Here is my interview with SM Koz

sm_koz

Name: SM Koz
Age: 39
Where are you from: North Carolina
A little about your self `ie your education Family life etc:
I’m a veterinarian/consultant/writer who has been happily married for 10 years to a wonderfully supportive husband. We’re foster parents and also have a small zoo with two dogs, cockatiels, temporary foster cats, and a few goldfish. I grew up in Michigan, but moved to North Carolina for college over 20 years ago and never left. My parents instilled a love of reading in me from a very early age, so they played a huge, if not the greatest, role in me becoming a writer.

 

 

Fiona: Tell us your latest news?
My debut novel, Breaking Free, will be released on Amazon on 8/1!

 

 

Fiona: When and why did you begin writing?
Technically, I first started writing about nine years ago. The story was a murder mystery that took place on a cruise ship and one of the main characters had an English bulldog named Penelope. I wrote two pages, realized it was too hard, and then never looked at it again for five years. After my husband and I moved to a sleepy little village, I found myself with a lot of free time. One day while I was cleaning up computer files, I ran across my story with Penelope and was somewhat impressed by what I read. Having lots of time on my hands, I decided to write a full-length YA novel. That one was about a girl who moves to the beach to live with her older sister for the summer and falls in love with a boy as they help a stranded dolphin, named Maurice, recover from a mysterious disease. That one will never be published, but it’s kind of fun to go back and see what my first attempt at a novel was like! Since then, I’ve been writing about one book a year, some fanfiction and some original.

 

 

Fiona: When did you first consider yourself a writer?
When I posted Breaking Free on Goodreads! I’ve had a number of actual and virtual friends read my stories in the past; however, I was still nervous about publishing. But, ultimately, I knew like I had to do it with Breaking Free because it’s a story I believe in. I feel like it may help others. If it stops even one teen from cutting or helps one person understand how to support a friend who cuts, then I’ll feel like it was a success.

 

 

Fiona: What inspired you to write Breaking Free?
I have a friend and a family member who have both cut in the past. When I first learned about self-injury, I didn’t understand why people would purposely hurt themselves and, therefore, I thought it was to attract attention. I ended up spending quite a bit of time researching the topic, which opened my eyes. Most people who cut don’t do it for attention. In fact, like Kelsie in the book, they try to hide what they’re doing. They’re ashamed, but it’s beyond their control as it has become an addictive coping mechanism to try and deal with their overwhelming emotions, whether it’s depression, anxiety, whatever.

 

 

After learning so much about self-injury, I wanted to help others who were in my position—wishing to help their friends, but not understanding how to or even why their friends did what they did. That’s when I decided to turn it into a story. Because I typically write adventure-filled books, I knew immediately that the main characters would be in the wilderness and run into some unexpected hurdles along the way. I think it ended up being a nice mix of emotion, suspense, and romance with a couple plot twists to keep things interesting.

 

 

Fiona: Do you have a specific writing style?
I think I’m still developing that. I like fast-paced, action-filled stories with romance, but the emotional component of Breaking Free came surprisingly easy to me as I was writing. I feel like I may have found my niche and will be exploring this more in upcoming projects. One thing is for sure, though—my writing is fairly bare bones. I write to get the story across more than as an artistic expression of words. So, if you’re looking for something literary and poetic, you won’t find it in my works . If you’re looking for a suspense-filled story with plot twists, then check out Breaking Free.

 

 

Fiona: How did you come up with the title?
I really struggle with titles. Titles may actually be my least favorite part of writing. I always want something short, snappy, and interesting that helps set the tone of the story while tying into an integral plot point. Breaking Free came loosely from one of my favorite songs. Whenever I listen to it I think of Kelsie, so I made sure to work those words into the story when she’s at her lowest point and feels that breaking free from her life may be the only answer.

 

 

 

Fiona: How much of the book is realistic?
I think the entire novel is realistic in nature, meaning a lot of young adults struggle with the issues in Breaking Free, whether it’s low self-esteem, cutting, or feeling guilty for situations that may or may not be under their control. As far as what scenes are based on actual real-life situations? None.

 

 

Fiona: Are experiences based on someone you know, or events in your own life?
Yes. Like I mentioned before, a friend and a family member cut, which is what first interested me in the topic. My friend was gracious enough to share a lot of her experiences, which helped shape Kelsie’s self-injury behavior. As far as the physical traits of my main characters, their backgrounds, and the specific things they go through, those are all made up to try and create a gripping novel with three-dimensional characters and multiple conflicts. I like fast-paced stories and wanted to do that with Breaking Free, even though there is a large emotional component to the plot.

 

 

Fiona: What books have most influenced your life most?
I’d have to say Gorillas in the Mist by Dr. Dian Fossey because I wrote about that book for my Duke University entrance application. Luckily, I got in and my four years at Duke really shaped who I am. Being an alumna also led to meeting my husband .

 

 

Fiona: If you had to choose, which writer would you consider a mentor?
I haven’t really had an individual author serve as a mentor. I am part of Authonomy, a website for writers to gather, critique works, and share stories. That has been incredibly valuable in finding plot inconsistencies, identifying when I’m telling rather than showing, and finding faults with my characterizations. My books are always much better after a few months on Authonomy.

 

 

Fiona: What book are you reading now?
Takedown Twenty by Janet Evanovich  I tend to alternate between emotional reads and light-hearted chick lit.

 

 

Fiona: Are there any new authors that have grasped your interest?
I’ve just recently gotten into reading indie authors, and two that I’ve enjoyed are Cassie Mae and Penny Reid.

 

 

Fiona: Name one entity that you feel supported you outside of family members.
Author Sara Mack. She’s been a close friend for over 30 years and started writing two years ago. She took the plunge first and self-published her Guardian Trilogy last year. She is one of the main reasons I decided to self-publish Breaking Free and has been a huge help, not only while I’m writing, but also while navigating this crazy world of indie authors.

 

 

Fiona: Do you see writing as a career?
No, writing is definitely a hobby for me. It would be great if I could someday make enough money to consider it a career, but that day is not here yet. Until then, I’ll continue to hold down a day job and write in my spare time.

 

 

Fiona: If you had to do it all over again, would you change anything in your latest book?
I find little things to tweak every time I read through it, but, overall, I’m happy with the major plot points and characters.

 

 

Fiona: Do you recall how your interest in writing originated?
I’ve always been an avid reader and daydreamer. I used to make up stories in my head, but it wasn’t until I was suffering from complete boredom one day that I decided to write the story down. It was much harder than I expected, and I didn’t end up trying again for another five years!

 

 

Fiona: Can you share a little of your current work with us?
I’m currently outlining my next YA contemporary realism/romance book. This one will draw a bit from my personal experience as a foster parent and will again follow some teens that have been dealt a rough hand.

 

 

Fiona: Is there anything you find particularly challenging in your writing?
Characterization can be difficult for me. I want authentic characters, but it’s hard to be authentic when you’re creating characters who have vastly different values, backgrounds, and cultures than yourself. For this reason, all of my stories so far have been told in first person from a teenage girl’s POV. That helps me feel somewhat grounded since I was there. Even if her life or personality is much different than mine, at least I have some insight into the teenage female mind. I’m always impressed when authors are able to write from the opposite gender’s POV in a believable way. I don’t think I’m there yet.

 

 

Fiona: Who is your favorite author and what is it that really strikes you about their work?
I love Stephenie Meyer for what she was able to accomplish: a stay-at-home mom who wrote four books that billions of people worldwide fell in love with. Although she had an English background, she had no experience writing. Furthermore, her stories have been torn apart by critics, world-renowned authors, and millions of anti-fans. People can tear apart her writing style, but it worked. Isn’t the ultimate goal of writing to have readers fall in love with your story? It seems to me like she succeeded even if she didn’t follow the typical writing standards of the day. I like that. She went outside the box and it worked. I think it’s a good example of how literature, like everything, is constantly evolving.

 

 

Fiona: Do you have to travel much concerning your book(s)?
Not yet. Since Breaking Free is my debut novel, I haven’t been invited to any signing events. Maybe that will change if Breaking Free is well-received!

 

 

Fiona: Who designed the covers?
Me  Since this is just a hobby, I don’t have much of a budget.

 

 

Fiona: What was the hardest part of writing your book?
Writing Breaking Free came surprisingly easy. The hard part for me was getting up the nerve to actually publish it. It’s one thing to share your story with friends, but something else entirely to put it out there for the whole world to see. Luckily, I had some awesome beta readers who built up my confidence. If they hadn’t liked it, this would be just another story filed away on my computer.

 

 

Fiona: Did you learn anything from writing your book and what was it?
I learned a lot about self-injury. As far as writing, I learned that I don’t use many metaphors or similes. That’s something I hope to work on in the future to improve imagery in my stories.

 

 

Fiona: Do you have any advice for other writers?
For aspiring writers, I say just keep writing. And keep everything you write, even if it’s just a page or two. Eventually, you’ll write something that when you look back at it, you’ll be impressed by yourself. Pair that with a really good writing buddy and that will be all the motivation you’ll need to finish a full-length book.

 

 

Fiona: Do you have anything specific that you want to say to your readers?
Please write reviews of whatever you read. Authors depend on them! Whether you love or hate the book, telling us your feelings and the reasons behind those feelings is very helpful to our growth as writers.

 

 

Fiona: Do you remember the first book you read?
The first chapter book I read was Bobbsey Twins. I fell in love with the series immediately and devoured all the books, often reading under my covers with a flashlight. The first adult book I read was Watchers by Dean Koontz when I was in seventh grade. I’m still a huge Dean Koontz fan to this day.

 

 

Fiona: Other than writing do you have any hobbies ?
I love to spend time outside hiking, camping, taking photos, or just playing with our foster kids.

 

 

Fiona: What TV shows/films do you enjoy watching?
I know I’m weird, but I don’t watch much television. Evenings tend to be my time for hobbies so I’m usually writing, reading, or editing photographs. Once a month, I might take a night to veg out in front of the TV. When I do, I usually turn on something from HGTV or TLC. I love movies, but we’ve had a toddler in foster care for the last few months so we haven’t had many opportunities to watch those either. In general, I love chick flicks, mysteries, and action-adventure films, though.

