for some of the characters and their circumstances did have to be sought out both on line as well as asking many different people with similar challenges about different aspects of their Being.

 

 
Fiona: Who designed the covers?
RAYME: A wonderful friend and graphic designer, Barron Henzel: http://www.henzeldesign.com. I had a fairly specific vision for how I wanted the cover to be as well as color combination and he was able to fulfill my idea and make it even grander than anything I could have ever imagined!

 

 

Fiona: What was the hardest part of writing your book?
RAYME: Starting. The blank screen can be intimidating and many ideas were coming out of me all at the same time that I feared I was going to miss some of them. So I didn’t even try to do anything cohesive at first. I just started writing and when another idea came up that I knew I wanted to use later down the road, I just wrote it (in red) right in the middle of whatever it was I was writing and kept going.

 

 

Fiona: Did you learn anything from writing your book and what was it?
RAYME: Ha! The embarrassing fact that my age gives me away when I learned in high school in my manual typewriting class that one must always put TWO spaces after a sentence. Not so anymore, and I admit I STILL put two spaces after a sentence. ARGH!

 

 

Fiona: Do you have any advice for other writers?
RAYME: Keep writing! I know that’s been said a million times over by many other, if not ALL writers but it’s true! Even when you’re wanting to go a specific way in your writing and your brain is going some place else, write it down! Even write down the frustration of writing! There is always something in everything that you write that you will undoubtedly use somewhere down the line. Keep writing!!! And did I mention, KEEP WRITING?

 

 

Fiona: Do you have anything specific that you want to say to your readers?
RAYME: Take the unusual yet extremely rewarding and journey of “Dinner for God”. It’s a launching point for you and your loved ones to create an opportunity to communicate on a deeper and more loving level. There is always more to learn about each other. Let this be the vehicle for you to surprise not only your guests, but yourself. And ALWAYS keep it Joy-FULL.

 

 

Fiona: Do you remember the first book you read?
RAYME: “The Golden Egg Book” by Margaret Wise Brown and illustrated by Leonard Weisgard. I still have a copy of it. Not mine from when I first read it, but I found it again much later in life and treasure it so.

 

 
Fiona: Other than writing do you have any hobbies?
RAYME: Besides writing music…directing, choreographing, designing greeting cards, crafting.

 

 
Fiona: What TV shows/films do you enjoy watching?
RAYME: LOVE movies. Television shows…I don’t do too much of. I can’t bother watching whiny reality shows. I’m too busy living my own life.

 

 
Fiona: Favorite foods / Colors/ Music
RAYME: Favorite Foods: Pizza, Gelato, Roasted Vegetables. Favorite Colors: I can’t tell you which is my favorite because it’ll make all the other colors feel bad. Favorite Music: The next song I hear.

 

 
Fiona: If you were not a writer what else would you like to have done?
RAYME: Interior Designing or Set/Lighting Design.

 

 
Fiona: Do you have a blog/website? If so what is it?
RAYME: http://www.dinnerforgod.com where you can find recipes for all of the dishes that are served in the book, some bonus tips, sheet music of the songs and join my blog!
If you have any questions or something you’d like to share, please feel free to contact me at: rayme@dinnerforgod.com. I’d love to hear from you!
“Dinner for God” available at:

 

DinnerCover_final

Dinner_CDGraphic for MP3
“Dinner for God” CD available at:

 

Final cover sample front
“Dinner for God Planner” available at:

“Dinner for God” Kindle version:

Audible:

http://www.audible.com/pd/Fiction/Dinner-for-God-Audiobook/B00ATEEFQ2/ref=a_search_c4_1_1_srTtl?qid=1409116708&sr=1-1

Nook:

http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/dinner-for-god-rayme-sciaroni/1114156869?ean=2940016004952

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Here is my interview with Ann Gimpel

Name: Ann Gimpel
Age: Aw, that’s classified.
Where are you from? Originally Seattle, Washington, but I’ve lived in California for a long time, currently in Mammoth Lakes.
A little about your self `ie your education Family life etc: I’m a Ph.D level licensed psychologist and worked in that field for many years. I started writing in 2008, and now I write full time. I’m married (to the same man for forever). We have three grown kids and four grandchildren.

 

 
Fiona: Tell us your latest news?

Let’s see. Witch’s Bane just released. Witches Rule, last book in that series is coming in November. I just completed Earth’s Hope, last book in the Earth Reclaimed trilogy. It’s with my publisher. And I’m shopping for a home for Icy Passage a novel that came out of a recent trip to Antarctica.

 

 
Fiona: When and why did you begin writing?

2008. Hard to say why. I’ve always been a storyteller. I was one of those therapists who told stories to their clients. One day I decided to give voice to a story running around in my head and that was how this all began.

 

 
Fiona: When did you first consider yourself a writer?

After my first book was published in 2/11. Before that I’d had several short stories accepted for publication, but it was the book that did it.

 

 
Fiona: What inspired you to write your first book?

Mountaineering. I’ve spent a large portion of my life with a pack on my back in the mountains. There’s lots of solitude, and that’s when the stories run around in my head.

 

 
Fiona: Do you have a specific writing style?

Not sure quite what you mean by this question. I write urban fantasy and paranormal romance, which are the same genres I read.

 

 
Fiona: How did you come up with the title?

I have a lot of books out there. Titles come to me while I’m writing them.

 

 
Fiona: Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?

All my books have a message and it usually has something to do with the triumph of the human spirit over adversity.

 

 
Fiona: How much of the book is realistic?

My books mostly have “read world” settings, but many of the characters are supernatural. Magic and mythology abound. It’s another place my psychology background weaves into my writing.

 

 
Fiona: Are experiences based on someone you know, or events in your own life?

Sometimes. It’s one of the benefits of being old. I’ve had a whole lot of experiences to draw on for my writing.
Fiona: What books have most influenced your life most?

There are so many, it’s impossible to pick just one or list them.

 

 
Fiona: If you had to choose, which writer would you consider a mentor?

Robin Hobb and Nora Roberts/JD Robb

 

 
Fiona: What book are you reading now?

Sebastian by Anne Bishop

 

 
Fiona: Are there any new authors that have grasped your interest?

New to me authors include Nalini Singh, Sherrilyn Kenyon, and Anne Bishop.

 

 
Fiona: What are your current projects?

I have one outstanding project and that’s finishing my Dragon Lore trilogy. I need to write one more book to close it off. Once that’s done, I’ll be free to write something brand new.

 

 
Fiona: Name one entity that you feel supported you outside of family members.

I’ve been lucky. I’ve had lots of support from many quarters including my publishers, editors, and cover artists, not to mention all my author friends.

 

 
Fiona: Do you see writing as a career?

Definitely.

 

 
Fiona: If you had to do it all over again, would you change anything in your latest book?

No. Now if you’d asked me that about my first book, I might have answered differently.

 

 
Fiona: Do you recall how your interest in writing originated?

I’ve always been a writer, but before fiction, it was client notes and reports and grant proposals.

 

 
Fiona: Can you share a little of your current work with us?

I’m going to forward you a media kit for Witch’s Bane that includes a nice long excerpt.

 

 
Fiona: Is there anything you find particularly challenging in your writing?

Characters always came easy for me, but I had to teach myself plotting, pacing and holding tension.

 

 
Fiona: Who is your favorite author and what is it that really strikes you about their work?

It varies. I like Illona Andrews Kate Daniels’ series. And I liked Sherrilyn Kenyon’s Belador books. For a book to draw me in, the world building has to be spot on. The magic systems have to be congruent, and the character arcs have to show growth. I hate whiny heroines and badass men who walk all over them, probably because it feels too much like my other career.

 

 
Fiona: Do you have to travel much concerning your book(s)?

I travel to give myself grist for the writing mill.

 

 
Fiona: Who designed the covers?

Lots of people. My publishers hire those out. Fiona Jayde, Valerie Tibbs, and Kelly Shorten have done a bunch of them

 

 
Fiona: What was the hardest part of writing your book?

The hardest part of novels is the middle. There’s always a place where I’m certain the plot is lagging and the book is dull as dishwater, but when I go back through it editing, I’m always pleasantly surprised that wasn’t the case.

 

 
Fiona: Did you learn anything from writing your book and what was it?

Every book holds different lessons. It’s important to keep a positive attitude!

 

 
Fiona: Do you have any advice for other writers?

Keep writing and find a good critique group. One where they’re honest with you. It won’t do you any good if they don’t pick your work apart. No matter how famous a writer is, they have blind spots in terms of their own writing. It’s why you need crit partners.

 

 
Fiona: Do you have anything specific that you want to say to your readers?

Just thanks so much for buying my books! Hugs and I appreciate you so much.

 

 
Fiona: Do you remember the first book you read?

Unfortunately, no.

 

 
Fiona: Other than writing do you have any hobbies?

Mountaineering, skiing, backpacking, cooking, and occasionally sewing.

 

 
Fiona: What TV shows/films do you enjoy watching?

I love Supernatural and the Hunger Games movies have been great.

 

 
Fiona: Favorite foods / Colors/ Music.

Food:lobster with drawn butter. Color: any shade of lavender. Music: folk singers and bluegrass. Classical too.

 

 
Fiona: If you were not a writer what else would you like to have done?

Exactly what I did. Psychology was my first love and I’ve never been sorry for pursuing it. It’s given me a rich background and a solid understanding of how people (and fictional characters) function.

 

 

Fiona: Do you have a blog/website? If so what is it?
I have both. http://www.anngimpel.com and http://anngimpel.blogspot.com

 

 

Thanks so much for a very interesting set of questions, Fiona! I feel like my bones are picked clean. Big hugs and thanks for being part of my street team.

Witchs_Bane-Ann_Gimpel-500x800

Witch’s Bane
The Witch Chronicles, Book 2

By Ann Gimpel

Publisher: Taliesin
ISBN:

Release Date: 8/7/14

Genre: Dark Paranormal Romance
65,000 words
Two stubborn people—a witch and a mage—come together with a fierceness borne of desperation. Can passion trump their intense need for independence? Will they live long enough to find out?

 

Blurb:
Roz, Jenna, and Colleen are the last of the demon-stalking witches. So far, they’ve escaped disaster, but their luck is running low. When demons strike in the midst of Colleen’s wedding, Roz launches desperate measures because she and her sister witches are Earth’s only hedge against being overrun by Hell’s minions. As she shape-shifts to keep one step ahead of the demons, at least it takes her mind off her other problems. Personal ones. She burned through a couple of marriages with a string of loser men before, after, and in between. Though she wants to be happy for Colleen, the jealousy bug bit deep and hasn’t let go.

In Roz’s secret heart she’s attracted to Ronin, one of the Daoine Sidhe. He’s so profanely beautiful she can barely breathe around him, but he’s also headstrong and arrogant. Not good partner material, she tells herself, unless she wants to end up dusting her heart off one more time.

Ronin set his sights on Roz when she was at his home in the U.K. for a strategy meeting and he can’t get her out of his mind. Unfortunately, she’s so prickly getting close to her requires scheming. He casts an enchantment to lure her at Colleen’s wedding, but she senses the spell and rebuffs him.