 

 

Fiona: Favorite foods / Colors/ Music
I love ice cream and dark chocolate. If the two are combined, even better! My favorite colors tend to change with the seasons, but right now I’m on a yellow kick. My favorite bands are Muse and The Killers. I could listen to them all day, every day!

 

 

Fiona: If you were not a writer what else would you like to have done?
Well, writing is just a hobby for me so I spend most of my time working as a consultant who creates online training for pharmaceutical companies. I was actually trained as an aquatic veterinarian, though. My plan was to rehabilitate marine mammals or work in fish farming. That got a bit side-tracked with my husband’s career, but ideally, I’ll get back to that at some point. Writing will always remain a hobby, though, no matter what my day job is. It’s my escape from the stress and routine of everyday life.

 

 

 

Fiona: Do you have a blog/website? If so what is it?
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/pages/SM-Koz/789240311086153
Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/22041877-breaking-free
Breaking Free Release Party (7/28-8/1): https://www.facebook.com/events/1510036269211429/

 

Here is my interview with Adrianna Davis

 

 

Name: Adrianna Davis
Age 21
Where are you from I was born in Buffalo, NY, but I have spent most of my life and consider Conway, AR my home.
A little about your self `ie your education Family life etc
I am married to an amazing man with two beautiful bonus (step) children! I am a senior at the University of Central Arkansas receiving my degree in Creative Writing. From there, I will be going to graduate school for a MLS degree. I am majorly obsessed with TV, movies, books, and music! Some of my favourites are Harry Potter, Doctor Who, Sherlock, Merlin, (God bless BBC!!) Star Trek, One Tree Hill, Queen, Lurlene McDaniel, Supernatural, Law and Order:SVU, and oh so much more! The list goes on and on!

 
Fiona: Tell us your latest news?
Adrianna: All the Shorts (a collection of short stories and flash fiction) is with the beta reader! Can’t wait to get that back so I can dive into editing!

 

 

Fiona: When and why did you begin writing?
Adrianna: I can remember as far back as 8 years old, although I’ve probably been writing longer. I’ll ask mom or dad the next time I talk to them! Why? Because it’s what I do. It’s natural. It’s just something that comes to me.

 

 

Fiona: When did you first consider yourself a writer?
Adrianna: This is a hard question. It’s kind of like asking when did you realize you were Caucasian. It’s just something I’ve always been.

 

 

Fiona: What inspired you to write your first book?
Adrianna: I wrote it for Camp NaNoWriMo. I wanted to write something about a character in the LGBTQ community. It was actually a friend of mine who inspired me to write this. It was her challenges and her experiences that inspired me.

 

 

 

Fiona: How did you come up with the title?
Adrianna: The book is about a girl named Sapphire, nicknamed Fire. This was about her discovering who she was, hence the title: Discovering Fire.

 

 

Fiona: Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?
Adrianna: I hope that every person pulls something from this. I want them to read this with their own experience and ideas and opinions and pull something from it. Ultimately, it’s about acceptance and perseverance and hope.

 

 

Fiona: How much of the book is realistic?
Adrianna: Most of it. I interviewed people and used their experiences in forming this book. The sad thing is is that most of the stuff that happens to Sapphire are things that have happened to real living breathing people.

 

 

Fiona: Are experiences based on someone you know, or events in your own life?
Adrianna: Like I said above, most of these things have happened.

 

 

Fiona: What books have most influenced your life most?
Adrianna: Harry Potter and every Lurlene McDaniel book.

 

 

Fiona: If you had to choose, which writer would you consider a mentor?
Adrianna: Lurlene McDaniel, definitely.

 

 

Fiona: What book are you reading now?
Adrianna: Impulse by Ellen Hopkins

 

 

Fiona: Are there any new authors that have grasped your interest?
Adrianna: Danielle Taylor. I adore her and her work! She is definitely my new favorite!

 

 

Fiona: What are your current projects?
Adrianna: Courtesy of ADHD, I have several projects going on. All the Shorts is getting ready for the editing phase, and on top of that I’m working on To Whom It May Concern, and Two Sides of One Coin. All the Shorts is a collection of short stories and flash fiction. To Whom It May Concern, is a story about a male to female transgender and her coming out, and Two Sides of One Coin is a story about bullying.

 

 

Fiona: Name one entity that you feel supported you outside of family members.
Adrianna: God has been such a big blessing in my life. I don’t know where I would be without Him. Also, my publishing company, Titan InKorp has been amazing. I would be no where without them!

 

 

Fiona: Do you see writing as a career?
Adrianna: Yes, I do!

 

 

Fiona: If you had to do it all over again, would you change anything in your latest book?
Adrianna: Probably. I mean, it was my first book, and the more and more we write, the better we should become, so yeah, I think I would go back and make some changes.

 

 

Fiona: Do you recall how your interest in writing originated?
Adrianna: It’s just always been a part of me.

 

 

Fiona: Can you share a little of your current work with us?
Adrianna: Sure! Here’s a bit from Two Sides of One Coin:

“Oh Nikki!” a brown haired girl called out in a sing song voice. She groaned internally. When they would leave her alone, she had no idea.
“What do you want Lauren?”
“Guess what I heard.” She continued without allowing Nicole to guess. “I heard that you hooked up with your brother. Yup, had sex with him right outside in your yard!”
“Yeah, great story. Except, I don’t have a brother,” Nicole said, rolling her eyes. She tried to walk past Lauren, but Rae got in her path.
“Where’s the fire, Nikki?”
“I don’t like being called Nikki. My name is Nicole.”
Rae sighed. “Whatever.” She looked at Nicole, studying her, and then looked at Lauren, who was grinning. “We’ll call you what we want to call you. How about slut? Will that work?”
“Sure,” Nicole said, with a smile, “call me what you want. Just do it far away from me.”

 

 

Fiona: Is there anything you find particularly challenging in your writing?
Adrianna: Writing novels. I have such trouble making things long. The longest thing I’ve written was my first book, Discovering Fire, which is around 12,000 words.

 

 

Fiona: Who is your favorite author and what is it that really strikes you about their work?
Adrianna: Hands down, J. K. Rowling. Her ability to craft a world is awe-inspiring. Everything has some deeper meaning. She is truly a brilliant woman. Her characters and her story, I mean, the woman is just amazing and wonderful and genius. I look up to her more than anyone.

 

 

Fiona: Do you have to travel much concerning your book(s)?
Adrianna: I wish! I would love to travel! Unfortunately, my writing has not yet taken me down that path.

 

 

Fiona: Who designed the covers?
Adrianna: The brilliant minds at Titan InKorp!

 

 

Fiona: What was the hardest part of writing your book?
Adrianna: Completing it. I have the hardest time completing books and stories.

 

 

Fiona: Did you learn anything from writing your book and what was it?
Adrianna: I did. I learned about how truly evil humans can be, and that they can be evil with no reason whatsoever. Some people are just plain evil. No rhyme or reason.

 

 

Fiona: Do you have any advice for other writers?
Adrianna: Keep writing, no matter what anyone says!!

 

 

Fiona: Do you have anything specific that you want to say to your readers?
Adrianna: Keep reading, keep learning, and keep your mind open to new ways of thinking, new ideas. And remember no matter who you are, you are loved.

 

 
Fiona: Do you remember the first book you read?
Adrianna: No, I don’t. The first book I can remember reading is Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone.

 

 
Fiona: Other than writing do you have any hobbies?
Adrianna: making bows, reading, playing the flute, spending time with my family. I would love to do photography someday too.

 

 
Fiona: What TV shows/films do you enjoy watching?
Law and Order:SVU, Sherlock, Doctor Who, Merlin, Supernatural, True Blood, Glee, and so many more!

 

 
Fiona: Favorite foods / Colors/ Music
Adrianna: Pizza is the food of all foods. It has pretty much every food group on it! :D I also love salad and veggies! I have three favorite colors: black, blue, and gray! And music, I pretty much listen to everything! My favorite band of all time is Queen!

 

 
Fiona: If you were not a writer what else would you like to have done?
Adrianna: Well, as writing doesn’t pay the bills, I’m currently in school to become a librarian!

Fiona: Do you have a blog/website? If so what is it?
Adrianna: I sure do!

http://adriannadavis.wordpress.com/

 

Here is my interview with Renee George

 

&nbspName Renee George
Age – Middle. LOL 45
Where are you from – I live in Missouri, but I’m a transplant from Southern California.
Bio – Multi-published, award-winning author Renee George has been a factory worker, an army medic, a nurse, a website designer, a small press editor, an artist, and a teacher, but writing stories about sexy alpha men is the BEST job she’s ever had. When she turned thirty, she went back to college and earned her BA in creative writing. She has been married to the love of her life, a wonderful man who supports in every way, for over half her life (and that is a VERY long time!). She happily lives in a small, Midwest town with her husband, two needy dogs and a very independent cat.

 
Fiona: Tell us your latest news?
I’ve recently released Part One of a Five part serial, The Lion Kings. Coming up this week, Breathing Into Fire is releasing with Ellora’s Cave, and in the next two weeks, Wallbanger 2: The Old Fashioned is going to release.

 

 

Fiona: When and why did you begin writing?
I’ve been writing my whole life! Well, as long as I could string two words together. My mom has poetry from when I was in Kindergarten (bad poetry, but poetry all the same). I’ve always used writing (and reading) as an escape. I grew up in poverty, and reading took me places I could only dream about. Writing became a natural progression.

 

 
Fiona: When did you first consider yourself a writer?
In my twenties, when I started writing my first novel (the one that will never see the light of day). All the mistakes I made in that manuscript taught me how to craft a story. I think you have to be able to recognize when your writing is bad in order to grow. Getting critiqued, putting aside my ego, striving to make a story better–these are the things that made me a writer (those and actually writing).

 

 

Fiona: What inspired you to write your first book?
David Eddings’ Belgariod and Mallorean were my first inspirations, but like I said, that book has never seen the light of day. Since then, I’m inspired by everything around me, from conversations I overhear in a restaurant to an episode of a favorite television show. Hell, I’ve been inspired by a fortune cookie.