Roz is used to calling the shots. So is Ronin. Sparks fly. Tempers run hot, right along with an attraction too strong to be denied. Roz and Ronin come together with a fierceness borne of desperation, but demons are determined to rid themselves of the witches for good, no matter what it takes.
Excerpt:
Ronin Redstone unwound his arm from Roz and gripped his hands together in his lap to lessen the temptation to touch her again. Where he figured most of the guests were anxious to see the bride, he’d been interested in Roz. Probably too interested since he’d bounced to his feet the moment she entered the room and had even spun the mildest of spells to coerce her to sit near him. He pressed his lips into a flat line as he wrestled with his thoughts. Ever since he’d met the tall, imposing witch at his home in northern England a couple of weeks before, he’d been able to think of little else. She even entered his dreams with her silky black hair, pronounced cheekbones, and hawk-like nose. In those dreams, she was naked, her bronze skin glimmering in moonlight.
Her heady scent, pine forests and jasmine, tickled his nostrils and made him wonder what she’d feel like in his arms. Once he kicked the door open to that slippery slope, his cock sprang to life, clearly eager to find out. He tried to clip his libido before things whirled out of control and she noticed his arousal, but his cock wasn’t in the mood for negotiation—or retreat. He wove the tiniest don’t look here spell and draped his lower body with it.
In years past, he’d simply have created a love charm, imbued it with compulsion, and bedded the woman. That probably wasn’t a good idea, though. Roz would sense his magic, be outraged he tried to coerce her, and that would be the last he ever saw of the striking witch. Never mind she had good reason to not want much to do with him since he’d been one of the key players two hundred years ago who’d suggested foisting demon stalking onto the witches. He tightened his jaw muscles. Who could have guessed his little machination to get his kin out from under a highly unpleasant task would nearly be the death of the few witches who’d inherited the power through a magical version of gene splicing? Of course, he’d also been the one to send Duncan to fetch one of the witches to quell a demon uprising in the U.K. last month. That was how they’d discovered only three of the special witches remained…
No wonder she’s not overly fond of me. Ronin grimaced, not liking the truth in his thoughts. An inner voice huffed, reminding him it wasn’t his fault the witches in question hadn’t produced more offspring, but he shushed it.
Surely I can at least charm Roz out of that sour expression on her face.
He forced his breathing into a regular pattern and glanced toward Duncan and Colleen at the front of the room. The resident witch had completed her part of the ceremony and Titania was speaking in Gaelic so old he had trouble following it. The Sidhe binding ceremony lasted at least half an hour, so he let his thoughts drift. Anywhere but to his cock, which still throbbed uncomfortably.
As de facto leader for the Sidhe, a post he held more because no one else wanted it than because of any special skills on his part, he sensed they stood at the edge of a cataclysmic event. Abbadon and his henchmen, the Irichna demons, had grown appallingly strong. Capturing them one at a time and shepherding them to the Ninth Circle of Hell where they were trapped for all eternity wasn’t a workable solution anymore. There were too many of them, and maybe not enough space in the bottom of Hell.
Because he was afraid of a firm answer regarding Hell’s demon storage capacity, he hadn’t asked Titania, though surely she’d know. If they couldn’t dump Irichna behind the Ninth Circle’s gate, he had no idea what they’d do with them. And if Abbadon consolidated his full power, Earth would be laid waste. Ronin clamped his jaws together. Apocalypse didn’t come close to describing what would happen if Abbadon were freed from protecting his demons and could concentrate on taking over Earth.
In addition to not inquiring too closely about the Irichna, I also haven’t asked about Oberon. Ronin grimaced again. If the King of Faerie were truly so tired of immortality he’d let himself fade into the Dreaming, Ronin didn’t want to know about that, either.
When did I turn into such a craven I avoid unpleasant answers?
Even though he wasn’t expecting one, a response popped up anyway. He’d loved a human woman once, but she’d died bearing their son, who’d perished right along with her. The major vessel serving her heart had ruptured, and no amount of Sidhe magic could heal her or breathe life into their dead child. Ronin withdrew from the other Sidhe after that, mostly because he didn’t want to hear their lectures about the whole debacle being his own fault. After all, they weren’t supposed to mate outside their blood. When he finally picked up the reins of command a couple of centuries later—or maybe it had been three—he held himself aloof and avoided confrontations with anyone, about anything.
He ground his jaws harder together. His internal inventory was damned depressing; it forced him to take a harsh look at himself, and he didn’t like what he saw. He glanced at Titania. She clasped Duncan’s and Colleen’s hands between her own, and his eyes widened. Had he truly spent the entire ceremony sunk in memories and self-pity?
It would appear so, he thought dryly. In moments, Titania would utter the final words, Duncan would kiss Colleen, and the ritual would be done. He barely had time to wonder why Titania hadn’t kicked up more of a fuss about Duncan marrying a mortal, when the bridal pair kissed.
The tiniest sigh escaped Roz, and he looked sidelong at her. Her full lips were parted in half a smile, and she looked captivated by the ancient binding that had unfolded, mostly without him paying one whit of attention to it. She leaned toward him, her earlier ire apparently forgotten. “They make such a lovely couple,” she whispered.
Ronin narrowed his eyes and looked hard at Duncan and Colleen, wrapped in one another’s arms and kissing enthusiastically. He didn’t know about the lovely couple part, because he didn’t view the world that way. “They do look happy,” he whispered back because he thought he ought to say something.
Bubba, who’d been standing off to one side, made a grab for a bag Ronin hadn’t noticed before. The changeling reached inside and Ronin’s internal alarm went off. The changeling was about to throw something at the couple. Had the creature been co-opted by demons? It wasn’t unheard of since their race contained a smattering of demon blood. Afraid if he hesitated he’d be too late, Ronin pulled strong magic and rose to his feet.
Before he could loose it, Roz fastened a hand around his lower arm. “It’s just rice,” she said, her voice still low. “He’s going to throw rice at them. Stand down.”
Ronin met her dark, luminous gaze. “What sort of custom is that?” he demanded. Magic thrummed around him, making the air shimmer in iridescent hues. The changeling indeed tossed rice high in the air, showering everyone within a ten-foot radius of him, laughed uproariously, and then did it again.
“An old one.” Roz tugged on his arm and he sat reluctantly. “Bubba adores Colleen. He’s laid his life on the line for her a bazillion times. He’d never hurt her.”
“Better safe than sorry,” he muttered, feeling like an ass. “How was I to know?”
“It’s okay.” She let go of his arm and patted one of his hands.
As long as he was in an apologizing mood—they were rare for him—Ronin exhaled sharply and said, “I’m sorry I, um, suggested you sit next to me.”
She cocked her head to one side and quirked a brow. “If you’d only suggested, it would have been fine, but you did a tad more than that.”
Flutes and guitars began to play Mendelssohn’s “Wedding March.” Colleen and Duncan turned and floated up the center aisle with Bubba right behind, still throwing rice. Even Ronin had to admit they looked radiant. He’d known Duncan his entire life, and he’d never seen his fellow Sidhe look so carefree and besotted with joy. In one wild, unrestrained moment, before he glossed his emotions over with rationality, he wanted the same for himself.
Ronin felt Roz’s gaze still on him and knew he couldn’t ignore her comment. “You’re right,” he said stiffly. “I did do more than that.”
She repositioned herself so he had to look at her. “Why?”
Because I’ve wanted to strip you naked and worship your body from the day I met you. He cloaked his mind, hoping he’d been fast enough and she hadn’t read his thoughts. “I’m not quite sure,” he stumbled over the words, because they weren’t the truth.
Her dark gaze never left him as she weighed his statement. Finally she nodded, almost to herself. “When you figure it out,” she said and winked broadly, “be sure to let me know.”
Heat rose from his neck and swooshed over the top of his head. Damn! He was a Sidhe and a warrior. It was unseemly to blush like a love-struck maid. He opened his mouth to stammer some sort of reply, but she got up, along with the rest of the guests. “Come on,” she said. “I’m starving.”
He’d been afraid the second the ceremony was over, she’d race away from him as far and as fast as she could, but she’d just invited him to eat with her, at least he thought she had. He bit back a smile until just the edges of his mouth twitched. Maybe she didn’t abhor him as much as it seemed when she’d shot him that poisonous look once she sensed his magic.
I learned something. I have to ask her, not simply push her to do what I want. He hurried after her swishing skirt, not wanting to lose her in the crowd. He could always locate her, but the less magic he used until she got to know him, the better.
*
Roz caught up to Jenna just inside the dining area and hugged her. “Wasn’t it just perfect?” she gushed, still caught up in the mystical pull of dual wedding ceremonies.
Jenna hugged her back and nodded. She disentangled herself and eyed her friend. “What the hell, Roz? It isn’t like you to fall all over yourself.”
Roz settled her face into its usual, stern planes. “There. Is that better?”
Jenna grinned. “Yup. There’s the grumpy witch I know and love. What happened to you anyway? I looked back and you were trailing after that hunky Sidhe.”
“He snared me in a spell.”
“Ooooh.” Jenna clapped her hands together. “He must be interested.” She leaned close. “What did he do during the ceremony?”
Roz felt her face redden. “Nothing. I got mad at him once I realized he’d bamboozled me. Hush. Here he comes.”
“Awesome.” Jenna practically vibrated with enthusiasm. “He can eat with us.”
“I already invited him.”
A knowing look crossed Jenna’s face and she opened her mouth, but Roz hissed, “Can it, sister,” just before turning to Ronin and asking, “Where would you like to sit?”
He half-bowed—a courtly, old world gesture that drove home just how old he was—lifted Jenna’s hand to his lips, and said, “Nice to see you again, Miss Jenna. Anywhere the two of you wish to settle is fine with me.”
“Maybe we should get our food first,” Jenna suggested brightly, “since the tables will fill fast.”
“Good idea,” Roz snapped, feeling unaccountably jealous. Ronin hadn’t kissed her hand, but he’d been quick enough to snatch Jenna’s.
“If you don’t want him…” Jenna spoke in their telepathic speech.
“I thought you were interested in Tristan.” Roz led the way to a buffet table and picked up a plate.
Jenna smirked. “I am, but he’s not here.”
Roz dished up an interesting looking salad, brimming with shrimp and crab, and followed it with a few slices of rare beef and a roll. They found a table beneath a leaded glass window and laid their plates down.
“I’ll get us something to drink.” Ronin smiled. “Preferences?”
“What are you getting?” Roz asked, avoiding Jenna’s gaze.
“Mead,” he answered. “It’s what I prefer.”
“I’ll take Irish whiskey,” Jenna trilled and settled into her seat.
“Just bring me a glass of one or the other,” Roz muttered. “I’m not picky.” As soon as Ronin was out of earshot, or close enough, she glared at Jenna. “Leave him alone.”
“But you’re not even sure you’re interested in him,” Jenna protested.
“And how would you know that?” Roz stuffed a forkful of salad into her mouth, chewed with a vengeance, and swallowed.
The other witch dropped her gaze, looking sheepish. “I, um, peeked.”
Roz slammed a fist on the table hard enough the dishes rattled. “You looked inside my head without asking?”
“’Fraid so. Sorry.” Jenna started eating with a studied nonchalance.
Roz exhaled and then did it again. Both of them were lonely; getting angry with her longtime friend wouldn’t serve any purpose other than creating bad water under the bridge they’d have to clear at some point. “Jenna. It’s the wedding ceremonies. All the old magic in them makes us want what Colleen and Duncan have.”
“I suppose you’re right.” Jenna’s hazel gaze met hers and she looked repentant, her brows drawn together. “I’m sorry.”
“Me too.” Roz smiled crookedly. “Let’s not fight. Not today.”

 

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http://www.anngimpel.com

http://anngimpel.blogspot.com

http://www.amazon.com/author/anngimpel

http://www.facebook.com/anngimpel.author

@AnnGimpel (for Twitter)

Short Bio:
Ann Gimpel is a clinical psychologist, with a Jungian bent. Avocations include mountaineering, skiing, wilderness photography and, of course, writing. A lifelong aficionado of the unusual, she began writing speculative fiction a few years ago. Since then her short fiction has appeared in a number of webzines and anthologies. Her longer books run the gamut from urban fantasy to paranormal romance. She’s published over 20 books to date, with several more contracted for 2014.

A husband, grown children, grandchildren and three wolf hybrids round out her family.

Long Bio:
Ann Gimpel is a mountaineer at heart. Recently retired from a long career as a psychologist, she remembers many hours at her desk where her body may have been stuck inside four walls, but her soul was planning yet one more trip to the backcountry. Around the turn of the last century (that would be 2000, not 1900!), she managed to finagle moving to the Eastern Sierra, a mecca for those in love with the mountains. It was during long backcountry treks that Ann’s writing evolved. Unlike some who see the backcountry as an excuse to drag friends and relatives along, Ann prefers solitude. Stories always ran around in her head on those journeys, sometimes as a hedge against abject terror when challenging conditions made her fear for her life, sometimes for company. Eventually, she returned from a trip and sat down at the computer. Three months later, a five hundred page novel emerged. Oh, it wasn’t very good, but it was a beginning. And, she learned a lot between writing that novel and its sequel.