 

 

Fiona: Do you have a specific writing style?
I do have a particular style. I can see it in my writing, and it’s evolved over the years. I tend to be sparse with language, and to try and get in a as much punch with few words.

 

 

Fiona: How did you come up with the title?
Sometimes the titles come first, before I’ve even written the first words. Sometimes, they don’t. In those instances, I call my friends Dakota Cassidy and Michele Bardsley. They help me brainstorm for titles.

 

 

Fiona: Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?
Usually, I include some kind of self-discovery in my work, an “ah ha” moment of epiphany for the character, but not I don’t think there is some kind of deep message.

 

 

Fiona: How much of the book is realistic?
It depends. In paranormal books, emotions are realistic, but just about everything else is fantastical. In contemporary books, I try to make them realistically romantic (which isn’t always realistic to real life).

 

 

Fiona: Are experiences based on someone you know, or events in your own life?
No. I have a big imagination. Of course some aspects of real life are going to creep in, but for the most part, no.

 

 

Fiona: What books have most influenced your life most?
I am not sure any book has influenced my life, but I’ve had a lot that have influenced my writing.

 

 

Fiona: If you had to choose, which writer would you consider a mentor?
A mentor would mean that I have contact with that writer, so I would say Kate Douglas, Michele Bardsley, and Dakota Cassidy. They have both helped me in finding my own spirit of romance.

 

 

Fiona: What book are you reading now?
Nicole Peeler’s Tempest Reborn. I’m playing catch up on her Jane True series. Love her writing.

 

 

Fiona: Are there any new authors that have grasped your interest?
Cythia St. Aubin, Robyn Peterman, Dawn Montgomery, and Riley Hart.

 

 

Fiona: What are your current projects?
I’m working on The Cull 3: Ravished by the Alpha, Hot Toddy 2, and The Lion Kings (Part Two). It’s all about writing!

 

 
Fiona: Name one entity that you feel supported you outside of family members.
I have so much support its crazy. To name only one would do disservice to the other people who have always been in my corner.

 

 

Fiona: Do you see writing as a career?
Yes.

 

 

Fiona: If you had to do it all over again, would you change anything in your latest book?
No. You can’t keep rehashing a story (well, actually you can, which is the real problem). I usually just let it go after it’s finished.

 

 

Fiona: Do you recall how your interest in writing originated?
It came from wanting to tell stories. I am never lacking in the plot idea department.

 

 

Fiona: Do you have to travel much concerning your book(s)?
No.

 

 

Fiona: Who designed the covers?
I have been a professional cover artist since 2005. I do the majority of my covers, but when some publishers I don’t have a say. They assign the art to someone and it gets done.

 

 

Fiona: What was the hardest part of writing your book?
The beginning.. no wait, the end… uhm, I want to change my answer… the middle. Definitely the middle.

 

 

Fiona: Do you have any advice for other writers?
Take all the criticism you can get and put it to work for you. There’s no such thing as a perfect writer or a perfect story. You need people in your life who will be honest enough to tell you when something isn’t working, and you have to be open to hearing it.

 

 

Fiona: Do you have anything specific that you want to say to your readers?
Thank you so much for supporting me and my work. Without readers, I (and every author) would be nothing. I’d also like to thank my street team, A Street Team Named Desire, you all ROCK!

 

 
Fiona: Do you remember the first book you read?
No.

 

 
Fiona: Other than writing do you have any hobbies ?
Scuba diving.

 

 
Fiona: What TV shows/films do you enjoy watching?
All of them! LOL. I especially love science fiction and action movies.

 

 
Fiona: Favorite foods / Colors/ Music
Hot and Sour soup, Green, and I don’t really listen to music. I prefer audiobooks, though I listen to instrumental music sometimes when I’m writing.

 

 
Fiona: If you were not a writer what else would you like to have done?
Artist (which I also do).

 

 
Fiona: Do you have a blog/website? If so what is it? http://www.romance-the-night.com/Renee_George
Releasing July 25th. Breathing into Fire with Ellora’s Cave http://www.ellorascave.com/breathing-into-fire.html

 

 
Blurb: For ten thousand years, the phoenix has tied its fate to that of the dragon. As each new firebird rises from the ashes, she’s mated to the last-born dragon, ensuring the latter’s continued existence and prosperity. Should the mating not occur, dragons will eventually cease to exist.
As the chosen dragon, Grayson Stephens is aware of his responsibility, but he doesn’t have to be happy about it. Giving up a life of sexy hook-ups with coeds is no easy task. But there are some benefits to marrying Gemini Toru. If history’s any indicator, she’s beautiful. She’s never been touched by another. She’s unspoiled, pure…
And much to Gray’s shock, she is also a he.
Despite an intense attraction to Gem, despite how good the firebird’s hands, lips and tongue feel on his body, Gray is uncertain he can consummate their bond publicly. But he must decide quickly—before someone takes the decision out of his hands, dooming dragons to extinction in the process.

 

 

Here is my interview with Rosemary Rey

Name Rosemary Rey
Age 40
Where are you from:
New York City originally, now living in Illinois.
A little about your self `ie your education Family life etc
I went to undergraduate and law school in New England where I met my husband of fifteen years. We have three children under the age of twelve. We’ve moved around the US with his job in Higher Education. I was a practicing attorney until I decided to stay home upon another move.

 
Fiona: Tell us your latest news?
I published my first novel, a romantic, suspenseful, erotic work of fiction called Rebound, The Pentagon Group, Book I, which is a series of books about a couple who falls in love under very deceitful circumstances, and are trying to figure out how to make a relationship work despite the betrayal.

 

 

Fiona: When and why did you begin writing?
I started writing this book at the beginning of 2014 after we moved recently from one state to another. I wanted to write a book before hitting my 40th birthday in 2014. I hit the self publish button on April 28, two days before. It was a present to me.

 

 

Fiona: When did you first consider yourself a writer?
At 10, writing on a huge Smith Corona typewriter that my mother’s boyfriend gave me because I loved writing. More specifically, I wrote a book report based on a book and was given high praise at thirteen, and I knew I could write a book.

 

 

Fiona: What inspired you to write your first book?
I was tired of making excuses for not buckling down and writing the stories that swirl in my head. I knew that I could write one. I didn’t know if I could get it published by a publishing house. With so many people self publishing, I thought that I should go that route. I’m also interested in writing another work of fiction that I may peddle to a publishing house.

 

 

Fiona: Do you have a specific writing style?
I write the stories that form in my head. They are very specific and don’t interlap with the others that I may be writing simultaneously. My first book is first person, I am concurrently working on a third person along with the second book in the series, which is first person. I write out of sequence if a scene comes to mind, and the way in which I do that is to create a Heading Title and write. I can then cut and paste sequences when I’m editing on the laptop before I print out and edit on paper.

 

 

Fiona: How did you come up with the title?
I wanted a simple title that can play off of the next books in the series; the first is Rebound, the second is Unbound, and the last is Bound. No science to it.

 

 

Fiona: Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?
I wanted a strong heroine that was in control of her needs and desires, wasn’t afraid to take what she wanted, and is willing to make sacrifices for her self preservation. I’m learning a lot more about the character as I write.

 

 

Fiona: How much of the book is realistic?
Not realistic from my own life experiences, but I can see a woman falling in love blindly and dealing with the fallout from discoveries that she failed to contemplate and consider. I also tap into my legal experience and legal concepts that my character uses in the second book to protect herself. She’s pretty savvy, like many single women out in the world.

 

 

Fiona: Are experiences based on someone you know, or events in your own life?
I think events for sure. I’m the daughter of a single mother, and I’ve experienced the strength of my mother to work long and hard to care for me. However, my character is childless, but no less hardworking and honorable.

 

 

Fiona: What books have most influenced your life most?
“I Know Why The Caged Bird Sings” is the book that sowed the seed that let me believe that I could be someone special, that I could touch others with my writing, that I can capture and release feelings, desires, inflections of people through words.

 

 

Fiona: If you had to choose, which writer would you consider a mentor?
Toni Morrison. Her style is amazing, like poetry crafted as a novel. I’ve read all of her books. I may not love all her books, but I always feel like I have to know what she has crafted.

 

 

Fiona: What book are you reading now?
Sound Advice, by LB Dunbar, and Defiance by Ember Chase. I go back and forth. I’m too mentally fidgety to read just one.

 

 

Fiona: Are there any new authors that have grasped your interest?
Laurelin Paige, MJ Summers, Maya Cross, Shannon Dermott, Ember Chase are really good writers in the Erotica, Romance, Suspense combined stories that are popping out. I love being challenged by a book. Yes, I love the sensuality and the romance, but I need to be gripped by a dilemma that needs resolution.

 

 

Fiona: What are your current projects?
I’m working on Unbound, which is book two of my Pentagon Group series. I am also working on Flame, which uses people, places, and things from The Pentagon Group but will be a stand alone book.

 

 

Fiona: Name one entity that you feel supported you outside of family members.
I didn’t tell anyone. I’ve yet to tell family and friends. Rosemary Rey is a pen name. Rey is not my last name. I don’t know if and when I will tell family and friends because this is for me. The best supports are the groups from Facebook, Goodreads, and other sites that have provided a wealth of information. I’m very much appreciative of people’s kind words and suggestions

 

 

 

Fiona: Do you see writing as a career?
I would love to. However, I need to see more success; sales, reviews, others promoting and wanting to read more. I do know that I need to work hard to make success happen, and I’m willing to make this work for a year before I have to return to legal practice.

 

 

Fiona: If you had to do it all over again, would you change anything in your latest book?
Yes. No budget. I didn’t have an editor. No Beta readers. No help with the marketing and promotion or cover so I could focus on the writing. To save money, I did everything on my own. A lot had to do with a fear that I wasn’t good enough or the story wasn’t good enough to give out to others to help.

 

 

Fiona: Do you recall how your interest in writing originated?
I loved reading. I read all the time as a child. It was a hobby. I also was very imaginative and loved to tell stories. Writing them down helped release them from my mind.

 

 

Fiona: Can you share a little of your current work with us?
The main character has discovered a secret about the man she fell in love with. She is now struggling to make a new life for herself when he offers her two options, she takes the option he never thought she would. It transforms her life and maybe not for the better.

 

 

Fiona: Is there anything you find particularly challenging in your writing?
Time and focus. I have three children. I have a very busy husband. I have an ill parent. I have so many things that take over my time and attention. However, the laptop never leaves my thighs. I write often, even if it is on my Ipad while taking the kids to the park. Inspiration strikes at anytime.

 

 

Fiona: Who is your favorite author and what is it that really strikes you about their work?
I like Laurelin Paige and Sylvia Day. I love how they craft a good plot and keep it suspenseful. Mostly, I like how the create character dialogue, which is hard for me.

 

 

Fiona: Do you have to travel much concerning your book(s)?
I haven’t yet, and I would love to do so in the distant future when I see a demand from readers to see and hear from me.

 

 

Fiona: Who designed the covers?
I did. I’m an intermediate photographer. I’ve been doing product photography for ten years for use in my crafting blogs (now defunct). I also use online software for editing things free and use Microsoft software to make the cover for my paperback. It is a passion of mine coming up with an idea and creating it, knowing that I worked on it front to back.

 

 

Fiona: What was the hardest part of writing your book?
Deciding where the plot twists and turns. I also didn’t want to hurt the characters emotionally or physically, but that is a part of life.

 

 

Fiona: Did you learn anything from writing your book and what was it?
It is hard at first, but once you’ve got over ten thousand words, you’ve got a book. You just have to keep going and making it better, revising and tightening dialogue, storyline, plot twists.

 

 

Fiona: Do you have any advice for other writers?
Research self promotion and creating a network of people to help you promote the dickens out of your book because you shouldn’t spend so much time on that aspect. I’m too shy and feel unworthy of the attention, which is a definite problem in this industry. You have to hustle to get your name and book out there.

 

 

Fiona: Do you have anything specific that you want to say to your readers?
I don’t expect my book to be on any best selling lists. I wrote the story that I want to read. I’m still writing that story, so the first book is a teaser of things to come. I’d like readers to bear with me and keep reading until the whole story is complete. I hope they enjoy my works enough to keep coming back, book after book.

 

 

Fiona: Do you remember the first book you read?
I know I read early and often, but the first author I remember is Judy Blume. I adore her.

 

 

Fiona: Other than writing do you have any hobbies ?
I love social networking on Facebook and Goodreads. I watch romantic comedies and films. I play golf. I also try to exercise often, but the books have me sedentary lately.

 

 

Fiona: What TV shows/films do you enjoy watching?
I love The Mindy Project, American Ninja Warrior, and Orphan Black. I just watched Austenland. I love quirky, indie films like that.

Fiona: Favorite foods / Colors/ Music
I love sushi, steak and sweet potato French fries. Favorite color is green. I love Hip Hop and R&B. Mostly music from the 80s; favorite era ever.

 

 

Fiona: If you were not a writer what else would you like to have done?
Act. I would be an actress. I realized that I stifled my imagination for too long. I was trying to make my mother proud at the expense of my own happiness and fulfilment.

 

 

Fiona: Do you have a blog/website? If so what is it?

http://rosemaryreywriter.blogspot.com/

Thank you, Fiona for allowing me a forum to discuss more about me.

Here in my interview with D.L.Colón

The Lost City Cover Final Small

 

 
Name: D.L.Colón
Age: 23
Where are you from: Puerto Rico, soon be moving to the US
A little about your self `ie your education Family life etc
I have lived in Puerto Rico all of my life. I have degree in Culinary Arts and don’t have any experience in writing until now. I’m a very humble guy who likes to help others. I spend a lot of time at home playing video games, I consider myself a gamer. I hated reading until four years ago.

 

 
Fiona: Tell us your latest news?
My first book entitled, The Lost City: Drake’s Revenge is out on Amazon, Kobo and lulu.com and will soon be available on Barnes & Noble and iBooks.

 

 

Fiona: When and why did you begin writing?
I started writing last year in September. An author I follow on Facebook made the suggestion that I should write a book and I decided to give it a try.

 

 

Fiona: When did you first consider yourself a writer?
I’ve been writing songs and poems since middle school, but I never consider myself a writer until I started to write this book.

 

 

Fiona: What inspired you to write your first book?
I had this story on my head since I was in high school, but I couldn’t write it because I wasn’t sure I would be able to do it. I didn’t trust my ability since I don’t know much about English grammar and literature is really hard for me.

 

 

Fiona: Do you have a specific writing style?
That’s something I’ll be discovering as time progresses because, at the moment, I don’t have a specific writing style.

 

 

Fiona: How did you come up with the title?
I actually didn’t, it was my editor that suggested the name, and considering the story, the name matches well.

 

 

Fiona: Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?
I really don’t know if there’s a message because I wasn’t expecting a message there, but it could be… Just because you are the best at something, don’t get over confident because life will show you otherwise. Don’t judge a book by its cover, there’s more to that person that what they let you see.

 

 

Fiona: How much of the book is realistic?
How the characters interact and bond with each other and how things develop over the course of the book are completely realistic, but it is an urban fantasy/sci-fi type book so there are a lot of unrealistic parts as well.

 

 

Fiona: Are experiences based on someone you know, or events in your own life?
I could say it’s more on the events of my life, but I gave it the twist a good story needs.

 

 

Fiona: What books have most influenced your life most?
Ex-boyfriend Handbook by Matt Dunn, that’s the first book I ever read and it’s the one that made me like reading.
The Summoner by Gail.Z.Martin, she is the author I followed after I read the book I mentioned above and also the one that made me start getting ideas in my head.
The Order of the Blade Series by Stephanie Rowe, she is the author that gave me the push I needed to start writing my own book.

 

 

Fiona: If you had to choose, which writer would you consider a mentor?
My mentor is D.N Simmons. She’s an amazing Author and helped me through the process of writing my book. She had the time to help and encourage me to continue when I thought about giving up.

 

 

Fiona: What book are you reading now?
I’m actually hoping to start reading the latest book of the Order of the Blade series which comes out the 28 July

 

 

Fiona: Are there any new authors that have grasped your interest?
So far there are a few that has, but their books are yet to be published.

 

 

Fiona: What are your current projects?
Helping a fellow author then I’m starting writing the second book of the Lost City Series.

 

 

Fiona: Name one entity that you feel supported you outside of family members.
Christina Escue at C.E. Editing, she’s my Editor and a valuable friend, she didn’t lose her mind with all the grammar errors she encountered in my first draft and she was patient with me. She helped me a lot and I’m really grateful for her help.

 

 

Fiona: Do you see writing as a career?
Yes, if everything goes well, I hope to make this a career.

 

 

Fiona: If you had to do it all over again, would you change anything in your latest book?
Actually, no. The readers have been giving me really good feedback and the book projects all that I wanted the readers to feel.

 

 

Fiona: Do you recall how your interest in writing originated?
Yes I was on High School and I had just finished playing Devil May Cry and I started to get ideas for a story. I decided to start to write it in my language, which is Spanish, but my computer broke down and I gave up on it.

 

 

Fiona: Can you share a little of your current work with us?
The Lost City: King’s Inheritance
The King family was killed on their throne when Raphael attacked the Caribbean, looking for the location of the boy of the prophecy.
They sent Noryad, their fourth and strongest son, through a portal to the Guild Never Too Late, the strongest one among them, but not before Noryad watched his brothers and sister being killed in front of his eyes. As the portal closed Noryad heard Raphael say to him. “I will look for you when you are older. You cannot hide forever.”
Noryad, now 24 years old, is forced to leave the Guild he dedicated his life to because his powers are getting out of control. His departure happened for another reason too. His parents left him a mission for when his powers got to be too much to deal with.
Go my son. Reclaim what is yours by right. Look for the Sword of Kings, the one our ancestors used during their leadership. Make our army of the dead comeback to life. Make the King of Camelot kneel before you and recognize you as his descendant.
Noryad, left with no other choice but to return to the place that has many dark memories for him, goes through a portal and into the unknown to look for something he’s never heard of.
He must learn to control his powers as he faces something sinister waiting for him in his Kingdom, and the Demon he hates the most.
Will Noryad be able to control his powers, find the sword his parents were talking about and make them proud of him? Or will he be too consumed by his revenge to claim his inheritance and lose all that he holds dear.

 

 
Fiona: Is there anything you find particularly challenging in your writing?
Translating my thoughts from Spanish to English.

 

 

Fiona: Who is your favorite author and what is it that really strikes you about their work?
Gail Z. Martin, how she was able to keep me on the edge my seat from the moment I started to read The Summoner till the last book.

 

 

Fiona: Do you have to travel much concerning your book(s)?
I haven’t had to travel yet. I hope that I get to travel to promote my book.

 

 

Fiona: Who designed the covers?
Izaak Moody, his website is izaakmoody.com

 

 

Fiona: What was the hardest part of writing your book?
Having the time to write it. I have a full time job and I take care of my dad who’s in a wheelchair.

 

 

Fiona: Did you learn anything from writing your book and what was it?
That I need to get better at grammar, I’m really bad in that aspect

 

 

Fiona: Do you have any advice for other writers?
Trust in yourself. Don’t let doubt cloud your writing. Don’t rush your book, the readers will know that it’s rushed. The book will be ready, and you will know when it is, take your time, polish it, don’t be harsh on yourself. The fruit of your work will be see when you read the finished material.

 

 

Fiona: Do you have anything specific that you want to say to your readers?
I hope that you enjoy this book and it’s the beginning of a long relationship between us. You’re the reason authors have their place, because we enjoy hearing/reading how ours books makes you feel and how they help you in a small way in your life.

 

 
Fiona: Do you remember the first book you read?
The Ex-Boyfriend Handbook by Matt Dunn

 

 
Fiona: Other than writing do you have any hobbies?
Playing my Xbox 360, reading, listening to music and watching Anime

 

 
Fiona: What TV shows/films do you enjoy watching?
The Legend of the Seeker./Arrow./ Falling Skies

 

 
Fiona: Favorite foods / Colors/ Music
Pizza/Red and Black/Rock

 

 
Fiona: If you were not a writer what else would you like to have done?
Focus on Culinary Arts, get my own Restaurant. I probably still will.