Around that time, a friend of hers suggested she try her hand at short stories. It didn’t take long before that first story found its way into print and they’ve been accepted pretty regularly since then. One of Ann’s passions has always been ecology, so her tales often have a green twist.

In addition to writing, Ann enjoys wilderness photography. She lugs pounds of camera equipment in her backpack to distant locales every year. A standing joke is that over ten percent of her pack weight is camera gear which means someone else has to carry the food! That someone is her husband. They’ve shared a life together for a very long time. Children, grandchildren and three wolf hybrids round out their family.

Here is my interview with Helen Hardt

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Name Helen Hardt
Age 50
Where are you from Columbus, Ohio
A little about your self `ie your education Family life etc
I have a B.A. from St. Olaf College and a law degree (J.D.) from the University of Denver.

 

 
Fiona: Tell us your latest news?
My newest release is Lily and the Duke, erotic Victorian romance. I released it on August 27, my 50th birthday! This is a book of my heart and I hope it does well .
Fiona: When and why did you begin writing?

 

 
I’ve been writing since I learned how…in first grade.
Fiona: When did you first consider yourself a writer?
When I got my first contract in 2008.

 

 

Fiona: What inspired you to write your first book?
I guess it depends on what you consider my first book! I started my first novel in eighth grade, and I was inspired by my unrequited love at the time. I still have that book! It will never see the light of day though…

 

 

Fiona: Do you have a specific writing style?
I’m a pantser all the way! I’ve tried plotting, but my characters end up having minds of their own.

 

 

Fiona: How did you come up with the title?
Lily and the Duke? The original title was Lily’s Waltz, and then Lily’s Affair. I read somewhere that title with “duke” in them do better, and since my hero was a duke, I figured I’d give it a try :D

 

 

Fiona: Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?
The message in most of my books is to be true to yourself  :D

 

 

Fiona: How much of the book is realistic?
I did a lot of research into history, so it’s pretty realistic. My heroine is a little bold for the time period, but she’s a lot of fun!

 

 

Fiona: Are experiences based on someone you know, or events in your own life?
Not really.

 

 

Fiona: What books have most influenced your life most?
Too many to list! Probably easier to list authors: Lisa Kleypas, Ayn Rand, C.S. Lewis, Laura Ingalls Wilder, Nora Roberts, to name a few…

 

 

Fiona: If you had to choose, which writer would you consider a mentor?
Lisa Kleypas. I love all of her work.

 

 

Fiona: What book are you reading now?
The Claiming of Sleeping Beauty by Anne Rice.

 

 

Fiona: Are there any new authors that have grasped your interest?
Gayle Forman, Suzanne Collins, Meredith Wild

 

 

Fiona: What are your current projects?
Rose in Bloom is the sequel to Lily and the Duke. That will be out in October. I have some cowboy stories re-releasing in November through a publisher. And I’m working on a new “50 Shades” type series!

 

 

Fiona: Name one entity that you feel supported you outside of family members.
My local writers’ group, Colorado Romance Writers.

 

 

Fiona: Do you see writing as a career?
Yes.

 

 

Fiona: If you had to do it all over again, would you change anything in your latest book?
Oh my, I’d change something in all my books! A writer is always thinking of ways she could have done it better.

 

 

Fiona: Do you recall how your interest in writing originated?
My father encouraged me when I was very young. He was an aspiring writer himself.

 

 

Fiona: Is there anything you find particularly challenging in your writing?
Sitting down and actually doing it!

 

 

Fiona: Who is your favorite author and what is it that really strikes you about their work?
Again, I can’t really answer. I love so many of them!

 

 

Fiona: Do you have to travel much concerning your book(s)?
Not really.

 

 

Fiona: Who designed the covers?
My good friend Meredith Wild designed the cover for Lily and the Duke.

 

 

Fiona: What was the hardest part of writing your book?
Cutting about 20,000 words. Would you believe it was originally 103,000 words?

 

 

Fiona: Did you learn anything from writing your book and what was it?
I learn something from every book. With this one, I learned how much I didn’t know in 2007, which was when I wrote the first draft.

 

 

Fiona: Do you have any advice for other writers?
Write! Never stop. And never stop studying the craft.

 

 

Fiona: Do you have anything specific that you want to say to your readers?
Thank you for reading! I appreciate it more than you know  :D

 

 
Fiona: Do you remember the first book you read?
My first novel was The Wonderful Wizard of Ox by L. Frank Baum.

 

 
Fiona: Other than writing do you have any hobbies ?
Reading! I also love to cook and I love to watch opera (when my older son is singing) and football (when my younger son is playing.)

 

 
Fiona: What TV shows/films do you enjoy watching?
I Love Lucy reruns are my favorite! I love Nick at Night and regularly watch Friends, Roseanne, and George Lopez. I’m a huge Game of Thrones and Orange is the New Black fan.

 

 
Fiona: Favorite foods / Colors/ Music
Sushi and ice cream! My favorite colors are burgundy, pink, red, and I love classic Rock music.

 

 
Fiona: If you were not a writer what else would you like to have done?
Be an artist.

 
Fiona: Do you have a blog/website? If so what is it?
http://www.helenhardt.com
Amazon Page http://www.amazon.com/Helen-Hardt/e/B008LZRKXQ/ref=sr_tc_2_0?qid=1409089012&sr=1-2-ent

 

10494521_10202798804111983_7337228615477461594_n Due out in October

 

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Here is my interview with Scott Seldon

Name : Scott Seldon
Age: 44
Where are you from: Colorado. Not a native, but I’ve been here most of my life.
A little about your self `ie your education Family life etc : Well, the hightlights first. Married with a son. Bachelor’s degree in something totally unrelated to my IT job. I learned computers hands on and can do amazing things with data.
My mother’s family has a lot of journalists and my grandmother was a historian so I come by writing naturally. I loved to create stories as a kid, naming and creating personalities and relationships for various toys. It was no surprise I started writing them down. I started out obsessed wtih Star Wars and then moved on to Doctor Who and Star Trek. My first complete stories were all Star Trek related. I think my life experiences have really broaded my mind and given me a huge base to write from.

 

 
Fiona: Tell us your latest news?
Scott: My fifth book is due out mid November. It should be available for pre-order sometime before that. It is called One Corner of the Sky.

 

 

Fiona: When and why did you begin writing?
Scott: I had stories to tell. A lot of writers begin by writing fan fiction about the main characters. I always had my own characters that I wanted to have interact and be the protagonist with the established characters in guest starring roles.

 

 

Fiona: When did you first consider yourself a writer?
Scott: Well, that took a while. I’d have to say the point was somewhere when I was writing my second novel, Pirates of I’ab. I got serious about it and decided it wasn’t just a hobby.

 

 

Fiona: What inspired you to write your first book?
Scott: I had a job where I was taking a lot of deliveries and so I got to know the drivers pretty well. A scene came to me of space trader, the science fiction equivalent of a delivery driver, and I had to write it down. That scene became a chapter then a book. Not a good one, but it was a finished book with a chohesive story. I really have to credit those guys.

 

 

Fiona: Do you have a specific writing style?
Scott: Sparse. I think I was way too inspired by Isaac Asimov. That and I had my eyes initially on being a screen writer. Both are somewhat sparse on florishes and concentrate carrying the story forward. I’d rather let the reader imagine most of those things for themselves.

 

 

Fiona: How did you come up with the title?
Scott: That can be the hardest thing. I have five books and 11 shorter works that I’ve put titles to. The first two books were easy. Well of Dreams came to me during a line of dialog. Pirates of I’ab is very descriptive of the antagonists. I’d have to say I am very influenced by Star Trek episode titles and science fiction from before I was born. Some of those titles are so poetic. I do try to make it applicable to the story at hand, but simple doesn’t work for me. Dust Between Stars has the protagonist as a fugitive and I thought that title really nailed the parts of being on the run in a galactic civilization that the story focuses on. One Corner of the Sky takes place mostly on a single planet. It was supposed to be a temp title during the editing and book design phase, but it stuck.

 

 

Fiona: Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?
Scott: That nothing you face should stand in your way. I have put my character of Ven Zaran through several kinds of hell in five novels (and two short stories), but he keeps going. His methods are not always legal, but he keeps moving forward.