Fiona: Do you have a blog/website? If so what is it?
I have a Facebook Page

https://www.facebook.com/AuthorD.L.Colon

If anyone is interested in getting my book you can find it here http://www.amazon.com/Lost-City-Drakes-Revenge-ebook/dp/B00LXG83AE/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1406060520&sr=8-1&keywords=The+Lost+City+Drakes+Revenge

 

Here is my interview with Renato Bratkovič

Name Renato Bratkovič

 

Age
If Life begins at forty, then I guess I’m 2 years old (and acting like it). :)

Where are you from
I’m from Slovenia, a little green piece of Europe.

 

A little about your self `ie your education Family life etc
I studied Slovene and English language with literature (and graphic design for a short while) – I haven’t obtained a degree as I wanted to do (and did) other things at that time. I work in advertising, where I think up stories to sell things on a daily basis, so it seems now, that it would be a great idea if I DID graduate … I’m also a bilingual writer and blogger, married with two kids.

 

 

Fiona: Tell us your latest news?
Well, I’ve had two literary events where I live recently, Bistrica Noir 1 and 2. I had a chance to introduce my literary work to the community and it was well received by local media. Prior to that I had a privilege to have my stories published in Noir Nation 3 (published by VegaWire Media) and in Exiles: An Outsider Anthology (published by Blackwitch Press).

 

 

Fiona: When and why did you begin writing?
I began writing seriously at the beginning of 2012 – half a year before that I wrote a couple of stories just to get some ideas out of my head, but then I stumbled upon a great little Noir story written by Paul D. Brazill. This was a critical moment for me as I found out that there was noir in my writing too, plus I started networking with authors, doing interviews with them, and of course – writing with some confidence.

 

 

Fiona: When did you first consider yourself a writer?
In 2008 I started working at an ad agency: I wrote print ads, scripts for TV and radio ads, PR articles, slogans, communication strategies. I wrote and I got paid for it. I guess I could consider myself a writer back then. Before that I had worked as a freelance designer.
But I didn’t do any fiction then, except for jotting down a couple of ideas for something that a couple of years later became stories.

 

 

Fiona: What inspired you to write your first book?
Well, as I said I began networking with fellow writers, starting with Paul D. Brazill, besides I found out that writing helped me stay sane and escape the stress and frustration from working in advertising. I also said to myself: “Listen, you’ve got a son, you planted a tree at the backyard of your house, so when the hell your book is coming out?”. I wanted to publish a short story collection, before I would turn 40, and I did! Just a week before. :)

 

 

Fiona: Do you have a specific writing style?
Well I guess I do have a certain style, but I’m not that aware of it. I pay more attention to get the stories, characters and voices messing around in my head on to the page. I tend to write short and simple sentences, which makes a lot easier for me to write both in Slovenian and in English. Perhaps writing in two languages is my style?

 

 

Fiona: How did you come up with the title?
The title of my short story collection is Don’t Try This At Home (in Slovene: Ne poskušajte tega doma – http://www.e-knjiga.si/more_list.php?recordID=73), which suggests that you shouldn’t try what you read at home. These are twisted stories about relationships, hurting each other (intentionally or unintentionally), there’s even a murder or three …

 

 

Fiona: Is there a message in your short story collection that you want readers to grasp?
Well, I just hope that things that happen to my characters don’t happen to them to often. My main objective is for the readers to have fun during the time they spend reading my work, and maybe surprise them a bit at the end.

 

 

Fiona: How much of the book is realistic?
It’s realistic in two ways – I’m not too much of a fantasy or Sci-Fi fan, so you won’t find vampires or aliens there. It’s also realistic in a way that a lot of things have actually happened …

 

 

Fiona: Are experiences based on someone you know, or events in your own life?
Some of the things actually happened to me in one way or another – they are, of course, more compact, more concise in a story, where for instance I stashed events that happened in a couple of months into a couple of days. It’s a lot more interesting now.

 

 

Fiona: What books have most influenced your life most?
Well, the Beats, transgressive and noir literature have most influenced my life, my view upon the world and, of course, my writing.

 

 

Fiona: If you had to choose, which writer would you consider a mentor?
I just couldn’t stick to one. Hubert Selby, Charles Bukowski, Irvine Welsh and Chuck Palahniuk have made the deepest impact on me, but then I discovered this wonderful bunch of authors like Paul D. Brazill, Heath Lowrance, Les Edgerton, Richard Godwin, Joe Grant, Thomas Rose-Masters, Kevin Lynn Helmick, Joe Clifford, Eddie Vega, the late Wayne C. Long, and many more who inspire me on a daily basis.

 

 

Fiona: What book are you reading now?
I can’t focus on just one book either, so my nose is dipped into Cormac McCarthy’s The Road, The New Black anthology edited by Richard Thomas, The Devil’s Guide To Hollywood by Joe Eszterhas, and The Exiles: An Outsider Anthology, edited by Paul D. Brazill, where there’s also one of my stories, The Tribe.

 

 

Fiona: Are there any new authors that have grasped your interest?
I discover one almost every couple of days, thanks to Social Media. :)

 

 

Fiona: What are your current projects?
Beside my day job in advertising I also run Artizan, your ad agency and publishing house, which serves both as a platform for my writing and as a publisher of other authors’ work – I’m cooking up some interesting titles (more about it in the near future). I’m also working on the translation/rewriting of my Don’t Try This At home collection into English, writing the first draft of something that could be the script for a TV pilot and struggling through the novel.

 

 

Fiona: Name one entity that you feel supported you outside of family members.
Well, the above mentioned (and unmentioned) community of wonderful writers have helped a lot by sharing, giving some feedback, reviews or even editing of my work, and two writers and editors, Eddie Vega and Paul D. Brazill, who encouraged me to submit my stories for their anthologies. I love these guys, who unselfishly support each other.

 

 

Fiona: Do you see writing as a career?
Writing can be a rewarding career when you’re not limiting yourself with fiction – you have to be ready to create content for websites and brochures, write articles for various magazines, think up ads and such. That’s writing and it can help you pay the bills. And if you make some money writing fiction, that’s a bonus, so keep up working! :)

 

 

Fiona: If you had to do it all over again, would you change anything in your latest book?
As a mater of fact, that’s what I’m doing right now. I’ve published my book as an eBook, but I intend to publish it as a paperback in Slovene and as an eBook in English.

 

 

Fiona: Do you recall how your interest in writing originated?
My writing had something to do with the identity crisis and life-begins-at-forty philosophy. :)
I wrote something as the 12 years old kid (when I would type one day, edit the other and bring the pages to my schoolfriend, and she would retype them and bring them back next day …) and a couple of shorts at the faculty. But that wasn’t anything serious.

 

 

Fiona: Can you share a little of your current work with us?
There’s this script I’m working on that I hope to develop a pilot for a TV series. It’s a Mad Men meets Amateur meets Misery story and I’m writing the first draft. I’ve already figured out the plot, but I have to translate this idea into a viable screenplay. I’m not sure yet whether I’m going to pitch it or not. I might turn it into prose eventually, but right now I like the idea of writing a screenplay.

 

 

Fiona: Is there anything you find particularly challenging in your writing?
Right now the most challenging part is to find some time to write – there are projects I need to finish, plus I’m a husband and a father of two, so any extra hour is worth gold to me. But anyway, I’ve done a lot more since I’m under the constant pressure then, say, five years ago.

 

 

Fiona: Who is your favorite author and what is it that really strikes you about their work?
Hubert Selby is still my favorite, it’s fascinating how natural his prose flows as if you’re in the middle of the scene, watching and listening to all those poor men and women screaming and torturing each other, his sentences ignoring the rules of grammar and punctuation (which is not only his writing style, but also the lack of knowledge, as he left school at 15).

 

 

Fiona: Do you have to travel much concerning your book(s)?
That hasn’t happened yet, but I visited New York in April, so one of my future stories might take place there.

 

 

Fiona: Who designed the covers?
The cover for my short story collection was designed by the publisher (Genija). But for the bilingual noir short Kravata/The Tie, which was published by my Artizan, I did the cover myself.

 

 

Fiona: What was the hardest part of writing your book?
Actually, I enjoyed every part of it. But you have to be persistent and determined to finish what you started – the feeling that comes after that is priceless.

 

 

Fiona: Did you learn anything from writing your book and what was it?
I learned that I enjoyed telling stories. To want to be a writer is one thing, but to sit down and write is something completely different. But I have yet to learn about publishing, marketing and selling books. I’m looking forward to it though.

 

 

Fiona: Do you have any advice for other writers?
Yes – before writing, there’s reading. Right after that comes thinking. Only then can you start writing. Read, think, write, repeat.
There are so many wonderful books out there and so many great writers have written them. They have figured all out, so read and learn from them, than try to embed what you’ve learned in your writing. But do try to find your own voice, of course.

 

 

Fiona: Do you have anything specific that you want to say to your readers?
Yes – keep following that blog, read, think (and possibly write). :)

 

 

Fiona: Do you remember the first book you read?
I learned to read before I turned six, and our kindergarten teachers used me to read fairy tales to other kids – I believe they were some Perrault’s and Brother Grimm’s stories back there.

 

 

Fiona: Other than writing do you have any hobbies?
I take pictures occasionally, but I haven’t got much time for hobbies right now. If I take the dog out for an hour, that’s a success.

 

 

Fiona: What TV shows/films do you enjoy watching?
I don’t watch TV. I’ve downloaded a couple of seasons of Mad Men and Californication and I enjoyed them. I’d enjoy writing this stuff even more I guess. I do, however, take my wife to the cinema every now and then – I love films, especially drama, human relationships, a bit of comedy, …

 

 

Fiona: Favorite foods /Colors/Music
I’m a herbivore, so any vegetables are great for me. My favorite color is blue and I listen to alternative, jazz, industrial, grunge, ethnic music … My favorite artists are Nick Cave, Radiohead, The Doors, Kraftwerk, Laibach, …

 

 

Fiona: If you were not a writer what else would you like to have done?
I’d be a comic artist or an animator. I drew a lot when I was younger.