 

 

Fiona: How much of the book is realistic?
Scott: That’s a loaded question to ask a science fiction writer. I have spent time researching how an intelligent alien species might evolve and how we might interact with them and then stuck with the Hollywood way of humanoids who can talk. I have some other settings in my head, but having a setting does not mean I have a story to write. As far as the planets and travel between them, not much is proven, but pretty much everything has a chance to be real on a theoretical basis.
But when it comes to my characters, independent of the setting, I keep it very realistic. I love the wild settings of the grand space operas, but I want my characters to feel real, alive, like people you might know. Without solid characters, science fiction is just a show piece for the imagination. I’d rather tell stories that people can relate to.

 

 

Fiona: Are experiences based on someone you know, or events in your own life?
Scott: No. There are things I throw in from time to time that come from my personal expereinces, but most is from research and other great works of fiction. I’ve lost jobs, lost my temper, had family members die, but we each face these problems differently and I like to extend myself as a writer by tackling characters who are at least partly different from myself. I’m sure there is a piece of me in each of my characters, but I try to make each character thier own individual. It’s what I enjoy reading so that is what I try to write.

 

 

Fiona: What books have most influenced your life most?
Scott: Isaac Asimov’s Foundation, Robert Heinlein’s The Door into Summer, and Brian Daley’s Han Solo Adventures. And I can’t forget Hyperspace by Michio Kaku. Not fiction, but very influential. I used to read a lot of mysteries as a kid and I think those show in some of my plots.

 

 

Fiona: If you had to choose, which writer would you consider a mentor?
Scott: Isaac Asimov. His essays on writing in Gold are priceless. I try to follow his advice and keep the ending of the story in mind and avoid anything that strays too far from that goal. I also try to capture the final story in the first draft and then polish it. I’ve read many books with advice on how to write, but his really hit home and has worked for me.

 

 

Fiona: What book are you reading now?
Scott: The Han Solo Adventures. I’ve been taking the summer to read some old favorites again, sort of to recharge and I always intended to finish the summer with these three stories.

 

 

Fiona: Are there any new authors that have grasped your interest?
Scott: Not exactly new, but I really like Jack McDevitt’s work. Especially his Alex Benedict novels. But I read the sample of Ancillary Justice by Anne Leckie and it jumped to near the top of my reading list (after I write the rough draft of my next book).

 

 

Fiona: What are your current projects?
Scott: I have one edit pass left on One Corner of the Sky, then I have some characters I’ve been ignoring so they are going to get some short stories in September. October and November I will be working on my sixth novel. I have the basic premise, but the full plot is not nailed down and I haven’t even found a working title beyond calling it Book Six.

 

 

Fiona: Name one entity that you feel supported you outside of family members.
Scott: I like that word, entity. That makes it easy to answer. The wonderful body of writers over at Agent Query Connect. I have met many wonderful people who have read my work, given me feedback, and helped me get better. A wonderfully supportive community that is quite different from others I’ve interacted with online.

 

 

Fiona: Do you see writing as a career?
Scott: Definitely. I have a day job, one that will give me a retirement, but I look to writing to be what I do long term. I have many stories to tell and I already may not get to all of them in my life.

 

 

Fiona: If you had to do it all over again, would you change anything in your latest book?
Scott: My latest book? No, nothing. The only book I really have anything that I would chagne was Well of Dreams. But by the time I had improved enought to see the issues, I had written book 3, Interlude of Pain. So I just edited it to the best of my ability and I think it works, it just could be better.

 

 

Fiona: Do you recall how your interest in writing originated?
Scott: It is my mother’s fault. I’m not sure what inspired her, but she wrote this science fiction novel. I loved it and started thinking that if my mother could write (and my grandmother who wrote history), that I would try. It took a while before I tried very hard and started completing things on a regular basis. But I trace the origins back to that story my mother wrote.

 

 

Fiona: Can you share a little of your current work with us?
Scott: I’m telling the story of Ven Zaran and his crew. It covers six books and ends with a game changer. Part of this come from how this series came about. My very first novel (my previous stories weren’t long enough to call novels) featured Ven’s great grandson, Mishka Zaran. I created this wonderful back story and I felt compelled to delve into it. One of the things I did was write Ven’s bio data. It’s kind of an outline of his life. I inserted a small civil war in his life and becaue of his actions his life won’t quite be the same again. I already wrote one small story that I included in Edge of Hyperspace called A Captain at War. Ven, under an alias, is going to become a war hero and it is going to impact his trader career. But first, I have to pen Book Six.

 

 

Fiona: Is there anything you find particularly challenging in your writing?
Scott: Ideas for stories. That’s why I’ve stuck with Ven for six books straight. I have other universes in my head, but finding stories that I both want to tell and that I think others might like to read, is challenging. But inspiration often hits in enexpected ways at unexpected times.

 

 

Fiona: Who is your favorite author and what is it that really strikes you about their work?
Scott: Isaac Asimov. I love how a dry scientist can create characters and situations that really drag me in. He admits many of his characters are very cardbaord, but the main ones, the ones he wanted the reader to focus on, are rich with character and live, at least for me, on the page. And if you have listened to any of his interviews, he can hold your attention the same way.

 

 

Fiona: Do you have to travel much concerning your book(s)?
Scott: No. I’m pretty stuck to home by my day job. It is hard to get away when there are things you have to do just about every day. Some things, thanks to modern technology, I can do remotely, but for most I need to be in the office.

 

 

Fiona: Who designed the covers?
Scott: Well, I do a basic mockup and then pass that off to a wonderful artist. Yotsuya (as he goes by online) has a way with composition and color. He does amazing things.

 

 

Fiona: What was the hardest part of writing your book?
Scott: Editing. I hate editing. It is almost impossible to catch every single mistake, even when you have other people do it. I got one book back after having someone edit it and I did a final pass to make sure I’d entered their edits right and I found things they missed.

 

 

Fiona: Did you learn anything from writing your book and what was it?
Scott: Get it out there. Books do no good just sitting there. They need to be out in the public. I don’t care you do what I did, self-publishing my books, or if you just hand it off to friends and family. Stories are meant to be told to others, not kept to yourself.

 

 

Fiona: Do you have any advice for other writers?
Scott: Follow Heinleins rules of writing. Specifically, write, finish, and then repeat. I would advise new writers to write at least three unconnected novels, edit them, polish them, learn what you are doing, then write a fourth and try to sell it. Don’t stop trying until you sell it.

 

 

Fiona: Do you have anything specific that you want to say to your readers?
Scott: The true test of the quality of a writer is how much people enjoy their work. If you enjoy my work, tell your friends about it, write a review, rate it, etc. That applies to any writer you like. Reviews from the site you bought the book from are very appreciated.

 

 
Fiona: Do you remember the first book you read?
Scott: No. The earlist ones I remember are Dr. Suess.

 

 
Fiona: Other than writing do you have any hobbies ?
Scott: I love music and movies. Especially classic movies. I could watch TCM all day.

 

 
Fiona: What TV shows/films do you enjoy watching?
Scott: Well, the list is not surprising. The Star Wars saga, Doctor Who (classic and new), Star Trek (the original series and the Next Generation), Babylon 5, Airwolf, Big Bang Theory, M*A*S*H, and Battlestar Galactica (original 1978 series).

 

 
Fiona: Favorite foods / Colors/ Music
Scott: Foods – pasta, pizza, encheladas, smothered burritos, hot dogs. Colors – black mixed with bright colors. Music – Jazz. Keiko Matsui and Vanglis (yes, his style is jazz even if he is classified as New Age most of the time).

 

 
Fiona: If you were not a writer what else would you like to have done?
Scott: My dream was to be an aeronautical engineer. I wanted to build and fly space planes. Writing about it is almost as good.