 

 

Fiona: Do you have a blog/website? If so what is it?
You can visit Artizan (http://www.artizan.si), I blog at Radikalnews (http://radikalnews.com) where I also do author interviews, just like you, Fiona. I can be found on Amazon (http://www.amazon.com/Renato-Bratkovič/e/B00H6F94G8), followed on Twitter (https://twitter.com/radikalnews) and connected with on Facebook (https://www.facebook.com/renato.bratkovic).

Here is my interview with K.Z. Morano

 
Name: K.Z. Morano

Age: twenty-something

Where are you from? I currently live in the Philippines.

A little about your self `ie your education Family life etc
Hi Fiona! Hello readers. Thanks for having me. :) I’m K.Z. – an eclectic eccentric. I’m a beach bum, a wanderer, and a certified bibliophile. I read and write anything from romance and erotica to horror and dark fantasy.
After graduating and earning all of my certifications, I worked at a hospital in the neonatal and pediatric intensive care units. Then I decided that the hospital is not the place for me. Against my parents’ and my family’s wishes, I turned my back on years of education and training. I then worked as a freelance article writer and then as an on-call instructor preparing students for their IELTS interview. I also have a clothing business (for local clients only) though I often end up sending the clothes to charity. You see, typhoons frequently visit the country especially during this time of the month (July). In fact, I’m very fortunate to have survived one recently. I write dark, twisted fiction on my spare time.

 
Fiona: Tell us your latest news?
I’ve published a book, my very first solo project. 100 Nightmares is a collection of 100 horror stories, each written in 100 words with over 50 illustrations. Inside, you’ll find monsters—both imagined and real. There are vengeful specters, characters with impaired psyches, dark fairy tales and stories and illustrations inspired by bizarre creatures of Japanese folklore. It’s currently available at Amazon.com http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00JVRJNG0

 

 

Fiona: When and why did you begin writing?
I’ve always liked reading ever since I was a little girl. But I started writing dark, melancholic poetry during my adolescent years. I stopped writing them the moment I stopped being an awkward teenager. I realized that I can’t be popular and brooding at the same time. There was a time in my life when I even stopped reading books for fun. I replaced them with lots of beauty and fashion magazines. But I suppose you can’t really hide who you are. Not for long. I’m an introvert. I’m a weirdo. I’m a sweet, sweet lady with a really dark side.:)
I started writing fiction on my blog, The Eclectic Eccentric Shopaholic and several months ago, with the encouragement of my blog friends and readers, I started submitted my first horror short to a publisher. I’ve been published in various anthologies ever since.

 

 

Fiona: When did you first consider yourself a writer?
Before I started writing fiction, I worked as a ghost writer. It was my first job ever. I created online content, wrote about anything under the sun—from articles on fashion and beauty to writings about health, sex and relationships. I started calling myself a freelance writer then… but seeing my work online with another person’s name, photo and bio attached to it made the job a little less than satisfying, even when I was getting paid to write.
Then I started writing fiction on my blog. I had a good audience. Still, that didn’t really make me feel like a writer but more like a blogger who likes to write fiction… Then I decided to enter a writing competition by Popcorn Horror. My story was chosen as one of the finalists and was published in the anthology last August 2013. The story was entitled “The Baobab”. It was only 100 words and I didn’t really get a cent from that project but they put MY name under the title of MY story. That was the time that I truly felt like a writer.

 

 

Fiona: What inspired you to write your first book?
I’ve always been passionate about micro-fiction. I’ve been posting 100-word stories on my blog for quite some time. My stories have been published in various publications but I’ve always wanted a solo project… something that would truly represent me as a writer. Whenever I want to have an idea about a particular author’s writing style/ versatility, I make sure that I pick up one of their story collections instead of a novel. I love the variety and infinite possibilities that story collections offer. That’s what my book, 100 Nightmares, offers– an eclectic assortment of every imaginable horror that exists, from real world horror to the extremely bizarre.

 

 

Fiona: Do you have a specific writing style?
My style varies from project to project. I’ve always had weird and eclectic tastes. I like mixing genres as much as I like playing with words. Sci-fi horror, dark fantasy, Lovecraftian horror, extreme horror, noir horror, bizarro fiction… The beauty of horror as a genre is that it’s practically limitless.
In my stories, I like putting some effort into imagery even though my writing is concise and quick-paced. For me, every single word matters.

 

 

Fiona: How did you come up with the title?
I’ve never been very good with titles. I’d like to say that there was some sort of awesome, otherworldly experience that lead me to choose 100 Nightmares as a title but it just came to me, really. :)

 

 

Fiona: Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?
Horror can be found in the most unlikely places.
Horror is here to stay… It’ll never die as fear never dies… it just keeps reinventing itself.

 

 

Fiona: How much of the book is realistic?
In 100 Nightmares, you’ll find almost everything from Lovecraftian horror to Dark Fairy tales. There is also a good amount of realist horror. I’ve always believed that there’s nothing that could be scarier than reality and that no creature under the bed could ever compare to the monstrosity of man.

 

 

Fiona: Are experiences based on someone you know, or events in your own life?
The stories that I wrote have been described as extremely disturbing so I’m happy to say that none if it was based on real events. Though I’m not saying that it can’t/won’t happen to anyone… ;)

 

 

Fiona: What books have most influenced your life most?
The fairy tales that I used to read when I was a kid. I still believe in happily ever after. :)

 

 

Fiona: If you had to choose, which writer would you consider a mentor?
Clive Barker’s earlier works taught me that there is no limit to the horror genre. He has mastered the art of pairing the grotesque with the gorgeous, the revolting with the arousing.

 

 
Fiona: What book are you reading now?
I’m currently reading No Sight for the Saved by JWK Fiction. It’s a horror anthology from James Ward Kirk and illustrated by Niall Parkinson. I have a story in this anthology entitled “The Father”. I always make it a point to read the other stories in the anthologies that I’m featured in. It’s a great opportunity to discover new talented authors and to read great fiction from my favorite ones.

 

 

Fiona: Are there any new authors that have grasped your interest?
I’ve had the pleasure of reading one of Aurelio Rico Lopez’s books. It’s wonderful to meet a fellow Filipino horror writer… and a very talented one at that. I also like Lori Lopez’s poetic writing. (They’re not related. lol but they’re both excellent writers!) I’ve also been very fortunate to share several anthologies with author Essel Pratt, a great and versatile writer.

 

 

Fiona: What are your current projects?
I’ve been invited to write a story for a horror anthology. I’ve never worked with this editor before so I’m pretty excited about this one. Some of my stories will also be featured in several upcoming horror and non-horror collections.

 

 

Fiona: Name one entity that you feel supported you outside of family members.
Sometimes, you just need someone to believe in you. I was lucky to have that kind of support through my blog friends and followers. I could never thank them enough. I wrote fiction in my blog before I got published. They were the first ones who suggested that I send my works to publishers/ compile my stories and release them as an ebook.

 

 

Fiona: Do you see writing as a career?
For me, it’s really too early to tell. :) But whether or not I get money from writing, I’ll certainly keep doing it.

 

 

Fiona: If you had to do it all over again, would you change anything in your latest book?
Perhaps. I’m truly my own worst critic. So it would be no surprise if someday, I do make a second edition and replace a word or two, a story or two, or maybe even an illustration or two…

 

 
Fiona: Do you recall how your interest in writing originated?
I’ve always loved books… touching them, smelling them (yes, I know I’m not the first writer to say that. haha) I read mostly to escape from reality. I wrote poetry as an outlet for all my teenage angst. I guess I always knew that I was going to write a book someday. I always thought that my first book would be a romance novel. But one day, I fell in love with horror…

 

 

Fiona: Can you share a little of your current work with us?

Katie came home from school, the delicious aroma from the kitchen greeting her.

“Mom?”

An eerie voice reverberated through the hallway.

Her mother was singing some strange, fragmented lullaby…

The door creaked open.

“Shhh…“ Katie’s mother warned. “You’ll wake the baby.”

Part of the blanket fell away to reveal raw turkey cradled in her mother’s arms.

She held it to her breast, lovingly patting its wet pimpled flesh.

“W-Where’s the baby?” Katie quavered.

Her mother’s face split into a demented grin. “Dinner will be ready soon.”

Slowly, numbly, Katie walked towards the kitchen. Something hissed and sputtered in the oven.

Mommy Makes Dinner (from 100 Nightmares) by K.Z. Morano

 

 
Fiona: Is there anything you find particularly challenging in your writing?
Sometimes, there are emotions that are almost impossible to describe and visions that are very difficult to put into writing… I guess every writer experiences this kind of pain. Sometimes you have to practically bleed… while trying to make it all seem so natural and effortless to the reader.

 

 

Fiona: Who is your favorite author and what is it that really strikes you about their work?
H.P. Lovecraft is a true master. I also admire Clive Barker, Poppy Z. Brite, and Ursula K. Le Guin. Aside from the fact that these authors are so completely original, I also love writers who pay as much attention to the words as they do to the story.

 

 

Fiona: Do you have to travel much concerning your book(s)?
Not really. I guess that’s the beauty of the whole publishing revolution. There are so many ways to promote your books online. And as an indie writer, I’m truly grateful for the generous people that help authors like me in spreading the word about our published works.

 

 

Fiona: Who designed the covers?
The cover for 100 Nightmares was designed by the brilliant Dan Verkys.

 

 

Fiona: What was the hardest part of writing your book?
The challenge in writing micro-fiction is that a single word can make it or break it. And the thing about creating a collection is that one truly terrible story can ruin the whole book. That’s the hardest part about it. And that’s also what I love about it.

 

 

Fiona: Did you learn anything from writing your book and what was it?
It wasn’t that easy to come up with 100 unique concepts for 100 stories. It wasn’t easy sitting down with 4 different artists for the 50 illustrations. But if there’s something that I learned about 100 Nightmares, it’s that writing was the easy part. The marketing… now THAT was the true challenge. :)

 

 

Fiona: Do you have any advice for other writers?
Find your voice and own it. Trust in your own writing and eventually, you’ll find your own readers.

 

 

Fiona: Do you have anything specific that you want to say to your readers?
Thank you so much for believing in me. :) And um, please don’t forget to write a review for 100 Nightmares. :)

 

 

Fiona: Do you remember the first book you read?
The first books that I remember reading on my own were Grimm’s fairy tales. My mother, aunts and grandmothers gave me books as presents. They were delighted by the fact that I showed more interest in books than in toys.

 

 

Fiona: Other than writing do you have any hobbies ?
I love reading, of course. And cooking. I spend most of my days in the kitchen… takes a lot of time because I usually cook from scratch. I like watching old Hollywood movies, drinking tea out of lovely teacups. I enjoy travelling, island hopping and shopping… I love shopping. :)

 

 

Fiona: What TV shows/films do you enjoy watching?
I like black and white movies. Oddly enough, don’t watch too many horror films. I’m a huge fan of Game of Thrones. I love watching high fantasy, superhero and action films.

 

 

Fiona: Favorite foods / Colors/ Music
Don’t get me started on the fave food list… haha I love crispy beef ribs with potatoes. I love huge prawns and mud crabs and exotic Filipino dishes like Crispy Pata (deep-fried pork knuckles), Kare-Kare (beef tripe and ox tail in peanut sauce) and Lengua (ox tongue in mushroom sauce). I also have a sweet tooth. I’m a chocoholic. :)
My favorite color is pink. Blue, comes in a close second.
I listen to an eclectic range of music. I can appreciate almost anything.

 

 

Fiona: If you were not a writer what else would you like to have done?
I could’ve been an archaeologist. Then I’d probably end up writing a book. I could’ve gotten married and be a stay-at-home mom. Then I’d still find some time to write a book. It doesn’t matter what I could’ve done/ become. I’ll always be a writer.

Fiona: Do you have a blog/website? If so what is it?
Visit me at my blog http://theeclecticeccentricshopaholic.wordpress.com/ where I post fiction, photos, and news about my published works

 

 

Don’t forget to like my Facebook page https://www.facebook.com/100Nightmares

Or find me on Goodreads https://www.goodreads.com/kzmorano

Link to 100 Nightmares- http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00JVRJNG0

Thank you. :) xo

 

 

Here is my interview with Diane Rinella

 

Name: Diane Rinella
Age: Timeless
Where are you from: San Francisco, CA
A little about your self `ie your education Family life etc
I’m a quirky, rock n’ roll fan girl with unhealthy obsessions. My house was built during the Civil War. I drink tea out of a cup used in the original Dark Shadows TV series. Sam always wins over Dean and Damon over Stefan, though I wouldn’t kick any of them out of bed.

 

 
Fiona: Tell us your latest news?
I am still floored by the fact that I spent last week on Amazon Top 100 Ranked Authors Lists in Literary Fiction and Contemporary Romance. Never did I expect to rank just a few ticks down from Steven King on someone’s note pad, let alone a list of top ranked authors.

 

 
Fiona: When and why did you begin writing?
It’s something I’ve frequently done on whims. A few year back I became serious about it.

 

 

Fiona: What inspired you to write your first book?
Movies play in my brain, especially once my head hits the pillow. Often they stem from something I have watched or read, a face, or a line of dialogue. I then project that into an alternate universe. It’s kind of like watching the movie Clue over and over again. “It could have happened this way, or it could have happened this way, but what really happened was…” I also have a theatrical background; so all those years of acting help me develop the characters that tell the story. Since my brain already explores this madness each night, why not get it down on paper?

 

 

Fiona: Do you have a specific writing style?
Personal—in that the reader sees life the way the main character does. Writing in the third person makes me feel like I have a dissociative identity disorder. Since my attention span is horrific, I like to keep things moving. Rarely is life all comedy or all tragedy, so you need both. Creating characters and situations that encourage a few chuckles provides a balance that helps the reader ride the emotional rollercoaster while avoiding monotony.

 

 

Fiona: How did you come up with the title?
Scary Modsters … and Creepy Freaks is about a girl who lives out of time and a dead, 60’s rock star who was raped by the record industry. The title is a play on the David Bowie album, Scary Monsters (and Super Creeps). If you get the joke, you are going to love the book.

 

 

Fiona: Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?
My first book, the controversial, sibling romance, Love’s Forbidden Flower, is all about civil rights. Many people say they believe in the freedom to marry, but when it comes down to it, they have not thought it through. That book will make you question where your boundaries are. In Scary Modsters, it’s all about being true to yourself. That theme is ever present in my work. I also seem to always get involved in the metaphysical aspects of my characters. Love’s Forbidden Flower deals with soul mates and Time’s Forbidden Flower tackles reincarnation. Scary Modsters looks at all of that and incorporates an obscure theory that gives the book a twist that I’ve yet to find anywhere else.

 

 

Fiona: How much of the book is realistic?
Scary Modsters is totally fabricated, yet many of the characters are based on real people. Love’s Forbidden Flower came from my heart, but many people in Lily’s situation have written and told me that it was like I had eavesdropped on their lives. They understood every crazy emotion she goes though, and many of her situations mirrored their own.

 

 

Fiona: What books have most influenced your life most?
Beyond a doubt, SE Hinton’s The Outsiders and Jacqueline Susann’s Valley of the Dolls.

 

 

Fiona: What are your current projects?
I’m struggling with a title for my latest project. Again the metaphysical comes into play. The premise is that a woman who was bullied for her weight meets a man who has overcome great challenges in sobering up. They find happiness, only for tragedy to strike. One fights to stay clean while the other goes on the spiritual journey of a lifetime. I’ve just about completed the first draft.

 

 

Fiona: Name one entity that you feel supported you outside of family members.
There is a civil rights group that has championed Love’s Forbidden Flower and coined the phrase, “Friend of Lily,” after it. When you write about something as controversial, yet surprising common, as siblings in love, the greatest support you can have is from those in that situation. To learn more, visit: http://marriage-equality.blogspot.com/

 

 

Fiona: Do you see writing as a career?
Everything in my life is transitory. The moment I have ever let myself think of anything as long term or permanent, it ends. There is so much that I want to do in life that I have no idea what tomorrow will hold. I like it that way.

 

 

Fiona: If you had to do it all over again, would you change anything in your latest book?
Not a thing. I keep hearing authors talking about going back and changing their books to make them more “acceptable.” (Translation, they think they will sell more copies if they mess with the story.) The thing is, authors create stories the way we feel they need to be told. Everything we do is for a reason. I know some people would have liked Lily in Love’s Forbidden Flower to be a little less independent and strong. No way. Lily is Lily. She is the polar opposite of her brother/love interest. She starts off at sixteen and does the same stupid things we all did at that age. Some of those things make you cheer; some make you shake your head. That’s the way we all were.

 

 

Fiona: Do you recall how your interest in writing originated?
No, but I can tell you what got me to write my first novel. One chilly fall afternoon I curled up and watched an obscure counter culture film called The Buttercup Chain. In it, two cousins, related through identical twins—thus making them genetic half-siblings—have a strong attraction. She is fine with the situation, while he is a huge ball of denial. The entire film I waited for the obvious to happen. When the film ended and the man was heartbroken, I felt a huge opportunity had been squandered. Clearly they were soul mates, and never once did we find out why he was so freaked out by his emotions. All you could believe was that he hid from who he was because of society. What a horrible world we live in where love is wrong.

The sadness of the situation stayed with me, as did my anger at the author for not taking the story where it needed to go, either by explaining the problem or by facing it. Upon doing research I discovered that there are so many biases toward the subject that I could not find a single book that really tackled it non-judgmentally. Yet the more I dug, the more common I found the real-life situation to be. The proverbial gloves came off and I started writing Love’s Forbidden Flower. What started as a story ended as a chalice in which I placed my heart, all the while asking why we make love laws. How we can tell others it is wrong to love, I will never understand.

 

 
Fiona: Is there anything you find particularly challenging in your writing?
Yes, getting past the first draft blues! First drafts are always bad. I have to remind myself that every author hates his/her first draft, but you have to pound it out. It’s like shoveling sand and creating a beach. When you are done you have a bunch of pebbles that get in your shoes and make your feet icky. Then you start building sandcastles. Eventually you walk away with a piece of art.

 

 

Fiona: Who is your favorite author and what is it that really strikes you about their work?
In her early work, SE Hinton wrote straight from the heart. She didn’t get hung up on mechanics. As a result, her books have held the hearts of thousands throughout their lives. I love Jacqueline Susann for the outrageous drama!

 

 

Fiona: Who designed the covers?
Scary Modsters was all me. I tried to contract it out, but I was having a hard time finding someone who understood 60’s mod art in the way I wanted it presented. I actually have an art background, so I went for it.

 

 

Fiona: Did you learn anything from writing your book and what was it?
I learned several things. First, I got a lot of negativity from the industry for writing an honest love story about a transgressive couple, making me question my own sanity. Then I published and started talking about my work. People’s eyes bugged out. When asked if they wanted ARCs they practically screamed, “YES!” Going with your gut is invaluable. Second, my compassion deepened immensely while writing Love’s Forbidden Flower. I knew the situation was not exactly rare, but I had no idea how common it is. 10-15% of all collage age people have had some type of romantic relation with a sibling. Just because you choose not to see something, it does not mean it isn’t there.
When it came to Scary Modsters, I found that a lot of what I was writing was based on events that happened to me because I needed a cleansing. While nothing in there is true for anyone I know, a lot of demons were revisited and exorcised.

 

 

Fiona: Do you have any advice for other writers?
Write the story you want to tell. We live in a wonderful era of a publishing revolution. There is no one out there who can stop you from writing and distributing your work. However, don’t just write and hit the publish button. Get as many people as you can to read your story and give honest opinions. Make the improvements you feel are needed and edit, edit, edit! Hire an editor. Do the best you can to catch every tiny misusage of a comma, but respect that even major publishers miss a lot or errors. Hit the publish button with pride. Know that bad reviews are inevitable. (Even the greatest of the classics get bad reviews.) Celebrate that you have done what so few others dare.