 

 
Fiona: Do you have a blog/website? If so what is it?
Scott: My website and blog are linked. I normally just point everyone to the main page – https://sites.google.com/site/scottrseldon

One Corner of the Sky blog

Here is my interview with Shannon McRoberts

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Name: Shannon McRoberts
Age: 34
Where are you from: Kentucky
A little about your self `ie your education Family life etc
I was born and raised in Kentucky where I still reside with my husband James, daughter Jaiden, a cat named Patches, and several fish. I graduated with honors from Georgetown College in 2001 with a degree in Psychology and minors in Sociology and Art. I have a very non-glamorous day job, but when I get home I try to unleash my creativity. You can visit http://www.shannonmcroberts.com to learn more :D

 

 
Fiona: Tell us your latest news?:
I just completed and am in final edits for my next book Cursed Bloods.

 

 

Fiona: When and why did you begin writing?:
Writing prose was the final creative frontier for me. I used to only do it when needed in school, which was a lot. My problem was creating something original that didn’t sound cheesy. Staring at a blank page is sometimes intimidating. One day after work, I had an idea for a story and then another and another. It spiraled into a book or two! Every time I think I am done with stories something else pops into my head.

 

 
Fiona: When did you first consider yourself a writer?
I was writing books when I was 5 if that counts!

 

 

Fiona: What inspired you to write your first book?
I had a tag line that showed up in my head. I built a world around it.

 

 

Fiona: Do you have a specific writing style?
Shannon Style!

 

 

Fiona: How did you come up with the title?
The titles to my books usually try to convey what the books are about. Nothing too fancy. Nothing too abstract. Verses of Athine is about Athine and her adventures. The Secret of Genetic Corp X is about the secret of the place. Cursed Bloods (to be released in 2014) is about Cursed Bloods. Erosion of the Heart, my poetry book, is probably the oddest named title I have.

 

 

Fiona: Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?
No, I just wrote stories for entertainment. My poetry does sometimes have messages. For instance I have several on the environment and some on religion.

 

 

Fiona: How much of the book is realistic?
My poetry is pretty realistic. It is all based on life events of myself and others around me. My other books are heavy with mythology you know and love—vampires, beautiful goddesses, dragons, but not in the manner you are accustomed to!

 

 

Fiona: Are experiences based on someone you know, or events in your own life?
Why yes, I happen to know a 7 foot tall Amazonian goddess like person with a giant fire sword. Wait, no I don’t. Actually, most of my stuff is pretty much made up :D

 

 

Fiona: What books have most influenced your life most?
I don’t know that any book, other than the Bible, has actually influenced my life at all. I love good stories. I don’t make life choices based on any of the books I’ve read or anything.

 

 

Fiona: If you had to choose, which writer would you consider a mentor?
Anne Rice

 

 

Fiona: What book are you reading now?
My own. I am in edit and formatting hell LOL!

 

 

Fiona: Are there any new authors that have grasped your interest?
Aidan Stone is a new author I recently spotlighted on my blog. I liked his first book. I’m biting at the bit to get Anne Rice’s new book in October :D

 

 

Fiona: What are your current projects?
I am currently adapting my novels into a comic book. I also have one or two prose books I’m working on outside the Daughter of Ares world.

 

 

Fiona: Name one entity that you feel supported you outside of family members.
Moonlite Comics here in Kentucky has been pretty supportive to the independent artists and authors like myself.

 

 

Fiona: Do you see writing as a career?
It can be. Anything can be a career if you choose it to be!

 

 

Fiona: If you had to do it all over again, would you change anything in your latest book?
Always. But not plot wise. Just like wording wise LOL. An author can nitpick to death.

 

 
Fiona: Do you recall how your interest in writing originated?
It was just something I had to do a lot of in school and I found out I was decent at it.

 

 

Fiona: Can you share a little of your current work with us?
Even better, check out the video trailer

 

 

Fiona: Is there anything you find particularly challenging in your writing?
Time. Never enough time to do it!

 

 

Fiona: Who is your favorite author and what is it that really strikes you about their work?
Anne Rice and I have no idea. I’m really bad about figuring that kind of stuff out. I just know I like her vampire books!

 

 

Fiona: Do you have to travel much concerning your book(s)?
No, I barely leave my home town. That’s what is great about fantasy…no trips needed!

 

 

Fiona: Who designed the covers?
Me, myself, and I :D

 

 

Fiona: What was the hardest part of writing your book?
Getting it all down and making sure it was all commensurate with the other books in the series. I hate continuity problems!

 

 

Fiona: Did you learn anything from writing your book and what was it?
That I can write a novel!

 

 

Fiona: Do you have any advice for other writers?
Be true to yourself. Be true to your story. Don’t listen to gatekeepers, but do listen to those that show a genuine interest in your work. Get an editor. Use ProWriting Aid to clean up your works. But above all, be true to your story and your style.

 

 

Fiona: Do you have anything specific that you want to say to your readers?
I really appreciate all the new readers I have been getting recently. I am glad so many are enjoying the story of Athine and also Zarra.

 

 
Fiona: Do you remember the first book you read?
I’ve read so many of them, no. My family always read to me and I think I was reading before school. I do remember I didn’t used to like reading at all LOL!

 

 
Fiona: Other than writing do you have any hobbies ?
Art, car mechanics, poetry, pets, and I used to do volunteer work.

 

 
Fiona: What TV shows/films do you enjoy watching?
Game of Thrones, True Blood, Xena…I’m your typical fantasy lover!

 

 
Fiona: Favorite foods / Colors/ Music:
Cheeseburgers/Blue/Rock and Roll but I like a lot of different kinds of music.

 

 
Fiona: If you were not a writer what else would you like to have done?
I am glad to say I have had opportunities to do just about every kind of thing I wanted to try. I have worked as a cover artist, an artist, a poet, and I’ve also dabbled in comic books.

 

 
Fiona: Do you have a blog/website? If so what is it?
Sure, you can check me and my books out over at http://www.shannonmcroberts.com. It is a one stop visit now. My book hub and everything about my art is also over there.

 

Verses of Athine Book Covererosion of the heart ebookGenx Redo Ebook

Here is my interview with Elaine Dodge

Elaine Dodge 3

 

Name Elaine Dodge
Age Age is just a number. One I’ve been lying about for years. I was 26 for about 6 years at one point.
Where are you from
I was born in Ndola, Zambia, grew up in Harare, Zimbabwe, have travelled fairly extensively and now live in Johannesburg, South Africa.
A little about yourself i.e. your education Family life etc
I trained as a graphic designer and worked in that industry for years, even running my own company, with my brother, for a while. A long stint in advertising followed. In the last few years, I’ve been toiling away in the TV industry, winning an odd international award. But that wasn’t enough. I realised I wanted to “tell stories”. I’m passionate about it. I feel most alive when I’m writing, and I delight in letting my imagination run riot. In November 2011, I finally took the plunge and decided to “wrestle the Rottweiler” and started putting all those stories on paper.

 

 
Fiona: Tell us your latest news?
I was a TV producer and writer for a wildlife TV production company with clients like NatGeo. Most of the company, including myself was retrenched just over a year ago. I am now trying to establish myself as a freelance copywriter, editor and whenever possible TV producer. I’ve just had my first job for a new client in New Zealand accepted. They loved it. Hurrah. And tomorrow I’m meeting another new client to discuss ghost writing a book. Memoirs, I think.

 

 

Fiona: When and why did you begin writing?
Writing was always a part of my career. But if you mean novels, well, every now and then, growing up, I’d enter a writing competition and get absolutely nowhere. Which as my brother never failed to tell me was only to be expected. I always thought I wanted to “make movies”, but it turns out what I really wanted to be was a storyteller. How I did that didn’t matter. Now, I’m happiest when I’m writing.

 

 

Fiona: When did you first consider yourself a writer?
When my first book was accepted by a publisher. Which was one of the reasons I chose not to go the self-publishing route. I wanted that validation. Anything else just seemed like wishful thinking.

 

 

Fiona: What inspired you to write your first book?
I’d been thinking of the plot for years, but as a movie not a novel. I’d always been interested in the notion of arranged marriages. The one is my book is arranged by default, as it were. I did a romance writing course where I decided to try out the notion and a few scenes from the book. One day the facilitator pulled me aside and told me I had to write the book. So as soon as the course was over I started writing in earnest. I was done in four months.

 

 

Fiona: Do you have a specific writing style?
Not that I know of. I just write what I feel the story needs.

 

 

Fiona: How did you come up with the title?
At first it was “Hope”, the heroine’s name but, to my dismay, I discovered that there were a LOT of books called “Hope” (not, it turns out, the most original historical romance heroine’s name, but true to her time and her background) and besides, when I started the edits, I realised it was more the hero’s story than the heroine’s. Then it was a simple hop, skip and a jump to Harcourt’s Mountain. That is where most of the action takes place and the cause of some of it.

 

 

Fiona: Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?
In “Harcourt’s Mountain” there was an underlying theme of honour and keeping one’s word.

 

 

Fiona: How much of the book is realistic?
I’m not sure I understand the question. It’s not a fantasy if that’s what you mean. I did a lot of research to ensure my facts were as correct as could be. Although I will admit to a slight stretching of the truth every now and then. The book is very loosely based on the real bride ships that came to British Columbia in the mid to late 1800’s.

 

 

Fiona: Are experiences based on someone you know, or events in your own life?
No, not really. But then, I should think all writers write from some form of personal well of experience.

 

 

Fiona: What books have most influenced your life most?
The Bible, the romances of Georgette Heyer, and the naval adventures of Dudley Pope. But that’s just the tip of the iceberg. I also loved westerns by Louis L’Amour when I was a teenager. There was a point when I was reading about five books a week. That was when I had moved out of home and didn’t have a TV.

 

 

Fiona: If you had to choose, which writer would you consider a mentor?
Georgette Heyer.

 

 

Fiona: What book are you reading now?
The Utter Relief of Holiness by John Eldredge, Constant Princess by Phillipa Gregory, The Nautical Chart by Arturo Perez Reverte and The Alchemist by Paul Coelho. It’s my third attempt at The Alchemist.

 

 

Fiona: Are there any new authors that have grasped your interest?
None that I can think of off-hand.

 

 

Fiona: What are your current projects?
It’s a steampunk novel called “The Device Hunter”.

 

 

Fiona: Name one entity that you feel supported you outside of family members.
Friends. With “Harcourt’s Mountain” it was definitely one friend in particular, Bronwen MacKeller. Her daughter Josie drew the wolf illustration that appears on the acknowledgement page.

 

 

Fiona: Do you see writing as a career?
It’s what I’m aiming for.

 

 

Fiona: If you had to do it all over again, would you change anything in your latest book?
No, I don’t think so.

 

 

Fiona: Do you recall how your interest in writing originated?
Storytelling. I love it, so I wanted to do it. I recall one day at school in the English class where we were asked to articulate the images that came to mind when the teacher read a particular poem. I got carried away and I realised that for me words have a visual power that is exciting.

 

 

Fiona: Can you share a little of your current work with us?
Like I said, it’s a steampunk novel called, “The Device Hunter”. It’s about a man, Thomas Meade, who, as a trained assassin is sent by the Patent Master, to hunt down and kill the creator of a new and extremely dangerous device. The creator turns out to be the daughter Meade didn’t know he had. There are quite a few sub-pots. I like sub-plots.

 

 

Fiona: Is there anything you find particularly challenging in your writing?
At the moment, it’s making the book work. I’ve finished the first draft but there are more issues than Vogue, as they say, and I need to tackle those. And as I am a freelancer if I don’t work, I don’t eat so most of my time is spent writing or editing for that and not for pleasure.

 

 

Fiona: Who is your favorite author and what is it that really strikes you about their work?
Georgette Heyer. I love her really top-notch research, her use of language and humour, her detailed and delicious plotting. And how, at the end, you always close the book with a smile and a sigh of delight.

 

 

Fiona: Do you have to travel much concerning your book(s)?
If you mean for research – I wish. No, unfortunately that’s what the internet is for.
If you mean to promote them – no. It’s an e-book so I have to try and meet people on the internet.

 

 

Fiona: Who designed the covers?
Charlene Raddon designed “Harcourt’s Mountain.”

 

 

Fiona: What was the hardest part of writing your book?
Being interrupted.

 

 

Fiona: Did you learn anything from writing your book and what was it?
I learned that I love writing, that the past is a good place to write from and that a cat makes a great partner for trying out dialogue with.

 

 

Fiona: Do you have any advice for other writers?
If you don’t write you’re, at best, one hopes, a reader; at worst, you’re just a talker. Set a goal, like finishing the book, and then do it. Write or stop calling yourself a writer.

 

 

Fiona: Do you have anything specific that you want to say to your readers?
Helen Keller once said, “Life is either a great adventure, or nothing.” Life’s too short to be anything other than an adventure.

 

 
Fiona: Do you remember the first book you read?
See Spot Run, I believe.

 

 
Fiona: Other than writing do you have any hobbies?
I love to do tapestry. It’s a good way to mull over tricky bits of plotting or dialogue.

 

 
Fiona: What TV shows/films do you enjoy watching?
I have an extremely eclectic taste when it comes to that. At the moment I am re-watching the Blackadder series.

 

 
Fiona: Favorite foods / Colors/ Music
Roasts with all the trimmings, (mainly because I don’t have an oven so if I get invited for Sunday lunch anywhere and there’s a roast it makes my heart sing.) Thai and of course pudding. Pudding should in fact come first.
Green, purple, yellow.

 

 
Contemporary Christian praise and worship, movie sound tracks.
Fiona: If you were not a writer what else would you like to have done?

Well, I still enjoy working in TV so if a great project came along I’d probably go do that.

 

 
Fiona: Do you have a blog/website? If so what is it?
http://www.elainedodge.weebly.com
Links to me:

http://www.tirgearrpublishing.com/authors/Dodge_Elaine/harcourts-mountain.htm

http://www.facebook.com/pages/Elaine-Dodge/422105531221691

http://www.linkedin.com/pub/elaine-dodge/1a/191/50

 

Harcourt's Mountain by Elaine Dodge - 500

Summary of the book.
Spring, 1867 – The western frontier of British Columbia hardly seems a likely place for romance. Filthy, terrified and confused, HOPE BOOKER is waiting to be sold off the ‘bride’ ship. LUKE HARCOURT happens upon the sale. It’s not love at first sight, but he feels compelled to save her from a life of slavery and prostitution. To allay her fears of being raped, Luke promises never to touch her. Being a man of his word, this is a pledge he quickly finds almost impossible to keep.
Battling their growing attraction to each other, they must learn to live together in the forests of the wild and almost unexplored mountains. They face white water, Indians, wolves, and dangerous men.
No longer able to deny their feelings, their ‘happy-ever-after’ is shattered when a corrupt land baron forces Luke’s hand. Enraged at the man’s actions, Luke rides into town—and disappears.
Alone and pregnant, Hope faces the prospect of the worst winter in ten years. The trauma of fighting off a hungry grizzly brings on labor, but the baby is stuck. Luke meanwhile wakes up on a ship bound for South America, captained by a revengeful sadist who plans to murder him. Will Luke survive and make it back to Hope in time?

Buying Links
Amazon.com

Amazon.co.uk

http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B00EK0V2Y4

Smashwords

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/347550

Apple

https://itunes.apple.com/fi/book/harcourts-mountain/id691811266

Kobo

http://store.kobobooks.com/en-gb/books/harcourt-s-mountain/AfzXusqRU0eTPTtVNPNMtA?MixID=AfzXusqRU0eTPTtVNPNMtA&PageNumber=1

Nook

http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/harcourts-mountain-elaine-dodge/1116758390?ean=2940045223997

Here is my interview with RJ Loom

Name R.J. Loom
Age 38
Where are you from
I was born and raised in a very small town along the shores of Lake Erie in Ohio.
A little about your self `ie your education Family life etc
I married my high school sweetheart and we’ve been married for 18 years. We have two teenage children and two very spoiled dogs (a Boxer and a Beagle). Up until a few years ago, I was a paralegal at a mid-large sized law firm before turning in briefs and pleadings for wine bottle openers and pruning sheers working at a close family member’s winery.

 

 
Fiona: Tell us your latest news?
Well I’m very excited to announce that my debut novel The Ilia Stone is set for release September 16, 2014. It will be the first book in a trilogy.

Here’s the blurb…

Nia Williams could never have imagined the way her ordinary life would be turned upside down after the death of her grandfather. A chance find unwittingly has her discovering the truth of an ancient Greek myth, plunging her into a world where the legends she only read about in her history books become her reality.