 

 

Fiona: Do you have anything specific that you want to say to your readers?
Thank you! From the bottom of my heart, thank you for allowing my heart into your lives.

 

 
Fiona: Other than writing do you have any hobbies?
I bake when I have time, which is pretty much never. I have been involved in The Rocky Horror Picture Show for over half my life. I also act. I just signed on to do a short that I am rather excited about. I have a huge passion for rock n’ roll, especially classic and vintage. A lot of references made it in to both books. Some references are very obvious, others are quite subtle.

 

 
Fiona: What TV shows/films do you enjoy watching?
Drop Dead Diva heavily inspired my work in progress. I love Supernatural and have a wicked love/hate relationship with Vampire Diaries. If someone puts on an old episode of Battlestar Galactica (the original), Bewitched, or I Dream of Jeanie, I’m going to plop down and watch it.

 

 
Fiona: If you were not a writer what else would you like to have done?
Before my daughter came into the world I had my own business making high-end wedding cakes. I’m talking like the crazy stuff that defy gravity.

 

 
Fiona: Do you have a blog/website? If so what is it?
http://www.dianerinellaauthor.com
Book Links

 

Scary Modsters: http://www.amazon.com/Scary-Modsters-Creepy-Freaks-Rinella-ebook/dp/B00J86FUQG/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1405994381&sr=8-1&keywords=diane+rinella


Love’s Forbidden Flower : http://www.amazon.com/Loves-Forbidden-Flower-Diane-Rinella-ebook/dp/B00AFHTK4U/ref=pd_sim_kstore_3?ie=UTF8&refRID=04M65MDKW7KESVY25456
Facebook: www/facebook.com/dianerinellaauthor/
Cheers!

 

 

 

Here is my interview with Morgan Reed

 
Name: Morgan Reed is my pen name – my true identity is Elizabeth Abrey

Age: 33

Where are you from:
Born and raised in South Africa, moved to the UK when I was 21 years old, been here for over 12 years now.

A little about your self `ie your education Family life etc:
I’m an only child, born to a South African mom and a British dad, both of whom are now deceased. I have always been a bit of a loner, preferring to spend my time in solitary pursuits such as reading, writing, crochet and latch hook crafts, puzzles, etc. I have taken various courses and hold diplomas in Child Care, Personal Assistant, Forensic Science, International Bar tending, Parapsychology, Creative Writing and Romantic Fiction Writing. I’m currently study courses in Proofreading and Editing, Novel Writing and Short Story Writing. I guess I’m a glutton for punishment when it comes to studying.

 

 

Fiona: Tell us your latest news?
I recently received my diploma with honours for Romantic Fiction Writing which I’m quite happy about. I’m also currently in the process of planning and writing my first novel.

 

 

Fiona: When and why did you begin writing?
I’ve been writing since I was a kid. I’d always dream up these silly stories, escapades and write them down to read to my stuffed animals. It was a form of escape, similar to reading. I could immerse myself in worlds other than the one I was stuck in.

 

 

Fiona: When did you first consider yourself a writer?
Once I had a short story of mine published in print, in an anthology title ‘A Certain Kind of Freedom’ under the name Elizabeth L Abrey. Looking back, it wasn’t that great a story but it gave me the motivation to move forward. Regardless of reviews, I write the stories that come to me. I write for myself more than for anyone else.

 

 

Fiona: What inspired you to write your first book?
A multitude of reasons really. The obvious being I have a story to tell, characters that insist on being brought to life. Another being to prove not only to myself but to others that I can succeed at what I set out to do. The most important though is that writing is my passion and what better way to celebrate and embrace that passion than by writing a novel.

 

 

Fiona: Do you have a specific writing style?
I think I’m still trying to find my own particular style, my own voice in a world of so many different ones. It’s definitely a learning process.

 

Fiona: How did you come up with the title?
‘Graveyard of Memories’ was an obvious choice as my book focuses on death and memories of the past and being haunted by ghosts no matter where you turn.

 

 

Fiona: Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?
That life is worth fighting for, that no matter how bad or disastrous things can become, there is always a glimmer of hope to hold on to.

 

 

Fiona: How much of the book is realistic? Not much other than the human emotions. It’s a paranormal horror adult romance (is there a genre niche for that?)

 

 

Fiona: Are experiences based on someone you know, or events in your own life?
I have incorporated certain real life experiences of mine into the experiences of my characters.

 

 

Fiona: What books have most influenced your life most?
‘I Heard The Owl Call My Name’ by Margaret Craven, ‘The Endless Steppe’ by Esther Hautzig, ‘Letting Go’ by Danielle Taylor and Nelson Mandela’s ‘Long Walk to Freedom’.

 

 

Fiona: If you had to choose, which writer would you consider a mentor?
I grew up reading Dean Koontz, John Saul, Danielle Steel and Virginia Andrews, so I would say these authors in particular set me on my path of becoming a writer.

 

 

Fiona: What book are you reading now?
‘A Knight in Shining Armor’ by Jude Deveraux and ‘Kiss of Surrender’ by Sandra Hill.

 

 

Fiona: Are there any new authors that have grasped your interest?
Danielle Taylor is amazing, such a talented writer. I honestly have hundreds of books on my Kindle at the moment waiting to be read and there are quite a few new indie authors I haven’t gotten round to, but plan to.

 

 

Fiona: What are your current projects?
‘Graveyard of Memories’ is a paranormal horror with an adult romance theme. I’m also working on another series of paranormal romances.

 

 

Fiona: Name one entity that you feel supported you outside of family members.
Honestly, my family have never been supportive of my writing, so I would say I get more support from my tutors and from a few close Facebook friends.

 

 

Fiona: Do you see writing as a career?
One day in the distant future perhaps, when I can afford to move to a cabin in a remote part of Montana or Colorado and immerse myself in my fantasy world on a permanent basis, hahaha! Well, that’s the dream in any case.

 

 

Fiona: If you had to do it all over again, would you change anything in your latest book?
If we’re talking published work then yes. I would change certain things about my short story ‘Abigail’. Perhaps flesh it out a bit more.

 

 

Fiona: Do you recall how your interest in writing originated?
From loneliness. It allowed me to step into my own fantasy world and escape the harshness of mine.

 

 

Fiona: Can you share a little of your current work with us?

I can share a little snippet, a teaser as such.
*He leaned down, his lips hovering just a fraction above hers for a brief moment before their lips connected. Violet moaned softly, surrendering to his touch. To Tyson, the softness and warmth of her lips was intoxicating. He deepened the kiss, teasing her lips apart with his tongue, pulling her body flush against his. Her hands moved up to encircle his neck, burying her fingers in his tousled hair. Tyson’s hands slid down to cup her shapely ass, pulling her flush against his body so that she could feel his arousal. Realising what was about to happen, he pulled away, his eyes sweeping her flushed face before he leaned in to whisper in her ear.
“You’d best run off to bed darlin’, before we both do something we’d regret,” Tyson growled huskily as he gently pushed her away. He turned away from her, placing his hands on the counter, taking a few deep breaths…trying to think of something that would help him lose the erection straining painfully against his jeans.*

 

 

Fiona: Is there anything you find particularly challenging in your writing?
I find it a challenge to express emotion constructively. It’s something I struggle with in reality too. I like a challenge though so it’s something I’m working on.

 

 

Fiona: Who is your favorite author and what is it that really strikes you about their work?
That’s a tough one. I have many. If I had to choose, I would say Virginia Andrews. I remember reading ‘Flowers in the Attic’ many years ago, as well as ‘Heaven’ and they just left a mark on me. She draws you in, emotionally and wrings you out. I’ve just always respected her work.

 

 

Fiona: Do you have to travel much concerning your book(s)?
Not yet, apart from walks in the park to spark inspiration.

 

 

Fiona: Who designed the covers?
I haven’t had the pleasure of finding a cover designer yet, but I look forward to the experience.

 

 

Fiona: What was the hardest part of writing your book?
I’ll have to let you know (it’s not quite done yet).

 

 

Fiona: Did you learn anything from writing your book and what was it?
I’m discovering a lot about myself as the novel progresses but the one thing I’m learning is that I need to stop editing as I go. It’s a bad habit of mine and one I’m trying to break. It’s a big time waster.

 

 

Fiona: Do you have any advice for other writers?
Follow your dream, write from the heart and with passion, find a good editor and develop a hard skin when it comes to reviews.

 

 

Fiona: Do you have anything specific that you want to say to your readers?
Go easy on me ? Hahaha. No, seriously, I hope they look forward to reading my work and that I help them escape their lives for awhile.

 

 

Fiona: Do you remember the first book you read?
I do indeed. It was ‘Flossie Teacake’s Fur Coat’ by Hunter Davies followed closely by ‘The BFG’ by Roald Dahl.

 

 

Fiona: Other than writing do you have any hobbies ?
I crochet blankets and make latch hook rugs. I also build puzzles, some of which I frame as art to go my walls.

 

 

Fiona: What TV shows/films do you enjoy watching?
I’m a huge Walking Dead fan but also enjoy shows like Castle, CSI, True Blood, Supernatural, Law & Order SVU, Without a Trace, Criminal Minds, Ally McBeal and Catfish. Movies wise I love While You Were Sleeping, LOTR, Centre Stage, Indian Summer, The Avengers, Thor, Braveheart and Interview with a Vampire.

 

 

Fiona: Favorite foods / Colors/ Music:
I like Italian and Chinese food. My favourite colors are black, fuchsia and indigo. Music wise I love a variety of different songs. Blake Shelton, Michael Buble, Nickelback, Blake (classical crossover band), Alannis Morrisette, Emily Kinney, Train as well as anything 50’s through to 90’s related.

 

 

Fiona: If you were not a writer what else would you like to have done?
Honestly, I don’t know. I work full time as a Sales Administrator at the moment but can’t imagine choosing that as a lifelong career.

 

 
Fiona: Do you have a blog/website? If so what is it?
Just my Twitter account which is https://twitter.com/MorganReedWrite and my Facebook account which is https://www.facebook.com/elizabeth.abreywriter Feel free to hit me up on either! I don’t bite (much) ;-)

 

 

 

 

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