Plagued with a strange link to others’ past, she follows the path of an ancient artifact around the world and throughout time as it reveals its story to guide her to contain powers once thought lost to the rise of modern religion.

Two men affected by the artifact vie for her allegiance; Gabriel, a man haunted by his own past, and smooth talking Viktor who wants Nia to embrace a life she never imagined.

A love sacrificed… An impossible decision…

As lines blur between right and wrong, how much will Nia be willing to sacrifice?

 

 
Fiona: When and why did you begin writing?
I believe I started writing about 5 years ago. It was a fluke really. I stumbled upon a group of writers on social media and on a whim joined the group. I don’t regret for a second that impulse decision because writing has become such a big part of my life since then. I didn’t realize how much I needed the creative outlet.

 

 

Fiona: When did you first consider yourself a writer?
I’m not sure I could pinpoint when exactly. Never really thought about it I guess. But looking back I think I’d have to say I was a writer as soon as I started actually writing down the stories in my head.

 
Fiona: What inspired you to write your first book?
It all started with an idea that popped into my mind one day when I was vegging out watching Clash of the Gods on the H2 channel. I started wondering what every happened to the Greek Gods? What if their powers existed today? These questions kept churning around in my mind and multiplying into more questions. It kept getting bigger than what I had normally been writing so I decided to start my little secret project and start writing here or there. Before I knew it, I had 20,000 words down. I did a quick guesstimate of how much of the story I had told by that point and realized… “I guess I’m writing a book. No, make that three.”

 

 

Fiona: Do you have a specific writing style?
Not really. I just let it flow and write scenes as they come to me. Unfortunately, that’s usually out of order. But for me, it seems the best way to capture the imagery and emotion of any scene. Now that does not mean that I don’t have some kind of outline of how the story is going to go. I guess it’s like looking at the cover of a puzzle box and knowing what the end result is supposed to look like before going in and moving the pieces around. It works for me.

 

 

Fiona: How did you come up with the title?
Actually, I have to give my dear friend Jas T. Ward credit on that one. I was wracking my brain trying to figure out a name for the ancient artifact in my story and she suggested Ilia Stone. I thought it was so simple and pretty I decided it was the perfect name for the book.

 

 
Fiona: Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?
Yes actually, there is. Not only is The Ilia Stone trilogy a story about the lives touched by an ancient artifact around the world and throughout time, but it is also – and probably more so – a story of self discovery. And I’ll leave it at that so that my readers can discover the message for themselves.

 

 

Fiona: How much of the book is realistic?
It is a Paranormal Romance. So there are powers and mythical beings at play. But I’d have to say overall, it’s pretty realistic. The story takes place in modern day with ‘trips’ of sorts to the past. Nia, the heroine, is your typical college student. She reacts to things that occur very much how I think most would react. Which I think adds a bit of humor to the story. I was very determined to make all the characters real and relatable.

 

 

Fiona: Are experiences based on someone you know, or events in your own life?
No. Although, I’d have to say that everyone could relate to making tough choices or sacrifices or feeling trapped by circumstances.

 

 
Fiona: What books have most influenced your life most?
Having been raised a strict Catholic, I’d have to say the Bible is one. All religions fascinate me. Aside from that, the first one that comes to mind is a book my high school Modern Novel teacher gave me. It’s called The Precious Present by Spencer Johnson.

 

 

Fiona: If you had to choose, which writer would you consider a mentor?
Jas T. Ward.

 

 
Fiona: What book are you reading now?
I’m actually between books at the moment. I just finished Harder by Robin York.

 

 

 

Fiona: Are there any new authors that have grasped your interest?
I read a lot! I’d have to say I have by far read more books this year by authors I have never heard of before than books by authors I have been reading for years. But to name a few…Kindle Alexander, Mel Favreaux, Cam Cassidy and Ruelle Channing.

 

Fiona: What are your current projects?
I have several things in the works. I’m working on the next two books in The Ilia Stone trilogy as well as two stand alones – a New Adult romance and a psychological thriller.

 

 

Fiona: Name one entity that you feel supported you outside of family members.
You recall that writing group I mentioned earlier? Yeah, them.

 

 

Fiona: Do you see writing as a career?
It would be nice. I think everyone wishes they could make a career out of something they feel passionate about.

 

 
Fiona: If you had to do it all over again, would you change anything in your latest book?
No, I think I’m pretty proud of how it turned out. I learned a lot while writing it and I only strive to get better. Maybe ask me that in another year or two though.

 

 

 

Fiona: Do you recall how your interest in writing originated?
This is something I don’t think I recognized until recently. But I’d have to say it’s probably always been there. I recall playing grammar and word games with my dad and siblings since I was little. Then there was that Modern Novel teacher I mentioned earlier who gave me that book. She had always taken a special interest in me and had recommended I take Honors English in 11th grade. She seemed to see something in me that I didn’t at the time. Maybe I just wasn’t ready to see it until now.

 

 

 

Fiona: Can you share a little of your current work with us?
Sure. Here’s a small excerpt from The Ilia Stone.
“Hey, I got an idea. How about we play twenty questions?”
Gabriel didn’t miss a beat. “Hey, how about we not?”
“See? That right there,” she said as she shifted back in her seat. “That’s what I’m talking about. You won’t even humor me.”
“I humored you by letting you eat in my car. Look where that got me. Now it smells like fries in here,” he pointed out.

 

 

Fiona: Is there anything you find particularly challenging in your writing?
I can be somewhat obsessive about details and things making sense. Since I write out of order and with so many aspects of this story (mythology, history and especially the character development), I think you can see how that might test my sanity.

 

 

Fiona: Who is your favorite author and what is it that really strikes you about their work?
I have many favorite authors. It would be tough to pick just one. The authors that have very well rounded characters and visuals without being too wordy are the ones that will stand out to me most.

 

 

Fiona: Do you have to travel much concerning your book(s)?
No.

 

 

Fiona: Who designed the covers?
Ariel LeAnn

 

 

Fiona: What was the hardest part of writing your book?
I’d have to say the hardest part is the complexity of jumping into a trilogy right out of the gate rather than a stand alone. That’s one big picture and a ton of puzzle pieces to fit together. A lot of learning was involved, a lot of research and a ton of thought.

 
Fiona: Did you learn anything from writing your book and what was it?
I learned so much writing this book. I wouldn’t know where to begin. But the biggest thing I learned though was that I could do it. Sometimes it seemed like such a huge mountain to climb but I found that if I just focused on putting the puzzle pieces together one at a time, I’d get there.

 

 

Fiona: Do you have any advice for other writers?
Don’t be your own worst enemy. Don’t get in your own way and stop yourself before you even try. Don’t beat yourself up over negative feedback. Appreciate the honesty and learn from it. Read, read, read. The more you read, I think you’ll find that there is no such thing as a perfectly written book.

 

 

Fiona: Do you have anything specific that you want to say to your readers?
If you decide to pick up a copy of The Ilia Stone, a million thank yous! It has been a journey not only for the characters but for myself as well. I’ve learned so much in writing this story. I hope you enjoy it and I would love to hear your feedback. Good or bad. Please leave a review or shoot me a message. My goal is to continue to strive to improve.

 

 
Fiona: Do you remember the first book you read?
Not specifically. But I’m pretty sure it was a Dr. Suess.

 

 
Fiona: Other than writing do you have any hobbies ?
Reading.

 

 
Fiona: What TV shows/films do you enjoy watching?
I don’t watch a whole lot of TV. But I admit there are times when I’ll turn on The History Channel, Bravo, E! or some home improvement channel and get sucked into a marathon of some show. Movies? I’m a sucker for scary movies or comedies.

 

 
Fiona: Favorite foods / Colors/ Music
Food: Mexican or Italian
Color: Purple
Music: I’m a rock or alternative rock kind of gal for the most part. Although, I’ll listen to just about anything, except for country.

 

 
Fiona: If you were not a writer what else would you like to have done?
Be a photographer.

Fiona: Do you have a blog/website? If so what is it?
rjloom.blogspot.com
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/RJLoom112

Twitter: @RJLoom

 

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